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Upgrading Integrating and Troubleshooting Exchange Server

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Upgrading Integrating and Troubleshooting Exchange Server Powered By Docstoc
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             Upgrading, Integrating,
             and Troubleshooting
             Exchange Server 2003 in
             Mixed Environments
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


             Terms you’ll need to understand:
              ✓   Domain controller                          ✓   Network News Transfer Protocol (NNTP)
              ✓   Global catalog server                      ✓   DomainPrep
              ✓   Organization                               ✓   ForestPrep
              ✓   Active Directory Connector (ADC)           ✓   Active Directory Migration Tool (ADMT)
              ✓   Post Office Protocol version 3 (POP3)      ✓   Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP)
              ✓   Internet Message Access Protocol version
                  4 (IMAP4)


             Techniques you’ll need to master:
             ✓ Upgrading from Exchange Server 5.5 to         ✓ Troubleshooting Exchange Server 2003 in
               Exchange Server 2003                            coexistence with other Exchange organiza-
             ✓ Upgrading from Exchange 2000 Server to          tions
               Exchange Server 2003                          ✓ Configuring and troubleshooting Exchange
             ✓ Migrating from other messaging systems          Server 2003 for existence with other mes-
               to Exchange Server 2003                         saging systems
             ✓ Migrating to Exchange Server 2003 from        ✓ Configuring and troubleshooting Exchange
               other Exchange organizations                    Server 2003 for interoperability with other
             ✓ Configuring Exchange Server 2003 to             SMTP messaging systems
               coexist with other Exchange organizations
48   Chapter.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
     . . . .


     Introduction
     This chapter deals with the exam topics you need to understand in regard to
     upgrading to Exchange Server 2003 from prior versions of Exchange, migra-
     tion from other messaging systems, coexistence with other messaging sys-
     tems, coexistence with other Exchange organizations, and interoperability
     with other SMTP messaging systems.
     Microsoft understands that it is rare for Exchange Server 2003 to be installed
     into an environment in which there is no prior messaging infrastructure. For
     this reason, an important part of the exam is knowing how to migrate to
     Exchange Server 2003 from other messaging systems or prior versions of
     Exchange. Similarly, Microsoft realizes that in many situations, disparate
     messaging systems need to coexist with each other. This is the reason for the
     focus on interoperability on the exam, although Microsoft prefers, of course,
     that you migrate all messaging clients to Exchange Server 2003 at your ear-
     liest possible convenience.

                    If possible, it is beneficial for candidates to have experience upgrading from
                    Exchange Server 5.5 and Exchange 2000 Server. As a student, the best option is to
                    create a test network using virtual machine software, such as Virtual PC or VMWARE.
                    This enables you to upgrade Exchange without negatively impacting a production
                    Exchange network.


                    The installation of Exchange Server 2003 requires that substantial modifications be
                    made to the Active Directory (AD) schema in the domain that will host Exchange
                    Server 2003. For this reason, we recommend against installing Exchange Server
                    2003 in a production Active Directory environment, unless it is part of a planned and
                    authorized deployment of the messaging system. Even though Exchange Server
                    2003 can later be uninstalled, the changes made to Active Directory itself are difficult
                    to roll back. The schema modifications made by ForestPrep cannot be rolled back. In
                    addition, it is important to note that only one Exchange organization can exist per for-
                    est. Any test deployment must be made with that understanding in mind.



     Upgrading from Exchange 2000
     Server to Exchange Server 2003
     Exchange 2000 Server will always be running on Windows 2000 Server and
     not on Windows Server 2003. This is because Exchange 2000 Server cannot
     run on the Windows Server 2003 platform. Exchange 2000 Server will either
     be in a Windows 2000 environment or on a Windows 2000 member server
     in a Windows Server 2003 environment. This is because Exchange 2000
     Server, like Exchange Server 2003, requires Active Directory to function
     correctly.
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There are several platform requirements that must be met before Exchange
2000 Server can be upgraded to Exchange Server 2003. These requirements
are as follows:
➤ Domain controllers must be running Windows 2000 Service Pack 3 or
  Windows Server 2003—If the domain in which Exchange 2000 servers
  are to be upgraded to Exchange Server 2003 has Windows 2000 domain
  controllers, these domain controllers must be patched to at least Service
  Pack 3. If the domain in which the Exchange 2000 servers that are to be
  upgraded to Exchange Server 2003 has Windows Server 2003 domain
  controllers, no further patching is required.
➤ Global catalog servers must be running Windows 2000 Service Pack 3 or
  Windows Server 2003—Similar to the preceding requirement, to support
  Exchange Server 2003, global catalog servers must be running Service
  Pack 3 or higher. Alternatively, if global catalog servers are running
  Windows Server 2003, no further patching is required.
➤ It is recommended that you have a global catalog server in each domain in
  which Windows Server 2003 is installed—This facilitates the generation of
  distribution lists for other domains within the forest. If global catalog
  servers are not installed, the generation of these distribution lists can
  take much longer.
➤ The computers that will be hosting the upgraded Exchange Server 2003 must
  be running Windows 2000 Service Pack 3 (or higher)—As Exchange 2000
  Server cannot run on Windows Server 2003, any upgrade of the host
  computer to this operating system must occur after Exchange Server has
  been upgraded. Always upgrade Exchange 2000 to Exchange Server
  2003 BEFORE upgrading Windows 2000 Server to Windows Server
  2003.
➤ A Windows 2000 cluster running Exchange is patched to Service Pack 4—If
  Exchange 2000 Server is running on a cluster of Windows 2000,
  Windows 2000 must be patched to Service Pack 4. This is required to
  support Kerberos authentication within the Exchange cluster.

After the necessary upgrades have been made to the platform on which
Exchange Server 2003 will run, Exchange 2000 Server needs to be upgraded.
50   Chapter.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
     . . . .


     Preparing Exchange 2000 Server for
     Upgrade to Exchange Server 2003
     Upgrading Exchange 2000 Server to Exchange Server 2003 requires that the
     Exchange 2000 server undergo some preparation. The following conditions
     need to be met:
     ➤ Exchange 2000 Server must have the Exchange 2000 Service Pack 3 applied
        before being upgraded to Exchange Server 2003—Problems will arise if an
        attempt is made to upgrade a version of Exchange 2000 Server to
        Exchange Server 2003 prior to the application of Service Pack 3.
     ➤ All Exchange 2000 databases are backed up before the upgrade occurs—This
        way, if something goes wrong, you can always roll the upgrade back.
     ➤ The components that are unsupported by Exchange Server 2003 are uninstalled
        before the upgrade takes place—These components are listed in Table 3.1.
        To remove these components, use Exchange 2000 setup. If you require
        these components for your organization, do not upgrade the servers on
        which they are installed. Install Exchange Server 2003 on other servers
        within the organization and have them coexist with the Exchange 2000
        servers. In some cases, the functionality of these components is built
        into the Exchange Server 2003 core.


     Table 3.1 Exchange 2000 Server Components Unsupported by Exchange Server 2003
     Component                                    Description
     Microsoft Mobile Information Server          Supports mobile devices such as PocketPC
     Instant messaging service                    Supports the instant messaging client
     Exchange Chat service                        Supports chat rooms
     Exchange 2000 Conferencing Server            Allows data conferencing as well as audio and
                                                  video conferencing
     Key Management Service                       Interfaces with organizational certificate
                                                  authority
     cc: Mail connector                           Connects Exchange to cc: Mail
     MS Mail connector                            Connects Exchange with MS Mail
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If the Exchange 2000 server has been extensively tuned to maximize per-
formance, you might also need to roll back these alterations. Either the per-
formance enhancements are no longer applicable to Exchange Server 2003
or the performance enhancements themselves might cause problems on the
new platform.
When planning an upgrade of Exchange 2000 Server to Exchange Server
2003, the current state of POP3, IMAP4, and NNTP services are preserved.
Any special configuration changes that have been made are carried over to
the new installation.


Preparing the Domain for the Upgrade to
Exchange Server 2003
Although you ran Exchange 2000 ForestPrep and DomainPrep when setting
up Exchange 2000 Server, you must rerun the Exchange Server 2003 ver-
sions of these utilities before upgrading to Exchange Server 2003. As was the
process with installing Exchange 2000 Server, ForestPrep must be run first.
It is important to note that if Schema Manager was used to index Exchange
Server 2000 schema attributes, you will be required to verify and reapply all
manual changes that were made to the original schema after ForestPrep fin-
ishes upgrading. Exchange Server 2003 ForestPrep does not preserve custom
changes made to Exchange 2000 Server schema, starting fresh with its own
Exchange Server 2003 schema.


              Unfortunately, there is one large bug in the upgrade process to Exchange Server
              2003 in a Windows 2000 AD environment that has a preexisting Exchange 2000
              infrastructure. The InetOrg schema entries are incorrect and you must apply a
              script to modify these entries before running Exchange 2003 ForestPrep. For more
              information, consult Microsoft Technet. The relevant article is Q314649.



After Exchange Server 2003 ForestPrep has been run, the Exchange Server
2003 version of DomainPrep must be run as well. DomainPrep does not
need to be run in every domain in the forest, but it does need to be run in
the following locations:
52   Chapter.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
     . . . .

     ➤ The root domain of the Active Directory forest

     ➤ Any domain in the forest that will host an Exchange 2003 server

     ➤ Any domain in the forest that will host Exchange Server 2003 mailbox-
        enabled objects, regardless of whether Exchange Server 2003 will be
        installed in that domain
     ➤ Any domain that contains users and groups that will manage the
        Exchange Server 2003 organization

     After these steps have been taken, Exchange Server 2003 can be installed on
     the same server as Exchange 2000 Server. The process is essentially the same
     as that which is detailed in Chapter 1, “Microsoft Certification Exams.” The
     Exchange Deployment Tools will guide you through the process. As many
     things, such as the Exchange organization name, will already have been con-
     figured during the installation of Exchange 2000 Server, there are fewer
     questions to answer during the upgrade process.


     Upgrading Front-end and Back-end Servers
     Special steps are required if you are migrating an organization that uses
     Exchange 2000 Server in a front-end/back-end configuration. Front-
     end/back-end configuration is often used with systems like Outlook Web
     Access on a network demilitarized zone (DMZ), or screened subnet. If the
     current Exchange 2000 organization uses a front-end/back-end architecture,
     the upgrade must be planned so that the front-end servers are all upgraded
     before the back-end servers. This process can be seen in Figure 3.1. An
     Exchange Server 2003 front-end server can support both an Exchange 2000
     server or an Exchange Server 2003 system configured as the back-end serv-
     er. An Exchange 2000 front-end server cannot support an Exchange Server
     2003 back-end server. More about Exchange in front-end/back-end config-
     uration can be found in Chapter 6, “Managing, Monitoring, and
     Troubleshooting the Exchange Organization.”
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    STEP ONE




      Front End
Exchange 2000 Servers



                                                  Back End
                                            Exchange 2000 Servers




    STEP TWO




     Front End
Exchange Server 2003
      Servers


                                                  Back End
                                            Exchange 2000 Servers




  STEP THREE




     Front End
Exchange Server 2003
      Servers


                                                  Back End
                                             Exchange Server 2003
                                                   Servers

Figure 3.1 Upgrade the front-end server to Exchange Server 2003 before upgrading the back-end
           server to Exchange Server 2003.
54   Chapter.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
     . . . .


     Migration from and Coexistence
     with Exchange Server 5.5
     There are many Exchange Server 5.5 sites still out there in the real world.
     For this reason, Microsoft has made migration from and coexistence with
     Exchange Server 5.5 an important part of the 70-284 exam.
     Exchange Server 5.5, like Exchange 2000 Server, is not supported on the
     Windows Server 2003 platform. Exchange Server 5.5 can exist in a Windows
     Server 2003 environment as a member server running on either Windows
     NT 4.0 or Windows 2000 Server. Unlike Exchange Server 2003, Exchange
     Server 5.5 has its own directory service. As Exchange was released before
     Windows 2000 Server, this directory service is entirely independent of Active
     Directory. Without special configuration using a tool called the Active
     Directory Connector, it is impossible to get the two different directory serv-
     ices to communicate with each other. Understanding how to get the two
     directory services communicating is a fundamental part of getting the two
     versions of Exchange to coexist.
     Coexistence is important because it is impossible to do a direct upgrade of an
     Exchange Server 5.5 installation to Exchange Server 2003. The only way you
     can do an upgrade-in-place is to go from Exchange Server 5.5 to Exchange
     2000 Server and then from Exchange 2000 Server to Exchange Server 2003.
     Microsoft provides two alternatives for moving Exchange Server 5.5 organ-
     izations to Exchange Server 2003. The first option is to use the Exchange
     Server Migration Wizard, which is the simpler option, but which might not
     be practical if more than a few Exchange 5.5 servers need to be migrated.
     The Exchange Server Migration Wizard is covered later in this chapter. The
     second option is to create an environment in which Exchange Server 5.5 and
     Exchange Server 2003 can work side by side, gradually moving users from
     one environment to the other with a minimum of disruption. After a coexis-
     tence is established, users can be moved via the Move Mailbox tool. We
     cover setting up a coexistence next.


     Creating a Coexistence Using ExDeploy
     ExDeploy provides a checklist of tasks that should be performed when cre-
     ating a coexistence between Exchange Server 5.5 and Exchange Server 2003.
     ExDeploy can be run from the Exchange Server 2003 splash screen. Rather
     than choosing to install a new Exchange Server 2003 organization as we did
     in Chapter 2, “Installing, Configuring, and Troubleshooting Exchange
     Server 2003 in a New Exchange Environment,” this time select the
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Coexistence with Exchange 5.5 option, as shown in Figure 3.2. This enables
you to join a new Exchange Server 2003 computer to an existing Exchange
Server 5.5 organization. The coexistence with Exchange 5.5 checklist covers
three different phases: Planning, AD Preparation, and Exchange Server 2003
installation.




Figure 3.2 Selecting the Coexistence with Exchange 5.5 option in the Exchange Server Deployment
           Tools.


The first step in the ExDeploy checklist is to ensure that Service Pack 3 or
higher has been installed if a Windows 2000 platform is being used, or that
Windows 2003 is being used. The second step in the checklist is to ensure
that NNTP, SMTP, and the World Wide Web publishing service are
installed and enabled on the server that will be running Exchange Server
2003. These steps are essentially the same as those you would have followed
while installing Exchange Server 2003 for the first time in Chapter 2.

DSScopeScan Tool Group
Things become different in the third step in the Exchange Server 2003
deployment tools checklist. Here, you run the DSScopeScan tool group.
This tool group is used to find out information about the Exchange Server
5.5 organization prior to setting up a connection between it and a new
Exchange Server 2003 system. The DSScopeScan tool must be run via an
account that has Exchange Server 5.5 administrator permissions as it queries
the organization for important information. The DSScopeScan tool group
includes four separate tools. These are
➤ DSConfigSum—Reports the number of Exchange Server 5.5 sites and
   servers per site
➤ DSObjectSum—Reports the number of public folders, distributions lists,
   and contact objects
56   Chapter.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
     . . . .

     ➤ UserCount—Reports the number of users per Exchange Server 5.5 site
        and in directory
     ➤ VerCheck—Checks if a server exists with Exchange Server 5.5 Service
        Pack 3 (or higher) within the organization

     The only way that you can ascertain if the DSScopeScan tools have run suc-
     cessfully is by examining the exdeploy.log log file. There is no simple dialog
     box that informs you if the DSScopeScan tools have executed without error.
     By default, the exdeploy.log log file is written to the c:\ExDeploy Logs
     directory. You can view the log using Notepad. You need to scan the log file
     manually to resolve any problems that the log indicates exist with your cur-
     rent configuration.
     The first part of the log lists information about the Exchange Server 5.5
     organization or mentions that it was unable to connect to the Exchange 5.5
     server you listed. Needless to say, you want the DSScopeScan tool group to
     be able to communicate with your Exchange Server 5.5 organization if you
     hope to have it coexist with Exchange Server 2003. The second part of the
     test looks for a global catalog or domain controller running Windows 2000
     Service Pack 3 or higher in the current or adjacent site.
     After the DSScopeScan tools have run, you are asked to install and run DCDiag
     and NetDiag (these tools are covered in more length in Chapter 2). These
     tools check network connectivity as well as connectivity to domain con-
     trollers.


     Phase 2
     After you have completed these steps, you move on to phase 2 of the
     Coexistence with Exchange 5.5 section of the Exchange Server Deployment
     Tools (see Figure 3.3).
     The first step of phase 2 is to run ForestPrep. The second step of phase 2 is to
     run DomainPrep. Both of these tools’ functions are described in Chapter 2.

     OrgPrepCheck
     The third step of phase 2 is to run the OrgPrepCheck tool group. This tool
     group consists of two tools, OrgCheck and PolCheck, that perform the fol-
     lowing functions.
     OrgCheck does the following:
     ➤ Checks that the schema extensions created by ForestPrep are correct

     ➤ Checks that the required domain groups have been created
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➤ Checks that the security descriptors are correctly assigned

➤ Checks that the Exchange configuration container has been created

➤ Checks the availability of global catalog servers




Figure 3.3 Phase 2 of the coexistence checklist.


PolCheck examines all domain controllers in the local domain to ensure that
they have the Manage Auditing and Security Logs permission set for the
Exchange Enterprise Servers group.
The OrgPrepCheck tool, like the DSScopeScan tool, writes output to the
exdeploy.log log file. Checking this log file is step 4 of phase 2; you will find
the relevant information at the end of the file.


Active Directory Connector
The Active Directory Connector (ADC) allows communication between Active
Directory and the Exchange Server 5.5 directory service (see Figure 3.4).
The account running the ADC installation routine requires Domain
Administrator privileges only. This is in contrast to the situation that existed
with the ADC in Exchange 2000 Server. In Exchange 2000 Server, the ADC
had a slightly different set of schema extensions than the general Exchange
2000 schema extensions. The schema extensions for Exchange Server 2003
and the Exchange 2003 ADC are the same. Unlike the Exchange 2000 Server
version of ForestPrep, the Exchange Server 2003 version of ForestPrep does
not write Exchange Server 5.5 organizational information to Active
58   Chapter.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
     . . . .

     Directory. A placeholder Exchange container is created and configuration
     information is written to Active Directory when you install the first
     Exchange Server 2003 instance in the forest.




     Figure 3.4 Active Directory Connector Installation Wizard.


     You must upgrade any prior ADCs to the Exchange Server 2003 ADC. You
     should perform this step before installing Exchange Server 2003 in the
     organization. The ADC can be installed on any computer in the domain.
     When you run the ADC installation program, you are asked which compo-
     nents you want to select. The two components are the Microsoft ADC
     Service Component and the ADC Management components. When per-
     forming this operation for the first time, you should install both components.
     After the ADC has finished installing, it should be run. The ADC Tools are
     shown in Figure 3.5.
     Running the ADC Tools consists of taking four steps. These steps are as
     follows:
       1. Tool Settings—The first step is to set an Exchange Server 5.5 server
          with which the tools can communicate. This server must be running
          Exchange Server 5.5 with Service Pack 3 or higher. Here, you can
          enter the details of the Exchange server that has communicated with
          earlier tools, such as the DSScopeScan or OrgPrepCheck tool groups.
          You can also set the location of the log file, which should be checked if
          anything goes wrong.
       2. Data Collection—The data collection step consists of four passes. Pass 1
          is the resource mailbox scan and checks for unmarked resource mail-
          boxes. Pass 2 is the ADC object replication check. It looks for objects
          that are not replicated between Exchange Server 5.5 and Active
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     Directory. At this point, this pass finds that objects are not replicated
     because you haven’t set up any connections. Pass 3 is the object repli-
     cation scan. Because no connection agreement has been configured, no
     objects have been replicated. Pass 4 is the Active Directory Unmarked
     Resource Mailbox Scan. This determines if you need to run the
     Resource Mailbox Wizard in step 3. In some cases, this wizard does
     not need to be run (for example, if there are no resource mailboxes in
     your Exchange Server 5.5 organization).




Figure 3.5 Active Directory Connector Tools.


  3. Resource Mailbox Wizard—The Resource Mailbox Wizard is used to
     find accounts in Active Directory that match more than one Exchange
     Server 5.5 mailbox. The wizard can be used to match an AD account
     to a specific mailbox and to mark other mailboxes with the
     NTDSNoMatch attribute. Changes can be made directly or exported
     to a .csv file that can be modified later in Excel. Pass 4 of step 2 deter-
     mines whether this wizard needs to be run. If it does not need to be
     run, nothing untoward will happen if it is.
  4. Connection Agreement Wizard—The Connection Agreement Wizard
     (see Figure 3.6) helps configure connections between the Exchange
     Server 5.5 directory and Active Directory, which, you’ll remember,
     functions as the directory for Exchange Server 2003.
60   Chapter.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
     . . . .




     Figure 3.6 Connection Agreement Wizard.



     The Connection Agreement Wizard In-Depth
     When you run the Connection Agreement Wizard, you are asked to specify
     a location of the destination container for new objects. By default, you
     should choose the Microsoft Exchange System Objects container. If your
     domain is not running in native mode with the ability to support universal
     groups, you are issued a warning that security cannot be properly managed.
     Next, you are issued a list of recommended connections, as shown in Figure
     3.7. These connections can be one-way or two-way. When planning a coex-
     istence strategy, two-way connections are better because they allow users
     who connect to both Exchange Server 5.5 and Exchange Server 2003 to
     retain full functionality.




     Figure 3.7 Recommended connections in the Connection Agreement Wizard.


     To create the Exchange Server 5.5 site connections to AD, you need to enter
     administrator credentials for those sites. This is done using the Set
     Credentials button, and the result is shown in Figure 3.8.
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Figure 3.8 Credentials for each site in the Connection Agreement Wizard.


After the administrator credentials have been entered for the Exchange
Server 5.5 sites, a similar process must be undertaken for all of the domains
that will interact with those sites, as shown in Figure 3.9.




Figure 3.9 Domain credentials in the Connection Agreement Wizard.


Next is the Connection Agreement Selection. By default, Public Folders and
Users will be replicated between Active Directory and the Exchange Server
5.5 directory, as shown in Figure 3.10.
The final page of the Connection Agreement Wizard provides a summary of
all of the decisions that you have made throughout the process of running
the wizard. Click Next to finish. After you finish the wizard process, the con-
nection agreements will be created. This can take some time depending on
the configuration of your Exchange Server 5.5 site and the layout of your
domain. Eventually, you are greeted with a screen informing you that the
connection agreements were created successfully.
62   Chapter.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
     . . . .




     Figure 3.10 Selecting the connection agreements to be created.


     After the Connection Agreement Wizard is run, the final task in the ADC
     Tools is to verify that all the tools have run correctly. This is performed by
     clicking the Verify button. It is important to note that replication between
     the Exchange Server 5.5 directory and AD might take some time. If you run
     the verification immediately, you are informed that some objects have not
     had a chance to replicate yet. Wait several minutes, and then attempt to ver-
     ify again. If after some time the verification fails, you need to again run the
     Connection Agreement Wizard. After you have completed the verification
     process, you have finished phase 2 of the Coexistence with Exchange 5.5
     checklist.


     SetupPrep Tool Group
     Phase 3 of the Coexistence with Exchange 5.5 checklist of the Exchange
     Server Deployment Tools begins with running the SetupPrep tool group.
     The SetupPrep tool group contains three separate tools:
     ➤ OrgNameCheck—Looks for Exchange Server 5.5 organization and site
        names that contain specific characters that will cause setup to fail.
        Organizations and sites must have names of less than 64 characters, the
        LDAP display name must not contain , = + < > # \ “ and the display
        name must not contain the characters ~ ! @ # $ % ^ & * ( ) _ + = { } [ ] |
        \:;“‘<>,.?/
        If any of these characters exist in Exchange Server 5.5 organization or
        site names, they must be changed before installing Exchange Server
        2003.
     ➤ OrgCheck—Checks AD information. OrgCheck was run earlier in the
        third step of phase 2.
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➤ PubFoldCheck—Checks that the directory and the information store are
   synchronized. If there is an entry for a public folder in the directory
   database without an entry that corresponds to it in the information
   store, the PubFoldCheck tool flags it.

All tools output to the exdeploy.log log file. After you have run the
SetupPrep tool group, check this log file for any problems.
Step 3 is to install Exchange Server 2003 on a new server. This process is
detailed in Chapter 2. The only significant difference is that you should
select the option Join or Upgrade an Existing Exchange 5.5 Organization
(see Figure 3.11). If you select Create a New Exchange Organization, the
new organization will not interoperate with Exchange Server 5.5. To join the
Exchange Server 5.5 organization, you need to enter the name of an
Exchange 5.5 server running Service Pack 3 (or higher) that is located in
your Exchange Server 5.5 organization. The same server that you have test-
ed in prior tools can, of course, be used here. Setup then tests some prereq-
uisite conditions and then you can continue with the installation.




Figure 3.11 Join or Upgrade an Existing Exchange 5.5 Organization.


After the installation has completed, you need to alter your connection
agreements to connect to the Exchange Server 2003 system that you have
just installed. To do this, you need to run the ADC Manager. From there,
you need to select a public folder or a user connection agreement. Right-
click and select Properties. Go to the Connections tab, as shown in Figure
3.12. In the Exchange Server Information box, enter the name of the new
Exchange Server 2003 system. Alter the port number to 379. The port must
be altered to 379 because this is the port that Site Replication Services (SRS)
64   Chapter.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
     . . . .

     uses. SRS is set to only respond to LDAP traffic on port 379. You are again
     asked to enter valid authentication credentials. You are then asked to perform
     a full replication the next time the connection agreement is run. You need to
     update all of the connection agreements in this manner.




     Figure 3.12 Connections tab.


     The benefit of all of this is that the connection agreements now run against
     SRS rather than AD. This helps prevent problems with directory replication
     and viewing the global address list.


     Validating Exchange Server 5.5/Exchange
     Server 2003 Coexistence
     The final set of steps is to validate that Exchange Server 5.5 and the
     Exchange Server 2003 systems are coexisting correctly.
     The tools used to do this validation are
     ➤ ADCConfigCheck—Checks that Exchange Server 5.5 directory config
        objects have been copied to AD. It should be run after replication has
        occurred. ADCConfigCheck writes output to exdeploy.log.
     ➤ ConfigDSInteg—Checks objects in AD to ensure that no problems have
        arisen since the installation of ADC. ConfigDSInteg writes output to
        exdeploy.log.
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                                                                                              65


➤ RecipientDSInteg—Checks all recipient objects in AD looking for prob-
   lems. Recipient objects include User, Group, Contact, or Public Folder.
➤ PrivFoldCheck—Uses Exchange 5.5 Directory Service/Information Store
   consistency adjuster to ascertain that the information store and the
   directory are in sync. Inconsistencies occur if a mailbox exists in one
   without a corresponding entry in the other. If a mailbox entry exists in
   the information store but not in the directory, PrivFoldCheck creates an
   entry in the directory.

After these tools have executed, examine the exdeploy.log log file for any
problems that might exist. After all of this is done, you will have added an
Exchange Server 2003 computer to an Exchange Server 5.5 organization and
configured them to coexist.


Move Mailbox Wizard
After the two technologies are in coexistence, you will be able to move mail-
boxes from the Exchange 5.5 server to the Exchange 2003 server.
To move mailboxes from an Exchange 5.5 server to an Exchange Server 2003
system, log onto the Exchange Server 2003 system that you have just
installed and run the Exchange System Manager. Expand the Administrative
Groups node and the Server node until you can view individual Exchange
servers in your organization, as shown in Figure 3.13.




Figure 3.13 Preparing to move a mailbox from Exchange Server 5.5 to Exchange Server 2003.
66   Chapter.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
     . . . .

     Exchange 5.5 servers are represented with white icons and Exchange Server
     2003 servers are represented with gray icons. Expand the Exchange 5.5 serv-
     er’s storage group until you reach the Mailbox folder. Right-click on the
     mailbox you are interested in and select the Exchange Tasks option. This
     starts the Exchange Task Wizard. You are presented with the option of either
     moving a mailbox or configuring Exchange features. Select Move Mailbox
     and click Next. You are then presented with two drop-down lists (see Figure
     3.14) that enable you to select the new Exchange Server 2003 system and
     mailbox store to which to move the mailbox. Next, you can select whether to
     create a failure report, or to skip corrupted items and create a failure report,
     with an option of setting a corrupted items threshold. Finally, you are asked
     at what time you want this process to occur. The default is immediately, but
     you can schedule this to occur at a later stage. For example, you would do
     this if the mailbox was currently in use.




     Figure 3.14 Selecting the moved mailbox’s destination.




     Using the Exchange Server Migration
     Wizard to Move from Microsoft Exchange
     Server 5.5 to Exchange Server 2003
     In many ways, the Exchange Server Migration Wizard is far less troublesome
     that the coexistence process. Rather than running innumerable tests, you
     simply point the Exchange Server Migration Wizard at an Exchange Server
     5.5 or Exchange 2000 Server, enter the appropriate administrator credentials
     (as shown in Figure 3.15), and accounts and mail are transferred across. The
     Exchange Server Migration Wizard can be configured so that new user
     accounts are created in Active Directory for each account that is transferred
     across from the Exchange Server 5.5 organization.
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Figure 3.15 Preparing to migrate accounts from an Exchange 5.5 server.


This method is, in some ways, simpler than setting up a coexistence between
an Exchange Server 5.5 organization and Exchange Server 2003 computer.
After the Exchange Server Migration Wizard has run, you will be able to
decommission the existing Exchange 5.5 server.



Migration from Other Messaging
Systems
Exchange Server 2003 ships with the Exchange Server Migration Wizard,
which can be used to migrate accounts and messages from other mail systems
to Exchange Server 2003. The Exchange Server Migration Wizard can assist
in migration from the following mail systems, as shown in Figure 3.16:
➤ MS Mail for PC Networks (will migrate users, mail, and schedule data)

➤ Lotus cc:Mail

➤ Lotus Notes

➤ Novell GroupWise 4.x

➤ Novell GroupWise 5.x

➤ Internet Directory (LDAP via ADSI)

➤ Internet Mail (IMAP4)

When you use the Exchange Server Migration Wizard, you have the option
of creating a new account in Active Directory for each user that is migrated
across. Messages in account mailboxes are also moved from the original
messaging system to Exchange Server 2003. It is important to note that you
68   Chapter.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
     . . . .

     cannot migrate from within an organization using the Exchange Server
     Migration Wizard; you can only migrate between separate organizations.




     Figure 3.16 The Exchange Server Migration Wizard.




     Coexistence with Other Messaging
     Systems
     Exchange Server 2003 can communicate with other messaging systems on
     the same network through the use of connectors. One of the great benefits
     of these connectors is that they allow users of both messaging systems to view
     a common address list. After Exchange Server 2003 is set up, several con-
     nectors can be installed by rerunning the setup utility.
     The connectors that can be installed are the Novell GroupWise connector
     and the Lotus Notes connector. To install the connectors, rerun setup,
     and use the Change action to install the necessary connector, as shown in
     Figure 3.17.
     In some cases, connectors that worked on Exchange Server 5.5 are not sup-
     ported on Exchange Server 2003. Examples include the MS: Mail and Lotus
     cc: Mail connectors. If you are planning a coexistence strategy with these
     older mail systems, you need to keep at least part of your Exchange Server 5.5
     organization operational. Connections to these older mail systems from
     Exchange Server 2003 will need to be mediated through Exchange Server 5.5.
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Figure 3.17 Installing the Novell GroupWise and Lotus Notes connectors.



                The use of the Lotus Notes and Novell GroupWise connectors is not supported on
                Exchange Server 2003 in a clustered configuration. You need to install a separate
                Exchange Server 2003 server in the same organization to use as a bridgehead when
                requiring coexistence with a Lotus Notes or Novell GroupWise environment.



Only one connector needs to be installed for a particular messaging system.
The server on which the connector is installed is called a bridgehead server.


Coexistence with Lotus Notes
Lotus Notes/Domino is a messaging/workgroup competitor to Microsoft’s
Outlook/Exchange Server 2003. The latest version of this product is Lotus
Notes/Domino 6.5. The Lotus Notes connector that ships with Exchange
Server 2003 supports versions 4.x and 5.x of the Notes/Domino software.

                A Certified Lotus Professional (CLP) will tell you that Domino is the proper name for
                the server software and that the name Notes is used to refer to the client software. So,
                although the Exchange Server 2003 documentation refers to the Lotus Notes con-
                nector, it is, in actuality, a connector to a server running Domino.



                The Lotus Notes connector that ships with Exchange Server 2003 does not directly
                support Lotus Notes/Domino 6 and above.
70   Chapter.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
     . . . .

                    On the Exchange Administration exam, Microsoft does not expect you to be a Notes
                    guru. All you need to know are the basics about configuring a connection between
                    Exchange Server 2003 and a compatible Lotus Notes server.




     Before the connection to the Lotus Notes/Domino server can be established,
     ➤ A special Notes user ID that will be used with the connector must be
        configured on the Notes/Domino server.
     ➤ The Lotus Notes client software must be installed on the Exchange
        server where the connector is installed.

     To start a connector, you must enable the specific services that the connec-
     tor relies upon. In the case of the connector for Lotus Notes, the following
     services must be configured to automatically start:
     ➤ Microsoft Exchange Connectivity Controller

     ➤ Microsoft Exchange Connector for Lotus Notes

     After it is installed and running, the Lotus Notes connector can be located
     in the Connectors node (see Figure 3.18).




     Figure 3.18 Location of the Connectors node.


     To configure the connector, you need to edit its properties. The properties
     of the Lotus Notes connector are shown in Figure 3.19.
     The Notes Server text box must be completed with the full name of the
     Notes server with which the connector will interface. This must be done
     using the Lotus Notes “Notes server/Notes organization” convention.
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Figure 3.19 Lotus Notes Connector properties.


The notes.ini file is the ini file used by the Notes client that you will have
already installed on the Exchange server. If the notes.ini file is located else-
where on the server, this location needs to be changed. The notes.ini file is
used to store settings about the special user that you have created on the
Notes server as well as some of the server settings.
The Import Container tab stores user, group, and resources imported from
the Notes server. These can be represented in AD as a user or as a contact.
The maximum size of an imported Notes address, which includes the Notes
domain, is set by default to 128 bytes. Any address larger than this size is
truncated. If truncation occurs, a modification can be made by editing the
Exchsrvr\Conndata\Dxamex\Amap.tbl file.
The Export Container tab holds those Exchange addresses that you want
exported to Notes address books. The Notes address books will be populat-
ed with the Exchange addresses when synchronization occurs. Contacts,
users, and groups can be exported to the Notes server.
After the connector is installed and functional, synchronization between
Notes and Exchange, or vice versa, can be initiated by opening the Notes
connector properties and selecting the Dirsync Options tab. From this tab,
you can set the directory update schedule and configure updates to occur
immediately either from Notes to Exchange or from Exchange to Notes. You
would force an update if a major change had been made on either side and
the next update was not scheduled to occur for a significant length of time.
72   Chapter.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
     . . . .


     Sharing Lotus Notes Calendars with the Calendar Connector
     The Calendar connector can be used to connect the calendaring system of
     Exchange Server 2003 with the calendaring system of Lotus Notes. This
     enables users of one mail system to schedule meetings via a shared calendar
     with the users of the other mail system.
     To create a new calendar connection, ensure that the calendar connection
     option is installed via Exchange Server 2003 setup (see Figure 3.17). If you
     are installing the Calendar connector on an Exchange server different from
     the one on which you installed the Lotus Notes connector, you need to
     install and configure the Lotus Notes client on the new Exchange Server
     2003 computer. This creates the notes.ini file, which the Calendar connec-
     tor requires to function. Locate the Calendar connector in the Exchange
     System Manager, as shown in Figure 3.18. Edit the properties of the
     Calendar connector and navigate to the Calendar Connector tab, where you
     can click New Calendar Type. Select either Lotus Notes and Novell
     Groupwise, as shown in Figure 3.20.




     Figure 3.20 Select the Calendar to which you want to connect Exchange.


     You are required to identify the Windows NT/2000 server hosting Lotus
     Notes. In general, you use the same Notes server as you did when configur-
     ing the Lotus Notes connector. You also need to know the path to the
     notes.ini file (by default, this is c:\windows\notes.ini) and need to enter the
     password of the Notes user that is configured to use the Notes client.


     Coexistence with Novell GroupWise
     Novell GroupWise is another popular messaging server that can be config-
     ured to interact with Exchange Server 2003. As with Lotus Notes, a server
     running Exchange Server 2003 must be selected as a bridgehead server to
     mediate communication between the two different messaging systems.
     Before setting up the connection, you need to have the details of a NetWare
     username and password. This account must have administrator’s rights on
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                                                                                                  73


the particular NetWare server that hosts the GroupWise messaging system.
The account must have read/write permissions to the API gateway directo-
ries. The account also must be configured as a member of GroupWise’s
NTGateway group.

              Just as Microsoft does not expect you to be a Lotus Notes guru, they also do not
              expect you to demonstrate an intimate knowledge of Novell GroupWise during the
              Exchange Administration exam. All that you need to know are the basics about con-
              figuring a connection between Exchange Server 2003 and a compatible Novell
              GroupWise server.


You also need to install the Novell GroupWise connector on the Exchange
Server 2003 computer that will be used as a bridgehead server between both
messaging systems. How to install the connector was discussed earlier and
shown in Figure 3.17.
After the connector is installed, you need to start the services that the con-
nector relies upon. These services can be found in the services MMC. They
are
➤ Microsoft Exchange Connectivity Controller

➤ Microsoft Exchange Router for Novell GroupWise

After the connector is installed, you can locate it in the Exchange System
Manager, as shown earlier in Figure 3.18. To configure the connection,
right-click and select Properties. You are shown the General tab of the
Connector for Novell GroupWise properties, as shown in Figure 3.21.
After you reach this stage, you need to input the API Gateway Path, which
is the UNC path (\\netwareservername\apipath) to the GroupWise API
gateway located on the GroupWise server. You also need to enter the user-
name and password for the account that you configured earlier with special
permissions on the NetWare server.
On the Import Container tab of the GroupWise connector properties, you
can choose to create a Windows contact, create a disabled Windows account,
or create a new Windows account for those NetWare users who do not have
accounts in the domain. You can also set up filters to determine if you will
import all of the GroupWise directory entries, or limit the importation to
entries in a particular format.
The Export Container tab allows you to export all of the users in a particu-
lar organizational unit (OU) to the GroupWise server as well as groups and
contacts located in that OU. After this information is exported, it will be
available to GroupWise users in their address book.
74   Chapter.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
     . . . .




     Figure 3.21 General Properties tab of the Novell GroupWise connector.


     The Dirsync Schedule tab on the Novell GroupWise connector properties is
     exactly the same as the Dirsync Schedule tab on the Lotus Notes connector.
     From here, you can configure a schedule of how often Exchange and
     GroupWise update each other. You can also force an immediate full reload
     or update of each directory, be it from Exchange to GroupWise or vice versa.

     Sharing GroupWise Calendars with the Calendar Connector
     Setting up a GroupWise calendar to be shared with an Exchange Server 2003
     calendar is very similar to the process used to configure the Notes calendar
     connection. To create a new calendar connection, ensure that the calendar
     connection option is installed via Exchange Server 2003 setup (see earlier
     Figure 3.17).
     Locate the Calendar connector in the Exchange System Manager, as shown
     in Figure 3.18. Edit the properties of the Calendar connector and navigate
     to the Calendar Connector tab where you can click New Calendar Type.
     You need to enter the GroupWise API Gateway location, as shown in Figure
     3.22.
     This needs to be in the format of GroupWise Domain and API Gateway sep-
     arated by a period (that is, Domain.Gateway).
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                                                                                              75




Figure 3.22 Setting up GroupWise Calendar Connection.




Removing a Connector
If you want to move the Notes or GroupWise connector from one Exchange
Server 2003 computer to another Exchange Server 2003 computer, you must
first stop the connector services listed previously. Remove the connector.
Use the Active Directory Users and Computers console to delete any con-
tacts that the connector has imported into the directory. After all of that is
done, you can reinstall the Notes or GroupWise connector on the new
Exchange Server 2003 bridgehead.
76   Chapter.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
     . . . .


     Exam Prep Questions
     Question 1
        Which of the following services are not supported and, hence, need to be
        removed from an Exchange 2000 server before performing an upgrade to
        Exchange Server 2003? (Choose all that apply.)
        ❑ A. Instant messaging service
        ❑ B. Exchange Chat service
        ❑ C. Exchange 2000 Conferencing Server
        ❑ D. Microsoft Mobile Information Server
        ❑ E. Outlook Web Access


     Answers A, B, C, and D are correct. Answer A is correct; Exchange Server
     2003 does not support the instant messaging service. Answer B is correct;
     Exchange Server 2003 does not support Exchange Chat service. Answer C is
     correct; Exchange Server 2003 does not support Exchange 2000
     Conferencing Server. Answer D is correct; Exchange Server 2003 does not
     support Microsoft Mobile Information Server components of Exchange
     2000 Server. These components need to be removed before upgrading a
     computer to Exchange Server 2003. Answer E is incorrect, Outlook Web
     Access is supported by Exchange Server 2003 and does not need to be
     removed as it will be safely upgraded.


     Question 2
        Which of the following should be done to a server running Exchange 2000
        Server before it is upgraded to Exchange Server 2003? (Choose all that apply.)
        ❑ A. Upgrade the operating system to Windows Server 2003.
        ❑ B. Upgrade Exchange 2000 Server to Service Pack 3.
        ❑ C. Upgrade Windows 2000 Server to Service Pack 3.
        ❑ D. Remove Internet Information Services 5.
        ❑ E. Run the IIS Lockdown Tool.
        ❑ F. Install Software Update Services.


     Answers B and C are correct. Answer B is correct; before Exchange 2000
     Server is upgraded, it should be patched to Service Pack 3 or higher. Answer
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C is correct; Windows 2000 Server should be patched to Service Pack 3 or
higher before the installation of Exchange Server 2003. Answer A is incor-
rect; if the operating system is to be upgraded, this should occur after
Exchange Server 2003 is to be installed. Answer D is incorrect; IIS should
not be removed because this will hamper the installation of Exchange.
Answer E, the IIS lockdown tool, and answer F, Software Update Services,
are not required to install Exchange Server 2003; therefore, these answers
are incorrect.


Question 3
  You want to upgrade an English version of Exchange 2000 Server running on
  Windows 2000 Server to the Korean version of Exchange Server 2003. The
  server currently has the following components installed:
  ➤ Novell GroupWise connector
  ➤ Outlook Web Access
  ➤ cc: Mail connector
  ➤ MS Mail connector
  ➤ POP3 service
  Which of these components should be removed before performing the upgrade
  to the Korean version of Exchange Server 2003 from the English version of
  Exchange 2000 Server? (Choose all that apply.)
  ❑ A. Novell GroupWise Connector (not supported on Korean version)
  ❑ B. Outlook Web Access
  ❑ C. Lotus cc: Mail connector
  ❑ D. MS Mail connector
  ❑ E. POP3 service
  ❑ F. This upgrade is not possible.


Answers A, C, and D are correct. Answer A, the Novell GroupWise connec-
tor, is not supported on Korean versions of Exchange Server 2003. Answer
C, the Lotus cc: Mail, and answer D, the MS Mail connector, are not sup-
ported either. If interoperability with these mail organizations is required, an
Exchange 2000 server acting as a bridgehead server should be kept. Answer
B and answer E are incorrect; Outlook Web Access and the POP3 service do
not need to be removed before installation. Answer F is incorrect; the
English version of Exchange 2000 Server can be upgraded to the Korean ver-
sion.
78   Chapter.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
     . . . .


     Question 4
        Which of the following pieces of information will be contained in the
        exdeploy.log log file when the DSScopeScan tools are run during the process of
        setting up a coexistence between Exchange Server 5.5 and Exchange Server
        2003? (Choose all that apply.)
        ❑ A. The number of Exchange Server 5.5 sites
        ❑ B. The number of servers in each Exchange Server 5.5 site
        ❑ C. The names of servers in each Exchange Server 5.5 site
        ❑ D. The service pack level of each Exchange 5.5 server in the organization
        ❑ E. Whether or not Exchange 5.5 servers have connectivity to DNS servers


     Answers A and B are correct. The DSScopeScan tool reports on the compo-
     sition of Exchange Server 5.5 sites, listing answer A, the number of sites, and
     answer B, the number of servers per site. It does not list answer C, the names
     of servers in each site, answer D, what service pack they are patched to, or
     answer E, whether or not they have connectivity to DNS servers.


     Question 5
        You are the mail administrator for a company that currently uses Lotus Notes
        R5. Your company has decided to migrate to Microsoft Exchange Server 2003.
        For a period of 6 months, both mail systems will need to interact. You have cho-
        sen a particular Exchange Server 2003 system to act as a bridgehead between
        the new Exchange Server 2003 system and the existing Lotus Notes R5 envi-
        ronment. Which of the following steps do you need to take before you config-
        ure the Lotus Notes connector on Exchange Server 2003? (Choose all that
        apply.)
        ❑ A. Ensure that the Notes connector has been installed by Exchange setup.
        ❑ B. Ensure that the Exchange Connectivity Controller and Exchange con-
             nector for Lotus Notes services are started.
        ❑ C. Create a special Lotus Notes account in Active Directory.
        ❑ D. Create a special Lotus Notes user ID on the Lotus Notes server.
        ❑ E. Install Outlook on the Lotus Notes server.
        ❑ F. Install the Notes client on the Exchange server.
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Answers A, B, D, and F are correct. Answer A is correct; you must ensure
that the Notes connector has been installed by Exchange setup. Answer B is
correct; you must ensure that the services that the connector relies upon are
running. Answer D is correct; a special Notes ID needs to be created on the
Lotus Notes server. Answer F is correct; the Notes client needs to be
installed on the Exchange server. Answer C is incorrect. A Lotus Notes
account does not need to be created within Active Directory. Answer E is
incorrect. There is no reason to install outlook on the Lotus Notes server.


Question 6
  You are configuring the NetWare user account that the Exchange Server 2003
  connector will use to access GroupWise. Which of the following administrative
  rights must this account have on the NetWare server hosting GroupWise?
  (Choose all that apply.)
  ❑ A. The account must have Exchange Full Administrator permissions.
  ❑ B. The account must be a member of the Enterprise Admins group.
  ❑ C. The account must be a member of GroupWise’s NTGateway group.
  ❑ D. The account must be a member of GroupWise’s Exchange Connector
       group.
  ❑ E. The account must have read/write permissions to the API gateway
       directories on the Novell server.
  ❑ F. The account must have administrative rights on the NetWare server
       running GroupWise.


Answers C, E, and F are correct. Answer C is correct; the NetWare user
account needs to be a member of the GroupWise NTGateway group.
Answer E is correct; the account must have read/write permissions to the
API gateway directories on the Novell server. Answer F is correct; the
account must have administrative rights on the NetWare server running
GroupWise. Answer A is incorrect; it is a NetWare account and needs no
Exchange permissions. Answer B is incorrect for the same reason. Answer D
is incorrect as there is no GroupWise Exchange Connector group.
80   Chapter.3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
     . . . .


     Question 7
        You are the mail administrator for an Exchange Server 2003 organization that
        coexists with a Novell GroupWise organization. The directory update schedule
        is configured to run every morning at 2:00 a.m. This morning at 10:00 a.m., you
        have added 30 new mail-enabled users to Exchange Server 2003. You receive a
        call from your manager asking why these users are not immediately visible to
        GroupWise clients. You inform your manager that the directories update each
        other at 2:00 a.m. Your manager asks if you can do something so that these new
        users are visible earlier than that. Which of the following steps minimizes traf-
        fic but meets your manager’s goals?
        ❍ A. Force an immediate full reload of the Exchange to GroupWise directory
             synchronization on the Dirsync Schedule tab of the GroupWise con-
             nector properties.
        ❍ B. Force an immediate update of the Exchange to GroupWise directory
             synchronization on the Dirsync Schedule tab of the GroupWise con-
             nector properties.
        ❍ C. Force an immediate full reload of the GroupWise to Exchange directory
             synchronization on the Dirsync Schedule tab of the GroupWise con-
             nector properties.
        ❍ D. Force an immediate update of the GroupWise to Exchange directory
             synchronization on the Dirsync Schedule tab of the GroupWise con-
             nector properties.


     Answer B is correct. Forcing an immediate update from Exchange to
     GroupWise updates the GroupWise data with the new Exchange users.
     Using an immediate update rather than a full reload minimizes network traf-
     fic and is quicker. Answer A is incorrect because it does not minimize net-
     work traffic. Answers C and D are incorrect because they update from
     GroupWise to Exchange rather than the other way around.

				
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