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					Apollo 11
      Vocabulary Words
module
bulky
focused
thrust
hatch
tranquility
awe
depressed
mankind
sensations
                   module
         The spaceship had four
         factory produced modules.



The lunar module
was used to land on
the moon surface.



module- a part of a spacecraft
that has a special use and can be
separated from the rest of the
            bulky
The spacesuits the
astronauts wore were
bulky.


  She wore a bulky scarf around her
  neck to keep her warm.


 bulky- large and puffy
                     focused
        She was so focused on her
        computer screen she didn’t
        see the green bug looking at
        her.

  Golfers need to be focused when
  they hit the ball.

focused- past tense of focus;
to direct attention to someone
or something
                         thrust
  The thrust of the engines helped
  Apollo 11 liftoff into space.


    The tennis star is fumbling for
    words, as a microphone is
    thrust before her after her
    victory

thrust- a sudden, strong push
or force
           hatch
The seaman climbed out of the
submarine’s hatch.


  The astronauts entered the
  command module through the
  hatch.


 hatch- an opening in the deck
 of a ship or spacecraft that
 leads to other decks
          tranquility
    She enjoyed the tranquility of
    walking through the quiet
    mountain scenery.

     The arrival of the motor
     boat broke the tranquility
     of the moment.


tranquility- the absence of
motion or disturbance
                   awe
           We feel great awe
           when we stand near
           vast mountains.



     The astronauts watched in
     awe as they watched the
     Earth rise over the Moon.
awe- great wonder, fear, and
respect
                  depressed
       When you played the
       piano, you depressed the
       keys.

            The water filled the
            depressed area of the
            land.

depressed- past tense of depress; to
cause to sink below the surrounding
region
               mankind

  Mankind has been around for
  many, many years.

The landing of Apollo 11 on the
Moon was the first time mankind
had set foot on the Moon.

mankind- human beings as a
group; the human race
                sensations
      The announcement of
      peace sent strong
      sensations throughout the
      nation.

 The people on the Earth wanted to
 know what sensations the astronaut
 was feeling as he walked on the
 Moon.
sensations- plural of sensation; a
feeling
Concept Vocabulary-
     odyssey

An odyssey is a voyage that
results in some kind of discovery
or change, usually for the good.
Often odysseys are physical
journeys to another place, but
they can also be educational and
intellectual.
                        odyssey
    The “Grapes of Wrath” tells of
    the odyssey of migrant
    workers to California.

         She went on an odyssey of
         sorts to Mexico where she
         grew up.
odyssey- any long series of wanderings
and adventures.
What is the significance
  of the word pairs?
powerful             weak
proud                ashamed
extraordinary        unremarkable

  They are antonyms.
  Can you identify the part of speech
  of each word?
  They are all adjectives.
           What is the definition of
                 each word?
powerful        -having great strength
weak            -likely to fall or give way
proud           -having a strong sense of satisfactio
ashamed          -upset or guilty because one has
                done something wrong or silly
extraordinary -unusual
unremarkable -everyday, common
Work with your partner to
put each word in an original
sentence that shows
meaning.


powerful        weak
proud           ashamed
extraordinary   unremarkable
         Can you think of any other
         words that would fit with
         the antonym pairs?
                          Did you think of

powerful/weak             flimsy
proud/ashamed              humble
extraordinary/unremarkable plain
What is the function of
  the word pairs?
precise           exact
remote            secluded
exciting          fascinating

 They are synonyms.
 What are synonyms?
 A synonym is a word that has the
 same, or nearly the same, meaning
 as another words.
What are the definitions
  of the word pairs?
precise             exact
definite, being exactly that, fixed
remote             secluded
removed, not direct, far away
exciting           fascinating
capturing the interest of, or holding
  the attention of
What are the possible parts
 of speech for the words?
 precise              exact
 adjective           adjective or verb
 remote              secluded
 adjective or noun    adjective
 exciting            fascinating
 adjective            adjective
         What are some other
         possible words that can
         be added to the synonym
         pair?
                        Did you think of:

precise/exact          accurate

remote/secluded        out-of-the-way

exciting/fascinating   thrilling
     Building Background
What do you know about the
 moon landing?
How long have people been
 investigating and exploring the
 universe?
Think abut what you have learned
 about astronomy from the other
 selections in the unit.
This selection will give you more
 information about space
 exploration.
Background Information
The natural body that is closest to
 Earth is the moon. The moon
 circles Earth every 27.3 days.
The moon doesn’t produce light. It
 reflects the light of the sun. When
 the astronauts refer to the dark
 side of the moon, they are
 referring to the side facing away
 form Earth.
Background Information
At the time of the events in this
 selection, the United States and
 the USSR were involved in a space
 race. The USSR had managed to
 send the first man to space.
The United States was afraid the
 Soviets would also beat them to
 the moon, so the Apollo mission
 was pushed forward rapidly.
Keep this question in mind as you read the
selection.

What is our place in the
universe?
Comprehension Strategies to
          Use
      Adjusting Reading Speed

      - Good readers know the text is not
        making sense and stop to reread.
      - Good readers identify the specific
        part of the text that is not making
        sense and reread only that part.
      - Good readers change reading speed
        in reaction to the demands of the
        text.
      - Good readers adjust reading rate to
        skim or scan for specific
        information.
Visualizing- A good reader recognizes
appropriate places in the text to stop and
visualize.
A good reader visualizes literal ideas or scenes
described by the author.
A good reader makes inferences while visualizing
to show understanding of the character’s
feelings, mood, and setting.
A good reader visualizes differently depending on
the type of text.
Clarifying . A good reader uses structural elements ,
context, and questioning to read and clarify the meanings of
unfamiliar words.
A good reader notes characteristics of the text, such as
whether it is difficult to read or whether some sections are
more challenging or more important than others.
A good reader shows awareness of whether he or she
understands the text and takes appropriate action, such as
rereading, in order to understand the text better.
How does this selection relate to the theme Our Corner of the
Universe?
What is the relationship between the Earth and its moon and our
solar system?
             Know           Want to Know         Learned
     Genre: Narrative
       Nonfiction
In Narrative Nonfiction:
facts about real people, places, or
 events are included. This
 information is shaped into a story.
the real people become characters;
 the real places become settings;
 and the real events become the
 plot.
Sometimes an author may add
 information about what a particular
 character is thinking or feeling
 even though the author could not
 really know this information.
          Focus Questions
How are astronauts similar to
 the early land and sea
 explorers?
How do astronauts help us
 learn more about the
 universe?
    Comprehension Skill:
    Drawing Conclusions
As you read the selection, use
 information in the text to draw
 conclusions about characters
 and events.
               Daily Editing
Correct the following sentences.

 sheila Went to the Store for
 Groceries.
 Sheila went to the store for
 groceries.
 Where have you been? Asked
 Monica.
 “Where have you been?” asked
 Monica.
Writing: Science Fiction
         Story
The revising stage of the
 writing process gives you an
 opportunity to rethink and
 improve your writing.
Today, you will focus on the
 content and sequential
 organization of your stories
 and revise to tighten the plot.
Story Structure That has
  a Beginning, Middle,
    Climax and End
You should set up the characters,
 setting, and problem, or conflict,
 of the plot in the beginning. The
 plot should involve a problem and
 a character or characters dealing
 with that problem.
What types of characters, setting
 and conflict are encountered in
 science fiction.
What are examples from your
 stories?
   Story Structure That
       has a Beginning,
Middle, Climax and End
As your story progresses, the key
 events of the plot should build
 tension toward the climax, or
 turning point in the story.
What are some of the climaxes or
 turning point in the stories you’ve
 written?
The end of your story should
 include the resolution, where loose
 ends are tied up and the narrative
 is completed.
          Remember
Revising does not necessarily mean
 rewriting. You should be looking for
 ways to make your writing better.
 Keep the things you have learned
 about Science Fiction Story writing
 when revising.
Your stories will be clearer if you
 delete any repetitious ideas and
 make sure your plots are
 sequentially and logically organized.
You should also make sure your
 settings, characters, and plots reflect
 conventions of the science fiction
 genre.
              Foreshadowing
Foreshadowing is a way a writer
 creates suspense by dropping hints
 about what will happen later in the
 story.
You can create more suspense,
 precision, and interest in your plots
 if you add in instances of
 foreshadowing.
Work with your partner to add at
 least one incidence of
 foreshadowing in each of your
 stories.
      Today’s Assignment
 Work with your partner to:
Revise your science fiction stories,
 focusing on deleting repetitious
 ideas and logical organization.
Use the Revising checklist and peer
 suggestions as a guide.
Add at least one instance of
 foreshadowing.
Spelling Test Pretest
      graceful     commenceme
      prohibit      nt
      exceed       similarity
      opposition   energy
      fatigue      outlandish
      distant      difference
      forbid       conclusion
      restrict     alliance
      secluded     strange
      surpass      clumsy
Check Your Spelling Test Pretest

         graceful     commenceme
         prohibit      nt
         exceed       similarity
         opposition   energy
         fatigue      outlandish
         distant      difference
         forbid       conclusion
         restrict     alliance
         secluded     strange
         surpass      clumsy
 Grammar, Usage, and
     Mechanics
The canoe leaning against the
shed
The canoe is leaning against
the shed.
This is an example of a fragment
sentence. A fragment does not express
a complete thought and should not be
written as a sentence.
Every sentence needs a subject and a
predicate to express a complete thought.
In the case of the sentence above, it is
missing a predicate.
Grammar, Usage, and
    Mechanics
Sean saw a giant nest it belonged
to a swan.

Sean saw a giant nest, and it
belonged to a swan.

This is an example of a run-on sentence. A
run-on sentence is two or more sentences
written as though they are one.
How can we fix this run-on sentence to be
one correct sentence?
Fix the two sentences.
Possible answers:
 The boy was running when.
The boy was running when
he found the penny.


 Ricky went to the park it
 closes at dusk.
Ricky went to the park. It
closes at dusk.
Fix three more sentences.
Possible answers:
 After school on Tuesday.
We went to the store after school
on Tuesday.

 Someone parked the car it was
 red.
Someone parked the car. It was
red
 She shot the basketball the
 crowd cheered.
She shot the basketball. The
crowd cheered.
                 Vocabulary Review
            What vocabulary word goes best in
            the sentence?
                                           bulky
            1. He headed back to the soft, ______
depressed      coach were his family sank cozily into the
               cushions.
bulky
            2. Armstrong planted his foot on the surface
hatch          of the Moon and declared it a giant leap
                     mankind
               for ___________.
mankind     3. The rocket’s _______ would propel them
                             thrust
               into space.
thrust
            4. Neil Armstrong exited the lunar module’s
               hatch
               ________ and stepped down the ladder.
                    depressed
            5. She ___________ the remote control
               button to turn down the sound.
                   Vocabulary Review
              What vocabulary word goes best in the
              sentence?

              1. The astronauts , sitting in the command
focused           module
                 __________ were perched on top of a
                 giant rocket.
module                       awe
              2. She was in ______ of their bravery.
tranquility                   tranquility
              3. The rooms ___________ underscored
                 the importance of the event.
sensations                       focused
              4. Everyone was __________ intensely on
awe              the television.
              5. Scientist would ask the astronauts about
                 the ____________ they felt in space.
                      sensations
     What are the
     possessives?
mother’s name
rocket’s sides
astronauts’ success
mother’s rocket’s astronauts’
Which is the plural possessive?
astronauts’
  Forming Possessives
Can you explain the rules for
forming possessives?

Possessives are formed by adding
I'd to singular words and -’ to
plurals that end in -s, and -’s to
plurals that do not end in -s.

What are the plural possessive for
mother and rocket?

mothers’ and rockets’
     How are the words
         related?
astronaut/Neil Armstrong
spacecraft/lunar module/Eagle

  They show levels of specificity.
  Why is it important to use specific
  language?
  The more specific you can be in
  your writing, the clearer your
  message will be.
 Specific words are often
 preferred because they provide
 a precise picture of the writer’s
 topic.
astronaut/Neil Armstrong
spacecraft/lunar module/Eagle
Can you explain the progression
 represented in the lines?
Neil Armstrong is a specific
 astronaut, the lunar module is a
 type of spacecraft, and the Eagle
 is a specific lunar module.
     Meet the Author
     Michael D. Cole
Why might writing a book about being
 an astronaut be the second-best thing
 to being an astronaut?
You could research all the specifics
 about the missions to the point where
 you felt like you were almost there.
Why do you think Cole writes books on
 space exploration for children?
He remembers what it was like to be a
 child who is fascinated with outer
 space.
         Theme Connections
 Why did Apollo 11 lose contact with Earth each
  time it traveled to the dark side of the moon?
 The moon blocks the radio waves coming from
  Earth.
 What kind of preparations were needed for
  Apollo 11 to be a success?
 A safe landing place on the moon needed to be
  chosen.
 How is the surface of moon like the surface of
  Mars?
 Both are covered in fine dust.
 Which spacecraft from “Apollo 11: First Moon
  Landing” is most like Pathfinder?
 Eagle is the most similar to Pathfinder because
  bother were launched from a bigger craft.
Writing: Science Fiction
    Story- Revising
 Using a Thesaurus
 It is important to use vivid,
 precise language while drafting
 your story to make your
 characters and settings come to
 life, to make the plot exciting, and
 to keep the reader interested.
 Lets look at some words and see if
 we can come up with better
 words.
         Can you think of a more
         descriptive word to use in the
         place of the following words?
run       sprint, scamper, dart, dash
walk      stroll, saunter, hike, amble
think     ponder, contemplate, deliberate
said      stated, whispered, announced, declared
went      departed, exited, left, disappeared
learn     discover, understand, gather, realize
ground    soil, earth, loam, dirt, land
      Let’s look at a writing sample.
      Can you think of a more exciting
      words for the underlined words?
A car was going down the highway, and another car was getti
the highway. The speeding car was quickly coming to the ot
already turning. CRASH! They hit each other! The speedin
Then the other car’s engine and turned into flames! The
gasoline. The color of the gasoline fire was blue and yello
crushed flat. Then the police and the firefighters came to battle
engine. The ambulance came right after the fire truck. Then th
to rescue the person in the on fire car. The other paramedic
person in the speeding car, which was hard because the car w
pancake.
    Let’s look at a writing sample.
    Sample alternative words

A car was speeding down the highway, and another car was g
onto the highway. The speeding car was quickly approaching t
was already turning. CRASH! They collided with each other
flipped over and the other car’s engine and burst into flam
burning gasoline. The color of the gasoline fire was blue and
were crushed flat. Then the police and the firefighters came to
the car’s engine. The ambulance came right after the fir
paramedics tried to rescue the person in the flaming car. Th
were rescuing the person in the speeding vehicle, which was h
was crushed flat as a pancake.
Assignment:
Work with your partner to go
 over your drafts stories.
Look for words you can make
 more vivid and precise.
Use the Thesaurus to
 generate alternative words to
 use in your story.
  synonyms                  antonyms

remote                  commencement
             restrict
                        conclusion     clumsy
distant      exceed
                        energy         graceful
secluded     surpass
strange                 fatigue
                        difference
outlandish
                        similarity
prohibit
forbid                  alliance
                        opposition
   He watches
  ______________   many movies.
 In this sentence the subject and
 verb agree. A subject and verb
 must agree in number. A singular
 subject (he) has a singular verb
 (watches), and a plural subject
 (they has a plural verb (watch).

Both Guadalupe and Ryki like
_________________________________
reading books.
Two or more subjects connected by and
use the form of the verb that agrees with
a plural subject.
Fix the sentences so the subject and
verb agree.

                Horses eats hay.
               Horses eat hay.

                The library stay open
                until 9:00.

               The library stays open
               until 9:00.
module        humankind
bulky         feelings
focused       sunken
thrust        calm
hatch         section
tranquility   concentrated
awe           cutaway
depressed     wonder
mankind       hulking
sensations    shove
                Word Structure
powerful/weak   proud/ashamed extraordinary/unremarkable
precise/exact   remote/secluded      exciting/ fascinating
mother’s name   rocket’s sides       astronauts’ success
astronaut/Neil Armstrong   spacecraft/lunar module/ Eagle



Work with your partner to create a sentence for one
word from each line. You will have a total of four
sentences. Make sure your sentence shows
meaning.
Be prepared to share your sentences with the class.
 Comprehension Skills
 Drawing Conclusions
Drawing conclusions requires
you to identify the author’s
subject and to look for clues
the author gives about the
subject. From these clues,
they can make a statement
about the subject.
  Comprehension Skills
  Drawing Conclusions
Let’s read about the astronauts who
participated in the mission on pages
406 and 407.
What clues about each of the men did
you find?
Did you notice that they were all pilots?
They all have been to space before and
are highly skilled.
With this information we can draw the
conclusion that the team was well-
qualified to go on the mission to the
moon.
      Comprehension Skills
      Drawing Conclusions
Steps involved in drawing conclusions:
  First, you should identify a topic.
  Then you should gather clues
   about that topic from the text.
  Finally, you should make a
   statement about the topic based
   on the clues you gathered.
     Comprehension Skills
     Drawing Conclusions
Let’s read about the launch on pages
408 and 409.
What conclusion can you draw about the
  importance of the launch?
It is extremely important because it’s the
  first time humankind will walk on the
  moon.
Identify several clues that would help
  you draw this conclusion.
They represent the human race. People
  throughout the world are waiting. An
  incredible traffic jam had been building
  for days around the launch site.
    Comprehension Skills
    Drawing Conclusions
Let’s read more about launching a
rocket on pages 410 and 411.
What conclusion can you draw about
 launching a rocket?
It is a difficult, precise, and time-
 consuming process.
What can you conclude about the
 astronauts’ feelings by Day Four of the
 mission?
They are enchanted by the view of the
 moon and stars from the spacecraft. They
 are also impressed by the brightness of
 the Earthshine.
           Inquiry Process
What does the selection make you
 wonder about?
Do you have a theory about why
 nations became interested in
 space exploration or any ideas
 about space exploration in the
 future?
Bring an item from home that is
 related to the selection to put on
 the Concept/Question board.
Writing: Science Fiction
     Story- Editing
Let’s look at the editing checklist
 on page 50 in Skills Practice 2.
You should check for run-ons and
 fragment in your stories, as well as
 any errors with quotation marks
 and apostrophes, which you have
 been studying this week.
You should also check thet you
 have correctly used commas to
 separate clauses in complex
 sentence..
 Writing: Science Fiction
Story- Edit the following.
The androids voice was
loud and anything but
human as it yelled Stop! it
chased the aliens in it’s
spacecraft through the
starry black void it finally
caught them Zooming and
zipping through the air.
 Writing: Science Fiction
Story- Edit the following.
The android’s voice was
loud and anything but
human as it yelled, “Stop!”
It chased the aliens in its
spacecraft through the
starry black void. It finally
caught them zooming and
zipping through the air.
               Spelling
Antonyms are words with
 opposite, or nearly
 opposite, meanings and
 synonyms are words with
 the same, or nearly the
 same, meanings.
You can find synonyms and
 antonyms for words in a
 thesaurus. Let’s look at
 the word graceful in the
 thesaurus.
                Spelling Assignment
           Find words from your
           Spelling list that are either
           synonyms or antonyms for
           the following words.
synonyms remote      distant, secluded
synonyms prohibit    forbid, restrict
antonym fatigue      energy
antonym clumsy       graceful
“Apollo, Huston, ________ go for
                 we’re
undocking.” reported Mission
Control.
         Quotation marks enclose the
          words of a speaker.
         Periods and commas should be
          inside closing quotation marks.
         Use quotation marks for poem
          titles, songs, and short stories.
         This is an example of a contraction.
         Contractions are where an
         apostrophe takes the place of
         missing letters.
Other Uses for Apostrophes

    Apostrophes also show possession
     by adding an apostrophe and an s
     to the end of singular nouns.
     (Pete’s glasses)

    “What kinds of vegetables don’t you
      like,” asked Mom.
    Didn’t Mom say, “Watch your
      brother?”
    The announcer said, “The game’s
      officially over.”

				
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