Equality Impact Assessment Summary

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					Equalities Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 - 2010

Lewisham is a diverse community made up of many different groups and
individuals. We value diversity and believe it essential to try to understand the
different contributions, perspectives and experience that people in our
community have.

We also recognise that there are many forms of discrimination affecting
peoples lives. We know that some groups of people generally experience
more discrimination than others.

To ensure that our services do not discriminate against or adversely affect
any equality group differently, we undertake Equalities Impact Assessments
(EIAs).

An EIA is the process of systematically analysing a proposed or existing policy
or strategy. This analysis should identify what effect, or likely effect, will follow
from the implementation of the policy, for different groups in the community.
Similarly, it can be the process for analysing the impact of delivering a service
or function on different groups in the community.

EIAs should be used, as far as possible, to ensure any negative
consequences for a particular group or sector of the community can be
eliminated, minimised or mitigated by other measures.

Below are the EIA summaries for all EIAs undertaken between 2008 -2009.
For further information on any of the reviews please contact the named officer
at the end of the summary sheets.
Contents Page

      EIA                                                           Pg No.
1.    14-19 Strategic Plan 2009 - 2013                                 3
2.    Council Tax                                                      5
3.    CYP Inclusion Service                                            7
4.    Housing Benefit                                                 10
5.    Lewisham's Drug & Alcohol Team                                  13
6.    Proposal to create an all age Academy in Downham                16
7.    Registrations - Births, Deaths & Marriages                      18
8.    Regulatory Services                                             20
      Services provided for vulnerable pupils through the Special     23
9.    Educational Needs and Education Access Unit
10.   Supporting People                                              25
11.   Youth Offending Service                                        29




Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010            2
Name of Review:                          Lewisham Children & Young People’s
                                         14-19 Strategic Plan 2009 - 2013
Period of Review:                        May 2010

Date review signed off by DMT:           October 2010

Scope of the review:

There is a statutory duty on Local Authorities to ensure that an effective 14 -19
partnership in each authority is the key vehicle through which reform of the curriculum
and targets for improvement in achievement and retention in education are delivered. In
Lewisham the 14-19 Strategic Forum comprises the local authority, providers of
services for 14-19 year olds, and other key stakeholders.

The Lewisham 14-19 Strategic Plan 2009 – 2013 is a strategic document which gives
the 14-19 Partnership an overarching framework and timescale for the development of
provision; it provides a coherent framework for the development of 14-19 education and
training in Lewisham. It is intended to complement partner organisations’ existing plans.

The vision and strategic aims of the partnership are that:
   - All 14-19 year olds in Lewisham will have access to a broad, rigorous and
       appropriate curriculum regardless of where they are learning. Through
       outstanding partnership we will ensure that young people study the right
       curriculum to meet their identified needs, at the right pace and place.

We aim to create for all young people a coherent, integrated entitlement of the highest
standard that will:
   - help them to realise their potential and achieve their aspirations
   - assist them on the path of lifelong learning which includes further and higher
      education
   - enable them to take an active and successful role in their local communities and
       in local and wider labour markets.

This assessment has considered the contents and proposals of the 14-19 Strategy and
analyses whether these are likely to have a positive or negative impact on different
groups within our diverse community.

Review team:
The EIA was conducted by Cliff Garland, Interim 14-19 Strategic Lead for Lewisham

Relevant data and research:
The EIA is informed by a range of demographic data; it also includes achievement and
attainment data which has been supplied by the Lewisham CYP Performance Team.
The data analyses the separate education achievement of boys and of girls, and
attainment of different racial groups including Black Caribbean children, other black
groups, and white groups.
Consultation:
The 14-19 Strategy has been influenced by national proposals for 14-19 education and
training as well as local and regional strategies and policies. It is an overarching
    Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010                    3
document that brings together the borough’s 14-19 commitments as detailed in existing
plans and strategies. As a consequence it relies on the consultation undertaken for
these various plans and strategies for its source information. However, over 200
individuals and organisations were consulted on the composite strategy between
November 2009 and February 2010.

Assessment of impact, outcomes and key follow up actions:
The 14-19 Strategy is intrinsically an equalities strategy due to its focus on the
Government’s 14-19 reform programme that aims to transform opportunities and
services available to young people by revising and streamlining qualifications,
broadening the curriculum offer and ensuring that the right support is in place for those
who need it. The Strategy addresses a number of issues relating to the equalities
themes and these are detailed as part of the scoping exercise.

The EIA includes an Action Plan and actions within this include:
   - Closing the attainment gap between underachieving groups and their peers,
      including a focus on key groups e.g. black pupils, white boys, and pupils for
      whom English is an additional language
   - Provision of transition support programmes for young people with learning
      difficulties and disabilities
   - Focus the reduction of the number of young people who are NEET (not in
      education, employment or training) on the more vulnerable groups of young
      people, including those who have learning difficulties and/or disabilities
   - Ensure support is provided from Connexions for all young people who have a
      statement of special educational need

Name and contact details of lead officer responsible for follow up action:
Cliff Garland, School Improvement Team, CYP Directorate, 3rd Floor Laurence House,
Catford Road, London, SE6 Tel: 020 8314 3804
For full report contact:
Strategy & Policy Team, CYP Directorate, 3rd Floor Laurence House, Catford Road,
London, SE6 Tel: 020 8314 8286




    Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010                     4
Name of Review:                          Customer Services Transformation
                                         Programme:
                                         Back To Front (B2F) Project for Council Tax
Period of Review:                        January 2010 – June 2010

Date review signed off by DMT:           October 2010

Scope of the review:
As part of the Customer Services Transformation Programme a review was undertaken
within the Council Tax service. There were several key findings within the review in
terms of our current approach and opportunities for improvement. As a result of these
findings, the review recommended a remodelling of the service based on the following
principles:
     Integrate the ‘back’ and ‘front’ office to provide a more holistic case management
        process
     Reorganise the existing structure to provide defined roles and responsibilities for
        staff and management and improve control over workflow
     Streamline accounts processes to enable capacity to be freed up for collection
        work
     Improve linkages between the council tax and benefits service
In early 2010, an implementation project was initiated to look at how these principles for
change could be turned into a practical service re-design and understand the potential
impact of these recommendations on service delivery.
Review team:
Enforcement Team Leader: Terry Abdullah, Service Transformation Officer: Justine
Roberts (Project Manager for the review and implementation)
Relevant data and research:
     Customer volumes and demand patterns (including access channels)
     Performance data
     Payment methods and Income (including by location)
Consultation:
A wide range of consultation was undertaken with customers, staff and stakeholders.
The primary method of engagement was undertaken using customer journey mapping
to track and describe the experiences of accessing the service and the CLG redress
toolkit which asks focused questions to track the level of customer service and remedy
systems used within a service. To provide the opportunity for widespread participation
with our customers, consultation was carried out by front line council tax staff supported
by the Strategy and Performance team, over three days in the Cashiers Service and
AccessPoint. In total almost 100 customers shared their views with us. In addition, a
stakeholder steering group was set up consisting of local voluntary and community
sector organizations to capture the perspectives of some of our more vulnerable
residents (i.e. CAB, multilingual advice society, Carers Lewisham, LDC). A similar

    Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010                     5
approach to the customer engagement, complemented by detailed discussion, was
undertaken. Staff workshops and interactive feedback boards were used in the
breakout areas to test ideas and gain feedback. Analysis and compilation of these
results were completed and circulated to participants.
Assessment of impact, outcomes and key follow up actions:
The Equality Impact Assessment shows the changes to the Council Tax service is not
likely to result in an adverse impact for any group and does promote equal
opportunities. Overall, there was support from staff, stakeholders and customers for the
proposed changes to the council tax service. This information was used to shape the
implementation process, with many changes increasing access, improving the quality of
service, promoting equality of opportunity for service users and mitigating aspects of
services delivery that have been historically problematic for some customer groups, for
example: placing specialist knowledge on the frontline and resolving customer enquiries
at first contact .

However, the consultation and analysis did highlight some areas where further work
could improve the experience of equalities groups. A summary of the actions include:
    Analyse equalities data for customers contacting Council Tax and for customer
       satisfaction data and review this information to identify service trends and
       integrate arising actions into service plans
    Introduce a translation statement with council tax bills and correspondence
       items, for customers whose first language is not English
    Conduct a review of correspondence items, involving staff and stakeholders, to
       ensure correspondence which is sent to customers is clear, jargon free and
       takes into account the needs of customers with visual impairment or learning
       difficulties
    Continue to offer an evening service but utilize telephony changes to enable
       evening service calls to be taken by home-workers
    Identify alternative rota patterns for staff if desks cannot be adjusted on the front-
       line
    Liaise with social services before proceeding with hard end enforcement action
    Include consultation with the VCS steering group as part of the 3 and 6 month
       post project review cycle
Name and contact details of lead officer responsible for follow up action:
Terry Abdullah – x46030 (TiessyrakaTerry.Abdullah@lewisham.gov.uk)
For full report contact:
Justine Roberts – x47051 (Justine.roberts@lewisham.gov.uk)




    Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010                      6
Name of Review:                            Children and Young People’s Inclusion
                                           Service
Period of Review:                          August – October 2010

Date review signed off by DMT:             November 2010

Scope of the review:
  The Inclusion Service (IS) is situated in the Kaleidoscope Centre for Children and
   Young People in Rushey Green, Catford, SE6. It is a new multi-agency service
                   comprising of a number of professional teams:

          Educational Psychology
          Sensory Specialist Teachers
          Communication & Interaction (ASD),
          Specific Learning Difficulties (Dyslexia)
          Early Years Early Intervention
          Behaviour Education Support
          Mental Health Practitioners

The Inclusion Service delivers a targeted service to children, young people (0 to 19
years) and families in all educational settings and those not in any provision. The
overriding aim of the IS is to maximise learning opportunities and minimise barriers. In
2009 the IS set out to develop a more holistic and integrated approach to service
delivery. The service is delivered through four multidisciplinary locality teams, offering
multidisciplinary consultation with the possibility of joint interventions. Each Children’s
Centre Area has an established multi-agency team of workers who can draw on a wide
range of professional skills and knowledge to meet needs locally. A CAF (Common
Assessment Framework) is the usual referral route into the service.

The main aim of this EIA is to determine the answer to the following two questions:

      Does the service, or the way it is delivered, affect some equality categories
       disproportionately and if so, can this be justified?
      Is the service delivered in a way that further promotes equal opportunities?

Review team:

Mary Cava, Head of Inclusion Service (Joint Lead Officer)
Louise Comely, Senior Educational Psychologist (Joint Lead Officer)
Rose Dowd – Acting Senior EP
Clare Gurbutt, Senior Social Worker and Acting Head of the Behaviour and Educational
Support Team (BEST),
Jessica Birnie, Lead Specialist Teacher for Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD),
Denise Gallagher, Lead Specialist Teacher for Communication and Interaction (CIT)
Christine Kiely, Early Intervention Team Manager (EIT)
Roisin Bennett, Lead Specialist Sensory Teacher
Nancy Secchi, Team Manager / Child Mental Health Specialist.
Robert Hodges, Policy Officer
    Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010                       7
Relevant data and research:
The EIA looked at a range of demographic data including statistics regarding the
educational attainment of different groups of Lewisham pupils e.g. in relation to Gender,
Race and Disability.

It was noted that Autistic Spectrum Disorder impacts more upon boys than upon girls and this
is reflected locally in the higher number of referrals from schools that relate to boys.

Consultation:
The aim of the of the Inclusion Service in its first year has been to embed multiagency
working. Ongoing update and review of the working model has been undertaken
throughout this initial phase, including an evaluation questionnaire sent to all members
of the Inclusion Service, which focussed on the understanding and perceived
effectiveness of procedures within the service.

The Inclusion Service now plans to consult with users to inform the ongoing
development of service delivery, as well as to inform this current Equalities Impact
Assessment. This academic year (2010/11) the Tribal database system will be installed,
which will provide the Inclusion Service with one database as opposed to the current
situation where each individual professional team has a separate database. Tribal will
enable interrogation of relevant data to the EIA for the whole of the Inclusion Service.

The service also plans to undertake further consultation with a focus on Early Bird
workshops, schools and settings, and private, voluntary and independent sector
organisations.

Assessment of impact, outcomes and key follow up actions:
This Equalities Impact Assessment indicates that the Inclusion Service is intrinsically a
service that promotes equality within the education system due to its focus on Special
Educational Needs and Disability. It is not likely to result in any adverse impact for any
equalities group.

However, there are a number of areas in which the service could aim to improve with
regard to key equality issues which have been identified; these are detailed below
within the Action Plan:

     Ensure all Inclusion staff receive updated diversity training and monitor uptake.
     Monitor referrals re gender. Discuss findings with schools and settings and
      explore causes of apparent over-representation of male referrals and how to
      change
    Monitor and raise with schools the gender inbalance in order o address this
      inbalance if appropriate
    Sample a specific Children’s Centre area for involvement of fathers in referral /
      intervention
    Monitor ethnicity of children referred to the Inclusion Service and create a profile
      of referral rates by ethnicity. Address the findings with schools and settings as
      appropriate.
    Monitor parental engagement in parent workshops with regard to ethnicity, and
      develop ways to improve representation of certain under-represented groups
    Offer ongoing training to schools and settings re. a range of Special Educational
    Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010                      8
       Needs and Disabilities
      Gather data on exclusions relating to SEN/ Disability where possible
      Raise awareness of Inclusion Service staff so as to promote policy and practice
       to ensure that there is equality of access to services for LGBT young people and
       parents
    Develop an Inclusion Service Induction pack for new staff joining the service that
       refers to issues in working with families of various religions and beliefs.
Name and contact details of lead officer responsible for follow up action:
Louise Comely – Acting Head of Inclusion Service, Kaleidoscope Centre for Children &
Young People, 32 Rushey Green, Catford, SE6 4JF Tel: 020 7138 1432
For full report contact:
CYP Strategy and Policy Team, 3rd Floor Laurence House – Tel: 020 8314 8286




    Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010                   9
Name of Review:                                       Customer Services Transformation
                                                   Programme: Back To Front (B2F) Project
                                                             For Housing Benefit
Period of Review:                                 October – February 2010

Date review signed off by DMT:                    October 2010

Scope of the review:
As part of the Customer Services Transformation Programme a review was undertaken
within the Housing Benefit service. There were several key findings within the review in
terms of our current approach and opportunities for improvement. As a result of these
findings, the review recommended a remodelling of the service based on the following
principles:
     Rotate staff between the front and back offices, thus ensuring that experienced
        and knowledgeable staff are always available on the frontline
     Remove the paper claim forms and replace them with an assisted claim system
        which will ensure that customers who may previously have had problems
        completing application forms, for example low literacy levels, vulnerable or where
        English is not their first language, will be supported throughout the process.
     Appoint Benefits Support Officers (recruited from existing ServicePoint staff) to
        be the initial contact for all telephone claimants and responsible for resolving the
        majority of telephone enquiries
     All new claims or change of circumstances to be processed by an Assessment
        Officer who will endeavour to complete the claim at the first point of contact.
        Customers will now be able to expect quick, accurate and clear decision making
     Officers to explain to claimants (either F2F or via the telephone) how their benefit
        amount was calculated so that the claimant has an opportunity to ask questions.
        Instead of a lengthy entitlement letter, a short disclaimer will then be issued
        containing only the most relevant information
     Allow customers to make appointments with an Assessment Officer rather than
        wait in AccessPoint
       Minimise the evidence needed to complete the claim process, with the culture of the
       service being refocused around paying not preventing claims
      Improve the self-serve facility to reduce the number of contacts
      Implement a new process for scanning and indexing evidence so that customer
       contacts and information can be added to the processing system immediately
In early 2010, an implementation project was initiated to look at how these principles for
change could be turned into a practical service re-design and understand the potential
impact of these recommendations on service delivery
Review team:
Assessment Team Leader: Betty Hyman, Service Transformation Officer: Alison
Bradshaw (Project Manager for the review and implementation)
    Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010                    10
Relevant data and research:
     Customer volumes and demand patterns (including access channels & type of
        enquiry)
     Transaction times and unit cost data
     Performance data e.g. processing times
     Customer Satisfaction (Exit Surveys)
     Census 2001, Borough Profile 2006, Labour Force Survey (CLG & DWP), ONS
        Annual Population Survey 2007
     Customer base e.g. geographic location, ethnicity, age, disability
Consultation:
Consultation was undertaken with: customers, staff, DWP, RSLs, Supported/Sheltered
Housing Accommodation Providers, voluntary and community sector e.g. Age Concern,
internal service departments (Housing Options, ServicePoint, Revenues, Legal, Audit).
The method of consultation was the same across all groups in order to maintain a
degree of equity and comparability. Participants at each session completed a journey
map, an interactive method of tracking and describing all their experiences as they
encountered the current service, in order to explore gaps or areas of weakness. They
were then asked tailored questions from a Practitioner’s Toolkit developed by the
Communities and Local Government Office (DCLG) to identify opportunities for change
and focus improvement activity. However, minor adjustments were made to the nature
of the policy message and the structure of the consultation so that they remained
appropriate for the target audience. For example, we set up a stand in AccessPoint for
three days during which time we spoke to over sixty customers whilst a pinpoint board
was placed in the 4th floor breakout area for staff to anonymously provide their
feedback. This was completed by more than 25 staff members. Similar to Council Tax,
a steering group involving the voluntary and community sector was established to gain
detailed insight into the impact of these changes on our vulnerable customers.
Assessment of impact, outcomes and key follow up actions:
The Equality Impact Assessment shows the changes to the Housing Benefit service is
not likely to result in an adverse impact for any group and does promote equal
opportunities. it is important to remember that the purpose of the Housing Benefit
service is to provide support to Lewisham’s most vulnerable residents. Removal of the
application form, introduction of assisted claims, use of other locations and promotion of
telephone interviews provides further support to these customers by enabling quick and
accurate decision making and promoting a ‘right first time’ working culture. The
following additional actions have been identified to embed this approach:
     Analyse equalities data for customers contacting Housing Benefits and for
        customer satisfaction data and review this information to identify service trends
        and integrate arising actions into service plans
     Investigate the feasibility of an appointments only Benefits service to reduce
        waiting times in AccessPoint (particularly important for customers with mobility
        difficulties)

    Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010                    11
      Implement new processes for home visits for vulnerable claimants and ensure
       visit is made within 5 working days. Visits will be carried out by the council’s own
       Housing Benefit officers or in partnership with other organisations, for example
       the Pension and Disability Carers Service, with all involved having the
       technology to verify further evidence and other documents
      Implement new arrangements to work with support workers to assist specific
       groups of vulnerable claimants
      Communicate availability of Access Point Deaf Service to accompany Hearing
       Impaired Housing Benefit Customers to Benefit interviews
      Review existing service letters for clarity and accuracy, with changes made on
       the system where necessary

Name and contact details of lead officer responsible for follow up action:
Betty Hyman – x49565 (betty.hyman@lewisham.gov.uk)
For full report contact:
Alison Bradshaw – x48995 (alison.bradshaw@lewisham.gov.uk)




   Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010                      12
Name of Review:                           Lewisham Drug and Alcohol Action Team

Period of Review:                         2009-2012

Date review signed off by DMT:            January 2011

Scope of the review:

Lewisham Drug and Alcohol Action Team (DAAT) implement the National Drug
Strategy (2008 – 2018) and the National Alcohol Strategy (2007). The team carries out
assessment of need and works in partnership with health and crime reduction services
to commission appropriate quality services. The overall objective is to reduce the harm
caused by drug misuse in relation to the health of individuals and the impact of drug
related crime on victims and to local communities. This includes supporting the needs
of individual service users, including those within the criminal justice system, and carers
and families. The service aims to increase the number of drug users in effective
treatment with an emphasis on under-represented groups and to improve education,
training, employment and accommodation outcomes to support the recovery and
community reintegration of drug users. The existing treatment system has been
retendered in order to increase value for money, improve quality, and mainstream the
substance misuse agenda.

The overall aim of this Equalities Impact Assessment (EIA) is to answer the following
key question: “What are the key barriers for equalities groups in accessing drug and
alcohol services in Lewisham, and how can they be reduced in order to improve access
for all?”

The overall objectives of the EIA are to:
    Undertake a detailed examination of barriers to access across the six equalities
      strands, other underrepresented groups, and all users.
    Assess barriers across all commissioned services.
    Develop an action plan to reduce barriers and inform the commissioning
      process.

Review team:
Charly Williams – National Management Trainee

Relevant data and research:

This EIA draws on a variety of local and national data sources:
    Needs Assessment 2008/09
    Alcohol Needs Assessment 2008/9
    Young Peoples Needs Assessment 2008/09
    Adult and Young People’s Treatment Plan 2009/10
    DAAT EIA 2005 (Ottaway Strategic Management)
    DAAT EIA 2007
    National Treatment Agency website
    Health Care Commission, Diversity Review 2008/09
    Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010                     13
Consultation:

In addition to local and national data sources, consultation was undertaken with a range
of stakeholders, including frontline and management staff, service users and carers
from the following organisations:

      Commissioned substance misuse services
      Non-commissioned substance misuse services
      Partner services (not substance misuse specific.)

The views of the treatment naïve population were also gained through engagement with
the voluntary and community sector. A total of 39 interviews were undertaken,
comprising 33 face-to-face interviews and 6 focus groups.

Assessment of impact, outcomes and key follow up actions:

The work of the Drug and Alcohol Action Team was assessed as having as high impact
for each of the six equalities strands. Alongside the positive steps being taken to
promote equal access and provision, the EIA identified key areas for action and
improvement.

Gender: Key issues that were identified by this EIA included the need for more gender-
specific provision and female-targetted promotion. The EIA identified that improved
childcare provision could be made available.

Age: The EIA noted that more work is needed to help staff to recognise and
understand substance misues among older people. For younger people, the EIA
identified that improved transition support, service user and parent/carer invovlement
and youth targetted promotion could help this gorup to more easily access services.

Ethnicity: Specfic ethnic groups attach different stigma to accessing drug and alcohol
services. The link to tranlsation services could be improved. The potential for more
BME-specifc services could also be explored.

Disability: The EIA confirmed that further work is required to ensure full DDA
complianece. Further work is also requried around the monitoring fo disability amongst
srrvice users.

Religion/Belief: Further work is required to effectivley monitor service users’
religion/belief. The EIA also noted the opportunities for further outreach activity with
faith communities.

Sexual orientation: Lack of understanding and awareness of the needs of LGBT
users; few LGBT staff; inadequate LGBT training; lack of LGBT-targeted promotion;
    Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010                      14
lack of cross-agency working with LGBT services and inadequate monitoring of LGBT
users.

Key actions: The EIA identified a series of actions for each equalities strand. These
actions included activity to increase family/partner involvement in treatment and the
development of a ‘service contract’ between the service and service users establishing
rights and responsibilities. Other actions included improvements in promotion activity to
under-represented groups and better partnership working with appropriate equalities
groups to ensure that the service’s offer is accessible and appropriate.

Name and contact details of lead officer responsible for follow up action:

Fiona Kirkman – Supporting People Manager, Community Services

For full report contact:

Community Services – Strategy and Policy team




    Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010                   15
Name of Review:                           Proposal to create an All Age Academy (3-
                                          18 years) in Downham by a merger of
                                          Merlin Primary School with Haberdashers’
                                          Askes Knights Academy
Period of Review:                         May 2010 to September 2010

Date review signed off by DMT:            Presented to Mayor and Cabinet on
                                          15.9.2010
Scope of the review:

The review considered the key elements of the proposal to (1) Incorporate Merlin
School with Haberdashers’ Aske’s Knights Academy (HAKA) to become an all-age
academy and (2) to enable Knights Academy from 2011 to offer automatic admission
each year to the secondary phase of the Academy for all Year 6 children who would
previously have attended Merlin and would now be part of the all-age academy.

Review team:
The assessment was undertaken by the Children and Young People’s Strategy & Policy
Unit with input from Chris Threlfall, Head of Education Development
Relevant data and research:
.
The review was informed by a range of data including:

Ward data on Downham and neighbouring wards
Local school place applications and school roll figures
Pupil population data
Details of school staffing (Merlin) and admissions processes

It was noted that there is a significant gender in-balance at HAKA with a much higher
number of boys on roll; the reason for this is not know but may be due to the greater
number of local schools for girls.
Consultation:
.
The Governors at Merlin School voted unanimously to take forward the proposal to
merge with Haberdashers’ Aske’s Knights Academy following an informal exercise with
parents.

A public consultation exercise on the proposal took place between May and July 2010;
the consultation was promoted on the Council website and details were sent to a range
of stakeholders including parents / carers of pupils, and staff from both schools, all
Councillors in Lewisham, and all schools within a one-mile radius of Merlin School. The
results were summarised in a report to Mayor and Cabinet dated 15.9.2010. The report
noted that 68% of written responses to the consultation who expressed a view gave a
favourable response to the proposals.

If the Mayor decides to go ahead with the proposal, then a statutory public notice to
close Merlin School will be issued, subject to the Secretary of State’s approval to the
proposed changes to HAKA. A period of six weeks would follow to allow for any
     Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010                    16
representations to be made to the local authority.
Assessment of impact, outcomes and key follow up actions:

The overall assessment is that the proposal does not have any adverse impact upon
any equality categories and that it will result in an improved educational resource in
Downham. One potential impact that was considered relates to the effect on demand
for other schools. However, local population projections indicate that a reduction in
demand for other schools is unlikely due to recent significantly increasing birth rates.

One of the stated benefits of the proposal is that a high percentage of pupils with
special needs at Merlin School will have access to the SEN facilities at HAKA. This
impact is looked at in some detail in the EIA.

The EIA includes an Action Plan with the following actions:

LA to monitor admissions to HAKA to identify any on-going level of gender in-balance
and possible impact upon attainment

LA to monitor admissions to schools within local areas and note any significant changes
for further attention.
Name and contact details of lead officer responsible for follow up action:
Chris Threlfall, Head of Education Development Tel: 020 8314 9971
For full report contact:
Strategy & Policy Team, CYP Directorate, 3rd Floor Laurence House, Catford Road,
London, SE6 Tel: 020 8314 8286




    Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010                     17
Name of Review:                          Customer Services Transformation
                                         Programme:
                                         Registrations (Births, Deaths & Marriages)
Period of Review:                        January 2010 – June 2010

Date review signed off by DMT:           October 2010

Scope of the review:
As part of the Customer Services Transformation Programme a review was undertaken
within the Registrations service. There were several key findings within the review in
terms of our current approach and opportunities for improvement. As a result of these
findings, the review recommended the following proposals:

      Deliver death registration directly from the hospital site to provide a joined-up
       and customer focused approach to registration services (this also separates the
       service from the location of ceremonies and birth registration)
      Introduce Scripting through CRM for CallPoint to effectively manage and resolve
       customer enquiries and reduce the flow to the back office
      Introduce new services to increase service offer in line with neighbouring
       boroughs and increase income
      Implement the national Tell us Once rollout campaign and fulfil national
       obligations as an ‘early adopter’
      Deliver a training programme to enable generic working and refresh staff in the
       use of disability aids and translation services

The Equalities Impact Assessment considered the impact of these proposals from both
the delivery and customer perspectives.
Review team:
Service Transformation Officer: Louise Hagan (Project Manager for the review and
implementation)
Relevant data and research:
    GRO Best Practice Guidance
    Registration Service delivery inspection report March 2009
    Benchmarking with other local authorities to understand service offer for non-
       statutory services + costs for Nationality Checking Service
Consultation:
    Analysis of customer satisfaction surveys (completed monthly) – trend analysis
    Based on the proposals, additional questions were added to the survey for a one
       month period to gauge opinions on the proposals for change (including interest /
       take-up for new services e.g. Naming Ceremonies and Renewal of Vows, and
       relocation of death registration to the hospital)

    Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010                   18
Assessment of impact, outcomes and key follow up actions:
The overall assessment is that the services covered in this assessment do not
discriminate and no adverse impacts have been identified. However there are real
opportunities now and in the future to take actions which will ensure better access to
service, and to ensure that services make a real contribution toward promoting equal
opportunities through ensuring mobility and access for all. Several actions have been
identified:

      Analyse equalities data for customers contacting Registration services and for
       customer satisfaction data and review this information to identify service trends
       and integrate arising actions into service plans
      Refresh staff training, including translation and Minicom, to increase service
       accessibility (particularly important for the roll-out of Tell us Once)
      Introduce naming ceremonies to increase options available to our customers and
       embed an inclusive service by offering a non religious service

Name and contact details of lead officer responsible for follow up action:
Martyn Manlow, x48109
For full report contact:
Louise Hagan, x46191




    Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010                   19
Name of Review:                         Customer Services Transformation
                                        Programme: Regulatory Services
Period of Review:                       March – June 2010

Date review signed off by DMT:          October 2010

Scope of the review:
This Equalities Impact Assessment (EIA) has been conducted to consider the potential
impact of the implementation of review recommendations for the Regulatory Services
and Private Sector Housing Service in Customer Services (as part of the Customer
Services Transformation Programme). The primary recommendations include:

Building Control:
    Move initial customer contact into ServicePoint – face to face enquiries to be
       handled in the Business Centre in AccessPoint and telephone contact to be
       taken in CallPoint for basic customer enquiries – i.e. determining whether
       building regulations approval is needed, booking inspections and taking
       payments
    Increase use of electronic channels for applications and fees – Enable
       customers to submit, track and pay for building regulations applications online.
       Remove cash and cheques as a payment mechanism and redirect customers to
       chip and pin payment methods
    Expand the service operating hours and increase capacity for inspections
       through mobile working – develop a rota system for building control surveyors to
       extend the availability for inspections from 10am – 4pm to 8am – 6pm. All
       surveyors to be classed as mobile workers to increase the number of inspections
       they are able to conduct each day

Private Sector Housing:
     Develop a quality private rented sector and making it a tenure of choice
     Improve the supply of private housing and making it a viable option for all
     Raise the standards of private sector accommodation particularly for the
       vulnerable
     Enhance the environmental performance and energy efficiency of private sector
       homes

Licensing:
    More joined up service delivery
    Improved ‘back office’ systems to enable high level of service delivery
    Facilitation of the introduction of mobile technology
    Introduction of systems to enable electronic payments, in particular linked to

    Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010                  20
        mobile working
     Enhanced self service, including online forms
Review team:
Service Transformation Officer: Justine Roberts, Performance & Improvement
Manager: Ruth McCrossen
Relevant data and research:
     Performance data
     Shelter research 2008
Consultation:
The Review Team drew on a range of evidence to analyse the impact of their
recommendations:
     Customer Satisfaction surveys (building control, private sector housing and
        licensing)
     Voluntary & Community Sector Workshop
Assessment of impact, outcomes and key follow up actions:
The proposed changes have been designed to increase the accessibility of services to
customers by making telephone and face to face contact easier. In this sense, we
anticipate that for all equalities groups the overall impact will be positive. However, the
process of improving accessibility will involved expanding and increasing the use of
online application submission and payment options. The review has recognised the
need to keep open face to face and telephone channels, particularly for more
vulnerable customers of the private sector housing service continues to meet the needs
of this customer group. A summary of the actions identified to address any adverse
impact identified is included in the action plan:

      Ensure that DFG and HRG customers are prioritised so that buildings regulation
       approval can be given quickly
      Carry out all building regulation inspections with a member of the Staying Put,
       Grants or Occupational Therapy team to ensure that there is continuity for
       vulnerable customers
      Produce and publicise a simple and clear guide to building regulations to be
       included with planning approvals and advertised via ‘Access Lewisham Adverts’
       which are being developed for AccessPoint to increase understanding of the
       process
      Analyse equalities data on all referrals resulting in an inspection and review this
       information to identify service trends and integrate arising actions into service
       plans
      Complete an annual satisfaction analysis using equalities data and link this to
       annual service planning cycles & include standard equalities monitoring from
       with all customer satisfaction forms
      Develop standard customer templates, translated into community languages to
       outline the results and next steps following a customer inspection

    Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010                     21
      Review and simplify documentation sent out to customers as part of the
       implementation of the transformation review including promoting alternative
       payment options

Name and contact details of lead officer responsible for follow up action:
Tony Mottram – x48063 (Anthony.mottram@lewisham.gov.uk)
For full report contact:
Justine Roberts – x47051 (Justine.roberts@lewisham.gov.uk)




   Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010                   22
Name of Review:                          Services provided for vulnerable pupils
                                         through the Special Educational Needs and
                                         Education Access Unit (Exclusions,
                                         Attendance in In-year Admissions)
Period of Review:                        July 2010

Date review signed off by DMT:           October 2010

Scope of the review
This EIA reviews three policy areas: (1) Permanent exclusions (2) School attendance
and (3) In-year admissions. It assesses whether the application of these policies is fair
and whether there are any areas in which adjustment need to be made to deal with
disproportionate impacts.
Review team
John Russell (Service Manager) – Lead Officer
Linda Fuller (Team Leader); Paulette Williams-Rose (Principal Attendance & Welfare
Service); Karen John (Inclusion Officer); Mary Faulkner (Fair Access Panel Co-
ordinator)

Relevant data and research:
      Fixed and permanent exclusion analysis 2008/9, including pattern from 2004/5
        (source: Lewisham CYP Performance Team);
      Pupil ethnicity by school type, January 2009 (source: Lewisham CYP
        Performance team);
      Further analysis of outcomes 2008/9 (source: SEN and Education Access Unit);
      Ofsted reports for Lewisham (2008) and Abbey Manor College (2009);
      Non-attendance prosecution data 2009/10;
      Attendance data 2009/10 by primary school
      Analysis of in-year secondary admissions in 2009/10, by school and year group
      General attendance data
Consultation
The In Year Fair Access protocol has been consulted on with the full range of
Lewisham secondary schools, and head teachers have made their own contributions to
it. It has also received the endorsement of the Admissions Forum, which includes
representatives from primary schools, parent governors, the Church of England
Diocese and the Archdiocese of Southwark Schools and Colleges Commission,
together with Lewisham councillors.

The Pupils Out of School Policy has also been consulted on with head teachers and
other agencies involved in the placement of vulnerable pupils and students, such as the
Youth Offending Service, Abbey Manor College, New Woodlands Outreach Service, the
Attendance and Welfare Service, Looked After Children Team and the Inclusion
Service.

The Attendance Strategy has been consulted on with head teachers and a range of
partners who share work with the AWS, such as the Metropolitan Police, Children’s
Social Care and Community Wardens.

    Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010                   23
There has been some negative feedback to the exclusion arrangements from parents,
in terms of the range of choices their children have once permanent exclusion has been
confirmed.

Assessment of impact, outcomes and key follow up actions
It was found that although the policies are likely to impact on certain groups more than
others because of their prevalence (e.g. higher representation of certain equality groups
in the exclusions and attendance data), there are sufficient mitigating factors in place to
prevent adverse effects. For example, different academic pathways are available to
ensure that excluded pupils have appropriate choices. The policies do not target or
exclude a specific equality category and are designed to promote equal opportunities
for vulnerable groups of children and young people. The EIA contains a number of
actions to be undertaken over the following year:

-Consult with equality groups about the operation of the policies and their operation
- Publicise the policies in an accessible way
- Widen the collection of data to include the impact of the effectiveness of exclusion
prevention strategies on pupils in special schools
- Explore whether it is possible to gather more information in relation to sexual
orientation, and to religion and belief. Link with data being collected about homophobic
bullying
- Examine the impact of the in-year admission arrangements on primary age pupils
- Compare the profile of pupils applying for in-year admissions in terms of their
ethnicity, with the profile of existing Lewisham pupils
- explore the reasons for Year 9 pupils having to wait for in-year admissions
- Explore the issues relating to the slower (on average) rate for admissions to
academies
Name and contact details of lead officer responsible for follow up action:
John Russell, Service Manager, SEN and Education Access. Tel: 020 8314 6639
For full report contact:
Strategy & Policy Team, CYP Directorate, 3rd Floor Laurence House, Catford Road,
London, SE6 Tel: 020 8314 8286




    Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010                     24
Name of Review:                            Supporting People

Period of Review:                          2009 - 2012

Date review signed off by DMT:             January 2011

Scope of the review:
The London Borough of Lewisham, in partnership with the London Boroughs of
Southwark, Lambeth and Bromley, is undertaking a project to procure a Framework
Agreement for the future provision of Supporting People Services in the borough.

A Framework Agreement is an agreement between a Local Authority and a preferred
provider to contract and provide services to an agreed price and quality for a specified
number of years. The life of the Framework Agreement for the boroughs will be four
years. Lewisham and the other three boroughs will enter into a Framework Agreement
with providers who are successful in tendering to provide supporting people services
through this type of agreement. Providers selected for the Framework Agreement will
be accepted onto each Boroughs’ preferred lists of supporting people service providers.
When any of the Boroughs need to procure a service, the preferred providers list will be
used to select a provider through a mini tendering process or through selection of the
most economically advantageous bid (based on both quality and price).

The aim of the EIA is to ensure that the Framework Agreement, both in its Procurement
and in its implementation, meets:

      the needs of all equalities groups and does not adversely affect any group;

      all of its statutory requirements relating to equalities and human rights legislation;
       and
      the aspirations out in the Council’s equalities policies.

Review team:

The EIA was conducted during 2009 and was completed by Civis Consultants.

The EIA was managed by:
    Fiona Kirkman, Lewisham Supporting People Manager
    Richard Holmes, Project Officer for the Lewisham and Southwark Framework
      Agreement
    Robert Crooke, Supporting People IT Officer
    Mike Hammond, Supporting People Contracts and Review Manager
    Sadie King, Policy Officer – Community Services

Relevant data and research:

    Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010                      25
The EIA has made use of the following data and strategies:

      The Lewisham Sustainable Community Strategy
      The State of London Boroughs: An Economic, Social and Environmental Audit of
       London Boroughs (report by Local Futures Group (December 2007))
      Office of National Statistics (ONS) Mid-year 2007 Population Projections for
       Lewisham
      Client Record Data for Supporting People Services
      A profile of Lewisham SP services by client group.

Consultation:

In developing the Procurement Process for the Framework Agreement consultationtook
place with statutory stakeholders, the three partner boroughs, current Supporting
People providers, Voluntary Action Lewisham and SITRA– a second tier advice and
training organisation commissioned to support providers to participate in the
procurement process.

Key issues raised by through these consultations included the capacity of small and
BME-specific providers to participate effectively in the framework process and ensuring
that information and guidance was available to voluntary organisations who were not
yet providing Supporting People services so that they could participate in the
procurement process.

Assessment of impact, outcomes and key follow up actions:

The EIA identified that in developing and implementing this framework agreement
specifc action was required to ensure that the process did discriminate and opertaed in
a mannoer that was transparent, fair and equitable. It also identified the need to ensure
that the framework did not disproportionately impact on small or BME providers who
may not have had the resources to participate effectively in the procurement process

Gender: The equalities assessment indicated that there would be a neutral effect on
services that cater to men, as there is a wide range of services that are mixed gender
currently accessed by men. The Framework should however enable male-specific as
well as female-specific services to be procured in the future if these are needed. The
impact on gender was therefore assessed as being positive.

Ethnicity: The development of the framework recognised the importance of retaining a
diverse group of service providers able to meet the needs of all Lewisham’s minority
ethnic populations. The EIA identified a risk that the value added skills and expertise
of BME providers e.g. in depth knowledge and understanding of the culture or language
of a specific community cannot be priced competitively for a tender and BME providers

    Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010                   26
would therefore be disadvantaged by the process. There was therefore a potentially
negative impact on this equalities strand. The EIA also identified the potential positive
benefitsof implementing a Framework Agreement since it allows for sub-contracting and
enables BME providers who do not get on to the Framework to work in conjunction with
other providers who have. In addition the ‘call-off’ process has the potential to be a
powerful tool for the borough to promote equality and diversity. The ‘call-off’ process
allows the borough to specify equality requirements and where necessary require
providers on the Framework to enter into partner arrangements with other specialist or
BME providers to deliver specified services.

Age: Lewisham has a range of organisations currently providing specialist services to
older people and to young people at risk and leaving care, in addition to those that cater
to all age groups. This ensures a good balance of services to meet the needs of all
ages. The Framework was assessed as being likely to either increase the number of
providers catering to these age groups or retain a similar number, the impact of the
Framework in relation to age discrimination was therefore assessed as being neutral.

Disability: The Framework Agreement was assessed as having a positive impact on
people with disabilities by ensuring that there is a range of providers that can meet the
needs of people with physical and sensory disabilities, learning disabilities, mental
health issues, HIV and Aids. It noted that it could also result in the current providers of
services to these groups being decommissioned in the future if they are not successful
in securing a place on the Framework.

Sexual orientation: At the time of conducting this EIA, the service did not consistently
collect data on the sexual orientation of service users. It identified that in the future the
Supporting People team should ensure that the service does collect and report the data
on sexuality consistently. The impact was therefore been assessed as neutral.

Religion/belief: At the time of conducting this EIA, the service did not collect specific
data on the religion or beliefs of service users. However, Supporting People operates
with an expectation that religion and beliefs of their service users will be addressed by
Supporting People services. There is a specific QAF requirement relating to cultural
and religious needs and performance in this area is regularly evaluated by Supporting
People contracts officers. The impact of the framework on this equalities category was
assessed as neutral.

Actions: All the actions arising from this EIA concentrated on ensuring that the
process of developing the Framework would result in a diverse range of providers with
the capacity and expertise to provide appropriate high-quality services that would meet
the needs of Lewisham’s citizens and communities. This was taken forward by the
Supporting People Project Board.

    Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010                       27
Name and contact details of lead officer responsible for follow up action:

Fiona Kirkman – Service Manager, Supporting People

For full report contact:

Community Services – Strategy and Policy team




    Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010               28
Name of Review:                            Youth Offending Service

Period of Review:                          2009 - 2012

Date review signed off by DMT:             January 2011

Scope of the review:
Lewisham’s Youth Offending Service (YOS) aims to prevent young people from
offending and re-offending and to provide support to victims of crime. The YOS is a
multi-agency team, providing a statutory function, and works in partnership with a
number of statutory and voluntary agencies.
This EIA underpins the YOS’s work as it identifies areas of concern in relation to
equalities and human rights issues. The primary function of this EIA is to establish
whether the work of the YOS may have an adverse effect or impact on particular
groups. It assesses the impacts of the service on the YOS client group and Lewisham
residents by the six equality strands. The EIA sets out the action to be taken to prevent
direct and indirect discrimination, and positively promote harmonious community
relations. This EIA has taken into account the direct work carried out by the YOS with
young people, their families and victims. It has not been able to take into account the
work carried out by its wider partnership, including the police, the Courts and the secure
estate.

Review team:

Robbyn Linden - Operations Manager, Youth Offending Service
Members of the Youth Offending Service
Community Services Strategy and Policy

Relevant data and research:

This EIA is informed by YOS equalities monitoring data and Lewisham Equality profiles.

Equalities Monitoring data is collected in the YOS from YOIS (Youth Offending
Information System) the database required for use by the Youth Justice Board.

Consultation:

The YOS collects feedback from young people, parent/carers and victims (where
applicable) for each Referral Order Panel. This information is gathered via brief
anonymous questionnaire. The information gathered is used to inform service
development, as well as volunteer training and development. The feedback is limited
in that the forms are only available in English and require that the participant is able to
read and write.

In addition, the YOS has a Youth Engagement Panel comprised of young people who
are either currently working with the YOS or have done so in the past. This panel

    Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010                      29
informs future planning and provides consultation where change is considered.

The Victim Liaison Officer gives feedback forms to victims who attend Referral Order
Panels. From 1st April all victims will receive feedback forms with covering letter from
YOS Strategic Manager. These forms do not collect information regarding diversity.

Findings from these consultation activities have informed the assessment of the EIA.

Assessment of impact, outcomes and key follow up actions:

Ethnicity: There is a significant over-representation of young men from BME
communities in the youth justice system. The YOS actively tackles this issue by
delivering several workstreams that contribute to addressing the over representation of
BME men in the youth justice system. For example, the Diversion Team has been
successful at ensuring that young BME young people receive interventions at an early
stage via the Triage service. The ethnic profile of young people coming through Triage
is similar that that of the young people who are involved with the YOS, therefore we
know we are working with the appropriate cohort.

Gender: The YOS has a positive impact on Gender Equality and has taken steps to
address the increase in numbers of young women entering the youth justice system.
There is a dedicated young women’s group offering appropriate support and a Girls and
Gangs Forum chaired by the YOS to ensure that girls are provided with extra support
and that they are not discriminated against.

Age: Whilst the YOS are required to only work with 8-18 year olds, the service ensures
that those who fall outside that age range are signposted to appropriate services in the
area.

Disability: There are currently no monitoring systems to track disability. The major
identifiable issue is the prevalence of young people with a statement of special
educational needs, which may indicate a learning difficulty. YOS staff are aware of this
and able to respond sensitively to the needs of young people. There is a full-time
Education Officer in the team who ensures that the statements are adhered to by the
LEA. The building the YOS is located in is not accessible, however the service does
offer an alternative site where necessary.

Sexual orientation: The YOS does not currently have systems in place to accurately
monitor sexual orientation. However the staff promote equality of access and, by
tackling homophobia, as well as beginning to address homophobic language used by
young people to ensure that LGBTQ young people are not excluded from the service.

Religion/belief: The YOS ensures that young people of all religions and beliefs are
provided with an appropriate service and ensures that a young person’s religion or
    Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010                    30
belief does not exclude him/her from accessing all areas of the service. The YOS
challenge stereotypes and inappropriate language used by young people regarding
religions and beliefs.

Key actions: Specific actions identified as part of this EIA include: supporting staff to
have an accurate awareness of the needs of young people with disabilities; improving
the means by which LGBT young people can feedback their opinions on the service, by
exploring how best to incorporate sexual orientation on YOS evaluation forms; and
widening the membership of the YOS Community Panel so that it continues to reflect
the diversity of the borough.

Name and contact details of lead officer responsible for follow up action:

Robbyn Linden – Operations Manager, Youth Offending Service

For full report contact:

Community Services – Strategy and Policy team




    Lewisham’s Equality Impact Assessment Summaries 2009 -2010                   31

				
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