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                   RESULTS REPORT 2003
                                     Submitted to the
                           Illinois Board of Higher Education
                                     August 15, 2003

                                   TABLE OF CONTENTS


University of Illinois at Chicago
    Executive Summary of Results Report……………………………….…………………...4
    Results Report Narrative……………………………………………….…….……………6
    Best Practices………………………………………………………………….................29
    Report on Performance Indicators…………………………………….………................31
    Eight-Year Program Review Cycle……………………………………………...............40
    Program Reviews in FY 2003………………………………………….……..………….49
    Status Report on Assessment of Student Learning…………………….…….…………..70

University of Illinois at Springfield
    Executive Summary of Results Report……………………………….………………….72
    Results Report Narrative……………………………………………….…….…………..75
    Best Practices………………………………………………………………….................90
    Report on Performance Indicators…………………………………….………................93
    Eight-Year Program Review Cycle…………………………………………….............102
    Program Reviews in FY 2003………………………………………….……..………...104
    Status Report on Assessment of Student Learning…………………….…….…………107

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Executive Summary of Results Report……………………………….………………...111
    Results Report Narrative……………………………………………….…….…………112
    Best Practices…………………………………………………………………...............128
    Report on Performance Indicators…………………………………….………..............130
    Eight-Year Program Review Cycle………………………………………………….....140
    Program Reviews in FY 2003………………………………………….…………….…141
    Status Report on Assessment of Student Learning…………………….…….………....160


University Administration
    Administrative and Academic Support Services ……………........................................162
    P-16 Education Initiative……………………………………………………………….164
    Technology and Economic Development .………………………………………….… 167
    Administrative Systems Integration…………………………………………………….170
University of Illinois
    at Chicago




  Results Report
   August 2003
                                University of Illinois at Chicago
                                     2003 Results Report

                                       Executive Summary

The University of Illinois at Chicago contributed in significant ways during FY 2003 to advance
the six goals of The Illinois Commitment. This summary provides highlights of the activities and
accomplishments of the campus in fulfilling each of the six goals.

In furthering Goal One, Economic Growth, UIC increased research productivity, moving the
campus into the top fifty research universities in both research and development expenditures.
The level of support for technology commercialization also rose with advances in all areas. The
campus produced over 5,500 highly qualified graduates with 23% of degrees awarded to students
in the health professions. Several new degrees programs were developed, including such areas
as bioinformatics and educational psychology, to respond to both occupational and student
demand. Other programs in critical areas are being submitted to the IBHE for approval. UIC
was one of seven institutions in the nation to submit an application for a National
Biocontainment Laboratory. If approved, funding will come from the National Institutes of
Health.

In supporting Goal Two, Teaching and Learning, the UIC College of Education has developed
alternative teacher certification programs to address the serious teacher shortage in urban
schools. A new doctoral degree in Urban Education Leadership, going before the IBHE, is
designed to train educational leaders to improve student achievement in low-performing schools.
Revisions of all teacher preparation programs were made this past year in order to align with new
state standards and requirements for such programs. The College of Education continues its
involvement in P-16 initiatives aimed at strengthening teacher preparation, teacher persistence
and retention, and professional development.

In support of Goal Three, Affordability, UIC has contributed substantial amounts of institutional
funds (over $8 million) in financial aid to students to offset declining assistance in ISAC MAP
awards. These funds keep educational expenses affordable for students from low- and moderate-
income families. Individual colleges have stepped up their efforts to attract private donations for
financial aid purposes, especially for graduate students for whom there are fewer financial aid
opportunities. Tuition increase for FY 2004 has been approved at a modest 5%.
At a time of budgetary constriction, enrollment in FY 2003 increased substantially. Faced with
reduction in faculty ranks, mostly among adjunct faculty, colleges have had to increase class size
and consolidate class sections in order to accommodate the additional students. Recruiting
efforts by the Office of Admissions and Records, the colleges, and minority support programs
has resulted in increases in minority enrollment over the past several years (2000-02). Degree
production among minorities has increased as well during the same period. Colleges and other
units have developed and implemented special programs for students in elementary and
secondary schools to improve their chances of attaining a college education.

The high quality of academic programs was maintained as evidenced by the re-accreditation in
the last two to three years of ten programs. In addition, the UIC Faculty Senate this past year
approved over 40 program revisions aimed at improving quality of content. More UIC programs
are being ranked nationally, further evidence of their quality. The quality of new freshmen
remains high. The mean ACT score of the freshman class admitted in Fall 2002 exceeded both
state and national averages. Many UIC students, at all levels, have received recognition of their
intellectual accomplishments through prestigious awards. Students in programs that require
certification or licensing examinations continue to achieve scores above state and national
means.

The campus is currently involved in a review of all administrative functions and support
programs to find ways of economizing their operations and reducing expenditures. The
Provost’s office has reorganized its structure and functions to improve operations, and now is in
the final stage of refinement. In light of budgetary constraints, colleges and other campus units
have been directed to reduce their operating budgets for FY 2003.
                              University of Illinois at Chicago
                            Report of Institutional Performance
                           On Goals 1-6 of The Illinois Commitment

                     Illinois Commitment Goal One: Economic Growth
                    Higher education will help Illinois business and industry
                                sustain strong economic growth.

UIC graduates entering the workforce. A strong economic center must have a strong education
system to prepare the workforce. A fundamental goal of the University of Illinois at Chicago is
to prepare graduates at all levels to contribute to the economic growth and strength of Illinois.
UIC graduates tend to remain in the local workforce and contribute to the local and state
economy.

Research outcomes impact our economy and quality of life through advances in technology and
healthcare. Outreach and public service activities support the social service infrastructure.

In FY 2002, UIC awarded 5,568 degrees (comparable figures for FY 2003 are not yet available),
an increase of 6% over the last five years (1998-2002). Of the total number awarded, 3,182 were
bachelor’s degrees, 1,688 master’s, 177 doctorates, and 521 professional. The health professions
programs accounted for 23% of degrees awarded at all levels in FY 2002.

Significant increases in degrees awarded during the past five years occurred in the College of
Business Administration where bachelor’s degrees were up by 48% and master’s by 59%.
Similarly, master’s degree production rose by 53% in the College of Architecture and the Arts
and by 33% in the College of Engineering.

A survey of graduates of the Class of 2000 (conducted in 2001) indicates that nearly 92% were
employed full- or part-time, and 83% were pursuing or had completed an additional degree.
Nearly 96% of UIC undergraduate students reside in Illinois.

Development of degree programs to support economic growth. During the past year, new
degree programs that support economic growth of Illinois have been approved by the University
or the Illinois Board of Higher Education. The M.S. and Ph.D. in Bioinformatics received IBHE
approval as did the Ph.D. in Educational Psychology. The program in Bioinformatics will train
students to work in the emerging fields of genomics and bioinformatics to collect, analyze, and
interpret the huge amount of data and information being produced in the post-genomics era. The
Ph.D. in Educational Psychology prepares graduates for positions in educational settings in
research and development of educational tests and the uses of technology, as well as in the
business arena in psychometrics, test construction and computer-based instructional design. The
M.A. in Real Estate, approved by the University of Illinois Board of Trustees and submitted to
the IBHE, is aimed at preparing graduates to enter a wide range of occupations in the field of real
estate, including real estate management, development, financing and marketing, to name a few.
The proposed Ph.D. in Earth and Environmental Sciences provides graduates with training in the
traditional disciplines of earth science and a special emphasis in environmental sciences on the
effects of the interaction between humans and the environment. The B.S. in Entrepreneurship,
also currently before the IBHE, will provide the necessary training for graduates to start up new
businesses, to work in small businesses or to work in family-owned businesses. Finally, the
proposed Ed.D. in Urban Educational Leadership is designed to train new and current
educational leaders (principals, superintendents, teacher leaders) to improve conditions in low-
performing schools in the Chicago metropolitan area.

Other educational initiatives for FY 2003 to help strengthen economic growth. The College of
Architecture and the Arts continues to develop an architecture and technology center that will
partner with Illinois businesses to provide educational and professional training for the next
generation of professionals, educators, and practitioners in architecture and the design-build
industry.

The health of the citizens of Illinois, therefore economic productivity, is being jeopardized by a
serious and growing shortage of health care professionals, particularly nursing. The College of
Nursing is partnering with health systems to provide degree and continuing professional
education to nurses as a strategy for retaining and strengthening the nursing workforce.

The Jane Addams College of Social Work provided training and continuing education programs
for employees of the State of Illinois’ Department of Human Services and the Department of
Children and Family Services.

The campus continued its successful cooperative work-study program with architectural and
business firms and civic and community organizations. Student interns are contributing to the
Illinois economy while gaining professional credit under internship programs.

The Great Cities Institute currently offers online certificate programs and the Urban Developers
Program for working professionals seeking to advance their skills:

      Online Certificate in Nonprofit Management

      Planning Commission Online (for municipal planning commissioners to sharpen their
       skills and maximize their impact on their communities)
          Public Housing Online Certificate Program (for public housing agency staff who want to
           improve their professional skills)

The new Science Learning Center in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) will insure
state-of-the-art teaching in the sciences and will better prepare LAS students for careers in
science and industry. This center will support undergraduate students taking courses in biology,
chemistry, physics, and earth and environmental sciences with a set of formal and informal
learning environments and a program of Peer-Led Study Groups.

The College of Education engaged the Chicago Public Schools in system-wide initiatives to
improve K-12 administrator and teacher preparation, in part by contributing leadership for key
CPS positions.

A joint seminar, with Engineering and Industrial Design, was offered in New Product
Development, with funding from the Whirlpool Corporation.

In response to the needs of industry and at the request of the College of Pharmacy’s National
Advisory Board, the College created the joint PharmD/MBA program which is scheduled to
begin in Fall 2003.

The Center for Human Resource Management held the largest event in its history, a two-day
conference on Global Human Resource Management, with 27 speakers and 112 attendees from
major corporations and universities around the world.

 Research productivity. Universities contribute to economic growth and strength of state and
national economies through research and development. UIC has continued its strong record with
regard to grant and research expenditures. In FY 2002, total grant and contract research
expenditures grew by 13% to $182.7 million and federal expenditures increased by 15.7% to
$145.2 million. UIC had 28 faculty members with expenditures exceeding $1 million each. The
National Science Foundation figures showed for FY 2001 (released in 2003) that UIC ranked in
the top fifty research universities in both research and development (R&D) expenditures (#46, up
from 49 among 601 universities) and federal R&D expenditures (#48). This growth has
continued into FY 2003 with total expenditures up 13.3% and federal dollars up 16.7% in the
first six months of the fiscal year.

One example of the strides made in research productivity is that of the College of Pharmacy:

           Research awards in the College are now over $14.3 million per year. Between 1998 and
            2002, the College increased research revenues an average of 11.6% per year.

           The College of Pharmacy ranks among the top five colleges of pharmacy in the nation
            for total NIH funding.

           Entrepreneurial activity revenues accounted for over $2 million in income for the
            College during FY 2003.
Technology transfer. UIC continues to increase its level of support for technology
commercialization. Total invention disclosures in calendar year 2002 increased from 76 in FY
2001 to 109 in FY 2002. The number of patents filed jumped significantly, from 31 to 74,
between FY 2001 and FY 2002, while patents issued saw a modest increase from 10 to 19 during
the same period. Royalty income for FY 2002 amounted to $2.42 million, up 20.4% from the
previous year.

Twenty-nine start-up companies were initiated with option/license agreements based upon
technology from the Colleges of Medicine, Pharmacy, Engineering and Liberal Arts and
Sciences.

Research highlights for FY 2003

Bioterrorism. UIC was one of seven institutions nationally to submit an application for a
National Biocontainment Laboratory (NBL) with Biosafety Level 4 capability. The NIH, which
will fund 75% of the $200 million cost, is expected to decide by September 2003 on one or two
sites for the NBLs.
A team of researchers led by a UIC assistant professor of earth and environmental sciences found
microbes packed in an ice-sealed, briny lake in Antarctica. The discovery may help advance
techniques to search for signs of life locked in the subterranean ice on Mars, and provide a model
for what lakes on Earth may have looked like during severe glacial periods.

UIC researchers discovered how the body’s first line of defense against dangerous microbes
inadvertently helps HIV rapidly infect the human immune system. UIC microbiologists
documented how HIV enters human T cells, where it multiplies with abandon and eventually
subverts the entire immune system, causing AIDS.

A study of the common wild mouse by two UIC biologists found evidence of dramatic
evolutionary change in a span of just 150 years, suggesting genetic evolution can occur a lost
faster than many had thought possible.

A UIC researcher in pharmacology and colleagues reported in an article in the journal Cell that
incidents of heart attack and stroke in a small number of men taking the drug Viagra could be
due to the drug’s elevating levels of a compound in cells that encourages platelets to aggregate.
Platelet aggregation can lead to clotting that blocks a blood vessel—a life-threatening condition
called thrombosis that can cause heart attack and stroke.

Advances in computing

      UIC was one of six educational institutions selected to develop and build a high-speed
       computer that will use geographically distributed computational resources linked by a
       new generation network of ultra-high-speed optical fiber. This advanced research tool
       will be a “virtual” computer with power to help researchers understand complex science
       as never before.
      A test conducted by a UIC computer scientist and a colleague at Northwestern University
       to push trans-Atlantic high-speed data transmission resulted in a new top speed of 2.8
       gigabits (billion bits) per second. The two computer scientists set the speed mark
       September 24 during a presentation in Amsterdam.

Continuing and expanded research initiatives. Construction on the College of Medicine
Research Facility has made significant progress toward completion. Final completion is
anticipated in 2005. This facility will be a focal point for state-of-the-art medical research.

Construction on the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) addition to the Outpatient Care Center
has been completed. The facility will house 9.4 Tesla imaging equipment (the world’s first MRI
at this power level) that will provide unprecedented capability for molecular and atomic level
biological research.

Economic development initiatives. UIC has partnered with private developers and community
organizations to foster economic development of neighboring communities by promoting
contracting and employment opportunities for local, minority and women owned businesses and
residents on its South Campus Development Project. Thus far in the Projects’ history, over $101
million, or 47% of the total contract dollars expended on housing and retail development, have
been awarded to local, women or minority contractors.

Graduate students from the College of Urban Planning and Public Affairs joined the Village of
Oak Park to explore redevelopment options for two of the Village’s most important business
districts.

Under the direction of the Great Cities Institute (College of Urban Planning and Public Affairs),
the Workforce Development Program has established partnerships with diverse local and
national organizations. Through these partnerships and its research, the Program seeks to inform
policies that help meet the workforce needs of urban communities around the region and the
country.

Other highlights from FY 2003

      The Institute for Entrepreneurial Studies in the College of Business Administration was
       awarded funding to host one of the six new state-funded Entrepreneurship Centers.

      The College of Engineering Energy Resource Center has been named the U.S.
       Department of Energy (DOE) Midwest Center for Combined Heating and Power (CHP).
       The Center provides educational outreach support and technical assistance in CHP with
       eight midwest states. The Center is also a designated U.S. DOE Office of Industrial
       Energy Technologies’ Industrial Assessment Center for assessments of energy
       conservation and waste minimization.

      The College of Medicine sites in Peoria and Rockford are active and significant
       components of the local business community. Not only do the sites provide local jobs,
       they strengthen the entire health care and biological research industries in those
       communities.

Goals for FY 2004

The UIC campus must anticipate and respond to the needs of employers and students. In order to
meet those demands, UIC must strengthen its academic base to prepare students for the
workforce. In FY 2004, campus units will seek new state funding and internally reallocate
existing resources to accomplish the following:

      Extend access to courses for students in the College of Business Administration to
       address occupational demands in Management Information Systems, Information and
       Decision Sciences, and Finance. New program and campus funds have been allocated
       towards building faculty ranks in the college.

      Continued employer demand for technically proficient personnel and rapidly increasing
       student demand for courses in computer science and electrical engineering continue to
       outpace internal financial ability to supplement the number of faculty in the College of
       Engineering. The college hopes to supplement internal reallocation efforts and campus
       funds with additional new program funds to address these needs.
      Programs offered by the College of Architecture and the Arts must remain at the cutting
       edge of technology. Experimentation with new media happens first in the arts. Further,
       the architecture and arts professions and industries are leading the way in the reliance
       upon specialized visual and audio digital tools across the full array of disciplines. Digital
       tools now being developed will quickly become mainstream. UIC must offer students
       access to these technologies.

      University educated nurses holding a BSN and nurse leaders with MSN degrees are in
       great demand. UIC’s College of Nursing has already begun to address shortages of
       nursing personnel with innovative recruitment and educational plans. A program of
       study that enables RNs to complete a baccalaureate degree with options to advance to a
       master’s degree is in place. Partnerships with the highest ranking community colleges to
       target their best graduates for entry into the RN-BSN completion program are an
       important component. Additional faculty members are required to fulfill these plans.

      UIC is positioned to perform important research in the areas of environmental
       epidemiology and health management. Collaboration between the UIC School of Public
       Health and the College of Business Administration will lead to efficiencies in the
       management and administration of important societal health care issues and to the
       education and training of new health care economists and administrators. The current
       economic situation highlights the need for more efficient and reliable financial and
       disease management methods in health care.

      A proposed new Language Learning Center (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences) will
       provide crucial international perspectives for the state’s future leaders. This will enhance
       course offerings such as German for Business and Spanish for Business and Law.
      The Health Policy and Administration (HPA) Division of the School of Public Health is
       developing a new Master of Health Administration program, in conjunction with the
       College of Business Administration, that will prepare tomorrow’s health care managers
       and leaders.

      The College of Nursing will continue to negotiate cohort programs in partnership with
       health systems.

      Plans for FY 2004 for the Center for Urban Economic Development include:

        Illinois Workforce Advantage: place-based community economic development in five
         economically distressed communities in the Chicago metropolitan area.
        Illinois minimum wage: applied policy research to determine the impacts of the
         proposed legislation.
        Access to higher education by undocumented immigrants residing in Illinois.
        Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity five-year regional strategic
         plans.
        Chicago Department of Planning and Development cost-benefit evaluation model, a
         tool for evaluating the costs and benefits of the City’s economic development
         funding.
        Research on competitive conditions faced by manufacturing firms in Chicago
         industrial corridors for the Department of Planning and Development,
         Commonwealth Edison, and World Business Chicago.
        Research in support of the Stepping Up Program, a training initiative of the
         Corporation for Supportive Housing and Wright College to identify career paths for
         disadvantaged, entry-level workers.

                  Illinois Commitment Goal Two: Teaching and Learning
                 Higher education will join elementary and secondary education
                          to improve teaching and learning at all levels

As the leading supplier of teachers for Chicago schools, UIC addresses a critical shortage of
qualified teachers for underserved urban public schools.

Attention to “P-16” issues has never been more intense in the State of Illinois. Illinois has a
growing shortage of qualified teachers, especially in the fields of special, bilingual, mathematics,
and science education in selected schools and districts throughout the state. Beyond this
shortage, higher education faces the challenge of meeting new expectations and higher standards
for student performance. While more is expected of students, more is also expected of schools,
teachers, and higher education institutions that prepare teachers.

Under the leadership of the University President, President Emeritus, and the deans of education
at the three campuses, the University of Illinois has developed P-16 initiatives concentrating on
strengthening teacher preparation, teacher persistence and retention, professional development,
greater collaboration with community colleges in teacher recruitment, preparation and support,
as well as improved data systems to support policy initiatives that will make a difference. The
University is also focused on opportunities to apply technology more creatively to support
teachers and schools.

The Colleges of Education, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Architecture and the Arts prepare
graduates for positions as teachers in elementary and secondary schools. In AY 2002-03 there
were 1,540 enrolled in teacher preparation programs in elementary, secondary, and special
populations programs. Three hundred one (301) completed teacher preparation programs in
2002 and received certification. Pass rates on the Basic Skills Test, Academic Content Areas,
and Teaching Special Populations for both 2001 and 2002 are available in Section II of this
report: Performance Indicators.

During this past academic year, the Colleges of Education, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and
Architecture and the Arts revised their elementary and secondary teacher education programs to
align with new Illinois state teacher preparation certification standards and requirements.

The LAS Department of Spanish, French, Italian and Portuguese initiated the Heritage Language
Teacher Corps for Chicago Public School teachers. Funded by the U.S. Department of
Education, Office of Bilingual and Minority Language Affairs, the Heritage Language Teacher
Corps is one of only two such programs in the country aimed at preparing heritage Spanish
speaking students to teach the language in secondary schools.

The Office of Mathematics and Computer Education (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences,
Department of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science) has greatly increased enrollment
in programs for preparation and the continuing professional education of teachers of mathematics
at all levels. For example, the number of teachers scheduled for Supervised Teaching (high
school) has tripled from approximately eight per year prior to 2002 to 28 for 2003-04.

Alternative teacher certification programs. Through alternative certification programs, the
College of Education continues to prepare elementary education, mathematics, science, bilingual
and special education teachers for serious teacher shortage areas.

The Middle Grade Mathematics and Middle Grade Sciences Projects provide routes to
alternative certification for highly qualified professionals wishing to change careers. Graduates
are qualified to teach mathematics or science at the middle grade level.

The College of Education continues to participate in a joint IBHE, ICCB, and ISBE initiative to
develop an Associate of Arts in Teaching program.

Contributing to professional development of in-service teachers. The College of Education and
other units involved in the professional development of elementary and secondary school
teachers continued to provide opportunities, through various programs, to enhance the skills and
knowledge of the teaching workforce. Activities covered a wide range of teaching issues,
including subject content, technology, recruitment, retention, and mentoring.

In addition to its mission of producing new teachers for Illinois’ school systems, the College of
Education is involved in several initiatives related to improving the teaching environment. The
dean of the College continues to advance the recommendations of the University of Illinois P-16
Task Force and Steering Committee.

The College of Education received $1.2 million in grants from the Chicago Community Trust to
improve the preparation, development and retention of teachers from west side neighborhood
schools. Along similar lines, the College is a partner with Chicago west side communities on
mentoring and induction initiatives addressing teacher recruitment and retention in low-income,
predominantly African American schools.

UIC’s Small Schools Workshop and the Chicago Public Schools designed a new initiative to
help improve teaching and academic performance at Bowen High School. Bowen is one of
several large high schools to be subdivided into smaller, autonomous schools of not more than
400 students.

Significant federal grant funding is supporting the system-wide support of pre-service and in-
service teachers in technology and bilingual education.

The Joyce Foundation recently awarded a planning grant to the College of Architecture and Arts’
Jane Addams Hull House to expand public access programming which will include partnerships
and curriculum development with CPS students and teachers.

The Department of Disability and Human Development (College of Applied Health Sciences)
operates an NEH-funded summer institute, “Integrating Disability Studies into Secondary
Education Curricula.” The institute introduces teachers in secondary education to humanities-
based disability studies. Activities are aimed at informing secondary teachers about disability
studies as a growing area of scholarship and developing accessible, grade-appropriate curriculum
lesson plans.

The College of Business Administration’s Center for Economic Education (CEE) participated in
over 100 events in Chicago in the past year, providing training to over 200 K-12 teachers,
students, and parents. The Center concentrates on promoting high-quality teaching of economics
and consumer economics in K-12.

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences’ Center for the Study of Learning, Instruction and
Teacher Development supports multi-disciplinary research on learning and teaching, as well as
the development and evaluation of learning environments and educational practices appropriate
for 21st century schools. The Center’s “K-12 Learning Consortium” project is developing a
system called AIM (Adaptable Instructional Materials) that provides a database of customizable
instructional resources for learning environments and assessment systems. The Center also
supports a project on “Teaching Teachers to Use Technology: What Works and Why?”

The Institute for Math and Science Education (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences) and other
UIC units are partnering with the Chicago Public Schools on an ambitious program to improve
the quality of mathematics and science teaching. Under the Chicago Mathematics and Science
Initiative (CMSI), UIC experts in teacher professional development, curriculum development,
research, and evaluation will be involved in implementing this program.
The Algebra Initiative (IMSE) is a collaboration between the Chicago Public Schools and
mathematics faculty at UIC, DePaul, and the University of Chicago. AI is providing critical
advice to the CPS leadership and has developed a new course sequence for middle school
teachers to provide them with the background they need to teach algebra in the 8th grade.

The Teaching Integrated Mathematics and Sciences (TIMS) Project and the All Learn
Mathematics (ALM) Project support teacher professional development through workshops and
in-school support for innovative mathematics curricula.

UIC researchers were awarded a four-year $2 million grant from Atlantic Philanthropies to
discover how best to teach prospective teachers to use technology, assess the impact on student
learning, and answer questions of what works, for whom, and why.

In conjunction with faculty from the College of Education, the Counseling Center’s Office of
Testing Service has been administering placement tests in mathematics and English to teachers
from selected local high schools to make them aware of the content of UIC courses. The
expectation of the project is that the teachers will be better able to prepare their students to
function in college-level courses.

Contributing to elementary and secondary student learning. As part of its mission to improve
learning at all levels, UIC colleges and departments support a wide variety of initiatives for the
improvement of student learning in both the elementary and secondary schools.

UIC is one of four Chicago universities to receive a $1 million Chicago Community Trust grant
to boost reading in 37 Chicago public schools whose students do not read at the highest levels

The College of Architecture and the Arts began a high school/community college partnership
with four high schools and Malcolm X College. The “Arts Reach Partnership Project for Access
to Higher Education” is funded through the Higher Education Cooperation Act for access and
diversity. The project provides over 250 high school students with skills that promote entrance
to higher education and arts education opportunities. (Also responds to Goal Four.)

The College of Architecture and the Arts continues to serve as the educational evaluator for the
Chicago Public Schools/Gallery 37 Advanced Arts Education Program. This program serves
200 CPS high school students in advanced art education and training. The college provides
teaching faculty as well as a year end evaluation of the program to the Chicago Public Schools.

The College of Engineering continues activities to bring technological innovations to the primary
and secondary teaching environments to improve instruction and learning. Most of the activities
are focused on elevating and improving science and mathematics education. The college is
extending its web-based educational capabilities that are now focused on providing physics and
technical education topics that can be made available to high schools in the city and throughout
the state.

The Upward Bound Regional Math/Science Center (Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student
Affairs) is designed to enhance elementary and secondary students’ skills and abilities in the
areas of mathematics, science, and technology, and prepare them as viable candidates for post-
secondary education.

The Educational Talent Search Program (Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs)
provides academic instruction to elementary students that supplements teaching in the public
schools. This supplemental instruction increases the in-class time of students and improves their
academic skills levels.

The Regional Math/Science Center has developed several initiatives that bring together UIC
researchers and professionals with the program’s high school sophomores and juniors to
introduce students to research study and methodology at the post-secondary level.

Other initiatives to improve elementary and secondary education. The College of Education
was responsible for operating the Chicago Principals Assessment Center, which serve the
Chicago Public Schools system.

The School of Public Health, in partnership with 20 elementary and high schools and with funds
from the Robert Woods Johnson Foundation and the federal government, has established the
Chicago Health Professions Partnership Initiative. The partnership promotes pipelines to health
professions from kindergarten to terminal degrees in public health sciences.

Twenty-five Jane Addams College of Social Work students completed the College’s post-
master’s certificate program for school social workers.

A faculty team from the Jane Addams College of Social Work implemented Peace Power, a
youth violence prevention program, to several Chicago schools.

The Disability Specialist in the Office of Disability Services has consulted with students with
disabilities, parents, and special education teachers at the secondary level about transition from
secondary to post-secondary education.

                        Illinois Commitment Goal Three: Affordability
             No Illinois citizen will be denied an opportunity for a college education
                                      because of financial need

Ensure sufficient financial support to students to meet educational expenses. The budget
problems faced by the state of Illinois have affected the financial assistance programs of the
Illinois Student Assistance Commission. The Monetary Award Program, although supplemented
marginally by the state in recent budget cycles, has not kept pace with tuition and fee increases at
public and private colleges and universities in Illinois. The elimination of the fifth year of
financial aid was particularly troubling for students who, more often than not, remain in school
beyond four years to complete their undergraduate education.

In an effort to minimize the impact of tuition and fees for its students and to supplement aid from
ISAC, UIC contributed $8.5 in FY 2003 to fund the difference between the maximum ISAC
MAP award and the UIC tuition and fees expenses. In addition, UIC provided over $900
thousand in FY 2002 to students who required support for a fifth year of education.
In FY 2002, the UIC Office of Student Financial Aid distributed $75.2 million in aid to students
in the form of federal/state/private/campus scholarships and grants, as well as student loans and
earnings from on-campus student employment. All of these sources of aid reduce the annual net
cost of education to a small fraction of family income. Low-income students pay no tuition and
fees.

Net cost of education. One measure to determine the impact of educational expenses on family
resources is to calculate the net cost to the aid recipient and his/her family after deducting state,
federal and private grants and loans. The following table illustrates the impact of financial aid
on the net cost versus family income (in quintiles, with Quintile 1 showing the lowest mean
family annual income of $14,499 and Quintile 5 as the highest mean annual income of
$163,000).




                       Impact of Financial Aid on Net Cost Versus Family Income
               Mean            Number of    Tuition and     Room &        Federal and        Institutional &         Net
              Income1           Students       Fees          Board       State Gift Aid2       Private Gift          Cost
                                                                                                   Aid3
Quintile 1     $14,499              2,546         $6,592       $6,428              $7,454              $1,677    $3,889
Quintile 2     $35,913              2,302         $6,592       $6,428              $5,480              $1,735    $5,805
Quintile 3     $59,327              2,399         $6,592       $6,428              $3,070              $2,054    $7,896
Quintile 4     $86,409              1,900         $6,592       $6,428              $2,274              $1,620    $9,216
Quintile 5    $163,800              1,097         $6,592       $6,428              $1,999              $1,381    $9,640

Another way to look at the net cost to students is to see what students paid toward their
educational expenses (tuition and fees) over the last three years (2000, 2001, and 2002).

                                    Financial Aid “Who Pays” Analysis
                                   Total Undergraduate Student Assistance
                                                 Fall 2002
    Students who pay                   Number                      % of Total                  Cumulative %
$                          0            2,397                        29%                          29%
$                1 - $ 499               326                          4%                          33%
$             500 - $ 999                333                          4%                          37%
$          1,000 - $1,499                273                          3%                          40%
$          1,500 - $1,999                230                          3%                          43%
$    2,000 – less than full              631                          8%                          50%


1
  Parent Income: Census Bureau
2
  Federal and State Gift Aid: Includes all Federal and State grants, scholarships, and waivers, including PELL and
MAP.
3
  Institutional and Private Gift Aid: Includes all institutional and private grants, scholarships, waivers, and
fellowships, including SEAL and UIC Tuition Grants.
   Full Tuition & Fees             4,144                     50%                      100%

This table shows that 29% of UIC undergraduates paid no tuition and fees, while 50% paid
anywhere from $1 up to just under full tuition and fees. Nearly 37% paid $1,000 or less of their
tuition and fees in Fall 2002.

As the analyses above show, a UIC education is affordable even for students from low and
moderate income families because of generous federal, state, and University financial aid
support. All three campuses of the University are committed to certain principles for financial
aid:
      A qualified student will not be barred from attending the University because the student
       cannot afford the price of tuition and fees as determined by federal financial need.

       Students who can afford to pay the full price of tuition and fees are expected to do so.

       Students who cannot afford to pay the full price will be offered a combination of grants
        and loans from various sources appropriate to their financial circumstances.

       The University will control its costs through control of the length of study for which it
        will support students from institutional funds and of the proportion of loans to grants
        made from institutional funds.
The average debt upon graduation for UIC undergraduates who have student loans is $16,250.
This is a small amount given the fact that the total lifetime return for the holder of a BA/BS
degree is nearly $1.1 million.

Individual colleges have increased their efforts to raise funds from private sources to provide
financial assistance to their students, especially at the graduate level where little gift aid is
available and students must depend on loans from government sources which have to be repaid.

       Funding for scholarships in the College of Business Administration increased to
        $155,000.

       The College of Pharmacy provides approximately $125,000 in scholarships each year to
        its professional and graduate students.

       The School of Public Health (SPH) offers stipends and training through the Health
        Careers Opportunity Program (HCOP) to minority public health students in the summer
        prior to their matriculation into the Master of Public Health program. Once matriculated,
        almost every SPH student with financial need is able to obtain support primarily through
        teaching and research assistantships.

       The College of Urban Planning and Public Affairs initiated its new Distinguished
        Graduate Scholar Award this past year. Intended to attract the very best doctoral
        students, the program provides a guarantee of up to four years of tuition-free education
        and salaries of up to $15,000 per year.
      The campus will increase the minimum graduate assistantship stipend for a 9-month,
       50% appointment by another $500 for FY 2004, making the new minimum assistantship
       $11,500.

      In Fall 2002, the College of Urban Planning and Public Affairs supported 129 graduate
       students through research assistantships within its two academic programs and seven
       research centers and institutes.

                    Illinois Commitment Goal Four: Access and Diversity
                    Illinois will increase the number and diversity of citizens
                          completing training and education programs.

Maintain enrollment at levels permitted by adequate educational resources. As a state
institution, the University of Illinois at Chicago recognizes its obligation to provide access to
qualified high school, transfer, graduate and professional students who will profit from UIC’s
intellectually challenging programs. Enrollment capacity, however, is determined by both
programmatic and physical plant limitations in accommodating the student body. UIC had a
record enrollment in Fall 2002—a 4.1% increase in undergraduate enrollment over Fall 2001,
and a 7.4% increase in graduate enrollment for the same period—and the campus experienced
difficulties in providing sufficient courses and sections to serve the needs of students. This
situation was exacerbated by the FY 2003 budget rescission and projected budget reductions for
FY 2004. However, in order to accommodate students last year and for the coming year, UIC
increased class size, consolidated course sections, and cancelled low-enrolled courses, thereby
achieving efficiencies of operation.

For the four-year period of 1998 to 2002, total enrollment grew by 4.2%, from 24,652 to 25,690
(excluding residents). Enrollment in graduate programs was even greater at 13.8% in the same
period. Notable enrollment increases between Fall 2001 and Fall 2002 were experienced by the
College of Medicine (+5.2%), the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (+8.9%), and the Jane
Addams College of Social Work (+42%). Enrollment pressure continues for Fall 2003 as the
number of applications from beginning freshmen is up by 8% over Fall 2002 and graduate
applications increased by 16%.

Diversity of the student body. UIC takes special account and advantage of the extraordinary
ethnic and cultural diversity of the Chicago metropolitan area, which encompasses two-thirds of
the population of Illinois and from which it presently draws most of its undergraduate students.

Currently, Native Americans constitute .l2% (60 students) of the student body, while the African
American student population stands at 9% (2,310), Hispanic at 12.9% (3,307), Asian American
at 20.5% (5,257), and Caucasians at 45.7% (11, 735). The remainder of the student body (3,021)
is categorized as “Foreign” or “Unknown.”

Over the last three years, 2000-02, enrollment increases have occurred for African American
undergraduates (1.7%), African American graduate students (8.7%), Hispanic graduate students
(11.2%), Asian American graduate students (7.3%), and Native American graduate students
(16.6%). Slight declines during the same period occurred for Hispanic undergraduates (-3.3%)
and Native American undergraduates (-13.5%).

Increase in degree awards among minority groups. Total degrees awarded (undergraduate,
graduate, and professional) to African American students increased from 413 in 2000 to 432
(4.6%) in 2002, with increases in each of the three years at the master’s, doctoral, and
professional levels.

The number of degrees awarded at all levels to Hispanic students increased from 569 in 2000 to
645 in 2002 (13.3%), with annual increases at the baccalaureate, master’s and doctoral levels.

Students with disabilities earned a three-year total (2000-02) of 132 degrees—89 bachelor’s, 37
master’s, 2 doctoral and 4 professional.

Through UIC’s minority support programs, Office of Disability Services, the Urban Health
Program and initiatives by individual colleges and other campus offices, UIC endeavors to
provide access and support to students who seek to complete education programs. Described
below are some of the efforts and accomplishments of these units.

      The School of Biomedical and Health Information Sciences established an online
       Specialist in Blood Bank Technology Certificate Program that allows students to
       complete the certificate through internet technology and provides them with professional
       advancement not previously available to them.

      The Department of Human Nutrition was awarded the Diversity Achievement Award by
       the American Dietetic Association for its efforts to recruit and retain minority students.

      During the past year, the College of Applied Health Sciences (AHS) has increased its
       recruitment efforts at Illinois community colleges and high schools with high percentages
       of minority students.

      Six-year graduation rate for AHS undergraduates entering as freshmen increased from
       55.3% to 63.6%.

      Undergraduate enrollment in the College of Business Administration increased by 10%
       and MBA enrollment increased by 14% between FY 2001 and FY 2002.

      The College of Education is seeking funding for a “grow your own” teacher preparation
       program for education support personnel in Chicago’s North Lawndale community.

      Underrepresented groups make up 21% of the College of Engineering’s undergraduate
       student body. The college is working at increasing the percentage of women in
       engineering through outreach programs. Currently, 26% of the undergraduates in the
       college are women, which is above the national average of 19% for other engineering
       schools.
   In response to the increasingly international make-up of the College of Liberal Arts and
    Sciences (LAS) student body and the diversity of countries of origin, LAS continues to
    offer lesser-taught languages, including Chinese, Japanese, Modern Hebrew, Arabic,
    Hindi-Urdu, as well as Russian, Polish, Ukrainian, Lithuanian, and Serbian.

   The College of Medicine continues to be a leader among medical schools in the United
    States in the admission, retention and graduation of underrepresented minorities and
    economically disadvantaged students. In addition, through its Rural Medical Education
    Program at Rockford, the college provides an opportunity for students from underserved
    rural areas of the state to become physicians and return to those communities to provide
    health care services.

   Students in the College of Pharmacy represent significant diversity: fifty-seven percent
    are non-Caucasian and 68% are female.

   The School of Public Health, in collaboration with the City Colleges of Chicago (CCC)
    and with funding from the National Institutes of Health, helped establish the Center for
    Science Success (CSS) at Harold Washington, Truman, and Olive-Harvey Colleges.
    Activities of the CSS will help increase the diversity of citizens completing training and
    education at the baccalaureate and post-baccalaureate levels. Specific activities include
    linking CCC faculty with UIC faculty for mentoring, identifying students majoring in
    biomedical sciences and linking them to UIC for baccalaureate and post-baccalaureate
    education in biomedical sciences and public health and counseling.

   The School of Public Health has established public health satellite centers in all City
    Colleges in order to increase the diversity of students that apply, are admitted, and
    receive training in public health.

   As part of its K-12 pipeline recruitment strategy, the School of Public Health has
    established the following programs:

        32-week Saturday College for elementary and high school students and a six-
         week Elementary School Summer Science Institute at Chicago State University
         for students from the Health Professions Shortage Areas of the south side of
         Chicago.
        32-week Saturday College for elementary and high school students, a six-week
         Elementary Summer Science Institute, and a six-week High School Summer
         Public Health Institute (HSSPHI) at the UIC campus for students from the Health
         Professions Shortage Areas of Chicago and the suburbs. Students in the HSSPHI
         receive stipends and are assigned to graduate student mentors.

   Student enrollment in each of the Jane Addams College of Social Work three degree
    programs—BSW, MSW and PhD—was over one-third African American and Hispanic.

   In the Fall 2002, 35 (38%) of the 92 students enrolled in the College of Urban Planning
    and Public Affairs’ public administration graduate program and 56 (30.8%) of the
        students in the Master of Urban Planning and Policy (MUPP) were members of
        recognized minority groups.

       The demographics of UIC student athletes indicate that 21.3% are from underrepresented
        minority populations. In an effort to encourage degree completion among athletes, UIC
        Athletics offers a fifth year financial aid program. This program provides financial
        support to scholarship athletes for one additional year of study after they have exhausted
        their athletic eligibility.

                Illinois Commitment Goal Five: High Expectations and Quality
        Illinois colleges and universities will hold students to even higher expectations for
          learning and will be accountable for the quality of academic programs and the
                                       assessment of learning

Quality academic programs. The quality of academic programs is measured in different ways
and by different venues, including accreditation by national professional accrediting boards and
by peer review. These reviews and rankings by external groups attest to the quality of UIC
programs.

Over the last two years the following UIC programs achieved re-accreditation by their respective
accrediting bodies, evidence of continued attainment of the quality standards of their professions.

       Architecture (M.Arch)
       Biomedical Visualization (M.S.)
       Computer Science
       Dentistry (D.D.S. and Advanced Certificate programs)
       Engineering (Baccalaureate programs)
       Human Nutrition
       Nursing
       Medicine (M.D.)
       Pharmacy (PharmD)
       Public Health (MPH, DrPH)

National rankings are another measure of programmatic quality, and UIC has several that have
been recognized for their excellence:

       The undergraduate business program ranked 62nd in the nation according to U.S. News &
        World Report rankings, making it the second top-ranked undergraduate business school
        in Illinois after UIUC.

       The Department of Accounting was ranked 30th in the nation in the U.S. News & World
        Report.

       The Department of Information and Decision Sciences (College of Business
        Administration) ranked 11th in the nation by Operations Research Management Science
        Today magazine.
      The College of Business Administration’s entrepreneurship program placed among the
       nation’s best in a survey by the inaugural issue of Entrepreneur Magazine.

      The UIC College of Nursing and most of its master’s programs are ranked in the top 10
       schools in the nation according to the U.S. News & World Report, 2003. For example,
       the Certified Nurse Midwifery program is ranked 3rd, while the Advanced Community
       Health Nursing program is ranked 5th. Moreover, the College of Nursing is 3rd among
       nursing programs in funding by the National Institutes of Health (2001 and 2002).

New programs. Mentioned above under Goal #1, UIC has developed new academic programs of
distinction that will serve the needs of qualified students, including the establishment of the
Ph.D. in Educational Psychology, the Ph.D. in Germanic Studies, the M.S. and Ph.D. in
Bioinformatics, the M.S. and Ph.D. in Biopharmaceutical Sciences, and the Bachelor of Fine
Arts in Performance. The Ph.D. in Earth and Environmental Sciences, the M.A. in Real Estate,
the Ed.D. in Urban Education Leadership, and the B.S. in Entrepreneurship will be submitted in
the very near future to the Illinois Board of Higher Education.

Continuing quality enhancement. During FY 2003 the UIC Faculty Senate reviewed and
approved 43 proposals to revise and improve undergraduate and graduate degree programs.
Included among these revisions were proposals to revise elementary and secondary teacher
preparation programs to align with new state standards and certification requirements.

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Educational Policy Committee initiated a review
during the past year of the structure and content of the general education requirements. The
Committee and LAS associate deans are working with a committee established by the Provost to
evaluate general education and develop a system to evaluate the student learning objectives of
general education.

Other examples of program quality enhancement include the following:

      During this past year, the School of Kinesiology completed a revision of its
       undergraduate curriculum, resulting in increased academic rigor and including an option
       for qualified students to write a senior thesis.

      Following a review by the Department of Physical Therapy of a ten-year experience with
       performance of physical therapy professional students, grade profiles predicting a high
       failure rate on the national licensure examination following graduation were identified.
       As a result, a minimum grade point average will be instituted for students in the Doctor
       of Physical Therapy program. New methods of assessment have also been implemented,
       including portfolio submissions and a comprehensive examination that must be passed
       prior to entry into the clinical education internships.

      Programs in architecture, graphic design, art education, and theatre (College of
       Architecture and the Arts) are being revised to meet the rigors of professional standards,
       as well as preparing students for the design, visual arts, art education, and performance
    market place. These standards include both portfolio and audition review requirements to
    insure the quality of professional education.

   The College of Business Administration is considering methods for holding students to
    higher learning outcomes, including the possibility of administering an overall
    achievement examination as a requirement for graduation.

   All teacher and administrator programs in the College of Education now require the
    assessment of student academic and professional skills at various stages of the academic
    career and early professional experience.

   College of Engineering faculty promotes enhancing the basic quality engineering
    programs with independent undergraduate research. Approximately 20% of the students
    choose to conduct research projects. In addition, inter-university competition projects
    provide additional quality enhancements to undergraduate engineering programs.

   The School of Public Health is making extensive revisions to the Doctor of Public Health
    program in order to strengthen its focus on preparing public health leaders. The revised
    program is expected to be a model for the 31 other schools of public health in the nation.

   The Jane Addams College of Social Work conducted a five-year review of student course
    evaluations and used the results to inform curriculum renewal and development.

   Over 90% of Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) and Master of Social Work (MSW)
    students completed their studies and graduated according to the time sequence and
    curriculum structure of the full-time or part-time programs in which they were enrolled.

Academic preparation and achievement of students as measures of quality and higher
standards and expectations. UIC is attracting new students with higher qualifications, both
in terms of national examination scores and high school ranks. The mean ACT score for the
Fall 2002 new freshman class was 22.9, well above both the national mean of 20.8 and the
Illinois mean of 20.1.

UIC continues to attract students with high ACT scores. One-fourth of the Fall 2002 new
freshman class had ACT scores above 25 and 5% had ACT scores of 30 or higher. The
Guaranteed Professional Program Admissions attracted 90 new freshmen with a mean ACT
of 31.4. In addition, there were 191 new freshmen in the Honors College with a mean ACT
of 29.4, and 231 in the President’s Award Program with a mean ACT of 23.7.

The mean high school percentage rank for the Fall 2002 cohort was 75.2. Nearly 60% of the
new freshman class ranked in the top quarter of their high school class and 24% ranked in the
top ten percent.

Retention and graduation rates have shown considerable improvement. The one-year
retention rate for Fall 2001 new freshmen was 78.3%, up from 77.9% for the previous year’s
class. The one-year retention rate has steadily increased for the last three cohorts. The six-
   year graduation rate for the Fall 1996 new freshman cohort was 42.9% with 4.8% still
   enrolled. This is a significant improvement over the graduation rate for the Fall 1991 cohort
   of 30.5% with 6% still enrolled.

   The College of Medicine continues to see a significant increase in the academic performance
   of the students who apply for admission. This has occurred in the face of a national
   reduction in the number of medical school applicants. Further, the graduation rates remain at
   an all-time high.

   Performance by students on state and national certification/licensure examinations.
   Evidence that UIC is producing quality graduates may be found in the success they have
   experienced in passing state and national certification/licensing examinations.

   The Illinois State Board of Education instituted its Illinois Certification Testing System in
   2000-01. Students enrolled in teacher preparation programs are required to take the Basic
   Skills Test, tests in Academic Content Areas, and for Teaching Special Populations. Test
   results are available for two years, 2000-01 and 2001-02. UIC students had a 100% pass rate
   for the Basic Skills Test and Teaching Special Populations and a 98% pass rate for Academic
   Content Areas for 2000-01. The pass rates for 2001-02 were 99% for the Basic Skills Test
   and the Academic Content Areas and 97% for Teaching Special Populations. The UIC pass
   rates equaled or exceeded the statewide pass rates.

   Other pass rates include:

          The 2002 pass rates for nursing students on the NCLEX test was 88%.

          Dentistry students have exceeded the pass rates for the National Dental Boards Part I
           and Part II for the last three calendars years, 2000-02.
Student achievements as a measure of quality and higher expectations. In recent years, there
has been a dramatic increase in the number of students receiving recognition (fellowship,
scholarships) for their academic achievements. Many have won prestigious awards that will help
them to advance their education and research. A few examples of their outstanding
accomplishments are:

      College of Architecture and Arts students have won national awards such as the
       Skidmore Owings and Merrill Foundation Scholarships, AIA Award, Schiff Foundation
       Scholarship Award, Art Institute of Chicago and the American Collegiate Schools of
       Architecture Awards.

      Two senior UIC students were named to USA Today’s 2003 All-USA College Academic
       First Team for their academic accomplishments and their leadership on and off campus.
       A third student was named to the Third Team. Only UIC and Yale University had more
       than one students named to the First Team, and UIC was the only Illinois university with
       a student on the First Team. The same two students on the First Team also received the
       coveted Gates Cambridge Scholarship, allowing them to study at the University of
       Cambridge in England next year
    Four UIC students won Fulbright grants to conduct one year of fully-funded research
     overseas.

    Two UIC students received Goldwater Scholarships, given to college students who intend
     to pursue research careers in mathematics, science, and engineering.

    A mechanical engineering doctoral student received a National Science Foundation
     Graduate Fellowship, one of just 280 engineering students in the country to win the
     award.

    A doctor of pharmacy student was named a recipient of the Paul and Daisy Soros
     Fellowship, one of 30 Soros Fellowships to be awarded in 2002.

    A 2002 graduate of the College of Architecture and the Arts received the $10,000 Master
     of Architecture Second Professional Degree Traveling Fellowship from the Skidmore,
     Owings & Merrill Foundation.

    A Ph.D. candidate in public policy analysis received a George Krambles Transportation
     Scholarship Award for 2002, just one of six recipients to win the highly regarded award.

    A recent graduate of the College of Architecture and the Arts was awarded second prize
     in an international student design competition sponsored by the Association of Collegiate
     Schools of Architecture.

    Three undergraduate and one doctoral student received National Security Education
     Program Fellowships for study abroad in non-English-speaking countries outside of
     Western Europe.

    A second-year medical student at the College of Medicine at Rockford took first place in
     the National Medical Student Biomedical Research Forum for her research poster,
     “Discovery of a Novel Histamine Releasing Receptor and its Clinical Correlation to
     Allergy and Asthma in the Human.”

    A graduate student in the College of Urban Planning and Public Affairs won the Urban
     Land Institute’s 54th Annual Trkla Scholarship Award.

    Two MBA students won “Golden Phone” awards in the Venture Challenge Competition.
     In competition with students from 20 top MBA schools, the two won top honors for
     developing the best business plan.

    Illinois Commitment Goal Six: Productivity, Cost-Effectiveness and Accountability
             Illinois colleges and universities will continually improve productivity,
                               cost-effectiveness, and accountability.
The condition of the Illinois economy and a state budget in deficit has affected support for
public higher education. Budget rescissions and reductions are unpleasant realities for
Illinois’ public universities. Over the last three years, UIC has experienced declines in the
state-base portion of its budget, from 38.8% in FY 2001 to 33.8% in FY 2003. In addition,
UIC returned funds to the state under two budget rescissions, $14.5 million in FY 2002 and
$6.3 million in FY 2003. To meet these cuts, UIC took action to reduce expenditures.
Reduction in the workforce occurred at all levels by eliminating open positions, including
adjunct faculty, academic professionals, graduate assistants, and support staff. Although
layoffs could not be avoided, other staff reductions were achieved through attrition
(retirements and resignations) and not filling vacant positions.

For FY 2004, UIC colleges and other units have been directed to reduce their operating
budgets by 11.13% of the state base. The units are now in the process of identifying ways of
accomplishing the reductions.

As mentioned earlier in this report, academic units have had to increase class size,
consolidate course sections, and cancel low-enrolled classes in order to achieve economies of
operation.

Measures have been taken by campus units to increase efficiency, increase income or reduce
expenditures in the following ways:

      Enrollments increased in the College of Business Administration in spite of a 10%
       budget reduction.

      Six-year graduation rates for the College of Business Administration have increased
       from 56% for the cohort entering 1994 to 64% for the cohort entering in 1996.

      The development of alternative teacher certification programs, and other endorsement
       programs (as complements to traditional preparation programs) provides an effective
       and efficient teacher preparation mechanism that is of mutual benefit to the student,
       the Chicago Public Schools, and the UIC College of Education.

      During the past year, the College of Medicine improved the efficiency and
       productivity of its clinical education programs and clinical services programs in the
       face of significant reductions in state general fund resources.

      Academic professional and civil service positions in the College of Pharmacy have
       been reduced in response to budget shifts.

      Program, capital, maintenance and other costs have been cut, deferred or reduced by
       the College of Pharmacy in response to budget pressures.

      Work on the Deferred Maintenance building audit was completed. A multi-year
       remediation plan has been developed in consultation with University Administration.
   The Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs continues to seek ways to
    improve productivity and ensure accountability. Cost containment measures have
    included the consolidation of administrative support for student operations, e.g.,
    sharing support staff.

   The medical center received a CIO Magazine Enterprise Value Award (EVA). Now
    in its 11th year, EVA is the Baldridge award for information technology (IT),
    representing the highest level of excellence in the strategic use of information
    technology (implementation of the electronic patient medical record).
   The vacancy rate for Registered Nurses has been maintained at between 2% and 3%
    for the entire fiscal year, which is dramatically lower than the Chicago metropolitan
    average of 10% to 12%. This has allowed the medical center to continue to operate
    productively as well as handle record patient volumes in both inpatient and outpatient
    programs.

   The medical center designed and implemented an Automated Call Distribution
    system serving 108 thousand patients annually to improve telephone access.

   Inpatient days and outpatient visits increased by over 39% from the previous year.

   As a result of responsible position management practices and oversight, staffing
    levels per adjusted occupied bed remain at the benchmark level of the top 30% of
    University Hospital Consortium academic health centers.

   In terms of cost effectiveness, the medical center achieved the following during
    FY 2003:

        Increased net revenue in outpatient care by 7% compared to FY 2002.
        Improved profitability of ambulatory care centers by $2.6 million compared to
         FY 2002 and by $500 thousand compared to budget.
        Increased net revenue in inpatient care by over 9.5% compared to FY 2002.
        Cash collections increased by $40 million in FY 2003, an increase of
         $20 million over the previous record-setting year.
        Reduced agency nurse cost by an additional $1.5 million compared to
         FY 2002.
        Decreased nursing salary and overtime costs by $300 thousand in critical care
         areas.
        Implemented a new contract management system that has identified over
         $3 million in underpayments; collection actions have been taken.
        New contract management system has been utilized to review IDPA payments
         and an additional $2 million in underpayments have been collected.
                  Best Practice (Academic) Illinois Commitment Goal Two:
                 Higher education will join elementary and secondary education
                          to improve teaching and learning at all levels

                                       Partnership READ

Partnership READ is a standards-based change process to improve children’s reading and
writing skills through collaborations with staff and administrators at ten Chicago Public Schools.
The goal is to improve the quality of reading and writing curricula, instruction, and assessment
practices. Through Partnership READ, the College of Education is helping these schools build
capacity to achieve long-lasting, positive change in students’ reading and writing competencies.
The focus is on professional development for administrators, reading specialists, and classroom
teachers that last beyond this two-year project to support ongoing reform efforts throughout the
district.

Using a combination of within-school and across-school activities, participants work through
four phases of the standards-based change process: 1) developing their school literacy vision; 2)
targeting standards to support achieving the vision; 3) closely analyzing the schools’ and
children’s progress toward the vision; and 4) determining instructional interventions to meet
targeted goals.

One school’s vision of the excellent graduating readers is those “who apply knowledge gained
from reading to their personal life and to their community in a positive and effective manner.”

While schools’ visions vary in specific detail, all focus on developing lifelong skills and
strategies.

Drawing on state and district standards and benchmarks, teachers at each grade level identify
ways they can contribute to the development of the excellent reader, focusing on teaching
students such skills as “using a variety of strategies to enhance comprehension through
connection to prior knowledge” or “responding to literature in analytical ways using a variety of
reader responses” or “recognizing sounds for each letter.”

Close analyses of schools’ and students’ current strengths and areas of need provide the basis for
making decisions about specific literary curricula and practices to implement by the end of the
first year of the project, and to use in a full-scale manner during year two. “Gallery Walks” at
the cross-site sessions will provide opportunities for schools to share what they have done as
well as gather new ideas from other Partnership READ schools. And a special course designed
for the Lead Literacy Teachers provides a forum for learning about current theory and practice in
both literacy and professional development, and for learning from each others’ experiences in the
standards-based change process.
               Best Practice (Administrative) Illinois Commitment Goal Six:
                  Illinois colleges and universities will continually improve
                       productivity, cost-effectiveness and accountability

                      University of Illinois Medical Center at Chicago
                              Contract Management System

The University of Illinois Medical Center at Chicago (UIMCC) recently installed a new contract
management system (PCON). Developed by an outside vendor, PCON is a software package
that enables the Medical Center to set up contract profiles in the current billing system of
approximately 150 managed care organizations. All billing and receivables involving the
managed care companies are reviewed and processed through the PCON system to ensure that
appropriate payment is received from these third-party payers according to contract provisions.
The new PCON system enhances an older system that was not capable of discerning nuances in
contracts.

At the time of implementation in March 2003, the UIMCC anticipated receiving significant
reimbursements. The new contract system has already helped staff to identify over $3 million in
underpayments and collection actions have been taken. In addition, PCON has been utilized to
review Illinois Department of Public Aid payments and an additional $2 million in
underpayments have been collected. Other contractors, such as Medicare, will be added as the
system matures.

Once all contracts are in place, underpayments will be detected immediately resulting in
improved cash flow. PCON will also improve the information available for contracting and
planning.
                                     Performance Indicators
                                       Institutional Context

The University of Illinois Chicago (UIC) is a comprehensive public university located in the
heart of one of the nation’s largest metropolitan areas. It is one of three campuses of the state of
Illinois’ land-grant university, the University of Illinois. Its mission comprises three traditional
elements—teaching, research, and pubic service, each shaped by and relevant to its metropolitan
setting as well as the University of Illinois’ traditional pursuit of excellence. UIC serves not only
the citizens of the state of Illinois but also students from throughout the nation and the world
who are attracted by both the University’s programs and the metropolitan setting on which it
draws and to which it contributes.

The University of Illinois at Chicago was formed by the consolidation, in the fall of 1982, of the
two Chicago campuses (formerly known as the University of Illinois at the Medical Center and
the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle) into a single institution of higher learning. Today
the University of Illinois at Chicago has a total enrollment of over 25,000 students, including
over 9,000 graduate and professional students.

UIC strives to be a first-rank public, urban research university. It is the largest institution of
higher education in the Chicago area, one of the top 100 research universities in the United
States, and dedicated to the land-grant university tradition of research, teaching, and public
service. Through its 13 colleges and professional schools, UIC offers undergraduate, graduate
and professional programs in architecture, art, applied health sciences, business administration,
dentistry, education, engineering, humanities, life and physical sciences, movement sciences,
mathematics, medicine, nursing, performing arts, pharmacy, public administration, public health,
social sciences, social work, and urban planning.

Admission to UIC is selective at the undergraduate level. The ACT mean score for the new
freshman class of Fall 2002 was 22.9, above the state of Illinois average of 21.6. Enrollment for
Fall 2002 reached a record of 25,690 (excluding residents), of which 16,543 were undergraduates
and 9,147 were graduate and professional students. Nearly 96% of the undergraduates reside in
Illinois, while nearly 63% of graduate and 84% of professional students are Illinoisans—
representing 84 of the 102 counties in the state.

UIC boasts a diverse student body with minority enrollment at 42.6%. In Fall 2002, African
Americans constituted 9% of the student body, while Hispanics made up nearly 13% and Asian
Americans accounted for 20.5% of the students. Through its minority support programs and
aggressive recruitment activities, UIC strives to recruit and retain qualified minority students.
As evidence of this commitment, the Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education Magazine ranked
UIC 35th among 100 institutions awarding the most bachelor’s degrees to Hispanics in 2000-01.

Over the last twenty years, UIC has emerged as a top research university. Through its faculty of
leading scholars and researchers, both fundamental and applied research is pursued, often in
partnership with the region’s business, cultural, health and service institutions. For the first time,
UIC moved into the top 50 national universities in federal research funding, according to the
2001 National Science Foundation figures (released in 2003). UIC now ranks ahead of Purdue,
Michigan State, and Indiana in federal expenditures. In total research and development
expenditures, UIC placed #46 (up from 49) out of 601 universities, with $259.8 million in
FY 2002, and in total federal funding UIC was at $143.2 million, or #48, up four places from
FY 2000.

Declining state revenues for Illinois public universities has presented the greatest challenge for
UIC. The impact of budget rescissions and reductions has been felt throughout university
operations. UIC has been forced to cut costs by eliminating positions at all levels, streamlining
course offerings, and reducing administrative costs. While tuition and fees have increased to
offset cuts in appropriations, UIC has worked to make the cost of education affordable for
students by providing $8.5 million in financial aid from institutional funds to meet the shortfall
in the ISAC MAP awards.

Despite the economic hardships currently plaguing the state and its public institutions of higher
education, UIC continues to fulfill its mission.

                    Illinois Commitment Goal One: Economic Growth
    Higher education will help Illinois business and industry sustain strong economic growth

Common Institutional Indicator: Percent of degree/certificate recipients either employed or
enrolled in further education within one year of graduation.

                                              1997 Graduates      1997 Graduates      2000 Graduates
                                             Surveyed in 2002    Surveyed in 1998    Surveyed in 2001
% Graduates employed full- or part-time           94.5%               91.3%               91.6%
% of Graduates who have pursued or are
                                                     42.8%              76%               83.2%
pursuing an additional degree



Mission-Specific Indicator: Data on research expenditures and technology transfers.


                                    FY 2000                  FY 2001                FY 2002
R&D expenditures                          $195.8 million        $233.1 million        $259.8 million
Federal research grants/contracts         $101.9 million        $125.1 million        $143.1 million
National ranking among U.S.
                                               #49                     #46                 N/A
research universities-Total R&D
National ranking among U.S.
                                               #52                     #48                 N/A
research universities-Federal R&D
Invention disclosures                          73                    76                    109
U.S. patents filed                             26                    31                     74
U.S. patents issued                             8                    10                     19
Royalty income                            $1.727 million        $2.014 million         2.425 million
License/Options                                14                    17                     29
                    Illinois Commitment Goal Two: Teaching and Learning
                 Higher education will join elementary and secondary education to
                             improve teaching and learning at all levels


Common Institutional Indicator: Annual number of students completing requirements for initial
teacher certification by certificate area.

        Program                   Total 2000                 Total 2001              Total 2002
Art                                   12                         13                      8
Chemistry                             2                          3                       4
Early Childhood                       4                          9                       5
Elementary                           138                        145                     145
English                               27                         32                      28
French                                1                          1                       1
General Administration                0                          1                       2
German                                0                          2                       0
History                               26                         35                      27
Mathematics                           21                         12                      21
Physical Education                    15                         11                      17
Physics                               0                          2                       1
Special Education                     39                         24                      28
Spanish                               13                         13                      14



Mission Specific Indicator: Pass rates for students taking Basic Skills Test, Content Area Tests,
and Tests for Teaching Special Populations

                                                 Statewide                                  Statewide
Test             Number   Number     Pass Rate   Pass Rate    Number      Number   Pass     Pass Rate
Field/Category   Tested   Passed                              Tested      Passed   Rate
Basic Skills
 Basic Skills      234      233        100%       100%          243        241      99%           99%
 Aggregate         234      233        100%       100%          243        241      99%           99%
Academic
Content Areas
02 Early Child      3        --          --        97%           6          --        --      98%
03 Elementary      110      109         99%        98%          103        102       99%      99%
23 History         23        22         96%        95%          30         29        97%      92%
25 English         33        33        100%        99%          30         29        97%      99%
26 Spanish         11        11        100%        100%         17         17       100%      98%
28 German           1        --          --        100%          1          --        --      100%
36 Math             8        --          --        100%          8          --        --      100%
37 Chemistry        3        --          --        93%           5          --        --      97%
41 Physics          1        --          --        100%          1          --        --      100%
50 Phys Ed         10        10        100%        99%           1          --        --      98%
51 Art             11        9          82%        89%           8          --        --      100%
Aggregate          214      209        98%         98%          211        208      99%       98%
Other Content
Areas
13 Reading          7        --          --        89%           1          --        --      100%
Aggregate           7        --          --        98%           1          --        --      98%
Teaching
Special Pop.
04 EMH               4           --           --         97%            5            --          --          91%
05 TMH               3           --           --         100%           5            --          --          99%
06 LD                13          13         100%         92%            15           14         93%          91%
07 Soc/Em D          8           --           --         99%            9            --          --          98%
Aggregate            28          28         100%         96%            34           33         97%          94%

    Summary
                     239         233         97%          98%           254         248         98%          98%
     Totals

Notes:

“—“ indicates “Number Passed” and “Pass Rate” not shown because “Number Tested” is less than 10.

EMH = Educable Mentally Handicapped
TMH = Trainable Mentally Handicapped
LD = Learning Disabilities
Soc/Em D = Social/Emotional Disorders

                           Illinois Commitment Goal Three: Affordability
                     No Illinois citizen will be denied an opportunity for a college
                                   education because of financial need

Common Institutional Indicator

                                     Impact of Financial Aid on Net Cost
                                           Versus Family Income

                        Financial Aid and Educational Costs by Income Quintile
                                    Estimated from Fall 2000 Data
          Dependent Undergraduate Students Who Applied for Financial Aid for Award Year 2003

               Mean         Tuition    Room &       Federal     Institutional   Net Cost    Ratio: Net     Ratio: Tuition
              Income1      and Fees     Board      and State    and Private                 Cost/Mean      + Fees less Aid/
                                                   Gift Aid2      Gift Aid3                  Income        Mean Income
Quintile 1     $14,499      $6,592      $6,428      $7,454         $1,677        $3,889       26.8%             0.0%
Quintile 2     $35,913      $6,592      $6,428      $5,480         $1,735        $5,805       16.2%             0.0%
Quintile 3     $59,327      $6,592      $6,428      $3,070         $2,054        $7,896       13.3%             2.5%
Quintile 4     $86,409      $6,592      $6,428      $2,274         $1,620        $9,126       10.6%             3.1%
Quintile 5    $163,800      $6,592      $6,428      $1,999         $1,381        $9,640       5.9%              2.0%
                                                                        Average              14.5%            1.5%




1
  Parent Income: Census Bureau
2
  Federal and State Gift Aid: Includes all Federal and State grants, scholarships, and waivers, including PELL and
MAP.
3
  Institutional and Private Gift Aid: Includes all institutional and private grants, scholarships, waivers, and
fellowships, including SEAL and UIC Tuition Grant.
                                  Impact of Total Grant Aid and Work/Study
                                     on Net Cost Versus Family Income

                                     Impact of Gift Aid and Work/Study on Net Cost
                                            Estimated from Fall 2002 Data*

                                                                                                Ratio:
                                                                                                             Ratio:
                              Number       Total Cost                  Work                      (Net
                  Median                                  Total                      Net                    Total Gift
                                 of            of                      Study                    Cost)/
                  Income1                                Gift Aid3                  Cost4                  Aid/Tuition
                              Students     Education2                 Offered                   Mean
                                                                                                            and Fees
                                                                                               Income
    Quintile 1     $14,499      2,546        $13,020       $9,131      $2,033      $1,856       12.8%        138.5%
    Quintile 2     $35,913      2,302        $13,020       $7,215      $1,992      $3,813       10.6%        109.5%
    Quintile 3     $59,327      2,399        $13,020       $5,124      $2,019      $5,877        9.9%         77.7%
    Quintile 4     $86,409      1,900        $13,020       $3,894      $1,981      $7,145        6.3%         59.1%
    Quintile 5    $163,800      1,097        $13,020       #3,380      $1,787      $7,863        4.8%         51.3%
                                                                           Average              9.3%         87.2%

     *Analysis is not available for AY 2000 and AY 2001.


                            Illinois Commitment Goal Four: Access and Diversity
         Illinois will increase the number and diversity of citizens completing training and education
                                                   programs

     Common Institutional Indicator

                        Baccalaureate Degrees Granted by Race, Ethnicity, and Gender

Race/Ethnicity/Gender     Degrees Granted in AY 2000       Degrees Granted in AY 2001       Degrees Granted in AY 2002
                              Number          Percent        Number          Percent         Number         Percent
  Native American                 4            0.1%               7           0.2%              10            0.3%
  African American              249            8.5%             256           8.0%             253            7.9%
   Asian American               665            22.7%            678           21.3%            680           21.3%
      Hispanic                  438            14.9%            438           13.8%            495           15.5%
      Caucasian                1,407           48.0%           1,610          50.7%           1,560          49.0%
       Foreign                   63            2.1%              75           2.3%              74            2.3%
      Unknown                   102            3.5%             110           3.4%             110            3.4%
        Male                   1,309           44.7%           1,367           43%            1,391          43.7%
       Female                  1,619           55.3%           1,807           57%            1,791          56.3%




     1
       Parent Income: Census Bureau
     2
       Total Cost is tuition + fees + room and board to compare to data in national studies.
     3
       Total Gift Aid: Includes grants, scholarships, waivers, fellowships from all sources.
     4
       Family contributions + loans: Includes all Federal Direct Student Loans, Federal PLUS Loans, and Federal Perkins
     Loans.
                           Master’s Degrees Awarded by Race, Ethnicity, and Gender

Race, Ethnicity, Gender    Degrees Granted in AY 2000   Degrees Granted in AY 2001   Degrees Granted in AY 2002
                            Number        Percent       Number        Percent        Number         Percent
   Native American              9           0.5%           4            0.2%            0             0.0%
   African American           127           8.0%          117           6.9%           121            7.2%
    Asian American             95           6.0%          122           7.2%           119            7.0%
       Hispanic                77           4.9%           92           5.4%           100            5.9%
       Caucasian              762           48.0%         763          45.1%           738           43.7%
        Foreign               460           29.0%         538          31.8%           565           33.5%
       Unknown                 57           3.6%           56           3.3%           45             2.7%
         Male                 627           39.5%         661          39.0%           689           40.8%
        Female                960           60.5%        1,031         61.0%           999           59.2%


                           Doctoral Degrees Awarded by Race, Ethnicity, and Gender

Race, Ethnicity, Gender    Degrees Granted in AY 2000   Degrees Granted in AY 2001   Degrees Granted in AY 2002
                           Number         Percent       Number        Percent        Number         Percent
   Native American             0              0            0              0             0               0
   African American            4             4%            7            3.6%            8             4.5%
    Asian American            11            5.5%          11            5.6%           10             5.6%
       Hispanic                0              0            1            0.5%            8             4.5%
       Caucasian              99           49.2%          91           46.7%           74            41.8%
        Foreign               82           40.7%          79           40.5%           70            39.5%
       Unknown                 5            2.5%           6           30.7%            7             4.0%
         Male                105           52.2%          106          54.4%           94            53.1%
        Female                96           47.8%          89           45.6%           83            46.9%

                          Professional Degrees Awarded by Race, Ethnicity, and Gender

Race, Ethnicity, Gender    Degrees Granted in AY 2000   Degrees Granted in AY 2001   Degrees Granted in AY 2002
                           Number        Percent        Number        Percent        Number         Percent
   Native American             1           0.2%            1            0.2%            1             0.2%
   African American           33           6.0%           45            9.2%            50            9.6%
    Asian American           181          33.0%           141          28.7%           156           30.0%
       Hispanic               54           9.8%           35            7.1%            42            8.1%
       Caucasian             254          46.2%           251          51.1%           258           49.5%
        Foreign               15           2.7%           13            2.6%            5             1.0%
       Unknown                11           2.0%            5            1.0%            9             1.7%
         Male                308          56.1%           245          49.9%           259           49.7%
        Female               241          43.9%           246          50.1%           262           50.3%
                               Degrees Awarded to Students with Disabilities

                                     Degrees          Degrees        Degrees        Three-Year
                                    Granted in       Granted in     Granted in        Total
                                     AY 2000          AY 2001        AY 2002
                Bachelor’s             27               32             30                  89
                 Master’s              12               12             13                  37
                Doctorate               0                1              1                   2
               Professional             0                4              0                   4
                 TOTAL                 39               49             44                  132


Mission Specific Indicator

                   Enrollment Trends for 2000-2002: Racial/Ethnic Distribution

                    Native         African    Asian      Hispanic   Caucasian    Foreign     Unknown    Total
                   American       American
2000    UGRAD        42             1,552     3,707       2,765       7,179        289           597    16,131
         GRAD        12              526       405         411        3,061       1,559          225    6,199
         PROF         9              172       697         179        1,092         31           31     2,211
        TOTAL        63             2,250     4,809       3,355      11.332       1,879          853    24,541

2001    UGRAD             43        1,514     3,371       2,695       7,036        295           573   15,887
         GRAD             11         518       410         434        3,086       1,648          226    6,333
         PROF             10         170       764         187        1,113         30           36     2,310
        TOTAL             64        2,202     4,905       3,316      11,235       1,973          835   24,530

2002    UGRAD             37        1,578     3,979       2,677       7,380        250           642    16,543
         GRAD             14         572       489         457        3,214       1,791          266    6,803
         PROF              9         160       789         173        1,141         35           37     2,344
        TOTAL             60        2.310     5,257       3,307      11,735       2,076          945    25,690


               Illinois Commitment Goal Five: High Expectations and Quality
Illinois colleges and universities will hold students to even higher expectations for learning and
    will be accountable for the quality of academic programs and the assessment of learning

Common Institutional Indicator

                               Levels of Satisfaction with Programs of Study

                                   1997 Graduates              1997 Graduates               2000 Graduates
                                  Surveyed in 1998            Surveyed in 2002             Surveyed in 2001
Challenged by program                    1.8                         1.7                          1.8
Well integrated courses                  2.0                         1.9                          2.0
Quality of instruction                   2.1                         1.9                          2.1
1 = Very satisfied
2 = Somewhat satisfied
3 = Neutral
4 = Somewhat dissatisfied
5 = Very dissatisfied

Mission Specific Indicator

The following table provides examples of pass rates for students enrolled in Doctor of Dental
Surgery and Nursing programs.

  Pass Rates on the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX) for Nursing Graduates

                                            2000                        2001                      2002
UIC CON Pass Rate NCLEX*                    88%                         86%                       88%
National Pass Rate NCLEX

*The NCLEX examination grants nursing graduates licensure to practice as a registered nurse.


                        Pass Rates on the National Dental Board Examinations

                                                     Part I

                                                     UIC Pass Rate               National Pass Rate
                            2000                        93.55%                         93.4%
                            2001                        98.33%                         92.7%
                            2002                         92.0%                         90.0%


                                                     Part II

                                                     UIC Pass Rate               National Pass Rate
                            2000                        94.64%                         94.8%
                            2001                        98.25%                         94.0%
                            2002                        96.49%                         94.4%




     Illinois Commitment Goal Six: Productivity, Cost-Effectiveness and Accountability
              Illinois colleges and universities will continually improve productivity,
                                cost-effectiveness, and accountability.


Common Institutional Indicator

                                      Academic Discipline Unit Costs

                                            2000                        2001                      2002
                                     Cost     % of sector      Cost       % of sector      Cost     % of sector
Cost of instruction/credit hour
  Lower Division                    $111.18    80.2%      $109.59    74.4%         $118.17     76.9%
  Upper Division                    $207.18    98.7%      $216.17    98.0%         $222.21     96.0%
  Graduate I                        $404.60   110.9%      $436.38   114.0%         $478.82    119.6%
  Graduate II                       $607.56   103.1%      $603.33   101.2%         $667.50    106.2%
Total                               $239.15   107.4%      $248.81   106.0%         $269.19    108.6%


Administrative and support          $46.34     78.7%      $49.52    78.8%          $51.15     77.7%
cost per credit hour (all levels)
Percent of first-time, full-time
degree seeking freshmen who
complete their degrees within        37%                   42%                      44%
150% of catalogue time or are
still enrolled or transferred



Mission Specific Indicator

                                         Freshmen Retention Rates

                                                                            2000       2001     2002
            Fall 1999 freshmen who returned to UIC in Fall 2000             77%
            Fall 2000 freshmen who returned to UIC in Fall 2001                        79%
            Fall 2001 freshmen who returned to UIC in Fall 2002                                 79%



               Status Report on Goal-Setting for Common Institutional Indicators

The goal-setting process at the University of Illinois is coordinated by a university-level
committee that provides guidance and maintains consistency across the three campuses. That
committee establishes common procedures, which the campuses then flesh out with their
respective missions in mind.

At the Chicago campus, responsibility for setting goals for the common institutional indicators as
well as mission-specific indicators is centered in the Office of the Executive Vice Provost for
Academic Affairs. Discussions by staff in Academic Affairs have been ongoing with appropriate
campus administrators and deans and directors of academic colleges and units. Two new senior
academic officers will be added to the mix in Fall 2003 with the hiring of the Vice Provost for
Undergraduate Affairs/Dean of the Honors College and an as-yet-to-be-named Vice Provost for
Planning and Programs. With the addition of these new administrators, a more deliberative and
focused process will be implemented to continue discussions and planning for performance
indicators. In addition to the academic deans and the new officers, other participants in the
process will include the Executive Associate Provost for Academic and Enrollment Services and
the Vice Chancellors for Administration, Health Affairs, Research, and Student Affairs, each to
have responsibility for goal-setting appropriate to his/her functional area. A more structured
mechanism and process will be put into place at the beginning of the fall once the new people are
in place and further refinements of the reorganization of the Provost’s office have been finalized.
A timeline for accomplishing certain tasks associated with goal-setting will be developed and
implemented by the Office of the Executive Vice Provost for Academic Affairs in consultation
with those named above.




                              University of Illinois at Chicago

                             Eight-Year Program Review Cycle

                                          2003-2004
11
11.0101              B.S. in Computer Science
11.0101              M.S. in Computer Science
11.0101              Ph.D. in Computer Science

13
13.1322              B.S. in the Teaching of Biological Sciences

14
14.0101A             Master of Engineering
14.0501              B.S. in Bioengineering
14.0501              M.S. in Bioengineering
14.0501              Ph.D. in Bioengineering

14.0701              B.S. in Chemical Engineering
14.0701              M.S. in Chemical Engineering
14.0701              Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering

14.0801              B.S. in Civil Engineering
14.0801              M.S. in Civil Engineering
14.0801              Ph.D. in Civil Engineering

14.0901              B.S. in Computer Engineering

14.1001              B.S. in Electrical Engineering
14.1001A             M.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering
14.1001A             Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering

14.1201              B.S. in Engineering Physics

14.1501              Ph.D. in Geotechnical Engineering and Geosciences

14.1701              B.S. in Industrial Engineering
14.1701              M.S. in Industrial Engineering
14.1701              Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering and Operations Research
14.1801    M.S. in Materials Engineering
14.1801    Ph.D. in Materials Engineering

14.1901    B.S. in Mechanical Engineering
14.1901    M.S. in Mechanical Engineering
14.1901    Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering
14.3001    B.S. in Engineering Management
26
26.0101    B.S. in Biological Sciences
26.0101    M.S. in Biological Sciences
26.0101    Ph.D. in Biological Sciences
26.0101A   D.A. in Biological Sciences

40
40.0505    M.S. in Medicinal Chemistry
40.0505    Ph.D. in Medicinal Chemistry

51
51.0706    B.S. in Health Information Management
51.0706    M.A. in Health Infomatics

51.1005    B.S. in Medical Laboratory Sciences
51.1005    M.S. in Medical Laboratory Sciences

51.1401    M.S. in Surgery

51.2003    M.S. in Pharmacognosy
51.2003    Ph.D. in Pharmacognosy

51.2702    B.S. in Human Nutrition
51.2702    M.S. in Human Nutrition
51.2702    Ph.D. in Human Nutrition

60
60.0302    Energy Resources Center
60.1427    Integrated Systems Laboratory
60.5112    Center for Craniofacial Anomalies

                               2004-2005
04
04.0201    Master of Architecture
04.9999    B.A. in Architectural Studies

13
13.1202    B.A. in Elementary Education
13.1302    B.F.A. in Art Education
13.1305    B.A. in the Teaching of English
13.1311    B.S. in the Teaching of Mathematics

13G
13.1001    M.Ed. in Special Education
13.1001    Ph.D. in Education (Special Education)

13.0301    Ph.D. in Education (Curriculum and Instruction)
13.0401    M.Ed. in Leadership and Administration
13.0404    M.Ed. in Instructional Leadership

13.1311    M.S. in the Teaching of Mathematics

13.9999    Ph.D. in Policy Studies in Urban Education

16
16.0102    M.A. in Linguistics

23
23.0101    B.A. in English and American Literature
23.0101    M.A. in English
23.0101    Ph.D. in English

23.1001    B.A. in Communication
23.1001    M.A. in Communication

24
24.0101A   B.A. in Individual Plan of Study

26
26.0202    B.S. in Biochemistry
26.0202    M.S. in Biochemistry
26.0202    Ph.D. in Biochemistry

26.0501    M.S. in Microbiology and Immunology
26.0501    Ph.D. in Microbiology and Immunology

26.0601    M.S. in Anatomy and Cell Biology
26.0601    Ph.D. in Anatomy and Cell Biology

26.0613    Ph.D. in Molecular Genetics

26.0705    M.S. in Pharmacology
26.0705    Ph.D. in Pharmacology

26.0706    M.S. in Physiology and Biophysics
26.0706    Ph.D. in Physiology and Biophysics
27
27.0101   B.S. in Mathematics
27.0101   M.A. and M.S. in Mathematics
27.0101   Ph.D. in Mathematics
27.0101   D.A. in Mathematics
27.0301   M.S. in Mathematics and Information Sciences for Industry
27.0501   B.S. in Statistics and Operations Research


30
30.0801   B.S. in Mathematics and Computer Science

38
38.0101   B.A. in Philosophy
38.0101   M.A. in Philosophy
38.101    Ph.D. in Philosophy

51
51.2306   M.S. in Occupational Therapy

60
60.1306   Center for Urban Educational Research & Development
60.1310   Institute on Disability and Human Development
60.1313   Institute for Mathematics and Science Education
60.2403   Institute for the Humanities
60.5104   Center for Molecular Biology of Oral Diseases
60.5105   Temporomandibular Joint and Facial Pain Research Center
60.5109   Institute for Tuberculosis Research
60.5110   Sickle Cell Center
60.5113   Cancer Center
60.5120   Center for Pharmaceutical Biotechnology

                                2005-2006
05
05.0125   Ph.D. in Germanic Studies (Progress report)
05.0203   M.A. in Hispanic Studies

13
13.0802   Ph.D. in Educational Psychology (Progress report)
13.1325   B.A. in the Teaching of French
13.1326   B.A. in the Teaching of German
13.1330   B.A. in the Teaching of Spanish

16
16.0402   B.A. in Russian
16.0403   B.A. in Polish
16.0403    M.A. in Slavic Languages and Literature
16.0403    Ph.D. in Slavic Languages and Literature

16.0501    B.A. in Germanic Studies
16.0501    M.A. in Germanic Studies

16.0901    B.A. in French
16.0901A   B.A. in French Business Studies
16.0901    M.A. in French
16.0902    B.A. in Italian

16.0905    B.A. in Spanish
16.0905    Ph.D. in Hispanic Studies
16.0905A   B.A. in Spanish – Economics

16.1201    B.A. in Classical Languages and Literature
16.1201A   B.A. in Classical Civilization

50
50.0402    B.F.A. in Graphic Design
50.0402    M.F.A. in Graphic Design

50.0404    B.F.A. in Industrial Design
50.0404    M.F.A. in Industrial Design

50.0499    M.F.A. in Electronic Visualization

50.0602    M.F.A. in Film/Animation/Video

50.0605    M.F.A. in Photography

50.0699    B.F.A. in Photography/Film/Electronic Media

50.0702    B.F.A. in Studio Arts
50.0702    M.F.A. in Studio Arts

51
51.2003    M.S. in Biopharmaceutical Sciences (Progress report)
51.2003    Ph.D. in Biopharmaceutical Sciences (Progress report)
51.2301    M.A. in Art Therapy

51.2307    M.S. in Physical Therapy
51.2306    Doctor of Physical Therapy

51.2399    M.S. in Disability and Human Development
51.2399    Ph.D. in Disability Studies
                                2006-2007
13
13.1328   B.A. in the Teaching of History
13.1328   M.A. in the Teaching of History

26
26.1103   M.S. in Bioinformatics (Progress report)
26.1103   Ph.D. in Bioinformatics (Progress report)

42
42.0101   B.A. in Psychology
42.0101   M.A. in Psychology
42.0101   Ph.D. in Psychology

43
43.0104   B.A. in Criminal Justice
43.0104   M.A. in Criminal Justice
43.0104   Ph.D. in Criminal Justice
43.0106   M.S. in Forensic Science

44
44.0401   Master of Public Administration
44.0401   Ph.D. in Public Administration

44.0701   Bachelor of Social Work
44.0701   Master of Social Work
44.0701   Ph.D. in Social Work

45
45.0201   B.A. in Anthropology
45.0201   M.A. in Anthropology
45.0201   Ph.D. in Anthropology

45.0701   M.A. in Environmental and Urban Geography

45.0801   B.A. in History
45.0801   M.A. in History
45.0801   Ph.D. in History

45.1001   B.A. in Political Science
45.1001   M.A. in Political Science
45.1001   Ph.D. in Political Science

45.1101   B.A. in Sociology
45.1101   M.A. in Sociology
45.1101   Ph.D. in Sociology
51
51.1401J   M.S. in Pathology—Medicine (Progress report)
51.1401J   Ph.D. in Pathology—Medicine (Progress report)

60
60.4301    Center for Research in Law and Justice
60.4407    Jane Addams Center for Social Policy and Research
60.4511    Institute for Juvenile Research
60.4512    Great Cities Institute




                                  2007-2008
05
05.0107    B.A. in Latin American Studies
05.0201    B.A. in African American Studies

31
31.0501    B.S. in Movement Science
31.0501    M.S. in Movement Science
31.0501    Ph.D. in Movement Science

50
50.0501    B.A. in Theatre
50.0501    M.A. in Theatre
50.0599    B.F.A. in Performance

50.0703    B.A. in Art History
50.0703    M.A. in Art History
50.0703    Ph.D. in Art History

50.901     B.A. in Music

60
60.0502    Center for Research on Women and Gender

                                  2008-2009
04
04.0301    Master of Urban Planning and Policy

13
13.1323    B.S. in the Teaching of Chemistry
13.1329    B.S. in the Teaching of Physics

40
40.0501    B.A. and B.S. in Chemistry
40.0501    M.S. in Chemistry
40.0501    Ph.D. in Chemistry
40.0601    B.S. of Earth and Environmental Sciences
40.0601    M.S. of Earth and Environmental Sciences

40.0801    B.A. and B.S. in Physics
40.0801    M.S. in Physics
40.0801    Ph.D. in Physics

45
45.0601    B.A. and B.S. in Economics
45.0601    M.A. in Economics
45.0601    Ph.D. in Economics

45.1201    Ph.D. in Urban Planning and Policy

52
52.0101A   B.S. in Management
52.0101    Ph.D. in Business Administration

52.0201    Master of Business Administration

52.0301    B.S. in Accounting
52.0301    M.S. in Accounting

52.0801    B.S. in Finance

52.1201    B.S. in Information and Decision Sciences
52.1201    M.S. in Management Information Systems
52.1201    Ph.D. in Management Information Systems

52.1401    B.S. in Marketing

60
60.0407    City Design Center
60.1408    Urban Transportation Center
60.5206    Center for Urban Economic Development

                                2009-2010
51
51.0401    Doctor of Dental Surgery
51.0501D   M.S. in Oral Sciences
51.1101    B.S. in Dentistry

51.1601    B.S. in Nursing
51.1608    M.S. in Nursing
51.1608    Ph.D. in Nursing
51.2201    Master of Public Health
51.2201    Doctor of Public Health
51.2201A   M.S. Public Health
51.2201A   Ph.D. in Public Health

51.2801    Advanced Certificate in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
51.2803    Advanced Certificate in Endodontics
51.2804    Advanced Certificate in Oral Pathology
51.2805    Advanced Certificate in Orthodontics
51.2806    Advanced Certificate in Pediatric Dentistry
51.2807    Advanced Certificate in Periodontics
51.2808    Advanced Certificate in Advanced Prosthodontics
51.2899A   Advanced Certificate in Radiology (Dental)
51.2899B   Advanced Certificate in Oral Diagnosis and Oral Medicine
51.2899C   Advanced Certificate in Histology

                                2010-2011
13
13.1327    Master of Health Professions Education

40
40.0505    M.S. in Medicinal Chemistry
40.0505    Ph.D. in Medicinal Chemistry
51
51.1201    Doctor of Medicine (Chicago)
51.1201A   Doctor of Medicine (Peoria)
51.1201B   Doctor of Medicine (Rockford)
51.1201C   Doctor of Medicine (Urbana)

51.1401    M.S. in Surgery
51.1401J   M.S. in Pathology—Medicine
51.1401J   Ph.D. in Pathology—Medicine

51.2001    Doctor of Pharmacy

51.2003    M.S. in Pharmacognosy
51.2003    Ph.D. in Pharmacognosy

51.2099    M.S. in Pharmacy
51.2099    Ph.D. in Pharmacy

51.2702    B.S. in Human Nutrition
51.2702    M.S. in Human Nutrition
51.2702    Ph.D. in Human Nutrition
51.2703    M.S. in Biomedical Visualization
                                PROGRAM REVIEW REPORT

1.     Reporting Institution:        University of Illinois at Chicago

2.     Program Reviewed:             Master of Health Professions Education
                                     (13.1327)

3.     Date:                         AY 2002-03

4.     Contact Person:               Roger Nelson

       4.1.    Telephone:            (312) 413-3461

       4.2.    E-mail:               RPNelson@uic.edu

       4.3.    Fax:                  (312) 996-9391

5.     Findings and Recommendations

The Master of Health Professions Education (MHPE) program was reviewed in May 2003 by
external evaluators from Michigan State University and the University of Pennsylvania. In their
assessment of the MHPE, they gave high praise to the program:

       “If one were to change nothing about the MHPE program, it would remain a gold
       standard among programs that seek to prepare individuals for leadership positions within
       health professions education. The spirit of innovation, the excellence of the curriculum,
       the dedication of the faculty, the administrative oversight and support, and the quality of
       the students attracted to the program, all indicate a program of exceptional quality.”

Curriculum
Strengths

      The curriculum is well-grounded in principles of adult learning. Curricula content is
       presented in the context of problems that students could commonly face as health
       professions education leaders and in their interactions with other leaders.

      The MHPE program has invested considerable resources into on-line instruction, to the
       extent that all four core courses are available via the web, as well as most electives.

      Students may elect to take their coursework either on-campus, off-campus (i.e., on-line)
       or a combination of both modalities.

      A review of the core and elective courses indicates a strong focus on building practical
       skills of use to the health professions education leader.

      All MHPE courses are revised prior to each offering, thus ensuring that course content is
       current and relevant.
      The faculty has been engaged in self-evaluation. There have been several major and
       minor curriculum revisions, including the online offerings coupled with the decision to
       return to the thesis-project requirement with coursework credits.

Issues for consideration:

      The curriculum as presented may be too weighted toward acquisition of specific skills,
       i.e., focused on techniques, technical skills and technology, and less focused on
       assumptions, approaches and philosophy. There is a sense of a lack of grounding in the
       larger social context. Topics such as leadership within communities, addressing health
       disparities, addressing the needs of the underserved, and health policy and health care
       financing may address the wider, social context of medicine issues.

       Recommendation: While the program is very strong in “tech” oriented skill-building,
       the evaluators recommend developing programs themes such as those that address
       “leadership within the community context” and “leadership to help address the needs of
       the medically underserved.” Furthermore, the curriculum could be strengthened with
       more emphasis on the theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of the “tech” being
       taught.

      Some courses need to have clearer and more explicit ground rules and expectations and to
       offer more formalized feedback in a systematic fashion.

      Faculty need to consider the issue of the appropriate amount of methodology/planning
       versus assessment/evaluation in core courses, and revisit the need for combining
       methodology/evaluation and planning/assessment while considering alternative core
       course designs.
       Recommendation: The faculty needs to revisit the core course structure and offerings,
       and to reconsider the two-week on-campus core course structure and the combining of
       major content topics such as instruction and assessment, and curriculum planning and
       program evaluation. The program should retain its flexibility, (e.g., on-line, on-campus,
       combination) whatever core course decisions are made, as this is a major program
       strength.

      There is a need for an evaluation of the outcomes for courses offered in the two formats
       (on-line versus on-campus) and for the degrees granted primarily through one medium
       compared to the other. It is important for the faculty to assure themselves that they are
       not producing two different “strains” of student outcomes, both at the course and degree
       levels.

       Recommendation: The faculty needs to conduct evaluation research to assess the
       equivalence of the on-campus and off-campus courses, programs, and their outcomes.
       Do students who graduate from the off-campus program have the equivalent knowledge
       and skills as those who graduate from the on-campus program?
Faculty

Strengths

      The breadth of the training backgrounds and current teaching and research interests of the
       faculty as a clear strength of the MHPE program. The breadth also provides a solid
       bench from which to draw course leadership.

      There is a clear sense of collaboration among faculty, especially with regard to teaching.

      The faculty who are most heavily involved in teaching appear to be truly dedicated to
       teaching excellence.

Issues for Consideration

      The department needs to develop incentives for more faculty to become involved in
       teaching, mentoring and thesis project advising in the MHPE program. This will
       alleviate heavy teaching loads for some of the faculty.

      The advising burden currently falls to the director of the program who advises all
       entering students until they are far along enough in the program to select an advisor. A
       more equitable advising model is needed.

       Recommendation: The program should find the resources to recruit one or two
       additional tenure track faculty members and, if possible, another half- or full-time
       administrative person. The advising/mentoring role is too heavy. As the program grows
       in rigor and stature, both of these resources are sorely needed.

      There is a need for underrepresented minority faculty role models.
         Recommendation: The program should proactively recruit more under-represented
         minority faculty and students. While the program has had no difficulty filling classes by
         word of mouth, it may be necessary to reach out to minority organizations (e.g., National
         Medical Society) in order to attract qualified under-represented minority applicants.

Students

Strengths

        The student body is diverse with respect to international representation. Several students
         spoke openly about the valuable learning experiences provided as classmates talk about
         applications of study topics to their own health care settings.

        There is a growing base of alumni appear to be very successful in their fields. Many of
         them, years later, attribute their personal successes to the skills they learned in the
         program.

Issues for consideration

        Because students come from all over the world, the student body is culturally diverse.
         However, among the subgroup of students from the U.S., there are virtually none from
         underrepresented minorities. Special outreach to this population would be valuable.

        There is a dominance of physicians in a program that is intended for health professionals
         from many fields. Case discussions and assignments may be somewhat less relevant to
         the rare students from another academic background. The program needs to find ways to
         diversify the student body with respect to profession.

         Recommendation: The program needs to consider whether or not it wants to continue as
         a “health professions education leadership” program, or as a “medical education
         leadership program.” If the former, the program has to consider ways to diversify the
         student body with respect to profession—medical, allied health, nursing, etc.

        A new alumni tracking system is being developed and implemented. The MHPE is
         encouraged to give priority to this project.

Conclusion

The evaluators found that the Master of Health Professions Education program is
“very successful in discharging its mission of preparing leaders for their roles in health
professions education. This is a program of which faculty, staff, administration and the
institution can be justifiably proud.”

6.       Outcome
6.1   Decision: Program is in Good Standing
                                PROGRAM REVIEW REPORT

1.     Reporting Institution:        University of Illinois at Chicago

2.     Program Reviewed:             M.S. in Oral Sciences (51.0501)

3.     Date:                         AY 2002-03

4.     Contact Person:               Roger Nelson

       4.1.    Telephone:            (312) 413-3461

       4.2.    E-mail                RPNelson@uic.edu

       4.3.    Fax:                  (312) 996-9391

5.     Findings and Recommendations

A program review summary for the M.S. in Oral Sciences was submitted as part of the FY 2002
Results Report, but a review by external experts could not be accomplished in time to include
their findings and recommendations in last year’s submission. In the summary, the University
indicated that it would conduct a second review during AY 2002-03, calling for expert
evaluation and reporting the results of the review in FY 2003.

Finding

The data and information being produced by the Human Genome Project are contributing to
explosive changes in the understanding, diagnosis and etiology of oral disease. New discoveries
in the gene regulation of craniofacial development will provide direct applicability in
understanding craniofacial birth defects and developing interventions to reduce their incidence.
The current analyses of gene-environment interactions has already begun to identify linkages that
can be used to develop strategies for health promotion and disease prevention that can reduce the
incidence of oral disease. These studies will be extended to develop genetic risk assessment for
oral diseases and thus allow the initiation of preventive strategies at younger ages and further
reduce the incidence and prevalence of oral diseases.

The M.S. in Oral Sciences course work provides only a very limited introduction into the
genetics that is known and the manner in which it can be applied.

Recommendation

The M.S. in Oral Science Core Curriculum should be expanded and enhanced to emphasize the
currently available information regarding the human genome and how that information can be
used to improve oral health. The development of a new core of courses that addresses the future
directions of the field and takes advantage of the well-experienced faculty in the UIC College of
Dentistry is a recommendation that would address this current weakness of the program. The
college is well positioned for curricular modifications in the M.S. program that would parallel
the future directions of the field. The experienced faculty and their activity in molecular genetic
research at the cutting edge of the field represents a major opportunity to expand the potential
benefits for the graduates of the M.S. in Oral Sciences.

Finding

The student population is very well prepared prior to admission and is quite accomplished
academically. The students acknowledge that the M.S. program is an attractive aspect when
applying to the dental clinical specialty advanced programs, assuming that the latest material will
be included in the M.S. curriculum. Thus, the M.S. in Oral Science is a recruiting advantage and
attracts students with the knowledge and passion to look to future applications of sciences in the
care of their patients.

Because the program lacks the latest material in the curriculum, students enrolled in the program
do not see the content as an advantage in their training.

Recommendation

Emphasizing the importance of scientific advances to maintaining the cutting-edge
characteristics in clinical practice is recommended through enhancing the depth and breadth of
the coursework and establishing the M.S. in Oral Science as a priority at least equivalent to the
other activities expected of the students.

Finding

The separation of the various dental clinical specialties and their different curricula result in an
overall weak M.S. core curriculum that competes for priority with the more extensive clinical
education programs, which consequently are assigned higher priority by the students.

Recommendation

Integration of the different specialty curricula into a more robust M.S. core would result in a
much stronger program, reduce redundancy in curricula, and maximize efficiency of course
development and presentation.

Recommendation

The biomedical active researchers should be encouraged to participate in the M.S. in Oral
Sciences program so that their expertise can be recruited for the development of a new core
curriculum and to mentor student thesis projects at the most advanced topics of research.

Finding

There was limited information regarding the publication record of the M.S. theses.
Recommendation

Recommendation is made to determine the extent of publication of the M.S. theses and
determine whether these publications are occurring in quality journals. This would be a valuable
outcome measure for the program.

Summary
The external evaluators summarized their report with the following observations:

         “The M.S. in Oral Science has met its principal goals and objectives in providing a more
         flexible M.S. program for the College of Dentistry and to accommodate a greater
         diversity of students.”

        The M.S. in Oral Sciences program is beneficial for the College of Dentistry in its
         identification, recruitment and education of the dental specialty students.

        Additional administrative support, structure and commitment by the College of Dentistry
         would allow the M.S. in Oral Sciences program to reach its optimal potential.

Actions Taken

The Dean of the College of Dentistry has appointed a new head of the Department of
Periodontics who will also hold the title and position of Director of Graduate Studies for the Oral
Sciences. The appointment becomes effective September 1. The new head and Director of
Graduate Studies has been given a mandate to make significant changes to the M.S. in Oral
Science program based upon the recommendations of the reviewers and in consultation with the
dean, advanced program directors, and members of the Dentistry graduate faculty

6.       Outcome

         6.1 Decision: Program is in Good Standing.
                                     PROGRAM REVIEW REPORT

1.       Reporting Institution:        University of Illinois at Chicago

2.       Programs Reviewed:            Doctor of Medicine (51.1201)

3.       Date:                         AY 2002-03

4.       Contact Person:               Roger Nelson

         4.1.    Telephone:            (312) 413-3461

         4.2.    E-mail:               RPNelson@uic.edu

         4.3.    Fax:                  (312) 996-9391

5.       Major Findings and Recommendations

The Doctor of Medicine degree underwent accreditation review in 2001 by the Liaison
Committee Council on Medical Education (LCME). The review encompassed all of the College
of Medicine campuses at Chicago, Peoria, Rockford, and Urbana. A LCME/ad hoc survey team
conducted a site visit on November 25-29, 2001, and submitted a final report on April 9, 2002.
The LCME voted to continue full accreditation of the MD degree for an eight-year term. The
next accreditation visit will occur during the 2009-2010 academic year.

Progress Since 1994

        The College of Medicine has instituted a number of parallel and interlocking mechanisms
         to achieve consistency in objectives to ensure comparable effectiveness in the delivery of
         instruction across all sites.

        The College made strides in educational reform, including decompressing the pre-
         clerkship curriculum. Scheduled lecture hours have been significantly reduced, and there
         have been shifts from lecture to small group experiences, with an emphasis on student-
         centered, active learning.

        A program to assess student outcomes following graduation has been in place since the
         graduating class of 1997. An active “Outcomes Study Group” with representation from
         all sites has developed the instruments and provided feedback as to the appropriate data
         for assessment of the curriculum.

        Student performance on progress and shelf exams is continually monitored, and when
         problems in the curriculum are identified, that information is directed to the appropriate
         college committee for consideration and action.
      Substantial progress has been made in enhancing faculty research and in encouraging
       student participation in biomedical research. Since the progress report was submitted in
       1997, the growth in research activity (in terms of dollar expenditures) has exceeded 20%
       per year. Based on NIH funding, the College is currently ranked 48th among U.S.
       medical schools.

In its report, the LCME identified the following areas of programmatic strength:

      Extensive efforts have been made to ensure comparability of educational experiences
       across the College of Medicine sites.

      The faculty is strong and committed to teaching and student learning.

      Through innovative programs, the College of Medicine has been successful in achieving
       and maintaining its stated goal of matriculating and graduating a diverse student body.

      The College of Medicine has been successful in meeting its stated mission to educate
       physicians who are likely to practice in rural and urban underserved areas.

      The dean’s leadership has led to increased research productivity in the College of
       Medicine at Chicago.

      The four campuses interact effectively and efficiently toward achieving College of
       Medicine goals. This has enhanced the ability of the college to remain competitive both
       financially and academically.

      The deans at all of the COM campuses have developed and implemented innovative
       programs to promote successful teaching and learning.

      Partnerships have been developed between the College of Medicine and a broad network
       of clinical sites that provide excellent clinical training for students.

      The College of Medicine has advanced an institutional culture of scholarly inquiry
       through innovative research programs for medical students and resident physicians.

The Liaison Committee on Medical Education also identified some areas that require attention:

      Continued review of first and second year curriculum density and the integration and
       coordination of content areas across courses and clerkships is needed. While educational
       activities within a discipline are coordinated across program sites, and each course is
       reviewed periodically, there was no evidence of a comprehensive process for review of
       content omissions and unplanned redundancies across disciplines.

      Across the campuses, most clinical departments do not regularly provide mid-clerkship or
       formal feedback to students.
      Resident physicians are not consistently prepared for their teaching responsibilities in all
       clinical departments and across all campuses.

      Deferred maintenance of the physical plant continues to be of concern.

      The graduation competencies that define educational outcomes have yet to be
       consistently applied and evaluated across the sites.

      Currently, the two major indicators used to assess overall program effectiveness are Steps
       1 and 2 of the United States Medical Licensing Examination and the results of the
       National Resident Matching Program. The College needs to consider other assessment
       measures, including an assessment of graduates’ performance.

   The LCME has requested a progress report on these areas by January 1, 2004.

Actions Taken

Continued Review of M1/M2 Curriculum Density

The Basic Science Education Coordinating Committees (EECs) and the site curriculum
committees have undertaken systematic reviews of the site curricula. As an example of
horizontal integration, the microbiology and pharmacology course directors at Chicago have
worked to remove redundancies so that the actual lecture material flows more logically and is
more integrated. Following a yearlong study of the M1 curriculum at Urbana, the anatomy
course director revised the lecture schedule for the fall semester 2003 to better coordinate the
content of anatomy, embryology, histology, and physiology. The result is a curriculum closer to
an organ-based approach. Similarly, the M2 faculty will review and reorganize their curriculum
to eliminate redundancies in pathology and clinical laboratory sciences.

Mid-Clerkship Formal Feedback Not Consistent

Each of the Education Coordinating Committees has developed a strategic plan to ensure that
formative feedback is provided for every student approximately mid-way through her/his
experience, and that the session is formally documented.

Resident Physicians Not Consistently Prepared as Teachers/Evaluators

Ongoing faculty development programs for resident physicians have been modified to
incorporate the educational objectives of all core clerkships. Efforts to provide educational
interventions designed to better prepare residents from graduate medical education programs,
other than those sponsored by the university for their roles as teachers and evaluators of
University of Illinois medical students, are underway.

Deferred Maintenance

This area continues to be a serious concern in light of severe budgetary constraints.
Graduation Competencies Not Consistently Applied/Evaluated Across Sites

The CCIA Graduation Competencies Subcommittee has developed a comprehensive assessment
blueprint that maps learning objectives to assessment instruments. The College of Medicine is
currently researching and developing a Student Portfolio that will be required next academic year
to help document competency.
Criteria for Types/Numbers of Patients Seen

Each of the ECCs is working to determine the numbers and types of patients to which students
must be exposed to satisfy clerkship objectives. A comprehensive review of what students must
know and what tasks and procedures they must be able to perform by the end of the clerkship
experiences is underway. Once consensus has been achieved on the review of objectives, the
specific requirements will be elaborated.

Assessment of Educational Program Outcomes

The College of Medicine utilizes multiple measures of program quality, such as results of
licensure examinations, the National Resident Matching Program, student performance and
opinion data, longitudinal outcome studies of graduates, and residency director satisfaction
surveys.

6.     Outcome

       6.1            Decision: Program is in Good Standing
                                  PROGRAM REVIEW REPORT

1.       Reporting Institution:        University of Illinois at Chicago

2.       Program Reviewed:             Ph.D. in Pathology (51.1401)

3.       Date:                         AY 2002-03

4.       Contact Person:               Roger Nelson

         4.1.    Telephone:            (312) 413-3461

         4.2.    E-mail:               RPNelson@uic.edu

         4.3.    Fax:                  (312) 996-9391

5.       Major Findings and Recommendations

The Ph.D. in Pathology did not go through the review process in AY 2002-03 because the
program suspended admission of students in 2001. As of the Fall 2002, there were two students
remaining in the program.

A new head of national stature was recruited in January 2000 to assume leadership of a unit
whose national ranking was less than ideal for a college of medicine with substantial teaching
responsibilities. The new head quickly assessed the Ph.D. program and determined that it
required major revamping in order to make it a world-class program. His plans are to rebuild it
into a new program that will be competitive with the best in the country. The rebuilding process
will begin in 2004-05 by which time the appropriate faculty will be in place to fashion a new
Pathology doctoral curriculum. Building toward a new program has already begun.

        Five new faculty members have been hired since last August.
        Three clinician/scientists have been actively recruited.
        A search for a curriculum specialist in Pathology education is currently under way.
        The department is currently searching for an HIV researcher.
        An IT staff person has been hired who has already revamped the department’s computer
         facilities.
        The department will be assigned approximately one floor of research space in the new
         College of Medicine research building (now under construction).
        The head has developed a business plan for the department.

Part of the business plan calls for producing a steady stream of income that emanates from
research activities that lead to clinical tests from which income is realized. In turn, those funds
will be invested in academic pursuits, including endowing chairs in the department.

There is a very real sense of excitement in the department with the strategic plan it has
developed for its future, one that involves the rebuilding of the doctoral program in pathology.
6.   Outcome

     6.1   Decision: Require progress report in 2006-07 on the status of rebuilding the
           Ph.D. in Pathology program.
                                  PROGRAM REVIEW REPORT

1.       Reporting Institution:       University of Illinois at Chicago

2.       Program Reviewed:            Doctor of Pharmacy (51.2001)

3.       Date:                        AY 2002-03

4.       Contact Person:              Roger Nelson

         4.1.    Telephone:           (312) 413-3461

         4.2.    E-mail:              RPNelson@uic.edu

         4.3.    Fax:                 (312) 996-9391

5.       Major Findings and Recommendations

The Doctor of Pharmacy degree program underwent accreditation review in 2001 by the
American Council of Pharmaceutical Education (ACPE). An evaluation team conducted a site
visit on October 23-25, 2001, which submitted its report to the ACPE Board of Directors. At its
meeting in January 2002, the Board voted to continue accreditation of the UIC College of
Pharmacy professional Doctor of Pharmacy program until June 30, 2008, which represents the
customary six-year cycle.

Changes Since the Last On-Site Evaluation

The evaluation team acknowledged and commended the college for achieving a number of
changes and progress made since the last on-site accreditation evaluation.

        Strategic planning has occurred to guide development from 1997-2002.

        A new and expanded college leadership team has been established.

        A new curriculum for the entry-level pathway of the Doctor of Pharmacy program has
         been developed and implemented.

        New outcomes assessment activities and measures have been implemented, including the
         Watson-Glaser critical Thinking Appraisal.

        Improvements in promotion success rates among tenure-track faculty have been realized,
         and the development of an enhanced core of senior clinical track faculty has occurred.

        Physical facility renovations and enhancements have been made, including the
         installation of new network technology, technical upgrades in large classrooms,
         expansion of the Student Computer Laboratory and lounges for PharmD student
       organizations, and remodeling of college administrative areas and several large research
       laboratory facilities.

      Enhancements to the college’s financial resources have been made through incorporation
       of two-thirds of the clinical education account into the college’s permanent state budget,
       increases in corporate and private giving, a significant increase (over 100%) in
       extramural research funding, and increases in entrepreneurial revenue.

In its report to the ACPE, the evaluation noted the following college and programmatic
strengths:

      The leadership of the dean and the support provided by the college’s new and enhanced
       administrative structure;

      The faculty, in terms of their dedication to developing and implementing a new
       curriculum, and their success in research and scholarly activity;

      The students, as evidenced by their maturity and their enthusiasm for the profession;

      The college’s rich array of pharmacy practice resources, including the development of
       pharmaceutical care delivery models in community pharmacies; growth in this area will
       require substantial and sustained support and will further enhance the practice of
       pharmacy in the area; and

      The college’s success in augmenting its base budget with a variety of extramural and
       entrepreneurial funds.

Comments and Recommendations

The evaluation team noted that the college “is at a key point in its continuing
development,” and that a “continued and focused effort is needed to ensure the
ongoing success and quality of the Doctor of Pharmacy program….” The team identified six
areas that require the college’s attention:

   1. Strategic planning. The college needs to move forward with plans to develop a new
      strategic plan now that the goals set forth in the 1997-2002 strategic plan have been
      addressed. Many issues facing the college are strategic and will benefit from medium- to
      long-range planning.

   2. Curricular evaluation and refinement.. Continued curricular refinements should be
      made based upon evaluative data that have been obtained, particularly now that the newly
      revised entry-level PharmD curriculum has been fully implemented. Curricular
      flexibility should be examined (vis-à-vis electives) and efforts should continue in the
      development of the new educational pedagogy that incorporates an emphasis on active
      learning. A decision needs to be made regarding the continuation or termination of the
      Continuation Curriculum Option (CCO), the non-traditional pathway to the PharmD.
     3. Outcomes assessment.. The college should continue to develop and implement its
        comprehensive and systematic outcomes assessment plan. Particular attention should
        continue to be devoted to formative and summative assessment of student achievement
        and the acquisition of desired professional competencies.

     4. Physical facilities.. The college is in need of additional and different types of space to
        support the professional program and a rapidly expanding research enterprise. The
        anticipated building addition would address existing and future needs by providing new
        state-of-the-art laboratory space and enabling renovation of current building space to
        support teaching and other needs. Concerns exist regarding current building
        infrastructure and maintenance issues.

     5. Faculty issues.. The issue of mentoring needs continued attention, particularly as it
        affects large numbers of junior faculty across all of the pharmacy academic disciplines.
        Faculty development should receive continued support, particularly as it pertains to
        programs and activities designed to assist faculty in their abilities to deliver the
        curriculum in accord with the desired new pedagogy.

     6. Financial resources. The evaluation team noted that the college has been a good
        steward of the state funding it has been provided, and that the college has been successful
        in generating extramural and entrepreneurial funding. The team’s primary concern in the
        area of financial resources has to do with the continued vulnerability of state funding and
        other economic uncertainties.

A written report addressing the comments and recommendation of the evaluation team must be
submitted to the ACPE Board of Directors by December 1, 2004.

Actions Taken

     1. The college has taken action to terminate the Continuation Curriculum Option of the
        PharmD program. A proposal to approve termination will be presented to the UIC
        Faculty Senate in Fall 2003.

     2. The college completed a new strategic plan this past spring.

6.         Outcome

     6.1     Decision: Program is in Good Standing
                                  PROGRAM REVIEW REPORT

1.       Reporting Institution:      University of Illinois at Chicago

2.       Program Reviewed:           M.S./Ph.D. in Pharmacy—Pharmacy
                                     Administration (51.2002)

3.       Date:                       AY 2002-03

4.       Contact Person:             Roger Nelson

         4.1.    Telephone:          (312) 413-3461

         4.2.    E-mail:             rpnelson@uic.edu

         4.3.    Fax:                (312) 996-9391

5.       Major Findings and Recommendations

The M.S. and Ph.D. in Pharmacy (Pharmacy Administration) was reviewed this past spring by
two external experts, one from the College of Pharmacy at Washington State University and the
other from the School of Pharmacy at the University of Maryland.

The Department of Pharmacy Administration is under new leadership, the head having been
appointed in January, 2002. In the brief amount of time that he has been in place, the head has
made a significant impact on the department on many fronts. The reviewers noted that the head
“has a broad vision of the research and educational aspects of the department and provides
impassioned leadership.” The College of Pharmacy has developed a new strategic plan that, the
reviewers reported, “reveals several areas that are relevant to department growth and
development.” In addition to these positive aspects, the reviewers commented favorably on the
breadth and quality of the adjunct faculty, the support of the department from the dean and
campus administrators, and the richness of the campus research environment that provides the
department faculty with opportunities for collaboration and growth.

Following are the reviewers’ findings and recommendations.

        The faculty must address the focus of the department and decide which two or three
         content areas will be emphasized—areas from which the faculty will build its
         national reputation and graduate program.

Response/Action: The faculty will work to identify three to four research themes for the
program and pursue those paths. This decision will also affect the core curriculum of the
department, which, the report indicated, has “too many ‘required’ courses of which a number, yet
to be determined, would be transitioned into elective courses.” Thus, once the research themes
are identified, the core and elective course work curriculum for each area will be promulgated
and implemented. The new curriculum will provide a template that outlines core courses along
with various tracks leading to specialty areas. As revision of the curriculum emerges, the
department will keep in mind recommendations made by the reviewers with regard to capstone
and quantitative courses and the seminar course. The department seminar series will become
even more inclusive of graduate student participation by having graduate students present
individual sessions more often. In the near future, this will help to assess graduate student skills
and develop them as the same time. The redesign of the curriculum will also take advantage of
the richness of graduate course offerings from other on-campus departments, responding to yet
another recommendation of the reviewers that curriculum planning should explore the value and
appropriateness of taking courses provided in other units within the university.

        Programs of study are not clearly defined.

Response/Action: The faculty has recognized this problem and in the past nine months has been
planning to make changes in the core and elective curricula. Attention will be paid to
sequencing and the need for fewer courses.

        The graduate program should be directed at the matriculation of graduate students
         toward the doctoral degree.

Response/Action: The department is in agreement with this recommendation, and in the past
year the faculty has focused on admitting students into the program who are directed toward the
achievement of their doctoral degree.

Other programmatic components that the department has developed for graduate students
include:

        Creation of summer internships with the pharmaceutical industry.
        Identified funding sources to support graduate students’ attendance at annual research
         meetings.
        Instituted bi-annual progress reviews for students. Students prepare a self-evaluation
         report that looks at past performance and strategies for further development. The review
         meeting includes the student, his/her advisor, the Director of Graduate Studies, and the
         head of the department.

The reviewers observed that the quality of the graduate curriculum is reflected by the fact that
“graduates…appear to be well prepared for their careers.” Not only are graduates successful in
finding employment and in demand by employers, they have won awards for their
accomplishments, including, in each of the past two years, the American Foundation for
Pharmaceutical Education Fellowship and the prestigious Abraham Lincoln Fellowship.

6.       Outcome

         6.1.   Decision: Program in Good Standing
                                  PROGRAM REVIEW REPORT

1.       Reporting Institution:       University of Illinois at Chicago

2.       Program Reviewed:            M.S. in Biomedical Visualization (51.2703)

3.       Date:                        AY 2002-03

4.       Contact Person:              Roger Nelson

         4.1.    Telephone:           (312) 413-3461

         4.2.    E-mail:              RPNelson@uic.edu

         4.3.    Fax:                 (312) 996-9391

5.       Major Findings and Recommendations

The Master of Science in Biomedical Visualization underwent accreditation review in 2002 by
the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Educational Programs (CAAHEP). The site
evaluation team of the Accreditation Review Committee for the Medical Illustrator (ARC-MI)
conducted its site review on February 21-22, 2002. As a result of the site evaluation, the
Commission voted on July 12, 2002, to award continuing accreditation to the M.S. in Biomedical
Visualization. The next comprehensive evaluation of the program will occur in 2007.

The evaluators identified the following program strengths worthy of comment.

        The administration’s enthusiastic support of the program as evidenced by:

              Plans to increase the program’s visibility on the UIC campus by promoting the
               creation of a partnership with the School of Architecture and the School of Art
               and Design in the form of a common computer lab;
              Upgrade of the plumbing of the building housing the program’s facilities;
              Maintaining a competitive edge with regard to future funding of the program;
              Ready availability of financial aid through graduate teaching assistantships.

        The energetic leadership and management provided by the program director and by the
         current faculty members, which:

                Attracts well qualified and committed faculty, students and staff;
                Maintains high standards for the program;
                Maintains a high profile in professional organizations;
                Exhibits teaching and curriculum expertise;
                Fosters an atmosphere of open and easy communication between faculty and
                 students;
           Successfully proposed a change in degree title from the Master of Associated
              Medical Sciences to the Master of Science in Biomedical Visualization.
      The bright, articulate and talented program faculty members who:

            Are committed to keeping the curriculum up-to-date and relevant;
            Possess an unusually wide variety of professional/practical experience;
            Are accomplished and well-recognized by their peers as experts in their
             specialties;
            Provide innovative assignments and methods of teaching;
            Provide students with a sense of history of the program and field.

      Two well-equipped digital laboratories with up-to-date computer software and hardware.

      A curriculum that exhibits:

            Purposeful sequencing of learning experiences;
            Emphasis on effective communication;
            Efficient and creative use of assignments to satisfy more than one course
             assignment;
            Integration of traditional and digital media through team teaching;
            Unique opportunities for interested students to receive training in 3-D modeling
             and anaplastology;
            Rare opportunities to work with a Virtual Reality Lab;
            Commitment and support of the basic and clinical faculty.

      The bright, motivated, talented and mature students who:

            Very positive towards the faculty and curriculum;
            Willing to accept the challenges of a difficult program.

      The loyal alumni who:

            As recent graduates feel that they were well-prepared to enter the job market;
            Serve as a wonderful networking resource that the program cultivates.

Recommendation

The review team identified one area where the program is in non-compliance with
standards. Instruction in neuroanatomy is not currently part of the program but is listed
as a curriculum competency in ARC-Mi’s Standards and Guidelines

Action Taken

The program has taken steps to bolster the instruction in neuroanatomy. Lectures
concerning the central nervous system by medical faculty members have been added to
the visual cognition course, as well as lectures on all major components of the central
nervous system in terms of anatomy and physiology. The pathophysiology course also
covers the major diseases of the central nervous system.

The faculty will also be addressing changes in the academic program to improve
instruction in genetics, pharmacology, immunology, and advanced biomedical imaging.

6.     Outcome

          6.1        Decision: Program is in Good Standing
                      Status Report on Assessment of Student Learning
                                          Initial Phase

The University of Illinois at Chicago has launched the initial phase in its development of a
formal comprehensive student learning assessment program. A number of initiatives and
activities have been begun by the Provost’s office and are described below. With the completion
of its reorganization expected at the beginning of the fall semester of 2003, the Provost’s office
will have in place an effective structure to proceed with the planning and execution of a
comprehensive student learning assessment program.

Administrative Structure. The searches for the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Affairs and the
Vice Provost for Planning and Programs are expected to be completed by the beginning of the
fall semester. Both will be actively involved with assessment of student learning in General
Education and academic programs.

Inventory of Assessment Programs/Assessment Website. The Provost’s office has conducted
a survey of colleges to collect information on individual unit assessment plans. The survey
results will be placed in an assessment website. Availability of information about the assessment
activities of all colleges will contribute greatly to the planning and development of a campus-
wide assessment initiative.

New Program Approval/Program Review. The Provost’s office has started to review the
process for new program approval and program review. The improved process will ensure that
all programs contain a statement of expected student learning outcomes and a description of the
process by which student learning will be assessed.

General Education. The Senate Committee on Educational Policy and the LAS Dean’s office
have reviewed the Report of the Task Force on General Education. The Provost’s office has
analyzed General Education course data of the last eight semesters. In addition, questions on
General Education are added to the annual survey of graduates of the College of Business
Administration. The analysis of General Education data and the student survey results will
provide a useful basis for the LAS Educational Policy Committee and the Senate Committee on
Educational Policy to review the current General Education goals and General Education course
requirements.

Conferences/Workshops. In addition to the staff members of the office of the Executive Vice
Provost, faculty leadership of the Senate Committee on Educational Policy and faculty members
with assessment expertise attended the IBHE assessment workshop held in April of 2003.
Subsequent follow-up meetings were held by these workshop attendees. The Provost met with
this faculty group as well as the leadership of the Senate Committee on Educational Policy and
LAS Educational Policy Committee in the summer to plan for two assessment workshops in the
fall. These assessment workshops are expected to involve faculty members of various units to
develop processes to review student learning goals, identify assessment tools, and use the
assessment results for curricular improvement. The proposed processes will be shared and
further discussed with the deans and units heads. Implementation of the assessment processes is
expected to begin in 2004.



               University of Illinois
                  at Springfield




                        Results Report
                         August 2003
                              University of Illinois at Springfield
                                    2003 Results Report

                                      Executive Summary

The Illinois Commitment: Partnerships, Opportunities, and Excellence (February 1999)
established six goals to guide state and institutional strategic decision making, academic program
approval and review, and budget development in the coming decade. Section I of this report
describes FY 2003 activities and accomplishments for each of the six goals, planned activities
for FY 2004, and two Best Practices. Section II presents data on common and mission-specific
indicators, while Section III provides the results of this year’s academic program reviews.
Section IV consists of a status report on assessment of learning outcomes.

Goal One: Higher education will help Illinois business and industry sustain strong
economic growth.

    The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Center for Governmental Studies, in collaboration with
     the University of Illinois Extension Services, is engaged in the fourth year of a five-year
     initiative focusing on state and regional economic development. The project, a
     consortium of six state universities funded by the Department of Commerce and
     Economic Opportunity, seeks to generate economic development strategies that are
     transferable among regions of the state, have a statewide impact, and address priorities of
     six state regions.

    In FY 2003, despite budget rescissions within many state agencies with which UIS
     partners, the campus maintained and even increased grant and contract funding to
     $6.9 million.

Goal Two: Higher education will join elementary and secondary education to improve
teaching and learning at all levels.

    With 354 teacher education candidates, UIS has doubled the number of students obtaining
     teacher training since the baseline year of FY 2000. The number of students recommended
     for certification can be expected to continue to increase as these students progress through
     the curriculum.

    UIS initiated a master teaching and leadership concentration within the M.A. in
     Educational Leadership in Fall 2000. The concentration prepares students to sit for the
     national Master Teacher Certification Examination and is offered completely online.
     Headcount enrollment in FY 2002 was 146, an increase of over 400% from the 27
     students enrolled at the program’s inception in Fall 2000.

    In FY 2003, UIS continued to provide training and support to all public schools and
     community college partners in the Cisco Network Training Academy. UIS advanced to
     the next level of Cisco curriculum provider, Cisco Certified Networking Professional
     Academy. In addition, in Spring 2003, UIS was approved to serve as a regional academy
     for WEB Design and IT Essentials I and II.
Goal Three: No Illinois citizen will be denied an opportunity for a college education
because of financial need.

    UIS, along with the other two UI campuses, develops a financial aid profile each year for
     full-time undergraduate students. The profile for Fall 2002 indicates that the tuition and
     mandatory fees for 41% of full-time undergraduates at UIS were fully covered by need-
     based or non-need-based awards (i.e., Pell Grants, ISAC awards, private scholarships,
     institutional awards and grants, tuition waivers). Moreover, 53% of full-time students
     paid less than $1,000 per year. The figures were 35% and 47%, respectively, for Fall
     1999. These figures represent financial aid grants only; loan amounts are not included.

Goal Four: Illinois will increase the number and diversity of citizens completing training
and education programs.

    One of UIS’ principal contributions to expanding access to higher education is the
     development of online courses. Total online enrollments increased by 37% (from 2,425 in
     FY 2002 to 3,312 in FY 2003) and accounted for more than 13% of total credit hours in
     Spring 2003. One out of four UIS students took at least one online class in the spring, and
     one out of eight UIS students took online classes exclusively. In all, more than one
     thousand students chose online classes in the spring semester. Retention in online classes
     remains extraordinarily high, with 94% of online students retained during the semester,
     compared to an average of 96% on campus. The national retention rate in online classes
     typically averages 70%-75%.

    According to data provided by the Illinois Virtual Campus, in Spring 2003 UIS led all
     state university campuses in online, credit-bearing enrollment.

    The Fall 2002 enrollment in Liberal Studies Online reached 186. The program graduated
     25 students during AY 2002-03, up from 20 the previous year and a dramatic increase
     over the six that constituted the program’s first set of graduates in May 2001.

Goal Five: Illinois colleges and universities will hold students to even higher expectations
for learning and will be accountable for the quality of academic programs and the
assessment of learning.

    In FY 2003, Chancellor Ringeisen convened the National Commission on the Future of
     UIS. The goal of the Commission is to produce a concise vision that describes the
     campus’ aspirations for the kind of institution it will be in ten years. Approximately 200
     faculty, staff, alumni, and friends of UIS serve on the Commission’s 13 task forces. The
     Commission report is expected in October.

    In calendar year 2002, the number of refereed scholarly publications and presentations by
     UIS faculty was 182, a significant increase over the baseline of 164 set in Fall 1997.

    The third annual Science Research Symposium attracted about 200 students and faculty, a
      400% increase in participation over the previous year.

    Recruiting for the third cohort of the Capital Scholars Program was successful. As of
     June 30, 2003, a cohort of 133 had paid deposits indicating that they plan to attend in the
     fall. The average ACT score for these students is 25.9, and the average class rank
     percentile is 79.2.

    In FY 2003, thirteen smart classrooms were added, resulting in 90% of UIS classrooms
     being “smart.” With that level of classroom enhancement, it is fair to say that UIS is a
     technology-intensive campus.

    The past year was marked by a substantial increase in the number of cultural activities on
     campus, with a significant increase in opportunities for student involvement. Highlights
     include newly formed groups in music, forensics, and theater. In addition, the men’s
     basketball program not only was successfully integrated in the Prairie Stars lineup but also
     achieved several “upset” victories over nationally ranked opponents.

    As described in the Status Report on Assessment, the campus continued to make progress
     on the systematic assessment of student learning through the leadership of the Assessment
     Task Force.

Goal Six: Illinois colleges and universities will continually improve productivity, cost-
effectiveness, and accountability.

    In FY 2003, UIS responded to a budget rescission of $2.2 million (8.8% of state support)
     by eliminating reserve capacity, utilizing tuition dollars from higher enrollments, and
     eliminating vacant faculty and staff positions.

In FY 2003, the campus changed to a more decentralized budget model. Centrally held funds in
the Provost’s office were moved to college budgets. In FY 2003, $648,400 was moved with an
additional $933,600 to be moved at the start of FY 2004. This will allow for increased
incentives for planning, cost containment, and revenue generation and will allow UIS to respond
more swiftly and effectively to change.

Best Practices. In this year’s Results Report, UIS highlights two Best Practices. The Academic
Best Practice relates to Goal 4 (Access), the Online Degree Completion Programs in Liberal Arts
Disciplines. The Administration Best Practice relates to Goal 6 (Accountability), The Noel-
Levitz Study of Assessing the Delivery of Academic, Business, and Student Services.
                             University of Illinois at Springfield
                             Report of Institutional Performance
                           on Goals 1-6 of The Illinois Commitment

                     Illinois Commitment Goal One: Economic Growth
                    Higher education will help Illinois business and industry
                                sustain strong economic growth

Increase UIS’ contribution to the preparation of information technology professionals. The
University of Illinois at Springfield offers three information technology programs: M.S. in
Management Information Systems and B.S. and M.S. in Computer Science. Seventy-five
degrees were awarded in FY 2002, a significant increase from the 52 degrees awarded in
FY 2001 and 67 awarded in FY 2000. To facilitate degree completion, the MIS program
initiated a revision to its closure requirement in FY 2003 by instituting a capstone course.

The total number of program majors in the three information technology programs was 480 in
Fall 2002, up 33% from the baseline of 361 established in Fall 1998. Enrollment increases were
consistent across all three programs.

In June 2002, UIS received a grant from the Alfred F. Sloan Foundation that is enabling the
campus to establish six new online degrees/concentrations. One of the most recent is the B.S. in
Computer Science. This program is highlighted in the Best Practices description later in this
section.

   In FY 2004, UIS will begin to deliver the online baccalaureate computer science offering.

Develop partnerships with economic development agencies. Through UIS’ Office of Applied
Study, the university partners with area economic development agencies to offer undergraduate
students real world experience, while providing the agencies with additional staffing. Recent
placements have included the City of Springfield Economic Development Office, the Center for
Economic Progress, the Springfield Urban League Community Development Corporation,
Springfield 2000, and the Illinois Economic and Fiscal Commission.

Expand partnerships with state agencies to promote economic development in Illinois. During
FY 2002, the governor asked UIS to propose a plan for academic programs and activities that
could be carried out by a public policy research and service center to be affiliated with the new
presidential library and administered by UIS. The proposal, which was funded in the state’s
FY 2003 budget, called for transforming the campus’ Institute for Public Affairs into the
Abraham Lincoln Presidential Center for Governmental Studies (ALPCGS). During FY 2003
the transformation of the Institute for Public Affairs into the ALPCGS was completed.

The political culture of Illinois—past, present, and future—was the theme of the keynote and
panel discussion of the inaugural Public Policy Summit of the ALPCGS on April 29, 2003. The
summit accomplished its goal of exploring major public policy issues by bringing together the
perspectives of jurists, lawmakers, academics, journalists, political practitioners, and “watch-
dog” group representatives.
UIS anticipated the creation of several professorships, doctoral research associates, and graduate
assistantships related to the activities of the center. The UI Foundation supported these efforts
by expanding the scope and intensity of its development activities to help obtain significant
endowments and gifts. Regrettably, the appropriated funding for the ALPCGS was cut in the
FY 2004 appropriation. As a result, work toward the new initiatives has been slowed. The
ALPCGS still plans to work with the UI Foundation to undertake the outlined activities; their
development is likely to be much slower than originally anticipated, however.

The ALPCGS, in collaboration with the University of Illinois Extension Services, is engaged in
the fourth year of a five-year initiative focusing on state and regional economic development.
The project, a consortium of six state universities funded by the Department of Commerce and
Economic Opportunity, seeks to generate economic development strategies that are transferable
among regions of the state, have a statewide impact, and address priorities of six state regions.
Four projects have recently been completed: (1) the Pilot Research-Based Planning Process,
(2) Data Standards/Software, (3) Digital Governmental Regional Assessment, and (4) Economic
Development Tool Web Development. The capacity-building portion of the project is proceeding
as well. In FY 2003 a new faculty member became involved in the project, and two doctoral
research associates (DPA students) have been actively involved in the research. This is creating
a critical mass of expertise to provide economic development assistance in the Central and East
Central Region.

In partnership with the Illinois Community Action Association (ICAA) and the Department of
Commerce and Economic Opportunity, the ALPCGS continued a Best Practices award to
evaluate programs provided by 40 community action agencies. These programs are designed to
increase self-sufficiency in low-income Illinois residents by improving their opportunities, skills,
and capabilities. Although the number of applicants was down from last year’s inaugural
program, the quality of the applications was much improved. In addition to completing reviews
of the applications, this year’s project also included a training session for agencies on how to
identify, document, and assess their program impacts. A second project was initiated to help the
ICAA develop measures to assess community development.

During FY 2003, UIS continued the management and delivery of an online career specialist
program for the Illinois Department of Employment Security. The Campus Senate approved the
offering of a Graduate Certificate in Career Specialist Studies to be offered through the College
of Education and Human Services and the Human Development Counseling program. In
addition, UIS continued its partnership with the Illinois Department of Human Services for the
development, management, and ongoing delivery of an innovative online credit-bearing
certificate program for the administration of the Food Stamp Program.

The UIS Leadership Roundtable assembled distinguished alumni from across the nation for a
two-day discussion of challenges of the global marketplace and ways in which UIS can best
prepare its graduates for leadership.

Two important Student Affairs projects are also noteworthy in this category, the UIS Substance
Abuse Task Force and the Office of Student Volunteers and Service-Learning. Their recent
accomplishments are described in Goal Five.
   In FY 2004, UIS will continue to develop partnerships with state agencies and businesses
   through the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Center for Governmental Studies.

Increase UIS’ contribution to solving scientific, technical, and social problems. At
$6.9 million in FY 2003, grant and contracts awards increased slightly over FY 2002 figures.
This level of funding is particularly notable in light of budget rescissions in state agencies with
which UIS partners. The number of awards remained level at 61.

   In FY 2004, UIS’ principal contributions in the area of solving scientific, technical, and
   social problems will continue to be in applied research and public affairs education and
   training, conducted primarily through the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Center for
   Governmental Studies.

                  Illinois Commitment Goal Two: Teaching and Learning
                 Higher education will join elementary and secondary education
                          to improve teaching and learning at all levels

Develop partnerships with K-12 schools. The first UIS Public Policy High School Initiative was
carried out by the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Center for Government Studies. The program
recognized teams of Illinois students and teachers who identified a current, real-world problem in
their communities and then studied its historical framework and possible solutions. ALPCGS
staff assisted in the design of the study questions, and progress of each team was shared on a
website prior to a two-day symposium and awards ceremony in Springfield.
The second annual Lincoln and Leadership summer institute, another ALPCGS project, enabled
high school seniors to earn college credit while exploring Lincoln’s lasting impact on society.
Lincoln and Leadership are complemented with a graduate seminar for secondary school
teachers and a two-week, noncredit program for high school sophomores and juniors.
The Springfield Public Educational Partnership consists of Lincoln Land Community College,
Springfield School District #186, and UIS. The Springfield Urban League teamed with this
group and received a U.S. Department of Education GEAR UP grant for $2.4 million over a
period of five years beginning in August 1999. The students included in grant activities for this
academic year were eighth graders at Washington Middle School and ninth and tenth graders at
Lanphier High School. Services provided by GEAR UP for these students included tutoring,
leadership classes, and computer-assisted math and reading activities. Campus visits to LLCC
and UIS focused on financial aid, career awareness, and specific disciplines, including English,
math, biology, and chemistry. Students made individual classroom visits to UIS accompanied by
their high school instructor. GEAR UP also provided in-service professional development for
teachers on reading improvement.

   In FY 2004, GEAR UP college preparation activities will continue for ninth, tenth, and
   eleventh graders at Lanphier High School. The parent coordinator and GEAR UP
   coordinator will emphasize career awareness and financial aid for college.

Contribute to increasing the number and professional development of Illinois teachers. During
FY 2002, the last full year for which data are available, 78 students completed the teacher
education sequence and were recommended to the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) for
certification. This number returns the campus to the baseline of 78 established for FY 1999.
The number of candidates enrolled in teacher education remained fairly constant, dropping to
354 in FY 2002 from 357 in FY 2001. These numbers represent a 100% increase over the FY
2000 enrollment of 177, and the number of students recommended for certification can be
expected to continue to increase as these students progress through the curriculum.

UIS initiated a master teaching and leadership concentration within the M.A. in Educational
Leadership in Fall 2000. The concentration prepares students to sit for the national Master
Teacher Certification Examination and is offered completely online. Headcount enrollment in
FY 2002 was 146, an increase of more than 400% from the 27 students enrolled at the program’s
inception in Fall 2000. In FY 2003 the curriculum added a new sequence in School Law for
Teachers.

With many senior school administrators approaching retirement, there is a need in central Illinois
(as documented by the ISBE and student inquiries) to provide opportunities for those
credentialed as principals to advance to the level of superintendent. During FY 2002, UIS
proposed a post-master’s certificate to provide coursework needed for superintendent
certification. In FY 2003 the UIS post-master’s certificate was reviewed and approved by the
ISBE. The proposal is pending at the IBHE.

    In FY 2004 the campus will respond to feedback from the IBHE and re-submit its proposal
    for a post-master’s certificate leading to certification as a superintendent.

UIS designs several courses specifically for teachers, including Internet for Educators,
Technology in the Curriculum, Basic Technology Learning for Teachers, and Technology
Strategies for Teachers. In addition, UIS continued to expand graduate offerings in educational
leadership with grants from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and the Illinois Century Network
(ICN). The Sloan grant enabled nine new courses on advanced teaching methods, while the ICN
grant led to five new courses on special education methods for the regular classroom teacher.

   In FY 2004, UIS will expand the online offerings for teachers through the Master Teacher
   Leadership program’s School Law sequence. UIS will explore opportunities to offer teacher
   education courses to a cohort of Illinois Central Community College graduates in the Peoria
   area.

Develop technology partnerships with schools. UIS hosted the Conference of State Universities
and ISBE eLearning Division on Technology Aspects of the No Child Left Behind initiative in
Illinois. In cooperation with the Illinois learning technology Region Three (central and western
Illinois) school districts, the Office of Technology-Enhanced Learning (OTEL) developed and
maintained an online database of technology training initiatives funded by the No Child Left
Behind Act. The director of OTEL is featured on regular technology update web casts by the
ISBE. The director also presented at statewide conferences, including the State of Illinois Gifted
Education Conference (on challenging Illinois gifted children through the Internet) and the
Illinois Education and Technology Conference (an Internet update for school administrators).

OTEL staff members continue to offer periodic workshops for faculty and staff at Chicago State
University. Funded in part by a HECA Access and Diversity grant, these professional
development and training sessions share UIS expertise in developing and delivering online
learning.

In FY 2003, UIS expanded training and support to partners in the Cisco Network Training
Academy. UIS also added the next level of Cisco training, Cisco Certified Networking
Professional (CCNP) Academy, to its computer science offerings. This level of training
prepares certified graduates to build and administer a complex network of routers in a WAN
and LAN environment. Semester 1 of the CCNP curriculum was offered in Spring 2003;
semester 2 will follow in Fall 2003; semester 3, in Spring 2004; and semester 4, in Fall 2004.

In Spring 2003, UIS became a regional academy for Cisco Academy-sponsored curricula for
Web Design and IT Essentials I and II. The campus currently has four local academies that will
be local IT Essentials academies under the UIS Regional Academy. In summer 2003, Dr. Ted
Mims trained seven local instructors in IT Essentials I and six local instructors in IT Essentials
II.
    In FY 2004, UIS plans to train a regional instructor to offer Web Design. Web Design
    Academies will be held in Fall 2003 and Spring 2004.

Upgrade secondary science teaching skills. UIS offered professional development workshops in
math and technology for approximately 150 secondary school teachers. In addition, the teacher
education program consulted with Springfield Lanphier High School to provide in-service
workshops on reading strategies for their teachers.

                        Illinois Commitment Goal Three: Affordability
             No Illinois citizen will be denied an opportunity for a college education
                                      because of financial need

Keep increases of net costs to students within their ability to pay. Fall 2002 tuition and fees for
full-time UIS undergraduate students, based on 12 semester credit hours, were $1,676 per
semester. UIS, along with the other two UI campuses, develops a financial aid profile each year
for full-time undergraduate students. The profile for Fall 2002 indicates that tuition and
mandatory fees for 41% of full-time UIS undergraduates were fully covered by need-based or
non-need-based awards (i.e., Pell Grants, ISAC awards, private scholarships, institutional awards
and grants, tuition waivers). Moreover, 53% of full-time students paid less than $1,000 per year.
The figures were 35% and 47%, respectively, for Fall 1999. These figures represent financial aid
grants only; loan amounts are not included.

In FY 2003 the Foundation Office awarded 70 scholarships to 114 recipients for a total of
$81,865, up 13% from $72,351 in FY 2002.

   In FY 2004 UIS will increase tuition by 5%, a modest increase in light of the 8.8%
   reduction in state support in FY 2003 and the 8.6% reduction in FY 2004. UIS will
   continue to monitor the relationship between tuition/fee levels and financial aid awards.
                    Illinois Commitment Goal Four: Access and Diversity
                     Illinois will increase the number and diversity of citizens
                            completing training and education programs

Continue to develop online programs and support services. One of UIS’ principal contributions
to increasing access to higher education is the development of online courses. In June 2002, the
campus was awarded a $500,000 grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation (with matching
funds of $250,000 from the University) to expand its popular online degree offerings. The grant
money is being used to develop six new online degree programs/concentrations over the next
three years.

Online enrollments at UIS continue to grow rapidly. Total online enrollments increased by 37%
(from 2,425 in FY 2002 to 3,312 in FY 2003) and accounted for more than 13% of total credit
hours in Spring 2003. Over one thousand different students took online classes in the spring
semester. One out of eight UIS students took only online classes in the spring; one out of four
UIS students took at least one online class in the spring. Retention in online classes remains very
high, with 94% of online students retained during the semester, compared to the 96% retention
rate for classroom-based learners. According to data provided by the Illinois Virtual Campus, in
Spring 2003 UIS led all state university campuses in online, credit-bearing enrollments.

The Fall 2002 enrollment in Liberal Studies Online, the completion degree program for transfer
students, reached 186. There were 25 LIS graduates during AY 2002-03, up from the six that
constituted the program’s first graduates in May 2001 and 20 in May 2002. The College of
DuPage and Southwestern Illinois College expanded the LIS partnerships to 30.

UIS is ensuring its continued success in attracting online students by strengthening the support
infrastructure for online students. One indication of the integration of online students into the
campus is that in January 2003 student government elections were held online for the first time,
granting suffrage to our distant online students.

The Career Services portion of the online module for the UIS Applied Studies Program was
delivered successfully. Career Services and the Applied Studies Office are proposing to provide
a business etiquette course online.

Student Affairs implemented a Support for Academic Improvement Program using Blackboard
software to provide general information to support student success.

To maintain the quality of instruction for online students, UIS is working to make library
resources available online. Brookens Library now offers 97 discrete electronic services (up 23%
from the baseline of 78 set in Spring 2000) as well as the full text of more than 2,000 individual
publications (e.g., periodicals, academic journals, wire services). The library continues to deliver
copies of interlibrary loan articles directly to students’ homes. In FY 2003, library faculty
redesigned the Library Research Methods course into an online format, added FAQ and online
tutorials to the library web page, conducted special orientation sessions for Peoria students, and
added five new databases, including many new online books.
   In Fall 2003, UIS projects a 36% increase in online enrollments compared to Fall 2002.
   Total enrollments for FY 2004 are expected to reach 4,500. In addition, the campus plans to
   continue to increase the number of community college partnership agreements supporting the
   Liberal Studies Online baccalaureate completion program. Online baccalaureate degree
   completion programs in History and Computer Science will be launched in the fall.
   In FY 2004, UIS will institute an e-tuition rate for students who are registered exclusively
   online, making such courses even more attractive to students throughout the country.

Implement support strategies to enhance diversity on campus. In Fall 2002, student enrollment
rose to 4,451, marking the fourth consecutive year increase in total headcount enrollment. At the
undergraduate level, there were increases in the number of minority students across all race and
ethnic groups (American Indian/Alaskan Native, Asian/Pacific Islander, African American, and
Hispanic), with declines in the number of graduate students enrolled for each of these ethnic
groups. The result was an overall slight decline in the percentage of minority students enrolled
relative to the total population of students from Fall 2001 (11.8%) to Fall 2002 (11.5%). The
long-term trend of substantially increased enrollment of minority students at UIS should
continue. For example, enrollment of African Americans at UIS increased from 5.9% in FY 1992
to 8% in FY 2002. The percentage of international students, relative to the total number of
students enrolled, remained constant compared with Fall 2001 (4.1%), with slight increases
indicated in the number of international students enrolled at the graduate level and slight
decreases in the number of international students enrolled at the undergraduate level.

As of the first of July, 2003, five Hispanics, three African Americans, and three Asian
Americans indicated that they intend to enter the Capital Scholars Program, representing 9.7% of
the total number of students entering for whom racial or ethnic information was self-disclosed.

The Retention Subcommittee and the Minority Student Recruiting Advisory Committee
continued to focus on attracting and retaining all student populations, including those from
underrepresented groups. These subcommittees, after reviewing various data pertaining to
student recruitment and retention and, based on these reports, continued to work with units
across the campus to develop and implement policies to enhance the recruitment and retention of
students. The new Banner student information system will allow the campus to engage in more
systematic and accurate assessment of these strategies by tracking the number of students who
inquire about, apply to, and enroll at UIS by various categories including race, ethnicity, level,
and geographical locale.

UIS is proud of its involvement in the Odyssey Project, also known as the Clemente Course in
the Humanities, a curriculum developed by Bard College and taught throughout the country. The
program provides access to higher education to people who otherwise might not think of
pursuing a college degree. Its goal is to bring the humanities, through a sequence of courses in
philosophy, art history, literature, and U.S. history, to people who have completed high school
or its equivalent but have minimal college credit and who otherwise might not have the chance to
experience higher education. The project is based on the belief that exposure to the humanities
can help people better reflect on their world and its relationship to themselves. In 2002-03, UIS
faculty in history and English served as instructors in the program. The program’s director is a
UIS graduate.
               Illinois Commitment Goal Five: High Expectations and Quality
         Illinois colleges and universities will hold students to even higher expectations
                  for learning and will be accountable for the quality of academic
                              programs and the assessment of learning

Note: The campus’ progress in assessment is discussed in Section IV: Status Report on
Assessment of Learning Outcomes.

Increase enrollment by strengthening student recruitment processes, enhancing retention, and
upgrading marketing materials. During FY 2002, the University of Illinois at Springfield
completed a comprehensive marketing research study begun in FY 2001 in consultation with
Noel-Levitz. During FY 2003, the Enrollment Management Task Force, comprised of a
recruitment subcommittee and a retention subcommittee, met throughout the academic year to
review and assess accomplishments in the areas of student recruitment and retention on the
campus. Accomplishments include an Enrollment Opportunities Report that considers the
advantages and disadvantages associated with increasing various student populations (first year,
residential, full-time graduate, online, off-site) as well as the requisite resources for such
expansion. More than 1,300 students participated in the Student Satisfaction Inventory (SSI)
survey in Spring 2003. These results will be compared with both national norms and responses to
the Spring 2001 campus SSI, thus providing diagnostic information concerning both strengths
and areas for improvement in academics as well as in business and student services. The Noel-
Levitz study is highlighted in the Best Practices description later in this section.

Recruitment marketing materials were extensively revised in terms of design and information,
combining a collegiate look with crisp, clear writing to positively present UIS’ high-quality
programs and services. Subsequently, this approach was adopted by UIS for all of its printed and
web-based materials in FY 2003 for a consistent look and distinct brand.

The above efforts resulted in an increase of 3.8% in headcount enrollment from Fall 2001 to
Fall 2002, building on an 8.8% increase the previous year. The FTE enrollment from Fall 2001
to Fall 2002 rose 24% to 2787.15. The sharp increase in FTE reflects a larger number of full-
time (vs. part-time) students, both Capital Scholars and transfer students.

   In FY 2004, UIS will continue to take actions to improve recruitment and retention of both
   undergraduate and graduate students. The campus will analyze results of the Spring 2003
   Student Satisfaction Inventory and develop an action plan based on its findings. This activity
   is highlighted in the Best Practices Description later in this section.

Enhance academic quality through increasing the faculty base and recruiting and retaining
critical faculty and staff. The campus hired an Executive Director of the Abraham Lincoln
Presidential Center for Governmental Studies. Dr. Milan J. Dluhy assumed his duties on
July 1, 2003.

UIS hired 14 new tenure-track faculty in Fall 2003. The campus continues to attract faculty with
strong potential as both teachers and scholars. Among this year’s hires were graduates of the
University of Michigan, the University of Minnesota, and the University of Illinois at Chicago.
Although UIS continues to be an institution where excellence in teaching is an overriding goal,
the campus also seeks to enhance academic quality by fostering expectations of faculty as
teacher-scholars. Each fall the campus recognizes the scholarly works (books, refereed articles,
and refereed presentations) published in the previous year by its faculty. In Fall 2002, the
number of such scholarly works reported was 182, an 11% increase over the baseline of 164 set
in Fall 1997. The annual faculty recognition event was re-designed to allow the recipient of the
University Scholar Award to reflect publicly on the place of scholarship in his life. Additionally,
the campus awarded its second Faculty Excellence Award for career-long achievement in
teaching and scholarship to a faculty member who is a nationally recognized expert in Eriksonian
therapy. The campus continues to clarify and strengthen expectations for scholarship in relation
to tenure and promotion. The FY 2003 budget rescission and FY 2004 budget cut interrupted the
progress the campus was making in providing increased financial support for faculty scholarship.
The campus Research Board offered three workshops for faculty and staff on “The Great
Juggling Act: How Do You Stay Actively Engaged in Scholarship While Meeting
Responsibilities for Teaching and Service?”, “Grantsmanship: Seeking External Support,” and
“Writing for Publication.”

   The FY 2003 budget rescission and FY 2004 budget cut interrupted the campus’ progress in
   increasing its faculty base. Any additional resources made available in FY 2004 will be
   directed toward strengthening the faculty and staff base.

UIS held its third annual Science Research Symposium in April 2003. The daylong event was
sponsored in part by the Provost’s office. It featured traditional and poster sessions, and a
keynote presentation by Dr. Jerry L. Atwood. The 200 participating students and faculty (a
400% increase over the previous year) included faculty from regional colleges in the fields of
medicine, biology, and chemistry.

Enhance academic quality through program accreditation. Under the leadership of a new dean
hired in the spring of 2002, the College of Business and Management moves toward
accreditation by implementing significant curricular changes in its programming to comply with
AACSB guidelines. Reapplication for AACSB candidacy was approved in October 2002.
Curricular revisions required for accreditation were made at the undergraduate and graduate
levels, and the output of peer-reviewed publications (also required for accreditation), increased.
The self-evaluation year is AY 2005-06, with a peer visit to be scheduled in either fall 2006 or
early winter 2007.

The Human Services Program has agreed to submit an application for accreditation to the
Council for Standards in Human Service Education (CSHSE) by December 1, 2003. The
application will be prepared during Summer 2003.

As a first step in seeking environmental health accreditation, the Department of Environmental
Studies restructured its curriculum to offer an M.S. in Environmental Sciences, distinct from the
M.A. degree in Environmental Studies. The department plans to pursue the application for
accreditation in AY 2003-04.

The Educational Leadership, School Counseling, and Teacher Education programs underwent an
ISBE accreditation site visit during October 2002. Reaccreditation decision is pending.
The Social Work Program is making progress on an accreditation renewal. The lead faculty
author of the self-study has been identified and received training from the Council of Social
Work Education. The self-study report will be submitted in Fall 2003.

The Human Development Counseling Program underwent the Council for Accreditation of
Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) site visit during May 2002, which
included the review of the community counseling and school counseling concentrations. The
CACREP Board has extended the program’s accreditation for two years.

A report on strategic planning and assessment processes was made in May 2003 to the
Commission on Peer Review and Accreditation of the National Association of Schools of Public
Affairs and Administration (NASPAA) regarding reaccreditation of the Public Administration
MPA degree. The decision will be conveyed in July. Continued reaccreditation through 2009 is
expected.

   In FY 2004, UIS will continue to pursue the accreditation of programs as described above.

Enhance instruction through a program to develop contributions of part-time faculty. The Ad
Hoc Committee on Part-time and Nontenure track faculty surveyed department chairs, part-time
faculty, and full-time nontenure track faculty in an effort to develop policies and practices aimed
at making the best use of such faculty. The committee developed a series of recommendations
for the campus as a whole, for colleges, and for departments, which will be reviewed and
implemented in the coming year.

Develop a vision for the campus as a leading public, liberal arts institution. In FY 2003,
Chancellor Ringeisen convened the National Commission on the Future of UIS. The goal of the
commission is to produce a concise vision that describes the campus’ aspirations for the kind of
institution it will be in ten years. Approximately 200 faculty, staff, alumni, and friends of UIS
serve on the commission’s thirteen task forces. The commission report is expected in October.

Strengthen undergraduate education. Alumni surveys reveal high levels of satisfaction with
UIS undergraduate programs. The one-year-out survey results from 1999 through 2001
baccalaureate graduates reveal that more than 90% express both a positive attitude toward the
campus and toward their bachelor’s degrees and are satisfied with the quality of education
received in their majors. These results are consistent with the baseline set for graduates from
1991-97.

Recruiting for the third cohort of the Capital Scholars Program has been successful. As of June
30, 2003, deposits had been received from 133 candidates, indicating that they plan to attend in
the fall. The average ACT score for these students is 25.9, and the average class rank percentile
is 79.2--essentially unchanged from last year.

The 13 courses of the Capital Scholars integrated core curriculum have been developed and
offered. Various programs have begun to revise their curriculum to reflect lower, as well as
upper, division offerings. An assessment plan is being developed and implemented under the
direction of the program’s associate director, working in conjunction with a nationally known
authority in assessment of interdisciplinary programs. This effort has led to a model approach to
assessment of learning outcomes, one component of which was featured at the IBHE assessment
workshops held in Spring 2003.

   In FY 2004, UIS will continue to develop lower-division bridge courses, as appropriate,
   in its undergraduate majors. The campus will intensify its efforts to recruit minorities to
   the Capital Scholars Program.

Improve graduate education. Alumni surveys reveal high levels of satisfaction with UIS
graduate programs. The one-year-out survey results from 1999 through 2001 reveal that 94% to
96% express a positive attitude toward the campus, 94% to 96% express a positive attitude
toward their master’s degrees, and about 90% (88%-92%) are satisfied with the quality of
education received in their majors. These results are consistent with the baseline set for master’s
graduates from 1991-97.

As noted in the FY 2002 report, responsibilities for enrollment management were transferred to
the Division of Academic Affairs to increase the effectiveness of campus recruitment and
retention efforts. As part of that reorganization, the associate vice chancellor for graduate
education and research, who was already responsible for the graduate assistantship program,
assumed oversight of graduate admissions. Accomplishments during the past year include
development of the graduate studies website, clarification of graduate application requirements
for prospective students, and increased coordination among the Office of Admissions and
Records, the Office of Graduate Studies, the Graduate Assistantship Office, and the Office of
Graduate Internships.

One of UIS’ principal initiatives related to graduate education is its Doctor of Public
Administration offering. Enrollment has been level at 20-23 students since the program’s
initiation. As of May, 2003, the DPA program had awarded its first four doctorates.

The annual Outstanding Master’s Thesis Award was instituted in Fall 2001 as a means of
recognizing and honoring achievement in completing the campus’ graduate thesis/project
requirement. The Fall 2002 honoree was entered in the Midwest Association of Graduate
Schools’ Outstanding Master’s Thesis competition.

   In FY 2004, the campus will continue to increase efficiency in the application structure
   by processing departmental graduate admissions decisions electronically through Banner
   software.

Improve the quality and availability of learning-related technology. The number of computers
on campus dropped slightly from 1,067 in FY 2002 to 1,012 in FY 2003, but is still up 30% from
the baseline of 779 set in FY 1999. UIS began tracking this statistic in FY 1999 when the
definition of a fully capable computer met the criterion of “capable of running Microsoft Office
2000.” By FY 2003, that definition had changed substantially, to “capable of running three
simultaneous Office XP applications.” In light of this definition, in FY 2003 the computers at
UIS were 76% fully capable, 13% marginal, and 11% deficient. UIS will use these levels of
computer capability as a new baseline in future reporting years.
Ground was broken for what will be the largest and most technologically advanced building on
the UIS campus. The four-story, 125,000 square-foot building will house classrooms and state-
of-the-art computer labs, the offices of Enrollment Management, and various other student
affairs offices. The College of Business and Management and many departments of the College
of Liberal Arts and Sciences will move to the structure when it opens in 2004.

In FY 2003, thirteen smart classrooms were added, resulting in 90% of UIS classrooms being
“smart.” With that level of classroom enhancement, it is fair to say that UIS is a technology-
intensive campus.

To meet students’ needs for assistance, the computer support center offers 207.5 person hours
per week on the help desk. While this number was down slightly from the FY 2002 figure due to
budget cuts, it was still up 260% from the baseline of 57.5 in FY 1999.

A total of 47 wireless laptops are now available (compared to five a year ago), with 40 dedicated
to classroom use on portable carts and seven available for faculty and student checkout.

The Educational Technology Office installed two projectors in Brookens Auditorium,
significantly enhancing instructional capabilities and student life. The first is a high-end data
projector for displaying computer screens, video/DVD projection, and video conferencing. The
second is a 35mm film projection system that allows the campus to show feature-length films
(new releases, sneak previews, classics, and educational titles). The sound system provides full
Dolby digital sound support for the 35mm projector.

The UIS Career Services Office implemented several technological improvements to give
students access to timely and comprehensive career information. Among these were:
ERecruiting, which provides students with a database to search open positions and to submit
resumes for review by companies/employers; CareerSearch, a database that helps students
organize job searches; and DISCOVER, a career exploration system that not only profiles
interests, competencies, and skills, but also generates such critical information for students as
educational expectations, supply, and demand.

Brookens Library migrated to the new Voyager software platform. The system provides better
account access, the ability to renew online, and greater integration of functionality.

   In FY 2004, UIS will develop plans for a New Technology Learning Center and begin to seek
   funding for it.

Enrich the quality of student life. Continuing efforts of the past several years to expand the
array of arts and sciences courses and activities, the campus hired its first theater faculty
member, complementing hires made the previous year in music and forensics. In addition to the
lower-division Capital Scholars art and music course, UIS offered credit for music participation
and forensics participation, and a course on principles of acting. A full year of first-year
calculus-based physics was offered, and two full years of languages. Spanish, French, German,
Russian, Chinese, and Japanese enrolled about 250 students.
The past year offered a significant increase in opportunities for student involvement in cultural
activities. Highlights follow:

      The music program initiated a choir, pep band, string ensemble, and drum circle. The
       forensics team competed nationally, winning several individual honors and eighth place
       as a team in speech and debate at a national forensics tournament. The first two plays of
       the UIS Theater Program were well received, allowing UIS students to work with local
       actors.

      The Office of Student Volunteers and Service-Learning completed its first full year of
       operation. The office promotes community engagement and partnerships in education, the
       environment, neighborhood improvement, and social action. Over 20 educational, co-
       curricular service-related programs were offered to promote an ethic of civic engagement
       on campus.

      This year marked the 25th Annual International Festival and the inaugural Annual
       Japan/America night.

      A major milestone was the initiation of UIS men’s basketball. New athletic programming
       increased overall participation by 13.5%. Most significantly for the future, a student
       referendum passed to construct a new Recreation/Wellness center (proposed opening Fall
       2006).

      A Spring Film Series was begun, providing a wide selection of foreign and independent
       films. Attendance for these films exceeded 1,000.

      Among the speakers on campus this past year were the award-winning young adult
       author Richard Peck, noted civil rights attorney Morris Dees, former chair of the U.S.
       Commission on Civil Rights and historian Mary Frances Berry, and co-chair of the
       United States Lincoln Bicentennial Commission, Harold Holzer. Educator James Koch
       delivered the twenty-second annual David Dodds Henry Lecture.

UIS hired new directors in Student Life and Housing and Residential Life.

The men’s basketball program was successfully integrated into the Prairie Stars lineup and
shocked the NAIA community with several “upset” victories over nationally ranked opponents.
The Student Life gymnasium was updated to accommodate more spectators; a new sound system
was installed, and new signage was added to increase corporate sponsorship opportunities. The
first cheerleading team and pep band generated greater enthusiasm at games.

UIS joined the American Midwest Conference (AMC), considered to be one of the top NAIA
conferences in the country. Continued efforts toward NCAA affiliation have been suspended as
the campus focuses on enhancing the current program. One aspect of that enhancement will be
the addition of women’s softball in Spring 2004 as the campus’ seventh sport.
The campus reinforced the commitment to academics among student athletes through
development of a new policies and procedures guide for coaches and staff and a student-athlete
handbook. Additionally, a Student-Athlete Advisory Board and an Intercollegiate Athletics
Committee were formed.

During FY 2003, the campus had 56 registered student organizations. This number was down
slightly from the FY 2003 figure due to clarification on standards regarding legitimate student
organizations. The current number of organizations is 36% above the baseline of 41 established
in FY 1999.

The SORC, Student Organization Resource Office, opened on the main concourse of the Public
Affairs Center. The dedicated space will serve the business and conferencing needs of student
government and clubs

A residential population of students is needed to create the critical mass for strong co-curricular
programs. The number of non-Capital Scholars residential students remained virtually level in
FY 2003 at 401. With two classes of Capital Scholars in the Lincoln Residence Hall, their
numbers grew significantly to 206, bringing the total for the campus to 601, which was 73%
above the baseline of 348 set in Fall 1996.

Planning is under way for renovating one of the oldest apartment complexes on campus. The
renovation is intended to provide more attractive housing options for the majority of the
student/customer base, including converting external stairways to internal stairways, replacing
worn-out roofs, and upgrading plumbing and electrical infrastructure.

   Both the Division of Student Affairs and the faculty and staff of the Capital Scholars
   Program will maintain and encourage co-curricular, residential, recreational, and cultural
   opportunities. The campus will continue to plan for future housing needs, including
   renovation of the older apartments and possible construction of a new residence hall.

    Illinois Commitment Goal Six: Productivity, Cost-Effectiveness, and Accountability
              Illinois colleges and universities will continually improve productivity,
                                cost-effectiveness, and accountability

Develop a peer group. During FY 2003, UIS began to use its newly identified peer group to
conduct comparisons of tuition and faculty/staff compensation.

Improve productivity. To facilitate staff training on the Banner Enterprise Resource Planning
system, the Provost’s office and the Office of Business and Administrative Services cooperated
in purchasing and staffing two mobile wireless training labs. Hands-on training and tutoring for
staff was thereby accomplished over the busy spring semester with no disruption of dedicated
instructional computer labs. As other elements of Banner become operational over the next few
years, the mobile labs will ensure timely, cost-efficient delivery of training.
Reallocate resources from low priority to high priority areas. In FY 2003, UIS responded to a
budget rescission of $2.2 million (8.8% of state support) by eliminating reserve capacity,
utilizing tuition dollars from higher enrollments, and eliminating vacant faculty and staff
positions.

   In FY 2004, UIS will continue to realign its spending with the budget cuts experienced
   from the state level.

Decentralize budget to increase accountability. In FY 2003, the campus changed to a more
decentralized budget model. Centrally held funds in the Provost’s office were moved to college
budgets. In FY 2003, $648,400 was moved; an additional $933,600 will be moved at the start of
FY 2004. This will allow for increased incentives for planning, cost containment, and revenue
generation and will allow UIS to respond more swiftly and effectively to change.

   In FY 2004, the campus will develop an Income Fund distribution model, exploring ways
   to tie college budget allocations to enrollments and thus strengthen the tie between
   college decisions and revenue streams.
                  Best Practice (Academic) Illinois Commitment Goal Four:
                    Illinois will increase the number and diversity of citizens
                          completing training and educational programs

             Online Degree Completion Programs in Liberal Arts and Sciences

Description
In 2002, the campus received a grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation to develop five new
online degree completion programs in the humanities and sciences and expand the online degree
program in Master Teaching and Leadership. The focus of the program is extending selected
degree programs in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences to students who cannot come to
campus to complete their degrees. Over a period of three years, the grant will fund the
deployment of 54 new online courses and the launch of five new online degree programs.

Justification
Across the state of Illinois (and beyond the state’s boundaries) are many thousands of students
who have completed an associate’s degree or have made significant initial progress toward a
degree in the arts and sciences. However, for geographic, family/work obligations, physical
disability, or other reasons, many of these students have stalled in completing their degrees. As a
result, careers are stunted and life-long hopes and dreams are unfulfilled.

The University of Illinois at Springfield has a history of serving this population in the central
Illinois region through evening classes, weekend classes, teleclasses, and other alternative means
of delivery and scheduling. But, until recently, only students within a comfortable driving
distance from campus could benefit. Online delivery of classes enables students nearly
anywhere in the world to attend UIS on their own schedule, day or night.

Nationally, very few online degree completion programs are offered in the humanities and
sciences. The Sloan Consortium catalog of online degree programs lists only one other English
degree completion program online, no history degree completion program, and no math
baccalaureate degree completion program. UIS is not only demonstrating excellence in its
offerings, but is leading the country in offering Liberal Arts and Sciences online.

FY 2003 Outcomes
    An online degree completion program in English was launched in the fall term.
          Enrollment demand for the program is very strong, with all classes filling to
             capacity and applications for online majors overwhelming. The Fall 2003 cohort
             was admitted early in the spring and applications are now deferred to Fall 2004.

      Planning and preliminary course development was completed for the online Computer
       Science degree completion program that will launch in the fall.

      Planning and preliminary course development was completed for the online History
       degree completion program that will launch in the fall.

      More than two dozen new online courses were developed through the year.
                   Best Practice (Administrative) Illinois Commitment Goal Six:
                Illinois Colleges and Universities will continually improve production,
                                 cost-effectiveness, and accountability

                                     The Noel-Levitz Study
               Assessing the Delivery of Academic, Business, and Student Services

Description
In FY 2003, UIS administered the Student Satisfaction Inventory (SSI) to a sample of
approximately 30% of enrolled students. The SSI assesses student satisfaction on the delivery of
academic, business, and student services, all of which are key factors in student retention.

Justification
The UIS administration realizes that student satisfaction is closely linked to their satisfaction
with the delivery of academic, business, and student services. In April 2001, therefore, the
campus formed a partnership with Noel-Levitz, a nationally recognized consulting firm that
specializes in assisting colleges and universities with strengthening student recruitment and
retention practices through both market analyses and an examination of current enrollment
management practices.4

The Student Satisfaction Inventory (SSI), a baseline assessment tool used during this
consultation, measures the degree of importance students place on various academic, business,
and student services as well as students’ satisfaction with these services. By comparing the
aggregate responses against the distributional properties of the data, as well as against national
norms, the SSI provides an analysis of the areas of strength as well as the priorities for action
that should be considered to improve academic, business, and student services.

In April 2001, over 1,200 students completed the SSI. The respondent sample, which comprised
approximately 30% of the student body, was stratified to reflect headcount across the
undergraduate and graduate populations as well as the four academic colleges.

Although the SSI results confirmed that UIS was achieving its mission of teaching excellence,
students indicated several areas that could be improved. These priorities for action5 included
course availability (scheduling a wider variety of courses and scheduling courses often enough
and at more convenient times), reducing the run-around for students (especially among financial
assistance, admissions/records, and bursar) and extending service hours; putting student fees to
good use; providing adequate financial assistance and announcing awards in a more timely
manner; improving career services; clarifying the graduate assistantship/internship process;


4
  Although these activities were primarily aimed at undergraduate student populations, the information extracted
from these initiatives had a significant bearing on graduate enrollment as a large proportion of the campus’ graduate
enrollment is comprised of students who earned a baccalaureate degree from UIS. Given that over 40% of the total
student enrollment is at the graduate level, a Noel-Levitz consultant specializing in graduate enrollment was also
brought to the campus to examine practices, policies, and staffing in this area.
5
   Priorities for action are defined as those items that students identify as being very important but have a low level
of satisfaction or as those items with a large gap between the level of importance and the level of satisfaction.
improving parking as well as security staff response times; and providing channels for
expressing student complaints.

In Fall 2002, an Enrollment Management Task Force was formed by the Provost. One charge to
the group involved the formation of a retention subcommittee. This subcommittee, comprised of
faculty and staff across the colleges and divisions, was asked to recommend actions that could be
taken to enhance student retention and increase student satisfaction with the academic, student,
and business services on the campus. The retention subcommittee, using the results of the SSI
and the UIS Undergraduate Retention Plan that was developed during a campus-wide strategic
planning session held in July 2001, began working with various members of the campus
community across the academic affairs, student affairs, and business services divisions to address
the areas that the SSI indicated as priorities for action.

This past April, the SSI was again administered to a sample of undergraduate and graduate
students. As before, the sample was stratified to reflect student headcount across the
undergraduate and graduate populations as well as the four academic colleges. In addition, all
students enrolled in the Capital Scholars Program were asked to participate. A total of 1,378
students completed the SSI, a sample that represents approximately 30% of the 4,397 students
enrolled during the Spring 2003 semester.

FY 2003 Outcomes
The results of the SSI confirmed that students continued to identify campus strengths as being

      quality of academic instruction available at UIS
      valuable course content
      faculty expertise
      services provided by admissions, registration, and financial assistance staff
      campus safety and security
      reputation of the institution within the community.

The SSI also indicated that the efforts of the campus to improve academic, student, and business
services were effective in several ways. In particular, students reported increased satisfaction
with

      usage of student activities fees
      business office hours
      application processes associated with graduate assistantships/internships
      career services
      amount of financial assistance available for students and the timeliness of the award
       announcements
      available channels for expressing student complaints
      fairness/unbiased treatment of faculty with respect to individual students.

In FY 2004 the campus will further analyze the results of the Spring 2003 SSI and develop an
action plan based on the findings.
                                     Performance Indicators
                                       Institutional Context

The University of Illinois at Springfield (UIS) is one of the three campuses of the University of
Illinois. The campus is located in an attractive setting on 750 acres on the southeast side of
Springfield, the state capital.

UIS was established in 1970 as Sangamon State University under the governance of the Board of
Regents. On July 1, 1995, UIS became the third campus of the University of Illinois.

The campus, which has the Carnegie classification of Master’s I institution, offers 20
baccalaureate degrees, 19 master’s degrees, and one doctoral degree across its four colleges:
Business and Management, Education and Human Services, Liberal Arts and Sciences, Public
Affairs and Administration.

UIS strives to be an institution in which excellence in teaching is the central function and the
overriding goal; faculty are teacher-scholars; and students are engaged in a lively intellectual,
cultural and social life.

UIS emphasizes high-quality instruction as well as research and service carried out through
community partnerships that contribute to social progress, governmental effectiveness,
educational excellence, and economic development. In FY02 the value of grants and contracts
generated through these partnerships totaled $6.9 million. The campus has an emphasis on
public affairs, with leadership provided by the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Center for
Governmental Studies. Students have first-hand access to state government and public service
activities through special courses, research projects, service learning, and an extensive array of
internships.

Fall 2002 enrollment was 4,451 (2,445 undergraduate, 2,006 graduate). After enrollment declines
from Fall 1997 through Fall 2000, enrollment now approaches the historically high level of 4,611
achieved in Fall 1996. The five programs with highest enrollment in Fall 2002 were business
administration, management, educational leadership, computer science, and psychology. Teacher
education certification was being pursued by 354 students (Fall 2002) in conjunction with their
majoring in liberal arts disciplines.

UIS was founded as a senior institution serving junior-senior transfer students and master’s
students. Due to the absence of a lower division for most of the campus’ history, the proportion
of graduate students (44%) is unusually high in comparison to the typical Master’s I institution.
With the exception of the campus’ international students (most of whom are graduate students),
graduate students have typically been part-time students from the central Illinois region seeking
professional advancement. Historically, many of the undergraduate transfer students have been
adult part-time, returning learners seeking to complete their degrees. Given the nature of this
clientele, the average undergraduate student age in Fall 2002 was 29, while the average master’s
student age was 35. To meet the needs of this clientele, the campus has a long tradition of
making most undergraduate degree offerings available both days and evenings, while graduate
curricula are largely delivered in the evenings or on weekends.
During the past ten years, the campus has seen a shift in the mix of full-time to part-time
students. In Fall 1992, 44% of undergraduates and 16% of graduate students attended full-time;
in Fall 1997, the proportions were 48% for undergraduates and 19% for graduate students; and in
Fall 2002, the proportions were 59% for undergraduates and 22% for graduate students–a
dramatic increase in full-time students, particularly at the undergraduate level, including a
growing number of traditionally-aged students.

Over the past ten years the campus has become increasingly diverse; minority enrollments over
the past several years have been at their highest historical levels, with total minority enrollment
at greater than 11% and African-American enrollment at 8%. Through its Enrollment
Management Task Force, the campus is actively engaged in efforts to ensure that minority
students are not only recruited, but retained.

In October 1999, the IBHE approved establishment of lower-division offerings at UIS through
the Capital Scholars program. The Capital Scholars curriculum is designed for academically
highly capable, full-time, residential students with an emphasis on service learning. The first
cohort of 116 students matriculated in Fall 2001. As these students move through their four-years
at UIS, the Capital Scholars program—along with the growing UIS population of 18- to 24-year-
old transfer students—will result in an increase in the proportion of full-time students taking day
classes. Together, these students are creating the critical mass needed to generate a higher level
of co-curricular programming.

Even with the anticipated increase in the number and proportion of full-time day students, the
campus is actively engaged in reaching out to its traditional clientele of adult, returning students,
except that the mode of delivery now is increasingly via online offerings. As of Fall 2003 UIS
will be offering three undergraduate degree-completion programs and two graduate degrees
online. In Spring 2003, UIS offered the largest credit-bearing enrollment in online courses
among Illinois public universities despite being the smallest state public university campus in
overall enrollment. Online enrollment now comprises 13% of total enrollment.

The predominant economic/fiscal force affecting this campus throughout its history has been the
availability of resources for achieving its mission. The campus has experienced a substantial
decline in the proportion of its budget derived from state support (from 81% in FY 1990 to 71%
in FY 2003 –with the FY 2004 percentage dropping to 66%), while trying to hold tuition to
affordable levels. To address this problem, the campus has streamlined program offerings,
sought to increase enrollment, and cut administrative costs. Nonetheless, the adequacy of the
resources continues as a significant concern.

The campus looks toward a future in which it will become one of the leading small public liberal
arts institutions in the country, with a continued emphasis on public affairs. It will be a campus
marked by strong liberal arts offerings at the undergraduate level, undergraduate and graduate
professional programs of quality and distinction, and a lively intellectual, social, and cultural life.
                                Common Institutional Indicators

                               Illinois Commitment Goal One:
                     Higher education will help Illinois business and industry
                                sustain strong economic growth

Table 1.1
Percent of Baccalaureate Degree Recipients Employed or Enrolled in Further Education within One Year
of Graduation
                                                    Baccalaureate Degree
                                                           Cohort
                          2001                     2000                       1999
Employed                  88.6                     91.6                       93.4
Enrolled                  32.7                     25.7                       29.8
Employed and/or           92.3                     94.3                       96.7
Enrolled
The decline in the number employed and increase in the number enrolled reflects the downturn
in the economy.

                               Illinois Commitment Goal Two:
                Higher education will join elementary and secondary education to
                           improve teaching and learning at all levels
Table 2.1
Number of Students Completing Requirements for Initial Teacher Certification
                       2002                        2001                      2000
Elementary             32                          45                        63
Certifications
Secondary              26                          13                        24
Certifications

In Fall 2001, the teacher education program implemented curricular changes aimed at meeting
new standards for teacher certification. The greater number of elementary certification
completions in 2000 (compared to 2001 and 2002) reflects the decision of a number of students
to accelerate completion of their certification requirements so that they could graduate under the
earlier standards. The campus continues to place a high priority on meeting Illinois’ needs for
certified teachers, as evidenced by the planning under way to make the UIS teacher education
program available to students in the Peoria area. UIS anticipates an increase in the number of
students completing elementary certification in the next several years.
                                Illinois Commitment Goal Four:
                    Illinois will increase the number and diversity of citizens
                           completing training and education programs
Table 4.1
Diversity: Total Degrees Conferred, by Ethnic Group
FY 2002          Black, Non-Hispanic       Hispanic        Other Total      Springfield Total
                 Men Women Total Men Women Total Men Women Total           Men Women Total
Bachelors            9     38      47 4          3   7 201    358      559  214      399      613
Masters              9     17      26 3          4   7 141    185      326  153      206      359
Doctorate            0      0        0 0         0   0 0        0        0    0         0       0
Campus Total        18     55      73 7          7  14 342    543      885  367      605      972

FY 2001      Black, Non-Hispanic    Hispanic       Other Total                    Springfield Total
             Men Women Total Men Women Total Men Women Total                      Men Women Total
Bachelors        9     33     42 2       4   6 216    333      549                  227      370 597
Masters          2     31     33 1       1   2 105    210      315                  108      242 350
Doctorate        0      0       0 0      0   0 0        0        0                     0       0    0
Campus Total    11     64     75 3       5   8 321    543      864                  335      612 947

FY 2000      Black, Non-Hispanic    Hispanic        Other Total                   Springfield Total
             Men Women Total Men Women Total Men Women Total                      Men Women Total
Bachelors       13     32     45 5       5   10 218    373      591                 236      410 646
Masters          5     12     17 0       2    2 112    183      295                 117      197 314
Doctorate        0      0       0 0      0    0 0        0        0                    0       0    0
Campus Total    18     44     62 5       7   12 330    556      886                 353      607 960

Since FY 2000 the campus has seen a modest increase in Black, non-Hispanic degree
completion, from 62 degrees awarded in FY 2000 to 73 in FY 2002. The increase is largely
attributable to students completing graduate degrees. During this period degree completion at the
undergraduate level has been essentially stable.

Over the longer term, UIS has achieved significant advances in degree completion of Black
students, with a 49% increase in degrees conferred to Black, non-Hispanic students between FY
1992 and FY 2002. The increase is particularly notable at the graduate level, moving from nine
master’s degrees conferred in FY 1992 to 26 master’s degrees conferred in FY 2002.

The campus recognizes that substantial progress needs to be made in reaching out to and
recruiting Hispanic students, whose enrollment and degree completion levels have remained
level over the past ten years.
                                 Illinois Commitment Goal Five:
   Illinois colleges and universities will hold students to even higher expectations for learning
  and will be accountable for the quality of academic programs and the assessment of learning

Table 5.1
Pass Rates on Professional/Occupation Licensure Exams (UIS percentages reflect all candidates sitting
for the exam)
                           2002                    2001                       2000
CPA Licensure – UIS        37.0%                   25.0%                      28.7%
CPA Licensure –National 12% (estimated)            12% (estimated)            12.1%

UIS pass rates are consistently above the national average.

                                   Illinois Commitment Goal Six:
                     Illinois colleges and universities will continually improve
                         productivity, cost-effectiveness, and accountability

Table 6.1
Cost of Instruction per Credit Hour as a Percent of Sector Average
                        FY 2002                      FY 2001                   FY 2000
Level          Cost per      % of Sector   Cost per      % of Sector   Cost per      % of Sector
               Credit Hour   Average       Credit Hour   Average       Credit Hour   Average
Lower              $258.22       68.0%
Division
Upper              $260.19       12.4%        $246.45         11.8%       $232.80         10.9%
Division
Graduate I         $306.46       -23.5%       $324.32        -15.3%       $295.54        -19.0%

Graduate II      $1,156.91       84.0%      $1,010.34         69.5%       $796.69         35.3%

Total              $280.27       13.1%        $276.43         17.7%       $256.39         15.1%


As the smallest of the Illinois public university campuses, UIS prides itself on small class size
and attention to students as individuals. One of the results is that the campus does not offer
traditional large lecture courses as found at other Illinois public university campuses.
Consequently, the undergraduate instructional costs at UIS have, historically, been above the
average for other public university campuses.

The Capital Scholars program, reflected in the FY 2002 costs, epitomizes the campus’ effort to
deliver high quality instruction through innovative curriculum and classes smaller than those
typically found in lower division education at public universities.

At the master’s level, however, instructional costs are substantially lower than the average for
other public university campuses. Over the past three years, cost per credit hour for master’s
level instruction has steadily declined in comparison to the statewide sector averages. In FY
2002, UIS’ Graduate I costs of instruction were 19% below the sector average, declining to
23.5% below the sector average in FY 2002.
UIS’ single doctoral program necessarily leads to above average costs in comparison to
campuses with many doctoral offerings.

Table 6.2
Administrative Support Cost per Credit Hour as a Percent of Sector Average
                       FY 2002                    FY 2001                     FY 2000
Level          Cost per     % of         Cost per       % of Sector Cost per       % of
               Credit Hour Sector        Credit Hour Average          Credit Hour Sector
                            Average                                                Average
Lower               $81.27       79.2%
Division
Upper               $81.73       27.2%        $73.77         19.9%          $66.79     14.8%
Division
Graduate I          $92.71       -7.7%        $90.75          -6.0%         $79.77    -11.5%

Graduate II        $294.52      139.6%        $240.31        104.6%    $183.46       70.2%

Total               $86.50       31.4%         $80.31        27.8%      $71.67       21.8%


The pattern of administrative cost comparisons mirrors that of the instructional costs. The
campus must provide a base level of support functions. Being a smaller campus leads to having
these costs spread over a smaller number of credit hours, leading to higher-than-average
administrative costs. It is worth noting, however, that administrative costs at the master’s level
for the past three years ranged from 6% below the statewide average (FY 2001) to 11.5% below
the statewide average (FY 2000).

Note: No table appears for time-to-degree for First-time Freshmen (degree completion within
150% of catalog time, continued enrollment, or transfer). UIS’ initial cohort of first-time
freshmen matriculated in Fall 2001. Therefore, data on this performance indicator will not be
available for this campus until Fall 2007.

                                     Mission Specific Indicators

Retention
   Relevant Illinois Commitment Goals:
        Goal Four – Access and Diversity
        Goal Five – High Expectations and Quality
        Goal Six – Productivity and Accountability

Retention of Capital Scholars, First to Second Year
                           2002                       2001                  2000
Retention                  92%                        NA                    NA
Nationally, the average first-to-second year retention is 74.1%. When UIS created the Capital
Scholars Program, the campus hoped to establish an innovative curriculum and living-learning
environment that would result in substantially higher first-to-second-year retention rates. The
campus established the goal of 85%. With a first-to-second-year retention of 92% for the first
cohort of Capital Scholars, the campus has significantly exceeded that goal.
Fourth-year retention (percent enrolled plus cumulative percent graduated) of degree-seeking transfer
students
                                                        TRANSFER COHORT
                           1998                       1997                       1996
Retention                  61.1%                      68.4%                      64.4%

Fourth-year retention of transfer students (percent enrolled plus cumulative percent graduated)
over the past ten cohorts (1989 – 1998) ranged from 57.4% to 68.4%. Although the value for the
1998 cohort (61.1%) is lower than for the two preceding cohorts, it is above the median for the
past ten years (60.9%). The campus anticipates that with the planned increase in full-time,
residential transfer students, fourth-year retention values will increase. Meanwhile, through the
efforts of the Enrollment Management Task Force, the campus is increasing its efforts to
encourage re-enrollment of students who stop out and to remove administrative barriers that
might reduce degree completion.

Online Course Retention
                           Spring 2003                Spring 2002                Spring 2001
Retention                  94.3%                      96.3%                      88.2%

Nationally, the online retention figure is in the 70-75% range.

Public Affairs
       Relevant Illinois Commitment Goal
                Goal One – Economic Growth

Dollar Value of Grants and Contracts
                          2003                        2002                       2001
Grants and Contracts      $6.9 million                $6.8 million               $6.5 million

This level of funding is particularly notable in light of budget rescissions in state agencies with
which UIS partners.

Student Engagement
      Relevant Illinois Commitment Goal
             Goal Five – High Expectations and Quality

National Survey of Student Engagement Indices
The first full administration of the National Survey of Student Engagement at UIS was in Spring
2003. Institutional reports will be available in late August, and benchmark reports will be
available in November. Therefore, data are not available for inclusion in this table at this time.

                                   2003                    2002                    2001
Level of academic challenge                                N/A                     N/A
Active & collaborative learning                            N/A                     N/A
Student-faculty interaction                                N/A                     N/A
Enriched educational experiences                           N/A                     N/A
Supportive campus environment                              N/A                     N/A
Faculty Scholarly Productivity
       Relevant Illinois Commitment Goal
              Goal Five – High Expectations and Quality

Annual Number of Refereed Presentations and Publications
                        2002                       2001                     2000
Presentations and       181                        161                      218
Publications
Based on a five-year comparison, there has been a 10% increase in the annual number of
refereed presentations and publications. The unusually high figure for 2000 may be attributable
to data definition problems.

Goal-Setting Process

The goal-setting process at the University of Illinois is coordinated by a university-level
committee that provides guidance and maintains consistency across the campuses. That
committee establishes common procedures, which the campuses then flesh out with their
respective missions in mind.

At the Springfield campus, establishing goals in the following retention-related areas will be the
responsibility of the Enrollment Management Task Force:

       Common Institutional Indicators
          Completions by race, ethnicity, disability status, and gender
          Extent to which institutional quality and effectiveness are recognized by graduates
            through the alumni surveys

       Mission-Specific Indicators
           Retention of Capital Scholars, first-to-second year
           Fourth-year retention (percent enrolled plus cumulative percent graduated) of
              degree-seeking transfer students
           Online course retention

Establishing goals for the following teacher education indicator will be the responsibility of the
Dean of the College of Education and Human Services, in consultation with the teacher
education faculty:

       Common Institutional Indicator
          Annual number of students completing requirements for initial teacher
            certification by certificate area

Establishing goals for the remaining common and mission-specific indicators will be the
responsibility of the Chancellor and Provost in consultation with the deans and other appropriate
administrative leaders:
Common Institutional Indicators
   Percent of degree/certificate recipients either employed or enrolled in further
     education within one year of graduation
   Net price of attendance
   Pass rates on professional/occupational exams relative to state and/or local
     averages
   Cost of instruction per credit hour by student level as a percent of sector average
     by level
   Administrative and support cost per credit hour (all levels) and as a percent of
     sector average
   Percent of first-time, full-time degree-seeking freshmen who complete their
     degree within 150% of catalog time, or are still enrolled or transferred.

Mission-Specific Indicators
    Dollar value of grants and contracts
    Target levels on NSSE indices
    Annual number of refereed presentations and publications
                          University of Illinois at Springfield
                          Eight-Year Program Review Cycle

CIP Code   UIS Programs                                IBHE Due Date

23.0101    English (B.A., M.A.)                        June 2003
27.0101    Mathematical Sciences (B.A.)

13.0401    Educational Leadership (M.A.)               June 2004
42.0601    Human Development Counseling (M.A.)
22.9999    Legal Studies (B.A., M.A.)

03.0103    Environmental Studies (M.A.)                June 2005
24.0101    Liberal Studies (B.A.)
24.0199    Individual Option (M.A.)
60.1301    Center for Teaching and Learning

52.0201    Business Administration (B.B.A.)            June 2006
52.0299    Management (B.A.)
52.0201    Business Administration (M.B.A.)
52.0301    Accountancy (B.A., M.A.)
45.0601    Economics (B.A.)
52.1201    Management Information Systems (M.S.)

44.0701    Social Work (B.S.W.)                        June 2007
44.0000    Human Services (M.A.)
43.0104    Criminal Justice (B.A.)
54.0101    History (B.A., M.A.)
45.1001    Political Studies (B.A., M.A.)
45.9999    Sociology/Anthropology (B.A.)

60.4404    Abraham Lincoln Presidential Center for     June 2008
                  Governmental Studies
44.0401    Public Administration (D.P.A.)
09.0199    Communication (B.A., M.A.)
09.0401    Public Affairs Reporting (M.A.)
50.0702    Visual Arts (B.A.)

11.0701    Computer Science (B.S., M.S.)               June 2009
40.0501    Chemistry (B.S.)
51.1005   Clinical Laboratory Science (B.S.)        June 2010
51.2201   Public Health (M.P.H.)
26.0101   Biology (B.S., M.S.)
44.0401   Public Administration (M.P.A.)
44.9999   Graduate Certificate in Management of Nonprofit
                 Organizations
                               PROGRAM REVIEW REPORT

Reporting Institution: University of Illinois at Springfield

English, B.A. and M.A. (23.0101)

The English program has been in transition over the review period, with the retirement of all the
founding faculty members and the hiring of a new generation of teacher-scholars. As a result, the
program review will be completed during the upcoming academic year. However, the following
activities are noted in the English program:

      began lower-division instruction for the Capital Scholars program, including lower-
       division bridge courses for English majors

      developed an online degree completion program, with instruction delivered by regular
       program faculty

      developed and began offering a set of courses for students seeking careers in creative
       writing. One aspect of this activity was developing and obtaining governance approval
       for a distinct, rigorous creative writing closure activity
                                PROGRAM REVIEW REPORT

1.     Reporting Institution:          University of Illinois at Springfield

2.     Program Reviewed:               Mathematical Sciences, B.A (27.0101)
                                       College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

3.     Date:                           AY 2002-03

4.     Contact Person:                 Harry Berman
          Telephone:                   217-206-7411
          Email:                       berman.harry@uis.edu
          Fax:                         217-206-7623

5.     Major Findings and Recommendations

Context and Major Findings

The baccalaureate program in mathematics at UIS, while small (21 majors in Fall 2002), is
clearly central to traditional liberal learning, with connections to all science majors and the
undergraduate general education curriculum.

During the review period the number of majors ranged from a low of 13 to a high of 30.
However, the strong service role of the program is evidenced in the finding that despite the small
number of mathematical sciences majors, the program is consistently in the top half of UIS
programs in credit hour production per staff year.

With the future development of the Capital Scholars program, strengthening of instruction in
mathematics will be central to the campus’ aspirations to become a leading public liberal arts
institution.

Alumni surveys indicate that 81% of graduates obtain work related to their major and that 96%
are satisfied or very satisfied with the quality of their education in their major.

Actions Taken Since the Last Review

The program eliminated the graduate program in applied statistics in order to focus resources on
the undergraduate major.

The program revised the undergraduate curriculum to clarify appropriate clusters of courses for
students with differing career goals (e.g., teaching, actuarial science, business).

Actions to Be Taken

The program will develop and implement a program to assess learning outcomes for
mathematics majors.
As UIS expands the Capital Scholars program during the next review period, the campus will
need to develop a clear understanding of the curricular role of mathematics in lower-division
instruction and to clarify the program’s service role in general education and its service role for
other science majors. The program is requested to develop recommendations on staffing service
courses and courses for majors. Questions to be answered include: How many tenure track
faculty should the program have? To what extent should instructors or graduate assistants be
used for lower-division courses? What pattern of course caps is appropriate for lower-division
mathematics courses?

Delivery of an online degree-completion program in mathematics would complement UIS’ other
online degree-completion programs (e.g., English, history, computer science, liberal arts) and
would build up the historically low enrollment of majors in this program. The program is
encouraged to follow through with plans for online delivery of the mathematical sciences degree.


6.       Outcome

     X         Programs in Good Standing

               Programs Flagged for Priority Review

               Programs Enrollment Suspended
                     Status Report on Assessment of Learning Outcomes

Background

In the FY 2002 Results Report, UIS reported that in the fall of 2001, the Provost established the
Assessment Task Force. The charge of the Task Force is to review UIS’ assessment processes
and to recommend policy and structural changes to make assessment more useful to the campus,
both for improvement of curricula and for communication with external audiences. The task
force is comprised of faculty representatives from each of the campus’ four colleges, as well as
staff from UIS’ Center for Teaching and Learning and from the Division of Student Affairs. The
task force is co-chaired by the Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Planning and the Dean
of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The focus of this status report will be on the
activities of the task force.

FY 2003 Activities

The task force’s principal objective is to facilitate progress toward establishing a culture of
assessment of learning outcomes at UIS and, in so doing, to help achieve the IBHE goal that by
2004 all programs will systematically assess student learning and use assessment results to
improve programs. Put another way, the task force is the central coordinating body for achieving
two important outcomes: helping programs at what the NCA terms the planning level of
assessment to advance to the emerging level and helping programs that are at the emerging level
to advance to the maturing level.

To achieve this objective the Assessment Task Force carried out the following activities in
FY 2003:

      Identified assessment liaisons
          The task force recognized that creating a culture of assessment across the campus
          would be aided greatly by having one person in each department serve as the
          principal channel of communication and advocate for assessment in that department.
          With help from the deans, these assessment liaisons were identified early in fall 2002.

      Organized workshop on primary trait analysis
          In FY 2002, UIS, Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, and Northern Illinois
          University collaborated on submitting three HECA grants to support joint assessment
          activities across the three campuses. Unfortunately, with the elimination of HECA
          grants in the category of Teaching, Learning, and Quality, none of these proposals
          was funded. However, SIUE and UIS collaborated on and were able to carry out one
          component of the proposals. The director of SIUE’s Undergraduate Assessment
          Office and a UIS faculty member jointly presented a workshop to UIS faculty on
          Primary Trait Analysis, an important tool used for assessment of learning outcomes.
          The workshop served as an occasion to bring together the assessment liaisons with
          members of the assessment task force.

      Organized discussion of assessment of learning outcomes in graduate programs
          The idea of assessment of learning outcomes has been prominent at the undergraduate
       level for two decades, but assessment of learning outcomes at the graduate level is
       much less developed and poses special challenges. The Assessment Task Force
       organized a workshop on assessment of learning outcomes at the graduate level, with
       special emphasis on using the closure activity as a basis for measuring program
       outcomes.

   Organized workshop on use of portfolios in assessment
       One of the most popular and powerful ideas in the field of assessment is the design
       and analysis of portfolios of student work. However, the proper use of portfolios
       requires departments to achieve clarity about the purposes to which the portfolio will
       be put, how the portfolios will be gathered and stored, and how they will be analyzed.
       Drawing on the expertise of colleagues at Illinois State University, the Assessment
       Task Force conducted a workshop on this topic in Spring 2003.

   Solicited and reviewed proposals to attend NIU weeklong e-portfolio workshop
        Increasing attention is being given to handling portfolios in electronic databases
        accessible to faculty, students, and outside stakeholders. For several years, NIU has
        conducted a weeklong workshop on development and use of electronic portfolios.
        This year, NIU generously offered space at the portfolio workshop for participation
        by UIS faculty. The UIS Provost’s Office offered stipends for participation
        comparable to those received by NIU faculty. The task force solicited and reviewed
        proposals from faculty to participate in the workshop. Ultimately, five UIS faculty
        joined their colleagues at NIU as workshop participants.

   Conducted two disciplinary collaboration sessions with faculty from SIUE – disciplines
    represented were Political Studies, English, History, and Public Administration
        Achieving the goal of assessment of learning outcomes in all academic programs rests
        on adapting the tools of assessment to meet the instructional challenges of particular
        disciplines. With this in mind the Assessment Task Force conducted two disciplinary
        workshops in which they brought together faculty from SIUE and UIS in fields of
        Public Administration, Political Studies, English, and History to share perspectives on
        assessment.

   Presented at Summer 2002 and Spring 2003 IBHE Assessment Conferences
       In its Levels of Implementation document, the NCA notes that one of the indicators of
       an institution’s progress in implementing assessment practices is when faculty speak
       publicly, both formally and informally, to peers and other stakeholders in support of
       assessment of learning outcomes. By that indicator, the campus is, indeed, making
       progress, as evidenced in the participation of UIS faculty in both the Summer 2002
       and Spring 2003 IBHE assessment conferences.

   Developed website and newsletter to improve communication about assessment
       The UIS strategy for advancing the assessment agenda recognizes that regular
       communication about assessment activities is a key element of building a culture in
       which assessment of learning outcomes is viewed as a standard part of what faculty
       do. During the past year, the Assessment Task Force designed a website and posted
           information about the above activities. The task force also approved a design for a
           newsletter that will feature best practices and lessons learned from attempts at
           instituting assessment of learning outcomes.

In addition to these task force-related activities, the campus administered the Noel-Levitz
Student Satisfaction Inventory (see Best Practices description) and the National Survey of
Student Engagement, both of which assesses students’ perceptions of learning outcomes.

AY 2003-04 Activities

Among activities planned for AY 2003-04 are:

      In early fall each college will establish goals for advancing the assessment of learning
       outcomes for each of its departments. These assessment goals will be reported to the
       Provost’s office followed by end-of-year updates in order to gauge campus progress.

      The Assessment Task Force will follow up on last year’s portfolio workshops and assist
       departments seeking to institute portfolios as a tool for assessment of learning outcomes.

      The Assessment Task Force will initiate a newsletter featuring best practices and lessons
       learned and will continue to develop its website.

      The Assessment Task Force will continue to provide other forms of assistance to
       programs to enable them to advance to the next level of implementation of assessment.
       Particular emphasis will be given to programs in which there is no external accreditation.
University of Illinois
         at
Urbana-Champaign




  Results Report
   August 2003
                         University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
                                     2003 Results Report

                                      Executive Summary

Urbana-Champaign contributed to economic development by producing nearly 10,300 highly
qualified graduates in FY 2002, expanding activities in one of the nation’s leading university-
based centers of research and development with increased external funding and innovative new
initiatives connected to national research priorities, expanding technology commercialization
activities, and further developing the Research Park.

The campus developed alternative teacher certification programs in areas of special need,
enhanced professional development of math and science teachers, improved mathematics
instruction in the state, strengthened the campus relationship with the Chicago Public Schools,
and provided scientifically-based education policy evaluation and guidance to the State.

Declining State MAP assistance was compensated for with additional institutional funds devoted
to financial aid, with the result that the campus remained affordable to qualified students of all
income levels.

Enrollment levels were allowed to increase to match the growth in the number of Illinois’
graduating seniors. Urbana-Champaign ranked second among Big Ten public universities in
minority enrollment and in the percentage of baccalaureate degrees awarded to minority
students. Special programs and emphases resulted in increasing the diversity of the faculty, and
further efforts to increase the diversity of the student body were made through a variety of
programmatic initiatives and targeted programs.

The high quality of the campus’ academic programs was maintained and enhanced through
development of major new research and program initiatives. The campus attracted its best-
qualified class of entering freshmen ever, based on average ACT composite scores, and
increased its support for improving the quality of teaching through a variety of programs and
initiatives.

A thorough review of administrative and support services was undertaken in order to reduce
administrative costs and redirect the savings to support of the academic mission. More than
$3 million in savings has already been identified, with the full list of recommendations and
potential savings due to be identified in FY 2004. Measures being considered range from
reorganization of eleven academic departments in six colleges to elimination of senior
administrative positions to consolidation of support services among multiple units to increased
use of outsourcing.
                         University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
                            Report of Institutional Performance
                          on Goals 1-6 of The Illinois Commitment

                     Illinois Commitment Goal One: Economic Growth
                    Higher education will help Illinois business and industry
                                sustain strong economic growth

Produce highly qualified graduates who contribute to economic growth. Economic growth
requires an educated workforce. Urbana-Champaign’s most fundamental contribution to future
economic growth is producing highly qualified graduates. In academic year 2001-02, the
campus awarded 6,913 baccalaureate degrees, 2,437 master’s degrees, 15 advanced certificates,
317 professional degrees, and 601 doctoral degrees (comparable data for academic year 2002-03
will not be available until the academic year ends with the close of the 2003 summer session).

Almost 90% of UIUC undergraduates are Illinois residents. The great majority of them pursue
their careers in Illinois after graduation (two-thirds are working in Illinois five years after
graduation; more than 60% are working in Illinois ten years after graduation). As one example,
graduates of the College of Business overwhelmingly make their careers in Illinois (83% of 2001
graduates and 86% of 2002 graduates took jobs in Illinois). The average starting salary of these
new graduates was $46,441, which is about 7% higher than the average for new business school
graduates nationwide and 40% higher than the statewide average for new college graduates
across all fields. Similarly, starting salaries for new graduates of the College of Engineering
range from $50,000 to $58,000, which is $2,000-$6,000 above the national average for new
engineering graduates and 62% higher than the statewide average for all new college graduates.
More generally, it has been demonstrated repeatedly that a college degree has a positive impact
on graduates’ lifetime earnings, in the range of $600,000 for a baccalaureate degree and $1.25
million for a professional degree.

Contribute to knowledge and economic development by supporting one of the nation’s leading
research and development programs. Over the last three decades, especially, states that have
led the nation in economic development and are regarded as well positioned for the economy of
the 21st century are those that boast, among other things, universities that are major national
centers of research and development. In Illinois, that center is the Urbana-Champaign campus.

In the National Science Foundation’s most recent (April 2003) statistical compilation, based on
FY 2001, Illinois ranked 7th among the 50 states in university research and development
expenditures, and Urbana-Champaign was the university most responsible for that rating.
Research expenditures are commonly used to reflect two aspects of a university’s research
productivity. First, research expenditures reflect the sheer volume of research carried out, at
least in scientific and technical fields. Second, university research expenditures overwhelmingly
are funded by competitive awards, more from the federal government than any other source.
Thus, research expenditures are a rough index of the quality of a university’s research program
insofar as they are based on competitive research awards, and they allow the research
performance of universities to be compared on some common baselines.
In NSF’s most recent data, Urbana-Champaign ranked 18th nationally among all universities
(12th among public universities) in research and development expenditures, devoting $390.8
million to research. The only other Illinois universities ranked among the top 50 in research and
development expenditures were Northwestern (39th) and the University of Illinois at Chicago
(48th). The Urbana-Champaign campus’ expenditures on research and development from all
sources in FY 2001 had a direct and indirect economic impact (jobs, purchases, and the like) of
$1.06 billion. Aside from the economic benefits of this massive research enterprise, the long-
term contribution is to produce discoveries and innovations that can fuel continuous economic
development. The campus’ national rankings among more than 600 doctoral institutions in
research and development expenditures in some fields that connect closely to economic
development are: Chemistry—2, Computer Sciences—5, Engineering—10, Environmental
Sciences—12, Physics—13, Physical Sciences 14, Agricultural Sciences—18.

In FY 2002, for the fifth consecutive year, Urbana-Champaign led all universities nationally in
receipt of highly competitive research grants from the National Science Foundation. The
campus’ 312 NSF research awards totaled more than $107 million. During the last five years,
the campus has received almost a half-billion dollars in research support from NSF, and nearly
1,500 different awards. These awards reflect the quality and productivity of the campus’
research establishment, and they help make possible the discoveries and innovative applications
of science and technology for which Urbana-Champaign is renowned.

Increase support for technology commercialization. The Urbana-Champaign campus has been
steadily increasing its support for technology commercialization. Over the last three years, 218
patent applications have been filed, 65 patents have been received, and 364 technology
disclosures have been made. During the same period, 150 license agreements were completed,
and $18.8 million in royalty income was received. This high and growing level of activity
reflects reorganization and improved effectiveness of the Office of Technology Management to
support commercial application of faculty inventions.

Develop and expand programs of teaching and research that are directly connected to
economic development. Among the fields that have special promise for contributing to
economic development are information technology, interdisciplinary advances across the
physical and life sciences building on existing work in genomics, bioengineering, and the new
field of nanotechnology, which concerns science and technology on the scale of one billionth of
a meter and could change the way almost everything is designed and made, from medicines to
computers to objects not yet imagined.

The campus is continuing to expand its work and teaching in fields related to information
technology as reflected in enrollment more than doubling in both Computer Science and
Computer Engineering over the last decade. Construction of the new Seibel Computer Science
Center is well under way and will permit significant programmatic expansion. In FY 2002,
Urbana-Champaign received the largest share ($17 million) among all universities of the $90
million in research grants awarded by the National Science Foundation’s Information
Technology Research Initiative.

Ground has been broken for construction of the Institute for Genomic Biology, and the
innovative, discipline-spanning Post Genomic Initiative is developing rapidly with recruitment
over time of 18 new faculty members (11 have joined the faculty thus far) and the launching of
important new research programs: microreactors, microsensors and microimaging technology
for the post genomic era; genomic-based enhancement of plant functional traits; mammalian
developmental biology; proteomics and molecular function in biology; and, macromolecular
assemblies and machines as determinants of cell function. All of these initiatives have promise
for ultimately affecting the quality of life in a multitude of ways. Elsewhere across the campus,
ground-breaking new programs are moving ahead in areas such as sociogenomics (with the
ultimate goal of defining social behavior in genomic and proteomic terms, led by Professor Gene
Robinson who is spearheading the national effort to sequence the honeybee genome), and
biocomplexity, where the initiative led by Professor Carl Woese, winner of the 2003 Crafoord
Prize from the Swedish Royal Academic of Science, seeks to provide our first full understanding
of the biosphere and has the potential to transform our understanding of biology.

At the same time, new faculty and research programs in various aspects of nanotechnology in
both the materials and life sciences promise to make Urbana-Champaign an important center for
research in this national priority area. A proposal to create a new Department of Bioengineering
within the College of Engineering is moving through the required levels of approval.

Taken together, examples such as these illustrate the rapid pace of development across a broad
front of areas that are closely connected to economic development.

Further develop the University of Illinois Research Parks. The new Incubator Building,
Technology Place @ Illinois, opened in July, 2003, with 10 tenants. The facility will be able to
accommodate more 40 start-up ventures. The Incubator is the fourth building to be completed in
the Park, and a fifth multi-tenant facility is now under construction. A total of 27 tenants,
ranging from new start-up ventures to established companies such as Motorola, Caterpillar, and
Bayer, currently occupy space in the park. The park provides an environment where research-
based businesses can work with students and graduates of the campus, and also affords multiple
opportunities for collaborative research with the faculty. More than 550 people are now
employed in the Park, including 116 UIUC student interns.

Plans for FY 2004: Urbana-Champaign hopes to continue to contribute to economic growth by
further expanding research and education at the frontiers of science and technology, to increase
the number of technology disclosures, patents filed and received, licenses executed, and royalties
received, and to continue to expand the Research Park.

                 Illinois Commitment Goal Two: Teaching and Learning
                Higher education will join elementary and secondary education
                         to improve teaching and learning at all levels

In AY 2001-02, Urbana-Champaign had 1,330 students enrolled in teacher preparation programs
across all instructional specializations, with 526 students participating in supervised student
teaching. Four hundred fifty-two new teachers completed the teacher preparation program and
received certification (certification exam pass rates for the new graduates in 2001-02 were 100%
on the basic skills exam, 99% on the academic content areas exams, 100% on other content area
exams, and 100% on the teaching special population’s exams).
In addition to ongoing efforts to expand and continually improve the quality of the teacher
preparation program, the campus is actively engaged in a range of projects and initiatives that
directly impact secondary and elementary educators and administrators throughout Illinois.
From alternative certification opportunities for potential new recruits to innovative professional
development offerings for practicing teachers to on-line courses that make the campus’ resources
accessible anywhere in state, the campus continues to integrate teaching, research and practice to
improve public education in Illinois.

Program of alternative teacher certification programs in areas of specific need. Recruiting,
Educating, Certifying, and Retaining Underrepresented Populations In Teaching Science and
Mathematics (RECRUIT ) is a 4-year, NSF-funded project to develop, pilot test and assess the
effectiveness of an alternative science and mathematics teacher certification program that will
increase the number of secondary math and science teachers from underrepresented populations.
RECRUIT is intended to work as a teacher preparation model to bring qualified math and
science teachers into the K-12 environment, individuals who otherwise would have pursued non-
teaching careers. This program is a collaboration between the campus, the Illinois Institute of
Technology and four Illinois school districts.

The project website and promotional/recruiting campaign (targeting minority student serving
institutions and all institutions of higher education in Illinois) have been launched and efforts are
under way to secure campus and ISBE approval to offer Illinois certification to participants in
the program.

During FY 2004, the RECRUIT project staff plans to finalize arrangements with collaborating
school districts, establish a relationship with the Chicago Public Schools, and complete the
recruitment of the first cohort of 12 participants.

Building Relationships in Diverse General Education Settings (BRIDGES) is a program to
prepare teachers to work with students who have severe disabilities. The program will prepare
more than 250 special educators over a five-year period. BRIDGES consists of 3 options:
(a) a full time, on-campus undergraduate and master's degree option leading to an initial
certification; (b) a part-time, on-campus master's degree program focusing on professional
development for current teachers; and, (c) a part-time, off-campus teacher certification program
working together with the Chicago Public Schools. BRIDGES is based on the recently
established Illinois Professional Teaching Standards. Participants' skills and knowledge are
evaluated using an innovative, performance-based assessment model. Due to the critical
shortage of qualified special educators in the Chicago Public Schools, a special emphasis of the
project is on preparing teachers to work in diverse, urban settings.

During FY 2003, 30 undergraduates and 5 master's degree candidates were involved in the
BRIDGES Program. In FY 2004, 37 undergraduates and 11 master's degree candidates will be
involved. In addition, two cohorts of teachers (25 in total) from the Chicago Public Schools are
enrolled in the BRIDGES master's degree program as part-time students.
Teaching for Access to Standards and Curriculum (TASC) provides professional development
and teacher preparation in special education. The project provides graduate-level, full-time study
for teachers certified in areas other than special education who wish to earn this certification, and
full-time study for persons outside the teaching profession who wish to become special
educators. TASC also offers the option of part-time study to enhance the skills of practicing
educators.

The College of Education has established collaborative relationships with a number of schools in
high-need districts in the state, including East St. Louis, the Chicago Public Schools, Decatur,
and Springfield. These partnerships bring the expertise of the College faculty into the schools in
the form of in-service training throughout the year. The two-way nature of the relationships
provides a direct, educational benefit to our own graduate and undergraduate candidates in
Special Education. School personnel visit campus, serving as presenters and lecturers for our
courses, and candidates also have multiple opportunities to "shadow" these practicing teachers in
their own districts, gaining valuable, first-hand knowledge of the daily challenges they will face
in the field.

Regional Office of Education (ROE) Partnership for Special Education Graduate Credit entered
into a partnership with the UIUC Department of Special Education to meet specific school
district needs for credentialed and certified special education teachers in Champaign and Ford
counties. Starting in 2001, educators could earn graduate credit through a set of courses
designed to meet appropriate credentialing and state certification requirements in special
education. In addition to coursework, educators perform field-based observations and conduct
follow-up classroom visits to measure programs. During AY 2003, 23 teachers from
surrounding communities took classes in our ROE program. We anticipate that a similar number
of teachers will be involved in FY 2004.

Enhance Professional Development of Math and Science Teachers and Improve Mathematics
Instruction. Office for Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education (MSTE). Several
projects on the Urbana campus are helping to meet future teacher shortages in mathematics,
science, and technology education. The Office for Mathematics, Science, and Technology has
developed on-line curricula and resources aligned with ISBE standards to prepare in-service
teachers to teach middle school mathematics. These materials are being used by the Regional
Offices of Education and currently reach approximately 1,500 K-12 teachers. Through such
measures as the Illinois Standards Achievement Tests, the Office will examine the extent to
which students are learning more mathematics and science at earlier grades, electing further
study of mathematics and science in school and college, and proceeding to more science-based
fields of employment.

MSTE has been working with both in-service and pre-service teachers to build models for
reaching more students in mathematics and science. The MSTE-designed "Mathematics
Materials for Tomorrow's Teachers" (M2T2) are being used by hundreds of teachers around
Illinois. Five thousand files of the M2T2 materials are downloaded from the MTSE site each
month. In addition to these materials, MSTE has been piloting models for in-service teachers to
reach a broader range of students and has worked with nine, technology-intensive courses over
the past year to better prepare teachers for the mathematics classroom.
In summer 2003, five schools, involving 75 students and 15 teachers, participated in the
SummerMath Project where teachers work with new technologies such as small robots and
global positioning technology to reach students who are in danger of being filtered out of the
mathematics pipeline. When the model is complete, larger groups will be served. MSTE has
also been collaborating with the campus’ National Center for Supercomputing Applications on
their REVITALISE project to help retain and renew rural teachers through applications of
visualization technology in mathematics and science.

At the senior high school level, MSTE is collaborating with the UIUC Mathematics Department
to offer a credit-bearing college algebra course that is specifically designed to reach students who
have dropped out of the mathematics pipeline. This course is intended to provide the
competencies required for success in the UIUC Mathematica-based first course in calculus (Math
120). To date, approximately 50 students in DuPage County and at the Bloomington Area
Vocational Center have successfully completed the college algebra course. Within the next year,
it is expected that a cohort of students will proceed to Calculus I (Math 120).

Provide continuing professional development opportunities to state educators. Illinois Center
for Achieving Reading Excellence (ICARE). Through an Illinois State Board of Education
program, College of Education faculty are developing and providing professional development
activities and programs for pre-kindergarten through grade three staff who are participating in
the federal Reading Excellence Act (REA) program in Illinois. As part of the Implementation of
Professional Development Activities in the Reading Excellence Act, 22 College of Education
faculty and clinical instructors participated in the two-year program, working to provide direct
training and develop instruction in 15 major areas of reading activity. These professional
development activities and programs provided instruction and guidance about the skills and
knowledge needed to provide a strong foundation in reading acquisition.

During the last two years, 46 teachers, learning specialists, and outreach specialists from Ford
Heights, Kankakee, and Pembroke school districts participated in a literacy institute that was
structured under the REA program guidelines. The participants engaged in group activities that
focused on reading, including topics such as assessment, phonics and phonemic awareness
instruction, comprehension strategies, vocabulary development, family literacy, and literature
study. Fourteen of these ICARE participants, intrigued with the use of technology in reading
instruction, enrolled in the 2003 Moveable Feast course offered by the College of Education.

Novice Teacher Support Project (NTSP). Entering its seventh year of providing professional
development to new teachers through the first three years of their teaching experience, NTSP has
provided assistance to more than 400 teachers in a five-county area in Central Illinois. In fall
2000 an electronic mentoring component was added in order to provide new teachers with
assistance from experienced teachers within their content area and grade level. New teachers are
grouped with experienced teachers and interact through asynchronous, web-based conversations
about teaching, learning, and curriculum issues. This service is particularly valuable for smaller
districts, but teachers in larger districts also find it helpful. One important (and unexpected)
finding from ongoing evaluations of the e-mentoring project is the benefit to the mentors, who
are able to continue learning with and from the novices. The web site (ntsp.ed.uiuc.edu) is
continuously updated and expanded to offer novice and mentor teachers professional resources
as well as opportunities to interact with one another. Project staff continuously assesses progress
and adapt the program based on the rate and content of project participation, message analysis,
and focus groups.
Moveable Feast. The Moveable Feast is a week-long summer institute designed to improve the
ability of teachers to integrate computers and other technologies into all curricula. Teachers are
encouraged to develop a classroom project for their own school that integrates the Illinois
Learning Standards and the National Technology Standards. Now in its fifth year, the institute
has expanded from three sites in 1998 to eight sites with more than 360 participants in
2003. About 2,000 educators have attended the Feast over the past five years. A graduate credit
option is also available for participants interested in taking a 4-week online course concurrent
with one week of the Feast. In FY 2003, 34 participants elected to take this option. For the past
three years, participants in the Moveable Feast were able to receive continuing professional
development units (CPDU's) which they could apply towards their recertification plans.

The summer of 2003 also saw the continuation and expansion of a version of the Moveable Feast
tailored specifically to school administrators (originally piloted in 2002). Offered at three sites,
the training concentrated on educational technologies considered particularly relevant to
administrative duties and responsibilities. The administrators’ version of the program was
offered at Lake Park, Bloomington and Mt. Vernon. The summer of 2003 also saw the pilot of a
TechCoordinators Feast. School Technology Coordinators from around the state were able to
attend a three-day institute tailored to the ever-evolving demands on school district technology
coordinators.

Technology Across Learning Environments for New Teachers (TALENT) is an initiative led by
the College of Education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign that investigates the
most effective means for integrating technology in the preparation and practice of new
teachers. One goal of TALENT is to strengthen field placements for students in area cooperating
school districts by providing a technology resource library (laptops, projectors, digital cameras,
digital camcorders, scanners), by working in collaboration with mentor teachers from the K-12
schools, and by providing laptops for supervisors and student teachers to use during the student
teaching experience.

Curriculum, Technology and Education Reform (CTER). To upgrade teacher skills and prepare
technology coordinators for schools and school districts, the College of Education provides an
on-line alternative for practicing K-12 teachers to complete a Master of Education degree. Each
year, 25-30 students take on-line courses that focus on curriculum, technology, and education
reform. Annual surveys of graduates indicate that CTER has had a positive impact in their
professional development as educators.

In addition to providing broad access to students, regardless of geographic location, CTER has
established an impressive record of persistence in student participation and program completion.
Of the 133 students who have enrolled in the program to date, only one has dropped out of the
program and only three are behind their originally-planned graduation date.

Strengthen Recruiting/Placement Relationship with Chicago Public Schools. The Chicago
Public Schools Corporation is the third largest urban district in the country and faces one of the
nation’s largest shortages of qualified classroom teachers. The College of Education's
Educational Career Services Office (ECSO) is exploring ways to increase placements of our
graduates in the CPS system, as well as avenues to actively recruit new CPS graduates into the
UIUC teacher preparation program.

During FY 2004, ECSO plans to sponsor on-campus "recruiting visits" for groups of CPS
students. This project is based on a pilot trial in April of 2003, with CPS providing funding for
student transportation and accommodations.

ECSO will also provide several opportunities for Future Teacher Groups in Chicago,
Champaign, and Urbana to participate in college/campus sponsored activities over the next year
in an effort to acquaint these students with the facilities and the opportunities offered by the
College and the campus.

For the past three years, the College has participated in a national initiative, “Recruiting New
Teachers Inc. (RNT),” which focuses on bringing best practices to scale in the recruitment,
preparation, and retention of teachers of color. This initiative will continue in FY 2004 with a
focus on establishing a partnership with Chicago United, a corporate service organization
established to bring together diverse business leaders to improve race relations and increase
access to opportunities for people of color in the Chicago metropolitan area.

Provide scientifically-based educational policy evaluation and guidance to the state. One
responsibility of the campus is to provide state policy-makers with reliable, scientifically-
grounded recommendations and guidance for future decisions. A major project, the Evaluation
of the Implementation of Illinois Learning Standards (ILS), was completed in August 2002. This
four-year longitudinal evaluation provided the state with a picture of how state learning
standards are being implemented, what actions enhance or inhibit their implementation, and an
assessment of the relationship between ILS implementation and student performance. Data from
this study have been used extensively in strategic planning and goal setting within ISBE. These
data may become even more important in light of recent federal educational policy changes that
heavily emphasize standards-based education and student performance.

In August 2003, researchers in Education will complete a three-year evaluation of the Reading
Excellence Act (REA) in Illinois, a federal initiative to improve the quality of reading instruction
and student achievement in grades K-3 in low-performing/high-poverty schools throughout the
state. The evaluation focuses on measuring the extent to which six elements of effective reading
instruction were implemented over time in 42 REA schools across the state, assessing changes in
student reading performance associated with participation in REA, and gauging teacher
satisfaction with professional development and support provided by the initiative. Results from
the REA evaluation were used as the basis of the state's Reading First application.

UIUC faculty served as members of the Reading First Steering Committee, charged with
designing and implementing Illinois Reading First. Based on the application developed by this
committee, Illinois was one of the first states to be awarded Reading First funds in July
2002. UIUC faculty have received the contract to conduct the evaluation of Illinois Reading
First which will extend to 350 schools over the next six years. One of the most ambitious federal
initiatives under “No Child Left Behind,” Reading First provides substantial funding to low
performing/high poverty schools to improve reading instruction and raise student
achievement. The Reading First Evaluation will assess changes in instruction, assessment and
student performance in target schools over the course of the initiative.

Plans for FY 2004:

   Continue working with the Community College Board to develop common standards for an
    Illinois Associate of Arts in Teaching, (AAT) a two-year degree that will allow seamless
    transfer into a teacher preparation program at Urbana-Champaign or any of the other 58
    colleges and universities offering these programs. A master syllabus, common course
    descriptions and a matrix of standards are currently in development.

   During FY 2003, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Council on Teacher
    Education completed efforts to ensure that all professional education preparation programs
    are aligned with the new Illinois State Standards for Educators that went into effect on
    July 1, 2003. During the coming year, CTE will oversee the implementation of the new Unit
    Assessment Plan that will ensure ongoing systemic compliance with these state standards in
    all professional education preparation programs on campus.

   Develop a College-wide consortium of professional development and continuing educational
    providers specifically targeted to math, science and technology teachers statewide and to
    offer an educational service component to other campus science and technology
    departments.

   Continue to build and to expand the College's Summer Institute series for practicing
    educators statewide. Offering courses that target key areas of interest and relevance to
    educators (such as the College's summer institute in Bullying Prevention and Intervention)
    provides a route to ongoing professional development that satisfies state requirements, while
    also giving teachers skills and knowledge that will find immediate application in their
    schools.

                        Illinois Commitment Goal Three: Affordability
             No Illinois citizen will be denied an opportunity for a college education
                                      because of financial need

Provide adequate institutional financial aid to ensure that full tuition and fee costs are met for
our neediest students and that the campus remains affordable for all students. In FY 2003,
Urbana-Champaign undertook to use institutional funds to cover the “MAP Gap” caused
principally by the FY 2003 MAP maximum awards failing to cover full campus tuition costs and
by ISAC discounting MAP maximum awards by 5% for FY 2003. The campus also provided
institutional funds to fifth-year students who, because of funding reductions in FY 2003, did not
receive MAP assistance. These commitments benefited 5,620 students who received $6.615
million in extra institutional funds. This was an increase of more than $5.3 million in grants to
supplement MAP awards over what had been provided in FY 2002.

A comprehensive and useful way to assess college affordability is to examine net costs for the
student, after financial aid has been deducted, as a function of family income. An effective and
accepted way of conducting such an analysis is to focus on income quintiles, i.e., by segregating
families into five groups of equal size based on family income. As shown in the upper table
below, for the lower-income quintiles of our students in FY 2003, the students received sufficient
financial aid to reduce their net costs to levels they could afford. Indeed, the far right-hand
column below shows that financial aid completely covered costs of tuition and fees for students
in the lowest two income quintiles. For these students, their net costs are associated with room
and board, the living expenses they would have even if they did not attend college. By providing
institutional aid primarily to low- and middle-income students, strategically supplementing
federal and state aid, attendance at Urbana-Champaign is made affordable by students of all
income levels. In FY 2003, 22% of students paid no tuition or fees; 22% paid tuition and fees of
less than $2,000; 22% paid tuition and fees less than the full amount but greater than $1,999; and
the remaining 34% paid full tuition and fees.

The lower table indicates that when the total cost of education is considered (i.e., tuition and
fees, room and board) and gift aid and federal Work Study opportunities are deducted, then the
ratio of what the student and student’s family must pay to the family’s income is held within the
range of 12.5% to 14.2% for all but the highest-income students. The Illinois state average is
about 23%.

                                 University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
                              Financial Aid and Educational Costs by Quintile
                                      Illinois Mean Income by Quintile
                                       Estimated from Fall 2002 data
             Dependent Undergraduate Students Who Applied for Financial Aid for Award Year 2003

                                                                                                                               Ratio:
                               Tuition     Room         Federal        Institutional                  Ratio: Net           Tuition+Fees
                 Mean           and          &         and State       and Private        Net        Cost / Mean             less Aid /
                                                                2                 4
                Income          Fees       Board       Gift Aid          Gift Aid        Cost          Income              Mean Income
Quintile 1       $14,499       $6,704      $5,906         $6,928             $2,459      $3,223            22.2%                    0.0%
Quintile 2       $35,913       $6,704      $5,906         $4,950             $2,112      $5,548            15.4%                    0.0%
Quintile 3       $59,327       $6,704      $5,906         $1,846             $1,443      $9,321            15.7%                    5.8%
Quintile 4       $86,409       $6,704      $5,906           $600                $971    $11,039            12.8%                    5.9%
Quintile 5      $163,800       $6,704      $5,906           $392                $741    $11,477              7.0%                   3.4%
                                                                                       Average             14.6%                    3.0%
2 Parent Income Ranges: Parent income was used for dependent student tables.
3 Federal and State Gift Aid: Includes all Federal and State grants, scholarships, and waivers, including PELL and MAP.
4 Inst. & Private Gift Aid: Includes all inst. and private grants, scholarships, waivers, & fellowships, including SEAL & UIUC Tuition Grants
                                                                              Federal Loans/         Ratio:          Ratio: Total
                               Total Cost                       Work         Expected Family     (Loans+EFC)             Gift
                 Mean              of           Total Gift      Study        Contribution (For      / Mean           Aid/Tuition
                                         1            3                                    4
                Income         Education          Aid          Offered         Total Cost)          Income            and Fees
Quintile 1       $14,499          $12,610         $9,387        $1,387               $1,836             12.7%             140.0%
Quintile 2       $35,913          $12,610         $7,062        $1,318               $4,230             11.8%             105.3%
Quintile 3       $59,327          $12,610         $3,289          $913               $8,408             14.2%               49.1%
Quintile 4       $86,409          $12,610         $1,571          $206             $10,833              12.5%               23.4%
Quintile 5      $163,800          $12,610         $1,133            $18            $11,459                7.0%              16.9%
                                                                                      Average           11.6%               66.9%

1 Total Cost is Tuition + Fees + Room and Board to compare to data in national studies.
2 Parent Income Ranges: Parent income was used for dependent student tables.
3 Total Gift Aid: Includes Grants, Scholarships, waivers, fellowships from all sources.
4 Federal Loans Offered: Includes all Federal Direct Student Loans, Federal PLUS Loans, and Federal Perkins Loans.


Plans for FY 2004: Urbana-Champaign will undertake to keep attendance affordable for
students at all income levels through the combination of financial aid sources discussed above.

                           Illinois Commitment Goal Four: Access and Diversity
                            Illinois will increase the number and diversity of citizens
                                   completing training and education programs

Maintain enrollment levels that provide maximum access to the campus permitted by available
instructional resources and consistent with educational excellence. The campus’ instructional
capacity is the most fundamental determinant of access to Urbana-Champaign. With a steadily
growing college-age population (which is projected to continue to grow until about 2012), it is
incumbent on the state’s leading institution to strive to make more places for the state’s
increasing numbers of most highly qualified students. From FY 1998 to FY 2002, total
enrollment increased from 36,019 to 38,263 (+6.2%), and undergraduate enrollment increased
from 26,865 to 28,243 (+5.1%). It has been possible to gradually increase enrollment by
implementing efficiencies in how instruction is delivered (e.g., by setting class sizes at the
maximum levels that are consistent with each class’s instructional objectives and curricular
functions). The state budget rescissions of FY 2001 and FY 2002, and the permanent budget
reductions of FY 2002 and FY 2003 make the task of accommodating the best qualified students
in our growing college-age population more challenging than ever, but the campus will strive in
every responsible way to maintain enrollment levels that will provide access for the state’s most
highly qualified students.

Increase the diversity of the student body. Over the last 10 years, enrollment of African
American and Latina/Latino undergraduates increased by 15.9%; enrollment of African
American and Latina/Latino graduate students increased by 48.9% during the same period. For
fall, 2002, the number of Latina/Latino undergraduates increased by an additional 61 students to
a total of 1,946, or 5% of the student body. Enrollment of African American students increased
by 67 to a total of 2,336, or 6% of the student body. The percentage of undergraduate students
who are non-minority has declined from 70.8% in FY 2000 to 70.1% in FY 2001 to 69.4% in
FY 2002. The resulting enrollment levels place Urbana-Champaign second among Big Ten
public universities in minority enrollment. Moreover, retention/graduation of minority students
after five years stands at 66% for African American students and 65% for Latina/Latino students.
In 1998, the most recent year for which comparative data are available, Urbana-Champaign
ranked second among Big Ten public universities in the percentage of baccalaureate degrees
awarded that went to minority students.

Support diversity through programmatic initiatives, targeted programs, and building a more
diverse faculty. Urbana-Champaign supports student diversity with active programs in Afro-
American Studies, Asian Studies, and Latino/Latina studies. Each of these academic programs is
supported by a cultural program or committee. A total of 18 new faculty lines have been
committed to expanding these ethnic studies programs. In addition, a new Center on Democracy
in a Multiracial Society is being developed to expand teaching, research, and outreach
concerning diversity issues. During the 2002 spring semester, a campus-wide emphasis on
diversity issues supported special seminars, performances, workshops, and other co-curricular
experiences for students. Throughout the 2003-04 academic year, the fiftieth anniversary of the
Brown v. Board of Education decision will be commemorated in lectures, conferences, symposia,
performances, and other events that examine the decision’s long-term effects and the forces the
decision set in motion. In all, 27 different programs, offices, and initiatives work to enhance and
support the diversity of the student body. These range from peer recruitment programs that
recruit promising students while they are still in high school, to programs to provide targeted
academic support services during their study on campus. Some of these programs are
administered by the campus (e.g., President’s Award Program, Peer Recruitment Program),
while others are offered by colleges across the campus (e.g., ACES Young Scholars Program,
LAS Academic Assistance Program, Engineering’s Minority Engineering Program). Finally,
diversity of the faculty has increased notably. Of new faculty members who joined the campus
in FY 2002, 23% were members of minority groups (45 of 196 new hires), including 14 new
African American faculty members and 11 new Hispanic/Latino faculty members. Women
represented 46% of new faculty hires for FY 2002. Over a longer time frame, from 1992
through 2000, the number of African American and Latina/Latino faculty members has increased
by 40%, and the percent of faculty members who are women has increased by 23%.

Plans for FY 2004: Urbana-Champaign will endeavor to continue to manage enrollment to meet
educationally responsible targets permitted by available instructional resources, will work to
continue to increase the representation of minorities in the student body and of minorities and
women on the faculty, and will strive within available resources to increase support for
programs focusing on ethnic studies and diversity issues.

               Illinois Commitment Goal Five: High Expectations and Quality
         Illinois colleges and universities will hold students to even higher expectations
            for learning and will be accountable for the quality of academic programs
                                  and the assessment of learning

Maintain and enhance the excellence of academic programs. By all credible indicators,
Urbana-Champaign ranks among the handful of leading U.S. public universities based on the
quality of its academic programs. In the most recent (August 2002) annual report of the
Lombardi Program on Measuring University Performance at the University of Florida, The Top
American Research Universities, Urbana-Champaign tied with five other universities for the
number one ranking among public research universities (the others were University of
California-Berkeley, UCLA, Michigan, Wisconsin, and North Carolina). These rankings are
based on objective indicators of quality such as total and federal research expenditures, number
of faculty who are National Academy members and have received prestigious awards, and
number of doctorates granted.

Efforts were made to further enhance program quality in FY 2003 with major initiatives across a
range of areas. Initiatives in scientific areas such as bioengineering, nanotechnology, post-
genomic research in the life sciences, and computational biology were mentioned in the first
section of this report. Initiatives also were undertaken in the humanities and social sciences with
commitments of additional faculty lines in areas of high undergraduate demand and also new
commitments to support work in the arts, including the performing arts. A focused program of
cross-campus, discipline-spanning initiatives to identify and take advantage of opportunities for
research that hold special promise for making signal contributions is sponsored by the
Chancellor. These initiatives concern:

   The cell as a micro-machine (an effort to develop new tools for defining the functional “parts
    list” of cellular components and to characterize the suite of interactions occurring within a
    model cell);

   PharmaEngineering™: Neural repair in the nano domain (an effort to discover novel
    insights, solutions and fabrications for neural repair and restoration of function through nano-
    scale bioengineering applications);

   The humanities in a globalizing world (an effort to bring the insights of humanists to bear on
    developing a larger conceptual apparatus that can facilitate interpretation of and debate about
    the complex phenomena of globalization);

   Institutions in a demographically changing world (an interdisciplinary initiative to foster
    scholarly investigation of the connections between demographic changes and institutions;

   The arts in a technology-intensive world (an effort to engage the humanities with the fine and
    applied arts and with science and technology to explore the potential for the creation of new
    human experience through the arts);

   Food security (an initiative to ensure the safety and integrity of the nation’s food systems by
    addressing every aspect of food security, will identify the threats to our food supply and
    develop wide-ranging solutions through research, education and public engagement);

   Democracy in a multiracial society (examines how a multiracial democracy is experienced in
    a multitude of areas of everyday life, including mass and popular culture, religion, the
    workplace, and neighborhoods, with particular attention to the role of public education,
    public policy, and media and technology);
   Aging (an effort involving faculty and students in more than 20 departments to investigate
    topics concerning aging, including the molecular biology of aging, aging and cognitive
    function; physical activity and successful aging, disability and functioning in aging, legal and
    ethical issues and aging, assistive technology and aging, and images of aging in the
    humanities);

   Promoting family resiliency (a program to identify the social, institutional, community-
    based, and other factors that enable families to cope successfully with strains resulting from
    divorce, raising children in poverty, caring for aged parents, and caring for children with
    behavioral, attention, and learning programs, and to develop strategies for helping families to
    become more resilient in the face of such problems); and,

   The changing context of national and international policy (an inquiry into ways of focus on
    reinventing the performance of government to address problems that cross local, state,
    national, and regional borders, such as air and water quality, economic development,
    education, food security, gender inequality, global warming, governance, health care and
    nutrition, human rights and conflict resolution, inter-ethnic conflict, migration, public health,
    security, social welfare, and trade).

Support academic program quality by attracting well qualified students. The mean ACT
composite score for entering freshmen at Urbana-Champaign has increased steadily from 26.8 in
fall 1999, to 27.1 in fall 2000, to 27.3 in fall 2002 (the Illinois statewide average is 21.6). Their
ACT/SAT exam scores place Urbana-Champaign undergraduates 15th nationally among the
student bodies of all universities—public and private—that receive more then $20 million
annually in federal research funds.

Support academic program quality by working to improve the quality of teaching. More than
three-fourths of all courses taught at Urbana-Champaign are “top rated” for quality by their
students (i.e., ratings of 4 or 5 on a 5-point evaluative scale with 5 = excellent). In part, this
reflects an increasing emphasis placed on the importance and improvement of teaching.
Teaching Academies have been established in every college (with the smallest colleges
collaborating to establish an Academy). These Academies provide teaching workshops,
mentoring for junior faculty members concerning teaching approaches and skills, and similar
experiences in a year-long program for every new faculty member. Each year, the Teaching
Advancement Board awards $200,000 on a competitive basis to fund proposals for innovations
in teaching. Excellence in teaching is recognized annually with 17 campuswide awards for
faculty and graduate teaching assistants, 128 college and departmental awards for faculty and
graduate teaching assistants, and at the highest level of teaching excellence, honorific
designation as a Distinguished Teacher Scholar.

Plans for FY 2004: Urbana-Champaign will seek to maintain and enhance the excellence of its
academic programs with excellent faculty recruitments as permitted by financial constraints, to
support the development and advancement of new academic initiatives, to continue to attract
well-qualified applicants for admission, to maintain emphasis on the quality of teaching through
a variety of support programs, and to improve the availability and quality of curricular and co-
curricular experiences for students through a variety of programs.
    Illinois Commitment Goal Six: Productivity, Cost Effectiveness, and Accountability
              Illinois colleges and universities will continually improve productivity,
                                cost-effectiveness, and accountability

Reduce administrative costs and increase efficiencies. In March, 2003, the Chancellor asked
the Provost to chair a campus-wide committee to identify ways of achieving efficiencies and
economies in how administrative and support services are provided across the campus while
maintaining service quality, effectiveness, and accountability, in both administrative and
academic units and at every organizational level. The committee consists of 33 members,
including Vice Chancellors, representatives of administrative units, deans, academic department
heads, faculty members, academic professionals, members of the Senate, and students.
Subcommittees and task groups were created to examine functional areas and complex units, and
additional participants were added to provide needed expertise. The full set of
recommendations—areas for immediate implementation, promising areas where some additional
study is needed and short-term implementation is possible, and promising areas where long-term
study is required—has been requested by the end of July.

        The goals of this process are to achieve savings of at least $3 million annually (equivalent
to 45 faculty positions or the annual interest earned by a $60 million endowment), and to exploit
opportunities to increase service effectiveness and efficiency. Many of the possibilities that have
been identified require detailed investigation, and some require an extended period of time for
implementation. We expect the process to unfold to completion across FY 2004 and the full set
of approved recommendations for administrative units to be implemented by the beginning of
FY 2005. The process required for any major reorganization of academic units is more complex
and lengthy, and will require perhaps an additional six months to one year.

        Potential savings have been estimated for recommendations that have relatively simple
and straightforward financial consequences. Potential savings that would result from more
complex recommendations will require a longer time to estimate with an acceptable level of
confidence. The total of potential savings associated with the simpler steps that have been
identified thus far is $3,164,750. Following are some examples of measures that are under
consideration.

   Eleven academic departments in six colleges are being considered for consolidation or
    merger with other units. If approved, these steps would reduce the number of academic units
    by eight.

   Reorganizations recently completed within campus-level administrative offices have led to
    elimination of the positions of Vice Chancellor for Administration and Human Resources, an
    Associate Chancellor, an Associate Vice Chancellor for Research, an Associate Vice
    Chancellor for Student Affairs, and an Associate Provost for compliance and conduct issues,
    along with creation of a new Vice Chancellor for Public Engagement and Institutional
    Relations. Reorganization of the former Division of Operation and Maintenance, including
    consolidation of the former Office of Planning, Design, and Construction, resulted in
    elimination of an Associate Vice Chancellor position and other administrative support and
    managerial staff. The net savings resulting from these steps exceeds $600,000 per year.
   A structure for co-administration in the Foreign Language Building has been created to
    provide common support services to more than a dozen different academic units. This model
    for co-administration and provision of common support services will be replicated across a
    number of disciplinary and interdisciplinary units in Liberal Arts and Sciences.

   A shared service will be created to provide business and human resources support for all
    units located in the Swanlund Administration Building; once established, the center will be
    expanded to provide services to administrative units housed in the Illini Union Bookstore and
    the Student Services Building, as well as the Graduate College, the Center on Democracy in
    a Multiracial Society, and other programs.

   A proposal is being developed to create a preferred provider arrangement for purchase of
    information technology equipment; this arrangement is expected to result in significant
    savings on the campus annual $25 million expenditure on such equipment.

   A proposal is being developed to have the campus Office of Publications & Marketing create
    preferred provider arrangements for vendors of publications design and printing services; this
    arrangement is expected to reduce annual costs to units for purchase of these services, and
    also to facilitate units’ outsourcing of more of their publication activity.

   Part of the continuing investigation of reorganization opportunities involves examination of
    possibilities to achieve savings by shifting a number of campus services to the private sector.
    RFPs will be issued during FY 2004 for such services as grounds management, car pool and
    garage management, printing services, and the Waste Transfer Facility. Greater reliance on
    outsourcing could produce significant savings (for example, outsourcing of grounds
    management could yield a possible annual savings of $100,000).

Continue reconsideration of budgeting policies and practices. A Task Force of academic deans
is continuing its thorough review of campus budgeting policies. The goal is to ensure that the
budgeting system provides to schools and colleges appropriate and timely incentives for
delivering mission activities (teaching, research, public engagement) efficiently and
economically, and to create sufficient funds held at the center to support activities and initiatives
of campus-wide importance.

Work to better provide for the family-related needs of employees. A program to provide
insurance benefits for the same-sex domestic partners of campus employees was approved in
July, 2003, by the Board of Trustees.

Plans for FY 2004: Urbana-Champaign will continue to implement efficiencies in how
administrative support and services are implemented in order to save funds that can be
reallocated to support the academic enterprise, to improve budgeting policies and practices to
better align resource allocation with campus priorities and the state budgetary situation that is
likely to persist for the next few years, and to support the family-related needs of all employees.
                 Best Practice (Academic) Illinois Commitment Goal Two:
                Higher education will join elementary and secondary education
                        to improve learning and teaching at all levels

                                   The RECRUIT Program

Recruiting, Educating, Certifying, and Retaining Underrepresented Populations In Teaching
Science and Mathematics (RECRUIT ) is a four-year project funded by a grant from the National
Science Foundation to the College of Education to develop, pilot test and assess the effectiveness
of an alternative science and mathematics teacher certification program that will increase the
number of secondary math and science teachers from underrepresented populations. RECRUIT
endeavors to fill some of the critical shortages of science and mathematics teachers. The
program does so by targeting practicing scientists and mathematicians, and attracting and
preparing them to becoming K-12 teachers. The program is directed to recent and advanced
science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) graduates, and mid-career, scientists,
mathematicians, engineers, and industry personnel who might be interested in pursuing careers in
secondary science or mathematics teaching. This innovative program is a collaboration between
the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the Illinois Institute of Technology, and four
Illinois school districts.

Participants join the program in Year I for a two-semester residency on the UIUC campus during
which they complete a set of education courses required for certification. After completing this
course of study, the program participants are issued a one-year nonrenewable Provisional
Alternative Teaching Certificate. During Year I, participants receive Teaching Assistantships in
innovative science or mathematics courses offered in disciplinary departments on campus to fund
their residency at UIUC and provide them with opportunities to examine their content knowledge
for the purpose of teaching science or mathematics. Year II is an internship-like experience
during which participants take a full-time teaching position in a collaborating school district.
Participants teach under an expert mentor teacher in the building who is compensated by the
program. Simultaneously, participants enroll in a two-term, biweekly seminar that links them to
other teacher candidates in their cohort, mentor teachers, and university education and STEM
faculty. By the end of Year II, participants earn a nonrenewable initial Alternative Teaching
Certificate valid for four years of teaching. After completing four years of teaching, graduates
may apply for the Standard Teaching Certificate. During Year III, participants continue to teach
full time while enrolled in a set of advanced education courses leading to a Master of Education
degree.

This new project is currently seeking campus and ISBE approval to offer Illinois certification to
participants in the program.

During FY 2004, the RECRUIT project staff will finalize arrangements with collaborating
school districts, establish a relationship with the Chicago Public Schools and complete the
recruitment of the first cohort of participants.
                Best Practice (Administrative) Illinois Commitment Goal Six:
                   Illinois colleges and universities will continually improve
                       productivity, cost-effectiveness, and accountability

                                 The Deans Budget Committee

The subject of priorities in a university’s budgeting practices is a source of frequent discussion
and sometimes controversy on many campuses. Annual budget allocations receive close scrutiny
by the campus community, in part because an institution’s values and priorities are revealed in its
budgeting decisions perhaps more than in its official rhetoric. Budgeting decisions always
require choices to be made; rhetoric about institutional values and priorities does not. Implicit or
explicit in the budgeting process are evaluations of campus units, their performance and
leadership measured against institutional priorities and values. It is thus essential that campus
budgeting practices align and be seen to align with the campus’ stated values and priorities.

The most basic value of any university is that the academic mission—teaching, research, public
engagement—is the institution’s highest priority, and that administrative support services and
units exist to serve the needs of the academic mission. Although this value is uncontroversial, its
implementation in university budgeting practices often gives rise to controversy. It is thus
desirable that an institution’s budgeting practices implement its most basic value in a way that is
clear to all.

The Urbana-Champaign campus adopted a new budgeting system in FY 1998 that, among other
things, created a structural arrangement to display and assure the subservience of administrative
functions to the academic mission. This arrangement features the Deans Budget Committee,
which consists of the deans of the colleges and schools or their designees. All administrative
units present their annual performance reports, long-term plans, and resource requests to this
committee, which in turn makes recommendations to the Provost for allocations to
administrative units. Through this process, all administrative units reporting to the Chancellor or
a Vice Chancellor undergo annual campus-level budgetary review by the leadership of the
schools and colleges.

Creation of the Deans Budget Committee has had several benefits. The committee review
process displays structurally the relationship between academic units and administrative units,
and the priority given to the academic mission. The review process also makes administrative
units publicly and visibly accountable to the academic units they exist to support. When the
Deans Budget Committee recommends increased resources for an administrative unit, the
campus community knows that the new resources have been weighed against other uses of the
funds in a framework that rests on academic needs and values. As the campus community has
gained experience with this review process over the last few years, the traditional faculty
suspicion that administrative units reporting directly to campus administrators have first call on
resources contrary to academic values has been noticeably allayed, although some level of
suspicion is probably inherent in any university budgeting system. In times of severe resource
constraints, budgeting practices that visibly instantiate the institution’s academic values at the
core of its resource decisions are especially valuable.
                                      Performance Indicators
                                       Institutional Context

       Beginning in the early years of the 20th century, the university’s leadership embarked on
a course that, in the post-war era, placed Urbana-Champaign among the leading U.S. public
universities. Successive Presidents and, after the reorganization of the university into a multi-
campus system, Chancellors strove to maintain and enhance the eminence of Urbana-
Champaign, with the result that in 2003, the University of Florida’s Lombardi Program on
Measuring University Performance ranked the campus as tied with five peers (UC-Berkeley,
UCLA, Michigan, North Carolina, and Wisconsin) as the top-rated U.S. public research
university.

         Admission is highly selective. The mean ACT composite score for entering freshmen has
increased steadily to 27.3 in fall 2002 (the Illinois statewide average is 21.6), and places Urbana
undergraduates 15th nationally among the student bodies of all universities—public and
private—that receive more then $20 million annually in federal research funds. The enrollment
of 38,263 consists overwhelmingly of traditional students, and the number of applications for
admission has set new records in each of the last several years with well over 20,000 applicants
for each year’s freshman class. More than 90% of freshmen are Illinois residents, representing,
in fall 2002, 94 of Illinois’ 102 counties and 592 Illinois high schools. The student body is
diverse (the campus ranks second in the Big Ten in both the number of minority students and in
the percentage of baccalaureate degrees awarded that go to minority students) and in terms of
family income resembles the student body of a mid-priced private college (half of our
undergraduates do not apply for financial aid).

         Over the years and in the present, the university has built its faculty from leading scholars
and researchers, many of whom have achieved or are well on their way to achieving eminence in
their fields. The quality of this faculty is reflected in the institution’s extraordinary success in
attracting external support for its research programs (see information provided above concerning
Illinois Commitment Goal One), the number of leading corporations statewide and nationally
that seek to engage with its researchers, and in the special quality of education it offers by
involving its graduate and undergraduate students in the discovery of knowledge, led by faculty
who themselves work at the leading edge of their fields. Due in part to a range of special
initiatives over the last two decades, this faculty has become progressively more diverse as well
as accomplished.

         The progressive decline in state funding has affected all of public higher education. In
1979-80, the State provided $8 for every $1 the university received in tuition. In 2002-03, the
ratio fell to $1.50 from the State for every tuition dollar. In 2003-04, for the first time ever, State
and tuition revenue will reach rough parity. Tuition increases have fallen far short of keeping
pace with the decrease in State support, with the result that today the university spends about
$760 less per student each year in constant, deflated dollars, than it spent in 1980. The
university’s greatest challenge concerns whether it will be able to continue to fill its historic role
of providing access to a world-class university within the public higher education system in the
face of dwindling resources that make the institution’s quality increasing difficult to sustain.
                                     Illinois Commitment Goal One:
                                     Help Illinois business and industry
                                      sustain strong economic growth

Common Institutional Indicator

   Percent of degree/certificate recipients either employed or enrolled in further education
    within one year of graduation

                                                         1997 graduates*      1997 graduates     2000 graduates
                                                         surveyed in 2002     surveyed in 1998   surveyed in 2001
% graduates employed (full-time or part-time)            92.1%                84.6%              87.2%
% graduates who have pursued or are pursuing an
                                                         44.1%                83.4%              83.8%
additional degree

*Surveys of graduates are done each year on a rotating basis: graduates 1 year out, graduates 5 years out,
graduates 10 years out. This table provides the two most recent one-year-out surveys and the most recent five-year-
out survey.

Mission-Specific Indicators                                            2000             2001              2002

   Research and development expenditures
     (annual percentage change)                                        +4.3%            +4.6%             +7.3%6
   Federal research grants and contracts
     (annual percentage change)                                        +4.2%            +0.9%             N/A
   National ranking among U.S. universities research
     support from National Science Foundation                          1                1                 1
   Invention disclosures                                              119              134               111
   U.S. patents filed                                                 59               90                74
   U.S. patents issued                             21                          21               23
   Royalty income                                                     $4.8 M           $7.4 M            $6.6 M
   License agreements executed                                        55               50                45
   Number of Illinois companies served by teams of
     Engineering students through the Institute for
     Competitive Manufacturing                                         16               19                10




6
  Annual percent change for 2000, 2001, and 2002 is percent change in campus indirect cost recovery earnings,
which is an imperfect measure of total research and development expenditures. A more complete measure is
provided in annual National Science Foundation statistics by the most recent (April 2003) NSF report does not
include data for 2002. Available NSF data on annual percent change for 2000 and 2001 are within 0.3% of the
figures shown based on ICR recovery amount changes.
                                    Illinois Commitment Goal Two:
                                  Join with elementary and secondary
                         education to improve teaching and learning at all levels

Common Institutional Indicators

     Annual number of students completing requirements for initial teacher certification by
      certificate area (Note: The goal is not continuous growth but rather maintenance of
      significant numbers consistent with educational quality and instructional capacity)

          Pass Rate, Students Taking Teacher Certification Examination, by Certificate Area
          (Number of Students Successfully Completing Examination Given in Parentheses)
                                                   99-00 Graduates      00-01 Graduates    01-02 Graduates
    Basic Skills Test                                 100% (400)           100% (406)       100% (449)
    Early Childhood                                    100% (22)            100% (28)         100% (26)
    Elementary                                        100% (104)           100% (117)         99% (143)
    Social Science                                      94% (31)            100% (34)         100% (34)
    English                                            100% (49)            100% (43)         100% (40)
    Spanish                                            100% (14)                   —          100% (10)
    Biological Science                                 100% (15)                   —          100% (15)
    Mathematics                                        100% (25)            100% (17)          96% (24)
    Chemistry                                                 —                    —          100% (12)
    Art (K-12)                                          96% (23)            100% (24)         100% (28)
    Music (K-12)                                       100% (49)            100% (65)         100% (39)
    Physical Education (K-12)                          100% (15)                   —                 —
    Physical Education (6-12)                          100% (10)                   —                 —
    Agriculture                                        100% (15)                   —          100% (12)
    Trainable Mentally Handicapped                            —                    —          100% (18)
    Speech and Language Impaired                       100% (17)            100% (14)         100% (19)


Mission-Specific Indicators

     The Urbana campus is renowned for its innovations in development of and applications of
      technology to teaching. One arena in which this expertise is enlisted to serve elementary and
      secondary education is an annual summer institute sponsored by the College of Education in
      which teachers learn how to integrate computers and other technologies into their teaching.
      Part of the participants’ work involves developing a classroom project for their own school
      that integrates the Illinois Learning Standards and the National Technology Standards.
      Hence, one appropriate indicator of the campus’ support for improving elementary and
      secondary education is the number of participants in this summer institute, known as the
      “Moveable Feast.”

                                Participants in the Summer Institute on Integrating
                         Computers and Technology in Elementary and Secondary Education

                   Summer, 2000            Summer, 2001                     Summer, 2002

                           387                     464                              441
                                        Illinois Commitment Goal Three:
                                No Illinois citizen will be denied an opportunity for
                                  a college education because of financial need

Common Institutional Indicators

                              Financial Aid and Educational Costs by Quintile
                                     Illinois Mean Income by Quintile
                                      Estimated from Fall 2002 data*
             Dependent Undergraduate Students Who Applied for Financial Aid for Award Year 2003

                                                                                                                               Ratio:
                               Tuition     Room         Federal        Institutional                  Ratio: Net           Tuition+Fees
                 Mean           and          &         and State       and Private           Net     Cost / Mean             less Aid /
                                                                2                 4
                Income          Fees       Board       Gift Aid          Gift Aid           Cost       Income              Mean Income
Quintile 1       $14,499       $6,704      $5,906         $6,928             $2,459         $3,223         22.2%                    0.0%
Quintile 2       $35,913       $6,704      $5,906         $4,950             $2,112         $5,548         15.4%                    0.0%
Quintile 3       $59,327       $6,704      $5,906         $1,846             $1,443         $9,321         15.7%                    5.8%
Quintile 4       $86,409       $6,704      $5,906           $600                $971       $11,039         12.8%                    5.9%
Quintile 5      $163,800       $6,704      $5,906           $392                $741       $11,477           7.0%                   3.4%
                                                                                          Average          14.6%                    3.0%

2 Parent Income Ranges: Parent income was used for dependent student tables.
3 Federal and State Gift Aid: Includes all Federal and State grants, scholarships, and waivers, including PELL and MAP.
4 Inst. & Private Gift Aid: Includes all inst. and private grants, scholarships, waivers, & fellowships, including SEAL & UIUC Tuition Grants



                                                                              Federal Loans/             Ratio:             Ratio: Total
                               Total Cost                       Work         Expected Family         (Loans+EFC)                Gift
                 Mean              of           Total Gift      Study        Contribution (For          / Mean              Aid/Tuition
                                         1            3                                    4
                Income         Education          Aid          Offered         Total Cost)              Income               and Fees
Quintile 1       $14,499          $12,610         $9,387        $1,387               $1,836                 12.7%                140.0%
Quintile 2       $35,913          $12,610         $7,062        $1,318               $4,230                 11.8%                105.3%
Quintile 3       $59,327          $12,610         $3,289          $913               $8,408                 14.2%                  49.1%
Quintile 4       $86,409          $12,610         $1,571          $206             $10,833                  12.5%                  23.4%
Quintile 5      $163,800          $12,610         $1,133            $18            $11,459                    7.0%                 16.9%
                                                                                      Average               11.6%                  66.9%

1 Total Cost is Tuition + Fees + Room and Board to compare to data in national studies.
2 Parent Income Ranges: Parent income was used for dependent student tables.
3 Total Gift Aid: Includes Grants, Scholarships, waivers, fellowships from all sources.
4 Federal Loans Offered: Includes all Federal Direct Student Loans, Federal PLUS Loans, and Federal Perkins Loans.
*This sort of analysis is not available for AY2001 or AY2000. AY2002 is, of course, the year of greatest interest in
this report.
                                       Illinois Commitment Goal Four:
                           Illinois will increase the number and diversity of citizens
                                  completing training and education programs

Common Institutional Indicators

                      Baccalaureate Degrees Granted by Race, Ethnicity, and Gender7

Race/Ethnicity       Degrees Granted in AY2000         Degrees Granted in AY2001   Degrees Granted in AY2002
   Gender             Number          Percent           Number          Percent     Number          Percent
AI/AN                    10            0.2%                16            0.3%          12            0.2%
Black                   342            5.4%               376            6.0%         395            5.9%
A/PI                    795           12.5%               826           13.2%         919           13.7%
Hispanic                246            3.9%               295            4.7%         319            4.7%
White                  4691           73.5%              4505           72.0%        4885           72.7%
Not known               301            4.7%               241            3.9%         194            3.0%
Male                   3280           51.3%              3240           51.7%        3274           48.6%
Female                 3213           48.7%              3029           48.3%        3420           50.8%


                          Master’s Degrees Granted by Race, Ethnicity, and Gender

Race/Ethnicity       Degrees Granted in AY2000         Degrees Granted in AY2001   Degrees Granted in AY2002
    Gender            Number          Percent           Number          Percent     Number          Percent
AI/AN                     4            0.2%                 4            0.2%           5            0.2%
Black                    87            3.8%               100            4.6%          91            3.7%
A/PI                    126            5.5%               127            5.9%         109            4.5%
Hispanic                 56            2.4%                53            2.4%          71            2.9%
White                  1241           54.0%              1166           53.7%        1280           52.5%
International           747           32.5%               692           31.9%         831           34.1%
Not known                37            1.6%                28            1.3%          51            2.1%
Male                   1197           52.1%              1102           50.8%        1189           48.8%
Female                 1101           47.9%              1068           49.2%        1249           51.2%


                          Doctoral Degrees Granted by Race, Ethnicity, and Gender

Race/Ethnicity       Degrees Granted in AY2000         Degrees Granted in AY2001   Degrees Granted in AY2002
    Gender            Number          Percent           Number          Percent     Number          Percent
AI/AN                     1            0.2%                 1            0.1%           2            0.3%
Black                    18            3.0%                19            2.8%          16            2.7%
A/PI                     31            5.2%                30            4.5%          32            5.3%
Hispanic                  9            1.5%                16            2.4%          16            2.7%
White                   311           51.7%               345           51.7%         272           45.1%
International           221           36.8%               250           37.5%         258           42.8%
Not known                10            1.7%                 6            0.9%           7            1.2%
Male                    391           65.1%               432           64.8%         385           63.8%
Female                  210           34.9%               235           35.2%         218           36.2%




7
    The campus does not track students by disability status.
                   Professional Degrees Granted by Race, Ethnicity, and Gender

Race/Ethnicity   Degrees Granted in AY2000    Degrees Granted in AY2001    Degrees Granted in AY2002
    Gender        Number          Percent      Number          Percent      Number          Percent
AI/AN                 —            0.0%            —            0.0%            1            0.3%
Black                21            7.6%           16            6.0%           19            6.0%
A/PI                 16            5.8%           17            6.4%           17            5.3%
Hispanic             18            6.5%           19            7.1%           22            6.9%
White               214           77.0%          195           73.3%          237           74.3%
International         —            0.0%            4            1.5%            8            2.5%
Not known             9            3.2%           15            5.6%           15            4.7%
Male                130           46.8%          133           50.0%          163           50.1%
Female              148           53.2%          133           50.0%          156           48.9%


Mission-Specific Indicators

   The retention rate, commonly computed as the percent of students who enrolled on the
    campus as freshmen and have either graduated or are still enrolled after five years, is the
    most frequently used measure of an institution’s success in encouraging students to complete
    their baccalaureate degrees. Ensuring a high graduation/retention rate is not unique to
    Urbana’s mission, but it is an especially important goal as we cope with the need to reduce
    classes and instructors because of budget cuts and also continue to increase the diversity of
    the student body. The retention rates for the classes that most recently reached the five-
    years-since-entrance mark are:

                 Entered as freshmen in 1997: 79.9% (78% graduated, 1.9% still enrolled)
                 Entered as freshmen in 1996: 79.7% (76.9% graduated, 2.8% still enrolled)
                 Entered as freshmen in 1995: 78.4% (75.3% graduated, 3.1% still enrolled)

    These retention rates are very high in comparison to peer institutions. The Illinois statewide
    retention rate is 55%; the national average retention rate is 56%; the average retention rate for
    the Big Ten public universities is 68%. Among the public universities in IBHE’s peer
    comparison group for Urbana, the campus trails only Michigan (by 4 points), and UC-
    Berkeley and UCLA (by 3 points). The campus’ retention rate is equal to that of North
    Carolina and leads Texas and the University of Washington by 9 points each. Within Illinois,
    Urbana trails only Northwestern and leads all other major universities, public and private, by
    more than 10 points.

   Retention/graduation of minority students after 5 years stands at 66% for African-American
    students and 65% for Latina/Latino students. In 1998, the most recent year for which
    comparative data are available, Urbana-Champaign ranked second among Big Ten public
    universities in the percentage of baccalaureate degrees awarded that went to minority
    students.
                                  Illinois Commitment Goal Five:
    Illinois colleges and universities will hold students to even higher expectations for learning
         and will be accountable for the quality of programs and the assessment of learning

Common Institutional Indicators

   Extent to which institutional quality and effectiveness are recognized by graduates through
    alumni surveys

    Chancellor’s 2002 Senior Survey (2,690 graduating seniors responded, 57% response rate)

        How satisfied were you with your overall
        educational experience at UIUC? Responses
        on a 5-point scale, 5 = very satisfied:  Mean of all respondents = 4.0

        If you could start over again, would you attend UIUC again?
        Percent answering “Yes”
                                                      85% of all respondents
                                                      85% of men respondents
                                                      85% of women respondents
                                                      80% of Asian-American respondents
                                                      80% of African-American respondents
                                                      79% of Hispanic/Latino respondents
                                                      89% of Native American respondents

    Graduate Survey: Survey of graduates five years after graduation

        Is your current job related or closely related to your U of I major? 80.7% reply “yes”
        Has your UI degree been helpful in the duties of your job? 88.6% reply “yes”
        How well did your UI degree prepare you for your current job? 62% reply “well” or
        “very well”; 29.3% reply “adequately”

    Graduate Survey: Survey of graduates ten years after graduation

        Is your current job related or closely related to your U of I major? 80.1% reply “yes”
        Has your UI degree been helpful in the duties of your job? 89% reply “yes”
        How well did your UI degree prepare you for your current job? 61.5% reply “well” or
        “very well”; 29.8% reply “adequately”

   Pass rates on professional/occupational licensure exams relative to state and/or national
    averages
       Fundamentals of Engineering Examination

             2000 Urbana students pass rate: 93% 2000 national average pass rate: 79%
             2001 Urbana students pass rate: 91% 2000 national average pass rate: 78%
             2002 Urbana students pass rate: 97% 2000 national average pass rate: 79%
       Pass rates on the Uniform CPA Examination

            From 1991-2000, Urbana baccalaureate graduates ranked second in the nation in
            percentage of candidates passing all subjects taken

            May 2000 Uniform CPA Examination

               National average first-time candidates passing all components               18.3%
               Urbana candidates without advanced degrees passing all components           37.2%

            November 2000 Uniform CPA Examination

               National average first-time candidates passing all components               15.5%
               Urbana candidates without advanced degrees passing all components           22.2%

            May 2001 Uniform CPA Examination

               National average first-time candidates passing all components               17.2%
               Urbana candidates without advanced degrees passing all components           30.0%

            November 2001 Uniform CPA Examination

               National average first-time candidates passing all components               18.2%
               Urbana candidates without advanced degrees passing all components           22.2%

       Urbana graduates pass rate on the Illinois State Bar Examination
                                                  2000 Exam          2001 Exam        2002 Exam
        National Bar pass rate                         65%               77%              N/A
        Urbana Illinois Bar pass rate                84.3%               94%              N/A


Mission-Specific Indicators

   Qualifications of entering students. One indication of the quality of academic programs is
    the quality of students they attract. Urbana’s mission within the public university system, as
    it has evolved over the last century, has become to provide highly qualified students with
    access to a leading public university of national and international stature. The most easily
    compared measure of student quality is the ACT/SAT scores of entering freshmen.

        Mean composite ACT scores              2000 Freshmen      2001 Freshmen    2002 Freshmen
        Statewide average                               21.6              20.1
        Urbana entering freshmen                        27.1              27.1             27.3
                                      Illinois Commitment Goal Six:
                        Illinois colleges and universities will continually improve
                             productivity, cost-effectiveness, and accountability

Common Institutional Indicators

                                           1999-2000                   2000-2001                  2001-2002
                                        Cost      % of sector   Cost         % of sector      Cost     % of sector
 Cost of instruction per credit hour
    Lower Division                      $120.02       86.5%     $127.74          86.7%       $139.41      90.7%
    Upper Division                      $214.76      102.3%     $217.62          98.7%       $235.17     101.6%
    Graduate I                          $402.22      110.2%     $390.70         112.1%       $418.31     104.5%
    Graduate II                         $618.52      105.0%     $625.86         105.0%       $659.53     104.9%
    Total                               $249.70      112.1%     $257.35         109.6%       $280.98     113.4%
 Administrative and support cost
                                         $44.18       75.0%      $50.14          79.8%        $55.73      84.7%
 per credit hour (all levels)
 Percent of first-time, full-time
 degree seeking freshmen who
 complete their degrees within           77%                      76%                                    79%
 150% of catalog time or are still
 enrolled or transferred


Mission-Specific Indicators

Time-to-degree is a common indicator of the extent to which an institution offers needed classes
in a timely fashion to allow students to complete degrees in the expected periods of time.
Although the goal of permitting students to graduate on time is not unique to Urbana, this goal is
especially important at large campuses such as Urbana. It will never be the case that all
undergraduates receive their baccalaureate degrees at the end of four years of study, because
there are compelling reasons why some students will always take a longer period of time to
graduate. These reasons include changing majors (the majority of undergraduates change their
majors at least once; the later in the student’s career that the student changes majors, the more
the change is like to require taking additional courses and prolonging time to degree); completing
second majors (many of our best students complete two majors in order to better prepare
themselves for their careers); and pursuing additional interests (the freedom and encouragement
to pursue additional interests is one of the goals of education that should not be overlooked in a
desire to finish every student in the shortest possible time). These considerations
notwithstanding, time-to-degree is one index of educational efficiency.

                                                          1999-2000            2000-2001           2001-2002
 Average number semesters to baccalaureate degree       8.8 semesters        8.7 semesters       8.5 semesters
             Status Report on Goal-Setting for Common Institutional Indicators

The goal-setting process at the University of Illinois is coordinated by a university-level
committee to provide guidance and to maintain consistency across the campuses. That
committee establishes common procedures which the campuses then flesh out with their
respective missions in mind.

At the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the goals of the Illinois commitment—and
the common and mission-specific indicators—are among the subjects that are continuously
reviewed and closely followed in ongoing, regular discussions involving the campus leadership
and the leadership of the colleges and schools. Institutional fora for these discussions include the
Council of Deans, chaired by the Provost and involving the deans and directors of the academic
units, and the Chancellor’s Cabinet, chaired by the Chancellor and involving the Vice
Chancellors and heads of administrative and support units. In addition, the campus’ annual
report to the President, prepared each spring, provides an opportunity to review and revise as
appropriate the campus’ full range of goals and accomplishments.

The continuing, precipitous decline in State support will make it necessary to focus particular
attention during 2003-04 on goals and performance measures that are closely connected to
resources and their consequences. These include: financial aid and affordability; continuing
efforts to reduce administrative costs in order to redirect resources to instruction; the effects of
declining numbers of instructors and courses on undergraduates’ time-to-degree; our ability to
recruit and retain faculty, graduate, and undergraduate students of the highest quality; and faculty
and staff morale. Also needing attention are ways of supporting the campus’ most eminent
departments and programs in order to maintain the campus’ standing nationally and
internationally, ways of supporting campus initiatives in diversity and other areas despite
resource constraints, and ways of supporting the continuing development of innovative programs
of research that will secure the campus’ standing into the future.
                   University Of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
                       Eight-Year Program Review Cycle

 Campus Report
     Due Date    Disciplines/Fields
July 2003        English Language and Literature
                 Liberal Arts and Sciences
July 2004        Law and Legal Studies
                 Library Science
                 Public Administration and Services
                      M.A. in Public Administration
                      M.S.W. and Ph.D. in Social Work
                 Transportation and Materials Moving
July 2005        Agricultural Sciences
                 Agricultural Business and Production
                 Conservation and Natural Resources
                 Home Economics
                 Public Administration and Services
                      M.S. and Ph.D. in Human and Community Development
                 Health Professions and Related Sciences
                      M.S. and Ph.D. in Nutritional Sciences
                 Marketing
July 2006        Foreign Languages and Literatures
                 Business
                 Architecture
July 2007        Education
                 Social Sciences
                 Philosophy and Religion
                 Psychology
July 2008        Physical Sciences
                 Mathematics
                 Multi/Interdisciplinary Studies
                 Computer and Information Sciences
                 Engineering
                 Miscellaneous
July 2009        Area, Ethnic, and Cultural Studies
                 Communications
                 Parks, Recreation, Leisure, and Fitness
                 Visual and Performing Arts
July 2010        Biological Sciences/Life Sciences
                 Health Professions and Related Sciences
                      All except M.S. and Ph.D. in Nutritional Sciences
                              PROGRAM REVIEW REPORT

1.   Reporting Institution:        University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

2.   Program Reviewed:             B.A. in English (23.0101)

3.   Date:                         AY 2002-03

4.   Contact Person:               Keith A. Marshall, Ph.D.
                                   Assistant Provost
                                   204 Swanlund Administration Building
                                   601 E. John Street
                                   217.265.0451
                                   217.244.5639 (fax)
                                   keithmar@uiuc.edu

5.   Major Findings and Recommendations:

     5.1   Major Changes in Program:

             The undergraduate major in English was reviewed and revised in 1997-98.
             Changes implemented include a new gateway course, English 100, a multi-genre
             “Introduction to Literature,” which replaces English 101, “Introduction to
             Poetry.” Another new requirement, English 200, “Introduction to Literary
             Theory,” reflects recent changes in the discipline toward a more theoretical and
             critical framework. Student demand for the major has increased significantly,
             from 563 majors in 1996 to 970 majors this year.

     5.2     Major Findings and Recommendations:

             Student outcomes assessment, instituted in response to North Central Association
             campus review, reports favorably on the undergraduate major in English as
             preparation for the three major directions students take: graduate school in
             English or a related field; law school—still the most popular post-baccalaureate
             destination for English majors; and the business world.

     5.3 Actions Taken Since Last Review:

             Curricular changes outlined in 5.1 have been successfully implemented.

     5.4 Actions to be Taken:

             Consideration of instituting a temporary minimum grade point average for majors
             as a way of managing the number of majors and ensuring quality. Review of
             major planned after it has been on-line a full five years.
6.   Outcome:

     6.1   Decision: Program is in Good Standing
                              PROGRAM REVIEW REPORT

1.   Reporting Institution:         University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

2.   Program Reviewed:              M.A. and Ph.D. in English (23.0101)

3.   Date:                          AY 2002-03

4.   Contact Person:                Keith A. Marshall, Ph.D.
                                    Assistant Provost
                                    204 Swanlund Administration Building
                                    601 E. John Street
                                    217.265.0451
                                    217.244.5639 (fax)
                                    keithmar@uiuc.edu

5.   Major Findings and Recommendations:

     5.1     Major Changes in Program:

             M.A. and Ph.D. degrees remain in high demand. Applicant pool for our graduate
             program increased in quality during period under review: applicants coming from
             a truly national and international pool, presenting higher GRE scores and GPA’s,
             and coming from higher-ranked undergraduate institutions.

     5.2     Major Findings and Recommendations:

             Program currently has outstanding record of placement of graduates. In 2002-03,
             despite economic turndown and with fewer tenure-track jobs in English
             advertised, program placed 100% of Ph.D. graduates seeking tenure-track
             employment. M.A. graduates move on to Ph.D. in our program; transfer to peer or
             better programs; or obtain suitable employment in teaching or the business world.

     5.3     Actions Taken Since Last Review:
             Revision of master’s-level requirements: elimination of M.A. Comprehensive
             Examination significantly improves time to degree. Significant increase in
             graduate fellowships allows program to enroll higher-quality students and to
             ensure improved time to degree for Ph.D. students.

     5.4     Actions to be Taken:

             Implementation of improved placement services for M.A. and Ph.D. graduates
             anticipated in 2003-04. Efforts to secure additional fellowships and reduce
             teaching obligations for Ph.D. students so they may devote more time to research.
6.   Outcome:

     6.1   Decision: Program is in Good Standing
                              PROGRAM REVIEW REPORT

1.   Reporting Institution:         University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

2.   Program Reviewed:              B.A. in Comparative and World Literature (23.0301)

3.   Date:                          AY 2002-03

4.   Contact Person:                Keith A. Marshall, Ph.D.
                                    Assistant Provost
                                    204 Swanlund Administration Building
                                    601 E. John Street
                                    217.265.0451
                                    217.244.5639 (fax)
                                    keithmar@uiuc.edu

5.   Major Findings and Recommendations:

     5.1     Major Changes in Program:

             This program is designed to provide pre-professional program of study as
             preparation for graduate work in specific literature, as well as in Comparative
             Literature. The program has added a new concentration in World Literature that
             encompasses various academic approaches to literary study, but also the
             interrelationships between literature, philosophy, and history.

     5.2     Major Findings and Recommendations:

             The emphasis on global learning has encouraged expansion of offerings in non-
             western literatures and cultures.

             Many program graduates go on to graduate school. Both current and former
             students express high levels of satisfaction with their program of study.

     5.3     Actions Taken Since Last Review:
             In addition to the traditional major in Comparative Literature, the Program has
             added a new major in World Literature which is described above and which
             allows all study to be done in translation. This new major has facilitated study in
             literatures less commonly taught in the United States, especially non-western
             literatures.

             The recruitment of new faculty with joint appointments in the program allows us
             now to offer courses which include the literatures of Russia and Eastern Europe,
             Japan, Korea, India, and the Arab world, as well as the more traditional offerings
             of the program. The recruitment of a specialist in Medieval Literature has
             expanded our ability to offer formations in ancient literatures.
     5.4   Actions to be Taken:

           Increase the undergraduate program enrollment to prepare students for graduate
           school; continue to implement assessment of learning outcomes to measure
           students’ preparation for graduate studies and in graduate training.

6.   Outcome:

     6.1   Decision: Program is in Good Standing
                              PROGRAM REVIEW REPORT

1.   Reporting Institution:         University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

2.   Program Reviewed:              M.A. and Ph.D. in Comparative and World Literature
                                    (23.0301)

3.   Date:                          AY 2002-03

4.   Contact Person:                Keith A. Marshall, Ph.D.
                                    Assistant Provost
                                    204 Swanlund Administration Building
                                    601 E. John Street
                                    217.265.0451
                                    217.244.5639 (fax)
                                    keithmar@uiuc.edu

5.   Major Findings and Recommendations:

     5.1     Major Changes in Program:

             This program is designed to provide a pre-professional program of study as
             preparation for employment in higher education in specific literature, as well as in
             Comparative Literature

             The primary occupational objective of students in the graduate program in
             Comparative and World Literature is a teaching position in a college or
             university. As with other disciplines in the humanities, the job market has
             fluctuated a great deal over the past twenty years. Nevertheless, most of the
             program’s Ph.D. graduates are employed in institutions of higher education in the
             U.S. or abroad. M.A. graduates normally go on to earn a Ph.D.

     5.2     Major Findings and Recommendations:

             Both alumni and currently enrolled students report a high level of satisfaction
             with their programs of study. Graduate enrollments have increased by over 50%
             since the last review in 1996. Success in job placement is nearly 100%.

     5.3     Actions Taken Since Last Review:
             A revision of the M.A. theory list has been implemented.

             The Program in Comparative and World Literature has added faculty in non-
             western literatures, which has allowed an expansion of offerings in non-traditional
             fields as well as in Medieval Studies.
             Significant recruitment of faculty with joint appointments in other departments:
             East Asian Languages and Cultures, Linguistics, English, Spanish, Cinema
           Studies, Medieval Studies, has enlarged graduate course offerings and pool of
           graduate research advisors.

           The department has added a Program Coordinator to its staff to manage the
           graduate program in areas of admissions and overall student affair issues. It has
           upgraded and improved its web site to help provide better information for possible
           future graduate candidates.

     5.4   Actions to be Taken:

           Strive to maintain program quality in the face of campus-wide budget reductions.
           Identify new sources to fund fellowships so we can continue to attract the best
           students to the program.

6.   Outcome:

     6.1   Decision: Program is in Good Standing
                              PROGRAM REVIEW REPORT

1.   Reporting Institution:         University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

2.   Program Reviewed:              B.A. in Rhetoric (23.0401)

3.   Date:                          AY 2002-03

4.   Contact Person:                Keith A. Marshall, Ph.D.
                                    Assistant Provost
                                    204 Swanlund Administration Building
                                    601 E. John Street
                                    217.265.0451
                                    217.244.5639 (fax)
                                    keithmar@uiuc.edu

5.   Major Findings and Recommendations:

     5.1     Major Changes in Program:

             The rhetoric major remains much in demand.

     5.2     Major Findings and Recommendations:

             Student outcomes assessment, instituted in response to North Central Association
             campus review, reports favorably on the undergraduate major in Rhetoric.
             Students report that the program prepares them well for graduate study or for
             careers as professional and technical writers in business and government
             environments.

     5.3     Actions Taken Since Last Review:

             New undergraduate course in desktop publishing instituted to meet student
             demand. New undergraduate course in literature for writers instituted to broaden
             student exposure to literature from the writer’s point of view.

     5.4     Actions to be Taken:

             Consideration of instituting a temporary minimum grade point average for majors
             as a way of managing the number of majors and ensuring quality.

6.   Outcome:

     6.1     Decision: Program is in Good Standing
                              PROGRAM REVIEW REPORT

1.   Reporting Institution:        University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

2.   Program Reviewed:             B.A. in Speech Communication (23.1001)

3.   Date:                         AY 2002-03

4.   Contact Person:               Keith Marshall, Ph.D.
                                   Assistant Provost
                                   204 Swanlund Administration Building
                                   601 E. John Street
                                   217.265.0451
                                   217.244.5639 (fax)
                                   keithmar@uiuc.edu

5.   Major Findings and Recommendations:

     5.1     Major Changes in Program:

             The undergraduate major is one of the most popular in Liberal Arts and Sciences.
             Enrollment in the major has steadily increased from 329 students in AY 1996-97
             to nearly 500 students in AY 2002-03, which is consistent with national trends in
             the field. The Department has hired several faculty in the last three years, which
             has helped to accommodate these enrollment trends.

             In addition to attracting a large number of majors, the Speech Communication
             Department plays a central role in the University’s instructional mission. A full
             68% of the Department’s instruction in AY 2002-03 was delivered to
             undergraduates in other departments and colleges.

             Occupational demand in the field of communication continues to be strong. In a
             1995 study, the National Association of Colleges and Employers asked nearly 300
             employers in the U.S. what types of skills they look for in college graduates. The
             top three were: oral communication skills, interpersonal skills, and teamwork.

     5.2     Major Findings and Recommendations:

             Speech Communication students express very favorable reactions to the major. In
             the 2002 Chancellor’s Senior Survey, 93% of Speech Communication graduates
             reported positive attitudes toward the quality of faculty teaching in their major.
             Likewise, 83% of Speech Communication majors reported highly positive
             attitudes toward the educational philosophy of their major.

             A survey of 100 Speech Communication seniors at the point of graduation this
             year found that 40% had already obtained employment and another 33% had been
           admitted to graduate, law, or MBA programs. In the University’s most recent “5
           years out” survey of alumni (i.e., 1997 graduates surveyed in 2002), Speech
           Communication graduates were employed in a variety of occupations. Of those
           working full-time, 25% were in management positions, 20% were employed in
           business and finance, 15% were in computer and technology positions, 15% were
           in architecture and engineering, and 15% in education. Nearly 80% reported
           working in a field that was related to their major, and 87% were satisfied with
           their job. In addition, 91% of these Speech Communication graduates reported
           that their major was helpful in the specific duties of their current job.

     5.3   Actions Taken Since Last Review:

           In 1999, as part of the campus Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan, the
           Department reorganized the undergraduate curriculum from a distributional model
           emphasizing content areas to a competency-based model focused on learning and
           preparing students for the varied career paths graduates pursue.

           Since 1999, the Department has developed several new program areas including a
           focus on health communication, communication technology and social and
           psychological effects of the mass media. Courses in these areas are in high
           demand by students and reflect societal concerns as well as interests and
           employment opportunities of students.

           The Department has begun to develop a more aggressive outreach effort to our
           alumni including a graduation reception, an exit survey at the time of graduation,
           a homecoming reception for our alumni and an annual career panel comprised of
           successful alumni who come to campus to discuss their job experiences and
           training.

     5.4   Actions to be Taken:

           Re-examine the undergraduate curriculum to ensure that courses are properly
           sequenced, that students are able to enroll in the courses they desire, and that the
           curriculum is well integrated across program areas.

           The Department plans to assess advising of our 500 or so undergraduates with the
           goal to move to a more flexible system that also incorporates some career and
           employment counseling in addition to standard academic advising.

           Examine the internship program in an effort to coordinate it more effectively, to
           increase the number of students who are able to benefit from such an experience,
           and to strengthen the academic component to these opportunities.

6.   Outcome

     6.1   Decision: Program is in Good Standing
                              PROGRAM REVIEW REPORT

1.   Reporting Institution:         University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

2.   Program Reviewed:              M.A. in Speech Communication (23.1001)

3.   Date:                          AY 2002-03

4.   Contact Person:                Keith Marshall, Ph.D.
                                    Assistant Provost
                                    204 Swanlund Administration Building
                                    601 E. John Street
                                    217.265.0451
                                    217.244.5639 (fax)
                                    keithmar@uiuc.edu

5.   Major Findings and Recommendations:

     5.1     Major Changes in Program:

             The Department has attempted to hold the size of its graduate program (M.A. and
             Ph.D.) constant at approximately 60 students in residence each year. We receive
             an average of 100 applications annually for 16-18 new openings. Our M.A.
             program has grown slightly over the past few years, partly due to an increasing
             demand within business and industry for Communication Specialists. At the time
             of the last review, the ratio of M.A. to Ph.D students was approximately 40-60%,
             whereas today it is reversed—60% of our students are seeking the M.A. and 40%
             are seeking a Ph.D.

             On average, roughly one half of M.A. graduates pursue doctoral studies and one
             half enter careers, most often in business, health agencies, or government agencies
             in positions related to communication (e.g., training and development,
             organizational communication consulting). Employment levels at graduation for
             the terminal master’s students also approach 100%.

             Demand for Speech Communication graduate courses remains strong and has
             even grown in some areas. In AY 1993-94, 32% of the Department’s enrollments
             in Speech Communication graduate courses consisted of students from other
             departments and colleges. In AY 2002-03, this figure has grown to 40%.

     5.2     Major Findings and Recommendations:

             Reputational studies over the past few years have placed the Speech
             Communication graduate program at or near the top of its field in overall quality.
             Various studies of publication rates have found that the faculty also rank at the top
             of the field in terms of overall productivity.
           During the last decade, we have continually evaluated the appropriateness of the
           requirements of our master's and doctoral programs to ensure the quality of our
           students' education. As a result, the effective requirements for graduate degrees
           have evolved to keep pace with disciplinary developments and students' needs.
           Available evidence--students' success in securing appropriate positions, graduates'
           career success, feedback from graduate alumni and their coworkers--suggests that
           this ongoing evaluation and updating has been successful.

     5.3   Actions Taken Since Last Review:

           Since our last review, we have increased attention to those who desire
           employment outside the academic setting, specifically through the development of
           an Applied Communication Master’s Program (ACMP). The program maintains
           close relationships with Department alumni and other business community
           resources to support students’ career goals. Several faculty teach and conduct
           research in organizational communication and communication technology,
           serving graduate students who seek non-academic employment upon completion
           of M.A. degrees as well as students who seek doctoral-level training. Recent
           extracurricular activities that have been designed for the ACMP include: an
           annual panel of successful alumni from the program who return to campus to
           discuss their careers; a reception in Chicago for current M.A. students to meet
           area alumni of the program; and a new-student orientation that describes the
           ACMP in detail to incoming students.

     5.4   Actions to be Taken:

           Following our Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan developed in 1999, the
           Director of the Applied Communication Master’s Program will formally review
           the results of outcome indicators for this M.A. program every three years and will
           recommend curricular, programmatic, and other changes as indicated by these
           reviews.

           Further development of recruiting efforts that target students from
           underrepresented groups.

6.   Outcome

     6.1   Decision: Program is in Good Standing
                              PROGRAM REVIEW REPORT

1.   Reporting Institution:        University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

2.   Program Reviewed:             Ph.D. in Speech Communication (23.1001)

3.   Date:                         AY 2002-03

4.   Contact Person:               Keith Marshall, Ph.D.
                                   Assistant Provost
                                   204 Swanlund Administration Building
                                   601 E. John Street
                                   217.265.0451
                                   217.244.5639 (fax)
                                   keithmar@uiuc.edu

5.   Major Findings and Recommendations:

     5.1     Major Changes in Program:

             Since the last review, competition for the master’s and doctoral programs
             continues to be keen, averaging nearly 100 applications received annually for 16-
             18 openings each year. Applicants come from many of the nation’s best programs,
             and those accepted typically have offers from other leading Communication
             departments.

             There has been a slight shift in the ratio of M.A. to Ph.D. students in our program,
             with the current split at about 60-40% (M.A./Ph.D.). This shift is predominantly a
             function of the increased interest and demand for M.A. training in communication
             rather than any change in the quality of the doctoral program.

             The Department’s long-standing record of placing virtually 100% of its Ph.D.s in
             faculty positions has continued over the past six years. All 2003 doctoral
             graduates secured employment at major universities (e.g., Northwestern
             University, Texas A&M University, The Ohio State University, University of
             Wisconsin at Milwaukee). Ph.D. graduates of our program also are well
             represented in university administrations, on editorial boards of major journals in
             the field, in positions of leadership in national and international scholarly
             associations, and in the ranks of faculty in other top doctoral programs nationally
             and internationally.

     5.2     Major Findings and Recommendations:

             The latest survey of doctoral program reputations, conducted by the National
             Communication Association in 1995, ranked UIUC among the top comprehensive
             communication departments. The Department of Speech Communication had
           three of its four specialties ranked in the top quartile, and by one measure (based
           on mean rankings by 459 respondents), the Illinois program ranked third among
           all comprehensive departments. Like other recently published studies, this survey
           confirms that, by almost any standard, the Department of Speech Communication
           at the University of Illinois ranks among the most distinguished in the nation.

           In 2003, the vast majority of our Ph.D. graduates had multiple job offers from
           major universities, including Research I institutions. The strong and still growing
           undergraduate demand for courses in Speech Communication across the country
           is likely to continue to provide adequate employment opportunities for the
           Department’s Ph.D.s.

     5.3   Actions Taken Since Last Review:

           We have continued to add faculty strength in several areas that are considered
           among the most intellectually promising within our discipline. These additions
           have created and expanded capacity in areas that are centers of great disciplinary
           activity, public policy attention, and student interest.

           In addition, these new hires have expanded opportunities for master’s and
           doctoral students to gain research apprenticeship experience working with faculty
           members in ongoing research programs. Faculty research in the Department is
           currently funded by the National Institutes of Health, the National Science
           Foundation, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the
           National Cancer Institute, and the William T. Grant Foundation.

     5.4   Actions to be Taken:

           Increase the size of the master’s and doctoral programs slightly to reflect our
           larger faculty size and increased funding from outside sources. Growing the size
           of the program will be balanced with maintaining quality, increasing diversity,
           and monitoring employment opportunities.

           Following our Learning Outcomes Assessment Plan developed in 1999, the
           Director of Graduate Study will formally review the outcome indicators for
           doctoral students every three years and will be charged to recommend curricular,
           programmatic, and other changes as indicated by these reviews.

6.   Outcome

     6.1   Decision: Program is in Good Standing
                              PROGRAM REVIEW REPORT

1.   Reporting Institution:        University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

2.   Program Reviewed:             B.A. in Individual Plans of Study (24.0101A)

3.   Date:                         AY 2002-03

4.   Contact Person:               Keith A. Marshall, Ph.D.
                                   Assistant Provost
                                   204 Swanlund Administration Building
                                   601 E. John Street
                                   217.265.0451
                                   217.244.5639 (fax)
                                   keithmar@uiuc.edu

5.   Major Findings and Recommendations:

     5.1   Major Changes in Program:

             The Individual Plans of Study major is unique among all the degree programs in
             the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences inasmuch as there is no set curriculum of
             courses and no faculty members associated with the program. Instead, the major
             is an established procedure which is coordinated by an assistant dean and
             monitored by an ad hoc committee – the IPS Advisory Committee – which
             consists of three faculty members and two students. By means of this program
             undergraduates who decide that their academic interests do not fit within any of
             the presently offered majors can create their own major.

             According to Fall Semester registration records, the total number of IPS majors
             has been small, but has seen some growth in recent years.

                  Year     1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002
                  Total      3    3    3    3    7   14   11

     5.2     Major Findings and Recommendations:

             The program is highly productive in terms of degrees granted, as approximately
             95% of all students admitted to the program over the past twenty-five years
             received baccalaureate degrees. This high completion rate is largely explained by
             the fact that all candidates must create their own major, must obtain Committee
             approval for their program proposal by way of well thought-out arguments, and
             receive close mentoring from their self-selected faculty advisor. The overall
             effect is nearly ideal in terms of students’ finding creative expression of their
             outstanding abilities within a disciplined and rigorous structure.
           Inasmuch as there are no faculty members on staff in the Individual Plans of
           Study program, no comment is possible as to faculty members’ national ranking,
           service to their professional organizations, or research records.
           Graduates of the program uniformly advance either to graduate or professional
           programs appropriate for the subject of their self-created major or they enter the
           business world, where they seem to secure employment rather quickly. They
           report high rates of satisfaction with their jobs and maintain extremely positive
           attitudes toward the University and especially toward the benefits they obtained
           from the Individual Plans of Study Program.

     5.3   Actions Taken Since Last Review:
           Currently at the Board of Trustees is a proposal to add a Bachelor of Science
           option to the IPS degree, as many of our students pursue such fields as
           Neuroscience and Meteorology, for which the BA would be inappropriate.

     5.4   Actions to be Taken:

           Continue to promote the benefits of the program to increase student interest.

6.   Outcome:

     6.1   Decision: Program is in Good Standing
                              PROGRAM REVIEW REPORT

1.   Reporting Institution:        University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

2.   Program Reviewed:             B.A in Humanities (24.0103)

3.   Date:                         AY 2002-03

4.   Contact Person:               Keith A. Marshall, Ph.D.
                                   Assistant Provost
                                   204 Swanlund Administration Building
                                   601 E. John Street
                                   217.265.0451
                                   217.244.5639 (fax)
                                   keithmar@uiuc.edu

5.   Major Findings and Recommendations:

     5.1     Major Changes in Program:

             Students can pursue one of five interdisciplinary options within the Humanities
             major: American Civilization, Cinema Studies, Medieval Civilization,
             Renaissance Studies and Gender and Women’s Studies.

             The total number of students in the major, according to fall Semester registration
             records, has been relatively consistent since 1996: 1996 (43); 1997 (52); 1998
             (56); 1999 (39); 2000 (46); 2001 (33); 2002 (35). Moreover, judging from the fall
             enrollment data for 1996 and for 2002, the distribution of these majors among the
             four options also appears to have remained rather consistent.

     5.2     Major Findings and Recommendations:

             The program is quite productive in terms of degrees granted: slightly more than
             37% of students enrolled in the program received degrees in 1996 and
             31% in 2002. Given that the vast majority of courses taken by majors in the
             Humanities options are offered by other LAS departments, the program is
             extremely cost-effective.

             Graduates pursue graduate study, professional study, or entry-level management
             positions in business and government.

     5.3     Actions Taken Since Last Review:
             Discontinued the option in the History and Philosophy of Science in 1998.
             Added an option in Gender and Women’s Studies in 2003.
     5.4   Actions to be Taken:

           There is currently a proposal at the campus level to rename this program “LAS
           Interdisciplinary Major, Science and Letters Curriculum.” The coursework and
           scholarship of each of the current options has evolved to include disciplines in the
           social sciences and arts, and, therefore, it is appropriate to rename the major to
           illustrate this expansion in disciplinary breadth.

6.   Outcome:

     6.1   Decision: Program is in Good Standing
                      Status Report on Assessment of Student Learning

Urbana-Champaign has been actively engaged in the assessment of student academic
achievement since 1994, when the Task Force on Program Evaluation and Assessment was
appointed to develop mechanisms for evaluation and assessment of the campus’s undergraduate
and graduate programs and research units. At about the same time, the North Central
Association of Schools and Colleges Commission on Institutions of Higher Education began to
place special emphasis on the assessment of student academic achievement as part of its
accreditation process. In concurrence with and in response to that emphasis, the Provost charged
a standing faculty committee with oversight of the student outcomes assessment efforts of the
campus.

Since then, the Student Outcomes Assessment Committee has worked to help academic units
develop assessment plans for their majors and to develop assessment measures for the broader,
overarching, campus-wide learning goals that are expected of all UIUC students.

The UIUC system of assessment is unit-based and faculty-driven. The May 1997 Report of the
Task Force on Assessment and Program Improvement explains this approach:

    While campus leadership and support is necessary, only through faculty involvement
    can large institutions devise effective and efficient program-based assessment plans that
    will produce results beneficial for all academic units. With assessment planning located
    primarily at the unit level, faculty can exercise their responsibility to devise appropriate
    methods to measure student learning. The Task Force recommends a process that gives
    widespread ownership of assessment planning to faculty and enables them to determine
    the methods and instruments that are most applicable to their educational objectives and
    missions. Also, the Task Force supports the idea that academic units are best suited to
    determine how assessment results can be used to ascertain curricular strengths and
    weaknesses and to improve programs.

Campus units have access to a number of different kinds of technical assistance from the Office
of Instructional Resources. Unit assessment coordinators are invited to various outcomes
assessment workshops held throughout the year, and provided with individual technical
assistance as requested.

In 1997, every academic department submitted plans for devising locally appropriate outcomes
assessment measures and procedures. These plans were assessed by the Task Force and either
approved or revised based on the Task Force’s recommendations. In 1999, every unit was
required to report on implementation of its assessment procedures and any consequences that had
thus far resulted, such as changes to courses or requirements.

Reports on assessment will be incorporated into Program Reviews beginning in 2004.
  University of Illinois
University Administration




     Results Report
      August 2003
                                   University-wide Initiatives
                       Administrative and Academic Support Services
               Illinois Commitment Goal Six: Productivity and Accountability
                   Illinois colleges and universities will continuously improve
                        productivity, cost-effectiveness, and accountability

Budget Context - Over the last two years, a combination of cuts in the University of Illinois’
recurring budget and mid-year rescissions has resulted in an aggregate $232M loss in spending
capacity from FY 2002 to FY 2004. In response to these reductions, the University has allocated
a larger share of the cuts to the administrative and service units than to the academic units
(16.1% of the administrative/service annual budgets compared to 6.7% for academic unit
budgets). In the process, over $22M has been reallocated from administrative/service units to the
University’s core academic mission.

Prompted by the continuing decline in State revenues, the IBHE has recently set a target for state
universities in Illinois to reduce their budgets for administration and support services by 25%
from FY 2002 to FY 2005. Although the 25% target for reduction includes the FY 2002-03 and
FY 2003-04 budget cuts sustained by the University of Illinois, additional savings will be
required in order to meet the targeted 25% reduction.

Launching the Administrative Review - The University of Illinois’ Board of Trustees passed a
resolution at their March 2003 meeting directing the President to conduct a detailed review of
administrative and academic support services with the goal of identifying opportunities for cost
reductions and service improvements. The Board asked the University administration to explore
opportunities to consolidate or streamline support functions to improve efficiency and redirect
the cost savings toward the University’s core education, research, and service missions. The
review is being led by an Executive Team comprising the provosts, vice presidents, and
University Senates Conference Chair. They reported their recommendations to the President and
Chancellors, and the President presented a progress report concerning the initial Discovery Phase
of the review to the Board of Trustees at their meeting on July 17, 2003.

The Executive Team identified seventeen functional areas for review, determined the scope and
general approach for the review in each functional area, and appointed subcommittees of
University employees and faculty to conduct the reviews. In addition, consultants were engaged
to provide the approach, analysis framework, information on best practices and access to subject
matter experts in support of this important initiative.

Discovery Phase - The intensive, four month Discovery Phase involved about 140 people in the
review of approximately 75% of the University’s administrative and services spending, totaling
nearly $258M. Each team determined baseline financial, organizational, and operational
information for their functional area; developed a functional profile; summarized operational
strategies and goals; compared operations against industry best practices; identified opportunities
for improving the effectiveness and efficiency of operations by standardization, reorganization,
consolidation, outsourcing, or downsizing; quantified the potential savings or value that could be
realized from these opportunities; and assessed the institutional implications, positive and
negative, of required organizational changes.

On the basis of the potential savings or value of an opportunity, and the relative ease or difficulty
of implementing the required changes, the teams made one of the following recommendations
for each opportunity identified in their functional area:

  a) launch an action immediately because the probability of realizing the value is high.
  b) detailed investigation to assess the opportunity’s value and chance of realization
  c) no further action because the opportunity value is not significant

Savings Opportunities Identified - In the earliest stage of the review it was apparent that
several functional areas offered obvious opportunities for administrative streamlining that would
result in significant savings or improvements in effectiveness (option a). Appropriate changes
have already been implemented in these areas yielding approximately $1M in savings. Similarly,
there were several areas for which the absence of opportunities for savings or improvements was
obvious, thereby obviating further analysis (option c).

More than 80% of the University’s administrative spending is encompassed by functional areas
identified as requiring detailed analysis to assess opportunities for savings (option b). The initial
analysis of the Discovery Phase yielded estimates of about $10M in potential savings from these
areas. In addition, analysis of $829M of University expenditures for goods and services resulted
in an estimated $10M in savings that might be achieved through a higher level of standardization
and discipline in commodities purchasing. Additional analysis is required to confirm all of these
savings opportunities.

Detailed Analysis Phase: Benchmarking, Prioritization, Assessment - On the basis of the
IBHE FY 2002-05 target of 25% savings in the recurring budget, an estimated savings target has
been set for each functional area. However, it is essential to establish metrics for performance,
service levels, resource allocations, etc., to determine if the IBHE-based savings targets can be
met for each of the functional areas without incurring serious damage to the institution.
Consultants are being engaged to benchmark the functional areas against peers and industry best
practices as part of the Detailed Analysis Phase of the review that has now been launched. This
process of benchmarking and re-evaluation of savings targets will require eight to ten weeks.

Most of the 74 potential opportunities for savings that were identified during the Discovery
Phase of the review require prioritization and assessment in the ensuing Detailed Analysis Phase.
In each case a complete understanding of the achievable savings, potential impacts on service,
and the advantages and disadvantages of any reorganization must be reached. This detailed
assessment will require three to nine months and is expected to be completed by May 2004. The
President will present a mid-course progress report to the Board of Trustees at their November
2003 meeting.
                                   P-16 Education Initiative
         Illinois Commitment Goal Two: Improvement of Teaching and Learning
                Higher education will join elementary and secondary education
                        to improve teaching and learning at all levels.

The University of Illinois, with the leadership of President Emeritus Stanley Ikenberry and the
Deans of Education at all three campuses, continued its P-16 initiatives to address some of the
key issues affecting Illinois’ K-12 education system. The University has concentrated on
strengthening teacher preparation, teacher persistence and professional development, including
development of graduate programs that keep good teachers in the classroom while focusing on
school improvement. We have also moved into greater collaboration with community colleges
in teacher recruitment, preparation and support for development of an Associate Arts of
Teaching degree. Through the Teacher Data Warehouse, the University has led the effort to
improve data systems to support policy initiatives that will make a difference. The University of
Illinois is focused on opportunities to apply technology more creatively to support teachers and
schools, as well. Other higher education institutions and groups are similarly engaged and are
taking advantage of the opportunity and need to join forces.

Among the activities in FY 2003 are the following:

In early FY 2003 the University convened the P-16 Education Action Summit to chronicle the
current state of P-16 reform in Illinois and to achieve consensus from higher education leaders
on an action agenda for 2004 and beyond. Leaders from the higher education community
(college presidents and education deans) and those representing K-12 education, including
teacher and administrator groups, as well as representatives from business and industry, assessed
the effectiveness of reform initiatives already under way and committed to a set of priorities for
achieving significant P-16 improvement over the next 5 years. The Summit participants
identified specific action items for follow-through, established performance measures and
assigned responsibility for implementation. A steering group was established to implement the
initiatives that sprang from this consensus. The group reconvened in the spring of 2003 for an
Accountability Update to review progress. Below is the “action agenda” adopted by the Summit
group.

      Begin to "think differently," and act and work systemically across the full elementary,
       secondary and higher education spectrum. Get the issue on the agenda of chancellors and
       presidents, bring in LAS deans, and lend a stronger public voice on teacher education
       issues.

      Forge a community college/university partnership resulting in an Associate of Arts in
       Teaching (AAT) degree, to be concluded by the close of the 2002-2003 academic
       year. Define and explore other possibilities for collaboration.

      Create a statewide mentoring and induction program for all new teachers. Draw on the
       best elements of existing mentoring programs in Illinois and nationally and define the
       essential elements. Work toward passage of essential legislation.
      Achieve full participation in the Teacher Data Warehouse and begin creative, purposeful
       utilization of the system.

      Create a professional development portal to simplify access to conventional and on-line
       professional options offered by colleges and universities to teachers and school
       leaders. Focus on professional development quality and relevance.

      Create at least three innovative pilot programs for developing a "new era" learning leader
       for schools. Seek foundation assistance.

      Create a stronger more unified joint policy focus, building on sound data and analysis
       from the Illinois Education Research Council and other university-based research
       efforts. Focus sharply on areas of special need: low income students; math, science,
       special education, etc.; diversity; unique needs of both urban and rural schools; and
       achieving the goal of a highly qualified teacher in every Illinois classroom.

      Join together as a unified force, especially during the weeks and months ahead given the
       financial "perfect storm" that appears to be brewing.

In 2003, a community college/university partnership was forged, the goal being the crafting of
an Associate of Arts in Teaching (AAT) degree, responding to one of the activities on the action
agenda of the Summit group. Further refinements are in the works as the new year begins.
Faculty and administrators were involved in taking the new Illinois teaching standards and
incorporating them into this new degree.

In 2003, the Teacher Data Warehouse was expanded, with the goal of engaging all higher
education institutions. Today the Teacher Data Warehouse provides online access to
1,170,585 Teacher Service Records (TSR) from FY 1995 through FY 2003. These records
provide information about where teachers are teaching throughout the state of Illinois. The
TDW also provides online access to enrollment data for students pursuing teaching degrees and
certification in the state of Illinois, including 78,839 student records from 21 teacher education
institutions in the Warehouse. This will continue to be expanded and enlarged in FY 2004.

In 2003, attention was focused in a new way on graduate education for practicing teachers and
school leaders, focusing on the relevance and quality of these programs to the needs and careers
of teachers and school leaders, and greater “user-friendly” availability. UIC has developed a
new Ed.D. program proposal in Urban Education Leadership, which specifically addresses the
need of having administrative leaders engaged in classroom educational reform. The emphasis is
less on building management and more on practitioner-leader development. UIS has proposed a
certificate in educational leadership leading to the superintendent certificate, which also uses the
practitioner-leader model. On deck for future development are the concepts of advanced degrees
that will focus on classroom teaching, with the aim of making great teachers out of good
teachers.
Ongoing goals for the Illinois P-16 Initiative are to create increased opportunities, including
online options, for teacher professional development; to support mentoring programs for new
teachers; to develop an on-line portal for teacher professional development; and to form a
bipartisan group of Illinois Legislators who consider how Illinois can move from a condition in
which budget realities are driving policy decisions to a context in which policy decisions drive
the budget.
                            Technology and Economic Development
                   Illinois Commitment Goal One: Economic Development
                     Higher education will help Illinois business and industry
                                sustain strong economic growth

The University of Illinois continues to address its responsibility to be a leader in the growth and
development of the new high-technology economy of Illinois. This responsibility is:

       To broaden and strengthen the development of the Illinois and US economies through
       the effective management, transfer and commercialization of University-based
       technologies and intellectual properties, supporting the creation of jobs, careers,
       businesses and wealth, while fostering the continuous advancement of the University’s
       premier education and research programs.

To fulfill this responsibility the University, with leadership from the Board of Trustees
Committee on Economic Development, and the Office of the Vice President for Technology and
Economic Development, have established five major components:

       •   Best-of-class intellectual property protection and technology management through the
           campus Offices of Technology Management

       •   State-of-the-art research parks and incubation facilities associated with the Chicago
           and the Urbana-Champaign campuses (the Chicago Technology Park and the
           University of Illinois Research Park, respectively)

       •   World-class mentoring and start-up services from IllinoisVENTURES, LLC for
           promising new companies commercializing University-based technologies

       •   Highly reputable cutting-edge entrepreneurial education programs for undergraduate
           and graduate students providing an enriched educational experience for students and a
           pool of bright business, legal, engineering and scientific student talent supporting the
           commercialization of technology

       •   Dynamic and well respected corporate, business and public sector relationships

Research Investments: Exceptional faculty, modern facilities and significant competitive
research funding are the foundation for creating new knowledge and inventing new technologies
with commercial potential. In this context, the University of Illinois has historically performed
well. For example, based on the most recent comprehensive research expenditure data from the
National Science Foundation, the University of Illinois reported total expenditures of $624
million in 2001. This ranked the University 3rd in the U.S. behind only Johns Hopkins and
UCLA, and ahead of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Michigan. The
University’s Urbana-Champaign campus ranked 1st among all universities in Illinois and 18th
nationally with $391 million in research spending. Its Chicago campus ranked 3rd among all
universities in Illinois behind Northwestern and ahead of the University of Chicago, and 46th
nationally with $233 million in research spending.
To attain and to maintain this level of success in the competition for research funding from
federal, state, and private sources, the investments in cutting edge research facilities and
equipment and the highest quality faculty, students and staff must be continued.

Illinois, through policy action, expanded the responsibilities of the University of Illinois, its land-
grant flagship research and graduate education institution, as an invention engine for new
technologies to be a major driver in the creation of Illinois’ new economy. In support of this
expanded responsibility, additional investments in advanced science research facilities are being
made. These include:

       At Chicago:
          • Medical Sciences Research Building
          • Magnetic Resonance Imaging Center
          • Advanced Chemical Technologies Building

       At Urbana-Champaign:
          • Post-Genomic Institute (renamed the Institute for Genomic Biology)
          • National Center for Supercomputing Applications building
          • Thomas M. Siebel Center for Computer Science
          • Expansion of the Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory, home of the Center for
             Nanoscale Science and Technology

Intellectual Property Protection and Technology Management. The Offices of Technology
Management (OTMs) on the Urbana-Champaign and Chicago campuses are responsible for
protecting, marketing, and licensing University intellectual property (patents and copyrights).
Invention disclosure growth rates remain strong. In FY 2002, 220 disclosures were received and
42 new patents issued. Technologies continue to be licensed to established firms and to new
start-up companies. The University now has over 500 active licenses, which generated $8
million in royalties and fees in FY 2003. The marketing of new University-based technologies
received special attention in FY 2002. Advanced technology showcases, i-emerging, were held
at the Urbana-Champaign and the Chicago campuses, attracting 300 capital and service providers
and corporate representatives. Targeted marketing events, Technology Briefings, are now in full
swing to create auction markets for the licensing of technologies reducing the time to market.

Start-up Service: IllinoisVENTURES. To take full advantage of the commercialization
opportunities generated by the University’s research and development engine,
IllinoisVENTURES, LLC (VENTURES) was created by the Board of Trustees to catalyze and
accelerate the development of companies based upon University’s technology. VENTURES was
established to promote the translation of academic research into new products and businesses,
contributing to the growth of the high-tech economy in Illinois. Other benefits of this process
include workforce training and retention, as well as economic development benefiting the
University, state and stakeholders of the client businesses in the form of job creation, commercial
tenancy, professional service and other vendor billings and, ultimately, generation of state and
local tax revenue. VENTURES is currently providing consultation and/or financing to more than
50 new University high tech businesses pursuing markets that range from high power lasers to
biohazard and chemical weapon detection to nanoscale innovation for drug delivery and
electronics to revolutionary power sources for consumer products to groundbreaking drugs for
treatment of cancer, stroke and Alzheimer’s disease. Several of these high tech companies have
recently completed a first or second round of external (private equity) financing, an important
metric for business potential, including InterSymbol Communications (algorithms and chip
design to enable next-generation broadband communications), Renew Power (micros fuel cell
technology), ChemSensing (platform technology for electronic olfaction) and Mobitrac (software
for mobile resource management). The State has provided the initial funding for VENTURES.
VENTURES is partnering with regional high-tech economic development organizations to
successfully compete for grant funding under the DCEO Illinois Technology Enterprise Center
(ITEC) program. Partnerships are operating in Chicago and Urbana-Champaign. Through
leadership of the University of Illinois Foundation, an early stage fund is under development, the
Illinois Emerging Technologies Fund. This fund will provide the opportunity to partner with
other early stage investors and provide critical high-risk capital to the most promising new
ventures commercializing University based technologies.

Research Parks and Incubator Facilities. University-associated research parks at UIC and
UIUC attract established high-technology companies and support the commercialization of
University-based technologies. The Chicago Technology Park (CTP), on the west side of the
Chicago campus, is home to 30 biotech and pharmaceutical firms housed in ten buildings. In the
last decade, more than 30 companies have graduated from the CTP. The research park in
Urbana-Champaign was launched in 1999. Managed by the University of Illinois Research Park,
LLC, the park houses 210,000 square feet of leased space. A third developer-constructed multi-
tenant building will be completed this fall. The University is partnering with the DuPage County
Board in the creation of the DuPage County Technology Park. One of the cornerstones of this
partnership is the federally-funded (through the University’s National Center for
Supercomputing Applications) Technology, Research, Education and Commercialization Center
(TRECC), at the site of the Technology Park that opened in FY 2002.

The Research Center, a University incubator facility in the CTP, is fully leased by 20 start-up
companies commercializing new technologies, mostly life science and medical science based.
The Technology Commercialization Center (TCL) at Urbana-Champaign is fully leased with a
waiting list. The TCL provides rudimentary incubation support for 12 new start-ups.
EnterpriseWorks, the University’s new state-of-the-art incubator, opened in the University of
Illinois Research Park in July, 2003 providing 44,000 square feet of wet and dry laboratory and
office space to accommodate up to 30 new start-up ventures. Thirteen companies have already
signed leases.

Enriched Relationships. Enriched working relationships with business and industry, providers
of private equity capital, established technology firms, business service providers, trade and
business organizations, other Research I universities and federal laboratories and state and
federal agencies are essential if the University is to fulfill its responsibilities to help propel

Illinois’ new high-tech economy in the 21st century. In FY 2003 working relationships have
been expanded to create a more dynamic Illinois high-tech entrepreneurial community, which is
essential for the growth and development of a knowledge-based advanced technology economy
in Illinois.
                              Administrative Systems Integration
               Illinois Commitment Goal Six: Productivity and Accountability
         Illinois Colleges and universities will continuously improve productivity, cost-
                                effectiveness and accountability.

UI-Integrate, in FY 2003, completed its third of a five-year effort to ensure continued delivery of
core services and functions by implementing a cost-effective, integrated, and sustainable
business and student services system that will allow the University of Illinois to incorporate best
business practices. It involves installing an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system and
streamlining business practices.

System-wide, the University currently relies on over 150 systems that support a variety of critical
functions, such as admitting students, registering them, collecting tuition, paying employees and
purchasing supplies. Additionally, these systems are supported by hundreds of shadow systems
created by departments to provide the information needed to fulfill their respective, departmental
missions.

The UI-Integrate Project involves implementing the Banner ERP product developed by SCT
Software and Resources Management Corporation for higher education institutions. SCT
currently serves over 1200 colleges and universities in the United States. The University of
Illinois is their largest and most complex client. Installing the SCT Banner ERP system will
provide the flexibility to improve services to faculty and students while, at the same time, being a
cost-effective option to maintaining critical services.

Implementation of the SCT Banner Enterprise Resource Planning system will assume the
following:

      Continued provision of essential services
      Institution-wide access to and sharing of critical information
      College, departmental and user access to and sharing of information
      Ability to implement new policies and practices in a timely manner

During FY 2003, the project completed the implementation of modules for Student Recruiting,
Admissions, Financial Aid and Course Catalog. In addition, the components of Finance (i.e.,
General Ledger, Accounts Payable, Accounts Receivable, Fixed Assets, Purchasing, Budget
Maintenance and Grants and Contracts) were completed and installed in support of the Finance
implementation for production use on July 1, 2003 for FY 2004.

Also during FY 2003, design efforts for 11 of the remaining 12 components that will be
implemented over the life of the project were completed. A design effort for the remaining
component was well under way by the end of FY 2003.




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