ARTS - Granite State College

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                                           Learning Outcomes
APST = Applied Studies, Grant-Writing, Foster Care-giving
Complete an extensive self-assessment process to gain a better understanding of yourself and your
skills, interests, experiences, values and preferences pertinent to your career development and life
planning.
Gain a general understanding of select theories of adult development and generalize these
concepts to your own development.
Expand your knowledge of occupations, and gain awareness of available resources to research a
variety of occupations.
Define and articulate the elements important to personal career satisfaction, and develop the
strategy and skills to achieve personal career goals.
Identify and practice job search strategies.
Employ logic models to clarify the purpose and results of the project design for which grant funding
is sought, and use the logic model to develop a project abstract.

Identify funding databases and search potential public and private sector funding sources.

Demonstrate the ability to adapt writing to different funding sources by developing proposals to a
small community foundation, a major foundation, and a federal funding source.
Select the most appropriate funding sources given the organization’s mission and resource
requirements.

Understand the strategy of leveraging with collaborative partners and/or the operating budget.
Assemble and present necessary organizational background documentation for a grant application,
including budgets and support letters.
Write clear and measurable outcome statements that are appropriate to the review criteria for the
grant.
Prepare a timeline and evaluation plan that addresses the proposal outcomes for funding, including
audit and accountability plans.
Prepare for submission a final version of at least one grant proposal and deliver an oral presentation
of the proposal.
Evaluate rating scales and point systems used in the grant proposal review process.
Articulate a sustainability plan for the proposed initiative for when grant funding ends.
Develop a contingency plan in the event that the grant is not funded.

Become familiar with the effect of abuse, neglect and family chaos on child development.
Understand the negative behaviors exhibited by developmentally-disabled children and the negative
working model of the world from which they arise.
Develop a sense of competence with how to effectively cope with and begin to change severe,
negative behavior.
Develop an awareness of the role of the child’s therapist.
Describe the normal course of childhood psychological and behavioral development.

Understand the impact of neglect and abuse on how children view themselves and others.
Recognize how the negative behavior of developmentally-disabled children is an unconscious effort
to recreate what they are familiar with.

Be familiar with the variety of negative behaviors that developmentally-disabled children engage in
including: fire setting, stealing, lying, assaultiveness, self-mutilation, suicidal ideation, etc.
Be able to ensure the safety of the child, the caregiver and their family.
Recognize how the negative behaviors of developmentally-disabled children impact caretakers and
identify what they can do to counteract these effects.
Identify effective methods of containing and shaping unwanted behaviors.
Formulate strategies and use techniques that transform how developmentally-disabled children
view themselves and others, including increasing verbalization, fostering negotiating skills and
promoting positive interpersonal encounters.
Identify community resources, especially the child’s therapist, how to access them and understand
their role in working with developmentally-disabled children.
Understand the nature, symptoms, causes and treatment of developmental disabilities.
Become familiar with the evolution of services for developmentally-disabled children and youth, to
include current trends and legislations.

Demonstrate an understanding of the parts of the brain that affect developmental disabilities.
Correlate the in-utero factors resulting in developmental disabilities.
 Identify the nature, causes, symptoms and treatment of developmental disabilities.
 Develop an awareness of the impact of developmental disabilities on the child, the family and
society.
 Become familiar with the evolution of services relating to developmental disabilities.
Become familiar with the current trends, legislation and services relating to developmental
disabilities.
Develop an understanding of the special education process.
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                                         Learning Outcomes
ARTS=Visual Arts, Music, Architechture, Film, Creative Expression
Develop a sensitivity to and an understanding of the creative process through the exploration and
the utilization of basic drawing skills.

Become comfortable with a variety of graphic media, and utilize them to explore basic perceptual
skills of drawing including: edge, space, relationship, light, shadow, and Gestalt.
Improve hand-eye coordination, observation skills, and the perceptual keys needed to organize and
complete a drawing.
Recognize and implement the basic drawing ideas of contour, gesture, modeled drawings, and
perspective.

Learn to create the illusion of three dimensional images on a two dimensional surface            (canvas,
paper, board, etc.), by the use of planes/grounds, as well as a variety of perspective principles.
Apply principles of form to give objects roundness, fullness, mass, volume, and weight: a sense of
wholeness as opposed to flat line drawings, or frontal plane flat images.
Progress from drawing one object to many objects in a still life image incorporating the elements of
art and principles of composition.
Demonstrate an understanding of the variety of approaches to watercolor medium.
Participate in and be evaluated through peer review and/or mentor review of completed paintings
and works in progress.
Complete a final project consisting of a series of four paintings of the same size, style, and include
related subject matter.
Develop observational skills enabling you to simplify what you see and translate it into a three-
dimensional medium.
Understand and apply the elements of art sculpture including line, shape, color, texture, light,
shades, mediums, and surfaces.
Understand and apply the abstract principles of art sculpture including balance, repetition, contrast,
dominance, subordinance, proportions, ratio, perspective, planes, movement, mood, and visual
directives.
Effectively use different three-dimensional media on a specific project.
Take a concept from the drawing board and then develop this concept into a three-dimensional
piece of art work.
Critique the precise aesthetic qualities of art work, its composition, and the artist’s use of the
elements and principles of three-dimensional art.
Set up and use a digital camera, lenses, and auxiliary light sources.

Using a digital camera, demonstrate an ability to focus, set f/stop, shutter speed and film speed
settings, and display an understanding of the physical relationship between various camera settings.
Understand how light (artificial and natural) influences, and is recorded on, light sensitive
photographic materials.
Understand the basic laws of visual composition, unity, harmony, and balance of image and apply
these laws to photographs.
Begin to understand photography within the context of all forms of artistic expression through an
examination of the artistic motivation of well-known photographers.

Apply laws of visual composition to critique his/her own photographic work, and that of others.
understand the differences in memory storage and their devices.

Use a computer to capture, edit, and manipulate digital photographs for the Internet and printing.

Apply the basic vocabulary of the arts appropriately in discussions regarding the basic materials and
processes associated specific art forms such as music, visual art, dance, and drama.

Demonstrate acquisition of knowledge related to materials and processes in each art form.
Demonstrate awareness of and sensitivity to the sensory perceptions involved in responding to
various art forms.
Illustrate how the various art forms relate to each other.

Discuss ways in which the arts can enhance an understanding of multi-cultural relationships.
Identify the place of the arts in one's own life and ways in which experiencing various art forms can
have a personal impact.
Evaluate the role of public and private funding to support the arts.
Identify arts resources available to the local community and/or region.
Gain insight into the creative process and a heightened perceptual response to visual phenomena
through the cognitive processes such as recognition, realizing, reasoning, remembering, and noticing
what is and is not.
Gain knowledge about a variety of materials and the laws that govern what is possible to be
formulated from these materials.
Understand the nature of aesthetic activity and the place of art in life and in the evolution of
humankind.
Demonstrate the concept of visual order through a series of hands-on experiences that transform
materials into visual images that hopefully express some uniqueness.

The enrollee will learn how visual statements have expressed concerns and ideals of society by
exposing the concepts of social statements and the creation of such a visual commentary.
Experience the concept of form and function and the aesthetic qualities that relate to functional
objects, plus the exposure and the construction of such objects.
Outline the basic history of film.
Identify and explain the basic theories of filmmaking as art and integrate this knowledge into written
and verbal analyses of films.
Acquire the technical vocabulary of film and apply that lexicon to film analyses and to the creation
of a short narrative film.
Describe major principles and techniques of effective film production.
Critically analyze films in light of political, historical, and social contexts as well as their technical and
aesthetic elements.
Make a short narrative film incorporating all the major principles of effective film production.

Identify the major periods in the development of the American film industry and the relationship of
that development to changing national and international political concerns.
Demonstrate the ability to “read” a film though an understanding of styles of filming, narration, and
editing.
Describe and appraise the differing attitudes towards film arising from its multiple goals of
entertainment, education, and the creation of shared public experience.
Recognize, analyze, and evaluate the distinctive qualities of cinema as a means of conveying ideas,
information, and emotion.

Compare, contrast, and evaluate the merits of film and other forms of expression—e.g., literature,
political debates—as effective means of public discourse or personal education.
Discuss the basic elements and processes associated with music composition.
Explore the works of composers and artists who have made a significant contribution to the
development of both traditional and contemporary music.
Apply the basic vocabulary of music appropriately when describing a work in writing and in
conversation.
Demonstrate acquisition of selected basic skills/knowledge related to materials and processes in
music.
Interpret the form of a given piece of music and explain how the elements of form can render a
piece as sounding cohesive or fragmented.

Compare and contrast various elements, genres, styles, periods and origins in works of music.
Discuss ways in which music can enhance an understanding and appreciation of multicultural
relationships.
Develop an appreciation of the place of music in one’s own life and the ways in which experiencing
various musical activities can result in a deepened aesthetic experience.
Identify music-related resources available in the community, region and media.
Understand and apply the basic terminology of art to specific works of art.
Observe, identify, explain, and discuss specific visual images.
Identify main developments in the major periods in art history and the visual hallmarks associated
with such developments.

Demonstrate an ability to see art as the visualization of the artists' ideas and sensibilities.
Become familiar with the techniques of the modern-day artists and their effect on the viewed
image.
Identify major sources of support for the arts during the various historical periods.
Understand the key problems inherent in support for the arts to current society and the individual
artists.
Identify key buildings of history along with their dates and architects.
Develop a basic understanding of architectural and design terminology.
Trace the development of architectural periods and describe the significant aspects of design that
characterize buildings of each period.
Describe the social, environmental, aesthetic, functional, and structural forces that shaped key
architectural works of the time.

Discuss and evaluate the important criteria that make a building pleasing and functional.
Identify, experience, and develop strategies for managing the psychological barriers to the creative
process.
Gain experience in the five domains of creative endeavor: (1) playing; (2) expressing; (3) designing;
(4) inventing; (5) solving.
Apply the diverse phases of the creative process to tasks involving the two basic aspects of the self
as “creative instrument”: the body and the mind.
Evaluate contemporary theories and studies of creativity through reading, discussion, and written
critique.
Write a 3-part “creative autobiography,” examining: (1) your creative life in childhood; (2) present
creative activities; (3) future plans or vision in terms of creative directions.
Create and present to an audience an original project or object.
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                                      Learning Outcomes
BEHS=Behavioral Science, Psychology, Sociology, Anthropology
Become an informed consumer of research literature.

Write in discipline-appropriate research modes in the behavioral sciences, including APA style.
Reflect on research ethics; discuss both historical and recent examples.

Demonstrate an understanding of the requirements for safeguarding human research participants.
Explore quantitative research design, methods and analysis
Identify the role of program evaluation in the social/behavioral sciences and education.
Generate an appropriate research question, determine the corresponding research method(s), and
recognize the inherent epistemological relationship.
Generate a viable research proposal.
Understand the history and current state of human service agencies in the United States including
the parallel development of publicly funded social institutions, the private non-profit sector and the
faith based charities.
Comprehend the profile of persons in need of social services including those in need of short term
help after a disaster and those eligible for long term care.
Recognize the attitudes, beliefs and values which inform the work of the professional helper;
understand how these values are expressed in ethical decision making.
Demonstrate an understanding of the skills and techniques used by the professional helper in a
variety of personal and professional settings.
Identify the historical, economic, political and social factors which impact the delivery of human
services.
Understand the economic, cultural, medical and educational influences which lead consumers to
seek assistance from human service organizations.
Recognize the common elements in the methods used by helping professionals regardless of formal
training or practice setting.
Appreciate the necessary aspects of the helping relationship which include the helper’s values and
attitudes, communication skills, establishing of professional boundaries, and understanding of their
own motivation.
Apply acquired knowledge of the helping process to case studies.
Identify the local human service organizations which provide services to the members of the
community.
Discuss the relevance of behavioral science academic training to the work world.
Distinguish between profit and non-profit organizations that relate to social services and programs
involving behavioral science skills and knowledge.
Acquire a knowledge of how social services organizations, agencies, and programs are structured,
funded, and administered.
Develop knowledge and skills related to involvement in the work world including taking initiative to
network, conducting interviews and being interviewed, and promoting your own capabilities and
assets in field settings.
Acquire knowledge of career relevance, realities and opportunities with regard to behavioral
science training including range of salary, benefits and other compensation.
Compare and contrast principles and practices of major eastern/western psychotherapeutic models.
Discuss the interdependence of the mind, body, and spirit in the healing process.
Articulate and describe different theories of self and personality.

Describe the process of meditation including the discipline and self-awareness involved as well as
the benefits in terms of psychological, emotional and physical well-being.
Analyze the research regarding various models and techniques that have been used to promote self-
knowledge and psychological health.
Explain how psychological models and personality theories are informed by their cultural and
historical context.
Articulate and describe the roles of therapist and client throughout the healing process of each
psychotherapeutic approach.
Enhance research and communication skills by researching a related topic of interest for
presentation to an audience.
Develop a research question and create an operationally defined, testable hypothesis.
Complete computer and library searches of the research literature.
Differentiate the validity and reliability of a variety of measurement techniques such as
questionnaires, content analysis, observation, projective tests, and interviews.

Differentiate between correlational and experimental research with regard to causal inferences.
Demonstrate an understanding of the logic of hypothesis testing.

Compare and contrast qualitative and quantitative research from an historical perspective.
Determine the appropriateness of quantitative or qualitative research designs for specific research
hypotheses.
Differentiate between internal and external validity in research.
Identify threats to internal validity in research and demonstrate an understanding of how to control
for such threats.
Compare and contrast the “Results” and “Discussion” sections in journal articles in respect to
content reasoning.
Explain the development and importance of ethical guidelines for research in the Behavioral
Sciences to protect the welfare of human participants and animal subjects and apply these
principles to research design.
Design an original research study and write a Research Proposal.
Gain familiarity with medical research, theory, and treatments for stress disorders.
Differentiate deprivation psychology characteristics and theory from that of transcendental
psychology and utilize this body of study to recognize, understand, and act upon helpful and
threatening factors affecting the recovery process.
Assess recovery progress and needs within the frameworks of prominent developmental models of
psychological and social health and well-being, concentrating on the models of G.H. Mead, Erickson,
and Maslow.
Recognize problem areas and pinpoint possible treatment and intervention strategies within the
frameworks of each of these models (G.H. Mead, Erikson, and Maslow).
Critically assess and differentiate scientifically and theoretically solid evidence in the addiction,
trauma, and recovery literature from publications and media lacking scientific and academic
methodological rigor.

Understand the purpose of a mission statement to a social services organization and identify how an
organization and its services serve the community and its designated clientele.
Integrate and apply behavioral science knowledge, skills, and methods to a specific field setting,
client population, or service clientele.

Improve, enhance, and refine behavioral science-related skills, methods, and techniques.
Understand the importance of assessment and evaluation in providing social services and acquire
knowledge of quality assurance.
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                                         Learning Outcomes
CMPL=Computers
Use common computing terminology correctly to explain how computers work and to describe the
characteristics of system hardware, software and peripheral devices.
 Identify characteristics of common networks such as WANs, (including the Internet) LANs and the
protocols that support them.
Manage files and directories in both a single user and networked environment.
Identify and explain the importance of safe computing practices (e.g. spyware and virus preventions,
operating system updates.)

Create a formatted word-processing document that utilizes common formatting features.

Create a formatted spreadsheet that performs basic calculations using functions and formulas.
Create an effective presentation using presentation software.
Create a database from an existing design, create the forms for data entry, make queries of the
database and generate reports.
Demonstrate ability to navigate a course management system including making postings to a
discussion board, submitting assignments and reviewing content.
Articulate and discuss basic ethical, legal and societal issues arising from computer use and the
implications of electronic technologies.
Efficiently search, locate and evaluate information found on the Internet.

Format academic and professional documents in MLA, APA or other appropriate citation formats.
Demonstrate an understanding of the classification of programming languages.
Explain the software development life cycle, with focus on the programming phase.
Demonstrate an understanding of the mathematical and logic constructs that influence
programming languages and their implementations.
Demonstrate mastery of structured programming techniques.
Demonstrate mastery of programming selection and repetition structures.
Develop moderately complex algorithms and implement them using Qbasic.
Develop algorithms containing basic selection and repetition structures and applying mathematical
and logical concepts.
Read, understand and develop flowcharts and pseudocode.
Develop complex expressions, managing different data structures.
Use, explain and manage variables, constants and arrays.
Demonstrate mastery of the use of the procedures and functions within programming, along with
the purpose and efficacy of modularization.
Explain error-trapping and debugging techniques.
Design and develop programs using standard structured programming techniques.
Discuss the importance of naming conventions, comments, documentation and other good
programming practices.
Use and understand the value of external data sources (sequential and random access files,
specifically) in managing complex business tasks.
Become proficient in the use of computer applications and programs in order to create a website
that meets the user’s needs.
Identify and profile the targeted user audience and create a site that is appropriate to the user
profile.

Create a usability testing model to evaluate the site’s effectiveness relevant to the target audience.
Develop a website that is strategically tied to an organization’s mission/strategic plan.
Compile a site’s foundation documents, including mission, goals, and timetable, and explain how the
website developed illustrates best-practices in web design.
Create a maintenance plan for keeping the site current.
Explain and demonstrate the process by which a site becomes available on the Web, including the
steps involved in the file transfer protocol (FTP) to an off-site server.
Articulate the legal and ethical responsibilities of the web developer with regards to the use of
copyrighted materials, collecting and using information about visitors to a site, and the limits of free
speech on the web.
Understand the fundamentals of graphic design and desktop publishing.
Understand HTML creation, editing, and best practices.
Analyze and deconstruct the elements used in websites.
Design and layout an effective website for a specific audience.
Apply computer techniques to import/draw graphics and write copy.
Create and work with effective text/graphics combinations and color.

Explore the ethical use of information regarding copyright, intellectual property, etc. in web design.
Use “help” files and substantial online resources to learn about new software features.

Produce a complex document with word processing software. The document will be characterized
by: multiple chapters, table of contents, an index, footnotes and endnotes, tables, Mail merge, clip
art or other graphics, use and development of a custom created template or style sheet, use of
hyperlinks to other sections in the document/project, to other documents as well as locations on
the Web, change tracking and collaboration tools, macros

Complete a complex project utilizing a spreadsheet. The project will include the following
operations or features: multiple sections utilizing linked worksheets, at least two types of graphs
(chosen appropriately to the data being displayed), several formulas (both built-in functions and
user-produced formulas), lookup tables, pivot tables, interactive web pages, macros, projects should
include the use of the spreadsheet to do “what if” analysis.
Design and implement a small database. (Basic concepts of relational databases should be
introduced/reviewed.) The database should include: well-designed and normalized data tables,
input forms – including subforms for related tables, queries, including single and multiple tables,
parameter queries, outer joins and complex Boolean logic, reports, macros, access interactive web
pages
Integrate the output of at least two of the tools used in wordprocessing and spreadsheet software
to form a complete project.
Create a 2-page newsletter or its equivalent using Desktop Publishing either in a specific package
such as MS Publisher or using the advanced features of MS Word. The Newsletter should contain
columns, headlines, line art, clip art (or other drawing), word art, various type fonts and sizes and
other features typically found in newsletters.
Use collaborative tools from the Office Suite and the Internet to facilitate collaboration in learning
and productivity.
Demonstrate a deeper understanding of electronic data processing and data transport, developing
both conceptual knowledge and practical skills
Explain the relationships that exist between performance considerations of the hardware and
software components of a computer system
Describe representative network protocols, the constraints that system software and device
selection may impose on protocol selection and the problems engendered by multiple
(incompatible) protocols within an organization
Demonstrate a practical knowledge that focuses on the typical “advanced user” types of questions
pertaining to hardware and system-level software of common personal computers, its applications
software and its connections to a network.

Use the vocabulary of the field to communicate effectively with technical professionals.
Recognize the potential benefits and dangers of intranet/internet implementations.

Identify and use current trade and professional resources to keep abreast of trends in the field.
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                                         Learning Outcomes
COMM=Communication
Formulate an awareness of, and self-consciously experience, intrapersonal processes.

Become aware of, describe, and improve one’s own communication styles and strengths.
Differentiate between theoretical approaches to interpersonal communication and evaluate their
usefulness.

Integrate a new paradigm of communication that sees reality as co-created by communication.
Appraise the nature of conflict for oneself and others.
Explore and discuss strategies for dealing with interpersonal conflict.
Develop and demonstrate perceptual and listening effectiveness.
Apply principles of effective nonverbal and verbal communication.
Assess the influence of culture on interpersonal communication.
Discuss the influence of communications technology on interpersonal communication.

Identify and explain the basic terminology and theories of small group development and
communication related to group process over time and in individual group sessions.

Analyze current life situations and assess the role of small group communication in these areas.
Differentiate between the generic roles of member, leader and process observer during small group
participation.
Identify and analyze small group dynamics through utilization of reflective processing, feedback and
the maintenance of a journal and relate these observations to characteristic communication
behaviors.

Demonstrate knowledge and application of small group communication theory and research by
providing active, involved communication and meaningful feedback to other participants.

Reflect on your own communication behavior, and the behavior of others, utilizing the experiential
modes of “action learning” and reflective processing in the ongoing group laboratory process.

Demonstrate the skill of process observation in both in-class and out-of-class group environments
and explain its relevance to behavioral practice professionally, socially and personally.
identify and display basic small group leadership roles, skills, functions and techniques and articulate
their practical relationship to your professional life.
Identify and describe the components of the communication process: speaking, listening, nonverbal
communication, and perception.
Articulate the fundamentals of effective communication.
Explore the notion of co-creating reality through communication.
Conduct and evaluate research in the preparation of a presentation.

Organize thoughts into a public message using the basic building-blocks of arranging a speech.
Prepare and deliver presentations utilizing the principles of effective communication.
Demonstrate critical thinking skills as a listener.
Explain the nature of pluralistic audiences.
Develop confidence as a public communicator.
Effectively use appropriate technology to support presentations.
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CRIM   Upper
                                         Learning Outcomes
CRIM=Criminal Justice

Articulate a definition of crime and explain the historical precedents of modern criminology.
Identify and compare the characteristics of various crime typologies: e.g., violent crime, such as
rape, murder and arson, white-collar crime and property crime.
Explain the measurement of various types of crime and trace its extent historically.
Assess the social and financial costs of crime.
Identify and explain various theoretical causes of crime and/or criminality, including sociological,
psychological and biological perspectives.
Apply individual theories within each criminological perspective to case studies in order to offer
possible explanations for criminal behavior.
Identify and explain responses to crime and criminal activity within American society.
Acquire an awareness of social and economic factors which led to the development of a special,
separate juvenile justice system.
Gain familiarity with the principle delinquency causation theories.
Be able to apply causal theory to program assessment and evaluation.
Know and understand the major theories of delinquency causation.
Demonstrate knowledge of the historical context of the juvenile justice system.
Demonstrate the ability to compare and contrast causal theories and relate them to treatment and
prevention programming.
Demonstrate the ability to think and write about juvenile crime - its causes and prevention - and the
treatment and rehabilitation of juvenile offenders.
Demonstrate the ability to identify, analyze, and recommend solutions for a problem area in the
New Hampshire juvenile justice system.

Discuss the complexity of the criminal and juvenile justice system as a whole, as well as its
subsystems: the police, criminal and juvenile courts, corrections and treatment programs.

Trace the historical development of each subsystem to present-day ‘state-of-the-art” approaches.
Define the four primary purposes of the justice system and apply these ideas in the analysis of the
system’s effectiveness.
Be able to read and interpret empirical data in the study of crime and delinquency; as a science,
criminology must employ the scientific method in its analysis of crime.
Differentiate between informal and formal methods of social control recognizing current political
and social attitudes toward crime and delinquency.
Create a “flow chart” of the criminal and juvenile justice systems in order to demonstrate
knowledge of the relationships among the subsystems.
Describe the evolution of police departments in the U.S. and the political, economic and social
factors affecting their development and organization.
Identify the primary factors influencing police officers in the fulfillment of their duties.
Describe and differentiate the role of prosecutors, defense attorneys, judges and juries in both the
criminal and juvenile justice systems.
Explain the various sentencing options available to criminal and juvenile court judges and factors
taken into consideration in the application of each.
Trace the evolution of prisons and juvenile correctional facilities in the U.S, various treatment
modalities, and current issues confronting corrections today
Describe the development of the victims’ rights movement in the U.S., citing specific examples of
legislation designed to enhance victims’ rights.
Discuss the impact of politics on the criminal justice system as well as suggested reforms designed
to reduce the crime rate.
Summarize the economic and social conditions underlying crime and delinquency and the
implications each of these have for reducing the crime rate.
Develop a knowledge of the problem of crime in our society.
Develop an awareness of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention.

Be able to identify the opportunities for crime to occur, and develop theoretically based solutions.
Demonstrate knowledge of the theories of crime preventions and control.
Understand the issues of philosophy, politics, and policy as they relate to crime prevention and
control.
Demonstrate the ability to apply the theories to situational crime prevention.
Demonstrate knowledge of statutes protecting crime victims.
Demonstrate knowledge of a victim advocate role and duties.
Evaluate the different systems' responses to victims.
evaluate and critically examine community support programs to which for certain victims may be
referred.
Be aware of how victims can be compensated.
Understand a victim's reactions and behavior after a criminal act.
Understand the historical and philosophical context for the emergence of prisons as a means of
imposing the criminal penalty of incarceration.
Describe the historical basis for probation and parole.
Understand corrections within the context of the various roles and functions of the criminal justice
system.
Understand the roles of all the correctional professionals in various environments.
Differentiate the various types of present-day confinement facilities.
Critically evaluate the various forms of treatment available in the corrections system.
Understand the growing problem of overcrowding, the rise of communicable diseases, as well as the
unique problems associated with female incarceration.
Understand programs that develop social controls and evaluate methodologies. Explain how they
relate to correctional custody.
Describe and apply the process used to determine alternative sentencing.
Compare and contrast the various historical eras of American prisons.
Comprehend and summarize the major content of the U.S. and N.H. Constitutions.

Demonstrate appropriate application of the procedural rules utilized in the criminal justice system.
Identify the major Constitutional Amendments and discuss their practical application.
Analyze constitutional law and its application to various criminal justice and legal matters.
Articulate the relationship between the U.S. and N.H. Constitutions.

Discuss U.S. Supreme Court and N.H. Supreme court cases as they relate to constitutional issues.
Brief and analyze constitutional case law.
Describe the significance of, as well as the application of the Bill of Rights.
Apply the 14th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution and the N.H. Constitution in analyses of case
studies.
Explain the major U.S. Constitutional Amendments including, but not limited to, the 4th, 5th, 6th and
 th
8 Amendments.

Analyze and explain the modern societal impact of the U.S. Constitution and the N.H. Constitution.
Discipline   Level
CRIT       Lower

CRIT      Lower




CRIT      Lower
CRIT      Lower




CRIT      Lower

CRIT      Lower
                                          Learning Outcomes
CRIT=Critical Thinking
Acquire the basic "numeracy" skills necessary in solving simple math word problems, logic puzzles,
and numerical analogies.
Formulate and evaluate multiple strategies and alternate theories for solving problems and
explaining phenomena, whether social, physical, numerical, or theoretical/hypothetical. This
process involves the following particular skills: differentiate between subjective and objective
information; formulate probing, clarifying questions about underlying assumptions in accepted
paradigms of thought.
Apply problem-solving techniques based on logical, systematic analysis.

Write and revise a substantive critical thinking essay that emphasizes the following: evaluation of
the truth claims of an argument or hypothesis based on logic and empirical evidence; application of
the principles of sound reasoning, particularly when examining written arguments; articulation of
the difference between subjective and objective assessment of evidence.
Conduct a self-examination of critical thinking skills, applying the principles learned in this course to
your own thought processes and problem-solving techniques.
Discipline   Level
ECO        Lower

ECO       Lower

ECO       Lower
ECO       Lower

ECO       Lower

ECO       Lower
ECO       Lower
ECO       Lower

ECO       Lower

ECO       Upper

ECO       Upper

ECO       Upper

ECO       Upper

ECO       Upper

ECO       Upper
ECO       Upper

ECO       Upper
                                   Learning Outcomes
ECO=Economics

Demonstrate graphically and in words the concepts of supply, demand and elasticities.
Formulate economic decisions using the basic tenets of scarcity and choice, rational
behavior, and marginal analysis.
Analyze current economic data, such as GDP, inflation and unemployment.
Compare and contrast market and command economies to answer the fundamental
questions of what, how, and for whom to produce for each type of economy.
Distinguish between allocative and productive efficiency, and calculate the cost of
economic resources under various production methods.
Compare and contrast different market models, including monopolies and oligopolies.
Integrate recent economic events with fundmental principles of economics.
Relate international trade and trade policies to the concept of comparative advantage and
the impact on production of goods and services in various countries.
Demonstrate competence in words the theory & evolution of international trade with
emphasis on comparative advantage.
Formulate a deeper understanding of comparative advantage including the impact of
government intervention of comparative advantage.
Analyze current economic situations with particular emphasis on tariffs, and how these
affect the market in both the exporting and importing countries.
Compare and contrast non-tariff impediments to international trade, and analyze their
impact on the economy.
Analyze US trade regulation legislation from pre-1930 up to the current Doha Round of
negotiations.
Compare and contrast different trade regulation in developing nations and the impacts on
these societies.
Integrate recent economic developments in regional trade arrangements.
Relate international factor movements and the impact of multinational corporations on the
economies of nations.
Discipline   Level
EDU        Lower

EDU       Lower

EDU       Lower

EDU       Lower

EDU       Lower

EDU       Lower
EDU       Lower

EDU       Lower

EDU       Lower
EDU       Lower
EDU       Lower
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EDU       Lower
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EDU       Lower

EDU       Lower

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EDU       Lower
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EDU       Lower

EDU       Lower

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EDU   Lower
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EDU   Lower
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EDU   Lower



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EDU   Lower



EDU   Lower
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EDU   Lower
EDU   Lower

EDU   Lower

EDU   Lower

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EDU   Lower
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EDU   Lower

EDU   Lower
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EDU   Lower
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EDU   Lower

EDU   Lower

EDU   Lower



EDU   Lower

EDU   Lower

EDU   Lower

EDU   Lower

EDU   Lower

EDU   Lower

EDU   Lower

EDU   Lower

EDU   Upper

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EDU   Upper



EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper
EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper
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EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper
EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper



EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper



EDU   Upper
EDU   Upper
EDU   Upper
EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper

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EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper



EDU   Upper



EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper



EDU   Upper



EDU   Upper
EDU   Upper
EDU   Upper
EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper

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EDU   Upper

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EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper
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EDU   Upper
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EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper

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EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper
EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper

EDU   Upper
                                     Learning Outcomes
EDU=Education
Demonstrate an understanding of the historical, philosophical, and legal foundation of
special education.
Utilize effective practices for confidential communication about individuals with
exceptionalities.
Demonstrate knowledge of patterns of human development and the risk factors which
effect development.
Demonstrate the ability to utilize effective communication strategies within the school
setting.
Support the teaching and learning environment using basic strategies and techniques which
will support the learner’s independence.
Demonstrate knowledge of effective strategies for behavior management.
Articulate the differences between roles and responsibilities of paraeducators and other
staff members.
Identify disability categories and articulate how students are identified and become eligible
for special education.
Become an informed consumer of research literature.
Write in discipline-appropriate research modes, including APA style.
Reflect on research ethics; discuss both historical and recent examples.
Demonstrate an understanding of the requirements for safeguarding human research
participants.
Explore quantitative research design, methods and analysis
Explore qualitative research design, methods and analysis

Identify the role of program evaluation in the social/behavioral sciences and education
Generate an appropriate research question, determine the corresponding research
method(s), and recognize the inherent epistemological relationship.
Compare and contrast specific types of disabilities and possible adaptations and
modifications.
Identify students’ educational strengths and needs based on observations, interviews, and
record review.
Select and justify appropriate adaptations to address physical, cognitive, and socio-
emotional disabilities impeding access to the General Curriculum.
Discuss teaching and presentation strategies that address individual needs.
Identify a list of resources available to support adaptations/modifications to address special
needs.
Consult with IEP team members to revise lists of appropriate accommodations for
practicality of implementation.
Explain how adaptations and modifications for special needs will be evaluated on an on-
going basis by paraeducators, teachers, and parents.
Identify major theorists such as Rousseau, Dewey, Hutchins, Mann, Green, Rogers, and
explain their perspectives on education and learning.
Describe the evolution of professional roles and responsibilities in the U.S. education
system from colonial days to the present.
Using historical approaches as a foundation, explain how education evolves to meet the
changing needs of society.
Identify and explain how social, economic, and political historical factors have shaped
current education structures and practices.
Explain how schools are complex organizations within a larger community.

Based on theoretical perspectives, describe how school organizational units (e.g., preschool,
elementary, middle school, junior high, K-8, high school, and K-12) serve their populations.
Analyze a school’s mission statement in light of education philosophies.
Evaluate theoretical and historical perspectives in the construction of a personal philosophy
and approach to education.
Participate in an early field experience that provides opportunities for observing, teaching
and engaging with school age youth.
Construct a professional portfolio that demonstrates evidence of the NH Professional
Education Standards for Teacher Certification.
Identify and describe key theories of learning and instruction.
Explain instructional strategies and how they correspond to various theories.
Compare and contrast effectiveness of strategies for different content areas and for
different populations of students.
Develop lesson plans that align New Hampshire Curriculum Standards.
Explain how assessment can be used to guide instruction.
Analyze assessment approaches for different instructional strategies.

Connect teaching strategies with appropriate assessment tools and student outcomes.

Implement lesson plans for diverse learners and explain why the particular strategies were
chosen in relation to the curriculum standards, the population, and the environment.
Employ assessment tools to evaluate student learning.
Observe and evaluate the effectiveness of the instructional strategies and their
implementation.
Trace the history of early childhood education and identify leaders and how they have
influenced contemporary practices.
Explain and compare the contributions of major theorists and practitioners who have
contributed to the field of early childhood education (e.g., Pestalozzi, Froebel, Montessori,
Dewey, Piaget, Vygotsky, Erikson, & Gardner).

Compare and contrast the educational models of various programs including High/Scope,
Montessori, Bereiter-Engelmann, Head Start, Bank Street, Reggio Emilia, Waldorf.
Differentiate between programs such as nursery school, kindergarten, pre-school programs,
and child care in terms of their funding, staffing, training, and regulations.
Articulate the similarities and differences of programs designed for infants, toddlers,
preschool, kindergarten, and primary school age children with consideration for individual
differences and the developmental needs of each group, and with appreciation for the role
of play in developmentally appropriate practice.
Discuss issues facing children, families, and early childhood educators and programs and
explore the role of the early childhood professional in advocating improved services and
working conditions.
Apply the NAEYC Code of Ethics to professional practices.
Explain the impact of professional development for early childhood educators and its
impact on quality care for children.
Explain the central role of play as a vehicle to children’s learning.
Compare and contrast the elements required to successfully plan indoor and outdoor
environments for children from infancy through age eight.
Design developmentally and culturally appropriate environments which are inclusive for all
children from birth through eight years.
Evaluate existing environments according to nationally recognized standards of developmentally
appropriate practice.
Identify materials and resources and explain how their use in early childhood settings fosters
physical, cognitive, language, creative, and social development.
Articulate to staff and parents the importance and value of various learning materials and
resources to learning and development.
Discuss the health, safety, and nutritional concerns in the early childhood environment.
Effectively plan guidance strategies that promote health and safety awareness in children.
Plan schedules and transitions for children using principles of child development

Identify the New Hampshire State Regulations for Child Care Settings and compare them with
best practices as defined by the National Association for the Education of Young Children.
Demonstrate a repertoire of interactions with children that defines the educator’s role as
modeler, scaffolder and facilitator of children’s learning.
Critically reflect on best practices in designing environments for children.
Describe the nature of creativity and its role in social, emotional, cognitive and physical
development.
Demonstrate a working knowledge of the basic skills and content of each art form (art,
music, creative movement, and drama) while exploring your own creativity.
Design developmentally appropriate arts experiences for children from infancy through age
8 using a variety of arts materials.
Develop and evaluate integrated curriculum units which incorporate the arts as an
essential strategy for promoting learning in the academic disciplines (language arts, science,
math, social studies).
Analyze the organization of the environment in term of how effectively it provides for each
art domain, individual child choice, special needs, and appropriate display of children’s
work.
Assess children’s development by analyzing samples of creative work and formulate
appropriate responses.
Develop and modify activities in the arts to accommodate young children with special needs
in an inclusive setting, and promote comfortable, empathetic and just interaction with
diversity.

Critically reflect on best practices in utilizing creative arts to foster children’s development.
Describe the importance of language and literacy skills to children’s success in school and
society.
Distinguish quality print-rich environments in which children can work and play. Apply
principles of development in designing and implementing activities and curricula that
promote language and literacy development.
Evaluate materials to enhance the language and literacy experiences of children from
infancy through age 8.
Articulate the components of developmentally appropriate literacy events inclusive of
children with special needs and diverse backgrounds.
Explain strategies for encouraging children to experiment with emergent forms of reading
and writing.
Compare and contrast opportunities for children to use language and literacy for authentic
purposes in school, home and the community.

Use authentic forms of assessment to identify progress in language and literacy skill.

Respect and accommodate children’s developmental, cultural, and linguistic diversity.
Critically reflect on best practices in promoting language and literacy development in
children.
Identify and explain the stages of children’s cognitive development, using multiple
theoretical perspectives.
Apply the constructivist approach to explain and provide examples of how children develop
mathematical and scientific thinking.

Describe the setting and materials appropriate to providing children with opportunities to
expand mathematical and scientific understanding in the classroom and at home.
Apply understanding of developmentally appropriate practice in planning curriculum that
promotes logico-mathematical thinking in children through age 8 and accommodates
children with special needs and diverse backgrounds.
Evaluate the effectiveness of various commercially developed math and science materials
(including technology) for preschool and primary classrooms.
Apply principles of the Project Approach which integrate all aspects of curriculum based
upon children’s interests.
Analyze children’s books and teacher resources for their use in developing scientific and
mathematical thinking.
Critically reflect on best practices in facilitating scientific and mathematical thinking in
children.

Explain the value of assessment and its usefulness for early childhood professionals.
Articulate the concept of authentic assessment and demonstrate an appreciation of its role
in developmentally appropriate practice.
Discuss the ethical and legal standards required for research involving children, including
those with diverse backgrounds and/or disabilities.
Conduct observations of children, record data objectively, and interpret the findings.

Compare and contrast several types of observational methodology, for example, naturalistic
observation, time-sampling, and event-recording, and explain the usefulness of each.

Apply knowledge of child development in the interpretation and use of observational data.
Use developmental screening approaches to identify and refer at-risk children for further
evaluation.
Discuss the concept of “readiness” and its usefulness in early childhood education.
Use curriculum-based assessment to monitor children’s progress and plan for
developmentally appropriate programs and environments.
Discuss the role of standardized testing in the identification of at-risk and special needs
children.
Use basic statistical data in the interpretation of reports from psychologists and special
educators.
Critically reflect on the use of observation and assessment to foster children’s
development.

Demonstrate knowledge of specific disabilities, including their etiology, characteristics and
classification; identify risk factors associated with specific disabilities.
Describe key components of federal and state legislation, referral procedures, and the
special education process.
Understand the role of screening children for potential disabilities in making appropriate
referrals.
Apply knowledge of specific disabilities to appropriately adapt the early childhood
curriculum and environment in order to meet the needs of all children.
Become familiar with assessment tools and procedures used to identify special needs, and
demonstrate the ability to use evaluation data to design intervention strategies that
integrate the goals and objectives of IEPs and IFSPs.
Develop observation techniques and the skills to report observations effectively.
Identify appropriate resources to assist families with their priorities and concerns.
Demonstrate competence using a family-centered approach by working with families in
appropriate settings.
Develop the ability to participate, under supervision, as a member of an early childhood
intervention team.
Explain how various aspects of family structures, parenting skills, ethnicity, and socio-
economic status affect children's development and learning.

Demonstrate interpersonal communication skills that foster mutual respect and that
encourage families to be active participants in their children’s growth and development.
Explain the different types of educational approaches available for working with parents
(e.g. workshops, support groups, family conferences).
Design and implement at least one educational experience, or assemble at least one set of
materials, to enhance family member’s knowledge of child development and capacity to
support early learning in the home.
Describe and evaluate various approaches to enhancing family literacy and numeracy, and
knowledge of health and safety practices as they relate to optimal child growth and
development.
Explain strategies for involving parents/family members with child care providers as
partners in promoting learning and accessing community services.
Describe various approaches to early intervention screening and assessment for children
who may benefit from health or community services.
Explain appropriate methods of linking families to resources and processes for referral to
health, mental health, English as a Second Language (ESL), Adult Basic Education (ABE), and
economic assistance services and/or agencies as appropriate.
Critically reflect on best practices for promoting strong positive interrelationships among
families, early care and education, and communities through written assignments and
through selection of work samples for their professional portfolios.
Explain the concept of mentoring and describe the qualities of a good mentor.
Identify alternative mentoring models and their value in developing professionals.
Analyze how the role of supervisor contrasts with the role of mentor.
Evaluate strategies for combining and complementing effective techniques for both
mentoring and supervising employees.
Describe selected theories of adult development and analyze the implications of individual
development for training, on-the-job learning, and formal education.
Integrate principles of culturally relevant anti-bias curriculum and identify potential
prejudices that might interfere with appropriate practice.
Apply knowledge of stages of teacher development to interactions, goal setting and
feedback with employees.
Demonstrate awareness of the dynamics of roles within the workplace and skills needed to
build trusting, supportive, long-term relationships with employees.
Employ effective communication skills including observation and feedback on employee
performance, modeling and processing employee observations, the use of self-assessment,
conferencing and conflict resolution.
Reflect on your own practice in teaching, supervising and mentoring to improve
performance based on critical evaluation.

Discuss the standards of quality as they relate to licensing, accreditation, and credentialing.
Explain the relationship between your philosophy of quality early care and education and
program development and evaluation.
Create a budget based on philosophy, meeting standards of quality, and equitable
compensation for staff.
Outline the components for effective family involvement including policies for payment,
child health care, emergencies, and communication.
Construct a comprehensive framework for effective personnel including creating job
descriptions, hiring practices, performance review, employment policies, and professional
development plans.
Describe leadership styles of early childhood directors and the impact on effective
management and supervision.
Critically reflect on best practices in effective early childhood program administration.
Identify and interpret major theoretical perspectives on the reading process and evaluate
their strengths and weaknesses.
Observe and describe strategies used in teaching and assessing reading and writing in
elementary classrooms.
Analyze instructional approaches to reading and writing observed in elementary
classrooms.
Develop a tool-kit of instructional strategies in comprehension, vocabulary, phonemic
awareness, phonics, fluency, and the writing process that they can implement in teaching
students in grades K-5 to strengthen their reading and writing.
Select and use a range of assessment tools to identify individual students’ literacy strengths
and needs and to plan further instruction.
Design a lesson plan unit for teaching reading and writing in an elementary classroom that
incorporates instruction in comprehension, vocabulary, phonemic awareness, phonics,
fluency, and the writing process.
Implement and evaluate the effectiveness of a holistic reading and writing lesson in a K-6
classroom.
Evaluate theoretical models of literacy in the construction of a personal theory of literacy
instruction.
Compare the views of major theorists regarding students’ basic needs and causes of
student misbehavior.
Administer and interpret questionnaires to identify student needs and analyze the
classroom environment.
Report observations of effective teachers using eight instructional management skills.
Identify strategies for cooperative learning and/or peer tutoring.
Reflect upon factors important for individual and group management .
Describe and evaluate strategies to enhance peer relationships at the preschool,
elementary, and/or secondary levels.
Integrate information from questionnaires identifying student needs and analyzing a
classroom environment to develop a list of strategies to increase student motivation.
Identify problem solving processes for elementary and secondary school students.
Define a student behavior of concern, and collect baseline data to quantify it.

Implement an appropriate intervention for the identified behavior, measure the behavior
throughout the intervention, and evaluate the intervention’s effectiveness.
Examine the basic principles and components of the four traditional models of the etiology
of human behavior.
Examine the basic psychological needs, as well as behavioral and social dynamics in the
classroom.
Examine the interaction between behavior management and planning for effective
instruction.
Design standards for classroom and school-wide behavior and implement techniques to
enhance the learning environment.
Identify and implement methods to promote positive interpersonal relationships in the
classroom.
Identify, implement and evaluate interventions for individuals and groups that support
positive behaviors.
Examine and analyze the historical development of special education law.
Identify and examine principles established by litigation that affect the education of
students with disabilities.
Explain and evaluate legal rights and responsibilities of special needs students and their
families, teachers, and schools.
Analyze and evaluate state and federal legislation regarding students with disabilities in
relation to educational practices.
Examine and prioritize ethical issues teachers may encounter in relation to special needs
students and their families.
Compare and contrast state and local policies and procedures for the education of students
with disabilities.
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                                         Learning Outcomes
ENG=English
Discuss writing as a process, and implement the stages in that process.
Pre-write, assess, and revise multiple written assignments.
Practice exploring and generating content for forms of writing.

Employ various methods for organizing content, including identification of an organizing principle,
formulation of a thesis statement, limiting the scope of topics, and crafting logical transitions.
Differentiate among and compose in various modes of writing, with an emphasis on explanatory,
personal, and persuasive discourse.
Write a short research essay which: demonstrates an understanding of the method of research and
of the use of appropriate and accurate citation; demonstrates an ability to select, analyze and
synthesize resource information and to integrate it into a written discussion or argument for the
intended audience.
Apply the fundamentals of usage, punctuation, spelling, and syntax.
Critique the writing of other learners and offer constructive feedback.
Effectively plan and develop strategies for writing tasks or assignments.
Describe the stages of oral language development to include sound production, sentence structure,
and vocabulary development.
Evaluate the impact that social, cultural, psychological, and economic factors have on language and
literacy development.

Categorize vowel and consonant phonemes based on sound and physical characteristics.
Examine the major components of oral and written language.

Illustrate the contribution of vernacular and standard dialects to oral and written communication.
Propose changes in language use that may be varied according to audience.
Demonstrate an understanding of semantics and the grammatical structure of the English language
and the ways in which these conventions have changed over time.
Compare and contrast the Prescriptive and Descriptive approaches to grammar instruction.
Analyze and explain the spelling patterns of words.
Discuss how language changes and develops over time.

Identify and define various forms of media and the guiding principles of how these media function

Explain the media’s relationships with race, class, gender, sexuality, capitalism, and politics.
Analyze the role and influence of corporate advertisements, the government and censorship within
each form of mass media studied.

Describe the larger role of mass media as it pertains to shaping both American culture and society.
Explain how media studies can enhance one’s knowledge of both literary works and the craft of
writing.
Identify and interpret various messages being sent by different forms of mass media and analyze the
overriding purpose of those messages.
Examine the power of mass media in shaping individuals and the larger culture.
Identify major American writers and describe their most important works.

Explain the historical contexts and define the characteristics and major tenets of such literary eras
and/or movements as Puritanism, transcendentalism, romanticism, realism, and modernism.

Describe how specific authors and their works exemplify particular literary eras and/or movements.
Formulate a broad-based theory of what makes American literature uniquely “American”.
Define literary terms and apply them in analysis and discussion of readings.

Interpret orally and in writing complex ideas, themes, and conflicts embedded in literary works.
Articulate, in writing and group discussion, the major political, social, philosophical, and cultural
shifts in England from the Anglo-Saxon Period through the Enlightenment and discuss their
influences on writers.
Identify and analyze the styles, techniques and motifs of representative selected works from the
following genres: the oral narrative, the heroic epic, the chivalric romance, the revenge tragedy, the
courtly poem, the sonnet, the meditation, and the epistle.
Compare and contrast life experiences proscribed by class, culture, and gender, as evident in a
variety of literary texts.
Explore the reciprocal relationships among literature, art, history and culture.
Evaluate the technical competence and thematic poignancy of varied texts in order to assess and
debate their canonical status.
Compose and revise polished literary analyses.
                                                                                                   th
Articulate the major political, social, philosophical, and cultural shifts in Britain from the early 19
century to the present day and discuss their influences on writers.
Identify and analyze the styles, techniques and motifs of representative selected works of poetry,
prose, and drama from the Romantic period, the Victorian era, the Modern age, and the
Postmodern, Postcolonial present.
Compare and contrast life experiences proscribed by class, culture, race, and gender, as evident in a
variety of literary texts.
Explore the reciprocal relationships among literature, history, and culture.
Evaluate the technical competence and thematic poignancy of varied literary texts in order to assess
and debate their canonical status.

Compare and contrast the ideas of professionals from across the disciplines, e.g. psychologists, art
historians, educators, etc. whose work focuses on children and their literature.
Apply specific criteria to evaluate various types of literature for children such as its stance on
relevant developmental, behavioral, and cultural issues of concern to children.
Describe how a particular book may evoke various meanings to different children or to the same
child at different developmental stages.
Critically analyze literature based on personal criteria through an application of the concepts
developed by psychologists, art historians, educators and authors.
Explicate the variety of categories and range of genres into which children’s books can be classified,
providing some prominent examples in the major categories.
Discuss, explain, and respond to key works of literature for young adults.
Identify and analyze works of young adult literature across a variety of genres.

Evaluate works of young adult literature from the perspective of adults revisiting their adolescence.
Identify and assess central themes found in young adult literature.
Interpret and evaluate literature written for young adults according to its literary merits.
Compare and contrast the portrayal of adolescent issues in young adult literature with analyses of
young adults’ challenges from other perspectives (e.g., psychological, educational, sociological,
historical).
Construct a theory concerning the role of young adult literature in the lives of youth.
Identify expository and persuasive strategies and techniques in published texts by established
authors.
Identify and delineate what makes successful rhetorical strategies and techniques work and
evaluate their effectiveness in a given context.
Analyze surface meanings and subtexts in expository and persuasive written form by applying the
principles of language as a symbol system.
Apply advanced composition strategies to the planning, drafting, discussing, and revising of original
essays.
Demonstrate a general familiarity with the modes of discourse in at least one scholarly field and the
ability to effectively integrate research from that field into an essay using accurate citation
practices.

Define the genre of creative nonfiction and compare and contrast it with other types of writing
Analyze the function and impact of audience in shaping a piece of writing.
Engage in all stages of the writing process and formulate a composition paradigm that facilitates
your own individual writing practice.

Create original works that explore and embody the characteristics of the creative nonfiction genre
and employ various modes of discourse (e.g., description, narration, exposition, persuasion).
Establish and sustain a community of writers who share and critique each other’s work using
standard criteria for evaluation.

Reflect on the process of composition through letters, journal entries, and other writing projects.
Integrate primary and secondary sources into your work in a manner that lends factual support,
heightens creative effects, and provides appropriate documentation.
Produce original writing in the varied genres: poetry, short story, dramatic dialogue, journal, and
interview.
Discuss and analyze published writing as a model or context for creating original work.
Write critical responses to published texts with a focus on form, craft, and the generative process of
the author.
Generate critical, specific feedback in a creative workshop with peers.
Revise your work extensively and develop your own advanced creative writing process
Synthesize knowledge of a wide range of writing genres gained experientially by creating original
texts in those genres.
Define “culture” as a social, political, religious, linguistic, economic, and ethnic construct.
Explain how America is a nation of immigrants and appraise the ramifications of this heritage as it is
depicted by selected writers who treat multicultural themes in their work.
Compare and contrast the traditions, belief systems, and customs of several co-cultures as
represented in works of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry.
Evaluate the assumptions behind and the validity of such cultural myths as “America as melting
pot,” “the Golden Mountain,” and “the American Dream” as embodied in specific literary works
that focus on multicultural issues.
Compare and contrast the various waves of immigration into the U.S., and draw from literary
accounts to evaluate societal and institutional responses to them.
Realign your understanding of in- and out-groups, define ethnocentrism, analyze the roots of racial,
ethnic, class, and cultural biases, and debunk cultural stereotypes.

Debate the benefits and losses related to cultural assimilation for selected characters in literature.

Interpret orally and in writing complex ideas, themes, and conflicts embedded in literary works.
Identify fundamental philosophical questions presented in different literary genres.
Critically evaluate connections between philosophy and literature.
Compare, contrast, and evaluate the treatment of a philosophical theme in different historical
periods and literary sources--as, for example, the treatment of gender in plays by Aristophanes and
Shakespeare.
Evaluate the role of different literary forms, e.g., narrative structure, allegory, symbol, in expressing
different philosophical ideas.

Consider the importance of specific philosophies on the genre and form of literary works--for
example, the significance of Platonism in Shakespeare, or of Transcendentalism in Hawthorne.
Identify influential nature writers and discuss their most important works.
Compare and contrast major themes in representative works of nature writing from the classical
period to the present.
Explain the influence and effectiveness of various genres in nature writing.
Identify and explicate important philosophical, sociological, and political questions and issues
related to nature writing.
Consider and discuss the interrelationship between nature writing and natural science within their
cultural and historical contexts.

Analyze the use of literary devices, e.g., metaphor, simile, symbolism, etc., in nature writing.
Advance writing skills through experimentation with nature writing.
Demonstrate a familiarity with a range of literary texts written by women.
Examine the ways that literary devices such as imagery, metaphor, and symbolism contribute to a
text’s meaning.
Explain how literature serves as a cultural artifact, an expression of the values and concerns of the
people who write and read it.

Articulate how socially defined notions of gender influence behavior and artistic expression.
Facilitate discussions of literary works.
Evaluate various interpretations of a single literary text.

Formulate well-argued interpretations that address and incorporate multiple perspectives.
Identify several major ancient, Continental, Asian, African, Caribbean, Pacific, or Latin American
writers and describe their most important works.
Describe the characteristics and major tenets of selected literary eras or movements that developed
outside the American and British canons.
Appraise how political, social, and historical events and movements influenced selected ancient,
Continental, Third World, colonial, and postcolonial writers and their works.
Define literary terms and apply them in analysis and discussion of readings.
Interpret the complex ideas, themes, and conflicts embedded in literary works.
Distinguish among different types of autobiography and demonstrate the major defining
characteristics and conventions of each type.
Examine different autobiographers’ uses of literary techniques in select autobiographies.
Analyze and compare representative works of American autobiography from the early explorers to
today’s postmodern writers.
Evaluate and integrate primary and secondary sources in oral and written analysis of select
autobiographies.
Examine the uses of autobiographical writings in historical and/or cultural studies.
Identify and explain theories of autobiography.
Recognize and employ technical terms associated with analyzing short fiction.
Relate the importance of specific writers’ lives to their stories, themes, ideas, subjects, and/or
techniques.
                                                                                               th
Identify and compare the major trends and movements in short fiction from the late 19 to the
current century, and examine their influences on subsequent writers.
Analyze, compare, evaluate and assess works of short fiction.

Integrate primary and secondary sources in oral and written analyses of stories and their writers.

Formulate an aesthetic based on (or in response to) aesthetics represented in short stories.
Read and understand Shakespeare’s works as a result of reading a number of his plays.
Understand Shakespeare’s life and times as a result of reading related materials.
Understand the basic elements and language of drama.
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                                          Learning Outcomes
HIS=History
Consider the relevance of historical knowledge for the elucidation of contemporary human
experiences, and learn to identify persistent human concerns beneath the historical contingencies of
time and place.
Consider and evaluate the aims and theoretical problems of historical scholarship and of those
social sciences, (e.g. archeology, anthropology) most useful in reconstructing and understanding
past civilizations.

Examine, judge, and synthesize historical information about the following: evidence of and theories
about the life of homo sapiens in the prehistoric period; early civilizations in Mesopotamia, Egypt,
India, and China; the various societies that thrived on the invasion of early civilizations; the religious
innovations of the ancient Hebrews; the political, cultural, and scientific developments of early and
classical Greek civilization and of the Hellenistic age; the political and cultural achievements of
ancient Roman civilization, and the development of Christianity in the Roman Empire; the cultural,
political, and religious traditions of ancient China and Japan; the teachings of Mohammed, the rise
of Islam, and the development of Arabic culture; the religious, political, and artistic developments in
the Christian culture of western Europe during the Middle Ages, and the challenges to that culture
presented by the social, political, and institutional changes experienced in the fourteenth and
fifteenth centuries CE.
Develop familiarity with the sequence and import of key historical events and key figures in early
American history and use that knowledge as a foundation for analysis and interpretation of various
historical themes.

Explicate major historical themes of the 16th and 17th centuries such as European expansion,
decimation of American native peoples, resource exploitation, ethnic and religious conflicts, the
African diaspora, the rise of European imperialism and the first waves of European immigration.

Explicate major historical themes of the 18th century before the American Revolution such as the
Enlightenment in America, the Great Awakening, nascent capitalism, the slave trade, the movement
westward and northward of the frontier and the rise of an American consciousness.
Explicate major historical themes from the Revolution to the Civil War, including American
expansion across the continent and American trade across the oceans, early industrialization,
urbanization, and capitalism, the rise of King Cotton, the great waves of European immigration, the
advent of reform movements and populist political parties, and the growth of human freedoms and
democracy between the wars.

Discuss the shaping roles of climate, geography, disease and food sources in early American history.
Evaluate and use primary and secondary sources and material culture to develop patterns and
themes in history.
Analyze modern presentations of historical events for evidence of accuracy or bias, motivation and
agenda.
Develop appropriate theses and narratives from an assemblage of historical evidence.
Develop familiarity with the sequence and import of key historical events and key figures in
American history from the Civil War to the present and use that knowledge as a foundation for
analysis and interpretation of various historical themes.
Explicate the major historical themes of the 19th century, paying particular attention to
Reconstruction, Industrialization, Western migration and settlement, and the emergence of the U.S.
as a world power.

Explicate the major historical themes of the 20th century, such as the Progressive Movement and
the New Deal, the Great Depression, World War II, the Civil Rights movement, the Cold War, the
emergence of corporate power and influence, and the growth of an information society.
Critically evaluate primary sources for historical significance and importance.
Analyze secondary sources for structure, evidence use and historiographical significance.
Analyze historical evidence for patterns and new understandings.
Assemble evidence to form new interpretations and theses.
Appraise more clearly the foundations of our contemporary society by studying and analyzing
historical developments during and after the Renaissance.
Identify and evaluate the historical struggles that produced the modern individual, modern state,
modern science, and modern politics.

Examine, judge, and synthesize historical information about the following: the religious, social,
economic, and political order of the late medieval world and the challenges posed to that order in
the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries; the political and cultural developments in Italy in the
fifteenth and sixteenth centuries; the end of the religious unity of western Christendom after the
success of the Protestant Reformation, and the development of competing Catholic and Protestant
cultures; the rise of the modern territorial state in the aftermath of the wars prompted by the
Reformation; the intellectual changes from Copernicus to Newton that established modern science;
the intellectual and cultural program of the Enlightenment in the eighteenth century; the
development of modern political theory emphasizing natural rights, utilitarianism, and democracy;
the causes and consequences of the French Revolution; the Industrial Revolution and its early
economic and social consequences.
Trace and analyze the development of European contemporary economic, political, and
international order over the past two centuries.

Evaluate both the historical forces and the human choices that have shaped the modern world.
Identify choices that may be possible in our own efforts to resolve problems and alleviate present
dangers.
Examine, judge, and synthesize historical information about the following: the development and
influence of the Industrial Revolution, and of the legacy of the French Revolution in the early 19th
century; the conflicting political ideologies of conservatism, liberalism, and radicalism throughout
the nineteenth century as well as the rise of socialism, especially Marxism; the spread of
nationalism, and its effect on relations among the Great Powers; the great increase in scientific and
technological knowledge during the nineteenth century, the effects of this knowledge on European
power and, hence, on the spread of European imperialism; the political and military rivalries among
the European powers that led to the outbreak of World War I; the course and consequences of
World War I, especially as demonstrated by the Russian Revolution; the development of new
political movements after World War I, especially communism and fascism; the rise of totalitarian
states, and the challenge they posed to liberal democracies; the factors contributing to World War
II, the concentration camps, the Holocaust; the Cold War and the Atomic Age. the deconstruction of
European imperialism and the rise of the Third World after World. War II; the radical transformation
of social life and life-styles during the second half of the twentieth in Europe and the European
world, especially as this transformation effected questions of gender and race; the end of the Cold
Identify and explain major events of New England history.
Analyze these events in light of the political, economic, and social forces that shaped New England’s
history.
Discuss and evaluate the role of New England in our nation’s history.
Relate historical developments, themes, and issues to contemporary regional developments and
issues.
Demonstrate research skills using primary and secondary sources and apply knowledge to
successfully complete historical research.
Explain the principal political, economic, social and cultural forces that shaped the historic
development of a particular civilization.
Analyze the political, economic, social and cultural forces that shaped the historic development of a
particular civilization with regard to: a. their interrelationship and interdependence over time; b.
their relative impact on the development of the civilization; c. their continued presence and
influence in the contemporary world.
Identify the central challenges and opportunities confronting a particular civilization in the
contemporary world and in the future
Analyze and evaluate the influence of historic forces (political, economic, social, and cultural) on the
current and future condition and development of a particular civilization.
Evaluate other assessments of the contemporary condition and future prospects of the civilization
and compare them to one's own assessment.
Relate chronologically the series of events leading up to and through World War II.
Identify key figures and their roles before, during, and after World War II.
Understand the economic, social, and military circumstances of the 1917-1945 period.
Be able to relate learned facts to present-day issues.
Develop a basic understanding of Vietnam history and culture.
Understand the attitudes of our leaders and the free world in the post World War II period.
Explain and evaluate the rationale for America’s stance in 1946.
Identify and describe the shifts that have occurred in the political and social milieu over the three
decades after World War II and analyze the reasons for these changes.
Demonstrate an understanding of the social, political and economic factors that bear upon conflicts
of this type (the Vietnam War).
Trace the inter-relationships between various groups of the Vietnam War era and explain the impact
of social processes on the political process.
Evaluate the treatment of Vietnam War veterans and the ensuing problems.
Analyze and critically reflect upon a specific aspect of the Vietnam War.
Describe the principal political, economic, social and cultural forces that defined 19th century
America.
Develop skills necessary for historical research
Critically evaluate the influence of various historical explanations on the differences in perspective
on significant 19th century themes, ideas, or events.
Using a wide variety of sources and perspectives, analyze a significant 19th century American social
or cultural event, theme, or idea and develop a cohesive explanation of how that theme, idea, or
event evolved into our contemporary experience.
Evaluate the significance of 19th century ideas in the 20th century and into the present.
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                                        Learning Outcomes
HLTC=Health Care
A general awareness that there are multiple explanations for health as well as illness and numerous
techniques to create and maintain health and stimulate healing.
Awareness of the scope and limitations of allopathic and alternative healing principles.
Ability to introduce and discuss alternative therapies in the health and healing process.
Familiarity with the assumptions presented in allopathic and alternative health focusing on the
integration of both methodologies.
Know and be able to apply the working terminology and theories of allopathic and
alternative health.
Demonstrate the ability to analyze the different theoretical views and concepts of allopathic and
alternative health.
Demonstrate the ability to analyze the evolution of allopathic and alternative health from a clutural
as well as a medical anthropological perspective.
Demonstrate the limitations as well as the possibilities of the theoretical and practical views of
allopathic and alternative health.
Demonstrate the ability to think about, write about, and discuss problems relating to allopathic and
alternative health options in an informed manner.
Demonstrate an understanding of psychoneuriommunology via the mind modulation theory
influencing all body functions including the autonomic, endocrine, immune, and neuropeptide
systems.
Identify the forces (social, political, economic, legal, technical) and historic milestones in the
evolution of the contemporary U.S. health care system.
Recognize the forces currently impacting the structure and development of the U.S. health care
system and describe how those forces have shaped health care.
Define “managed care” and analyze the impact of managed care on the manner in which health and
human services are delivered.
Recognize the broader context in which health care providers provide services in order to more
effectively serve the needs of their clients.
Define the meaning of the term “vulnerable populations” and describe how the current health care
system addresses their health care needs.

Describe the impact of information technology on health care services and health service outcomes.
Understand the principles and tools of Continuous Quality Improvement, the dynamics of team
building, how to apply CQI their work and how to keep current in the field.
Explain the guiding principles of Continuous Quality Improvement.
List and explain behaviors/attitudes that contribute to/detract from team building.
Create flow charts, pareto charts, cause-and-effect charts, etc., as tools in reviewing and improving
work flow.
Design a plan to collect basic data to measure and assess outcomes.
Recognize common barriers to success and strategies to address barriers.
Explain and follow the Plan/Do/Study/Act cycle.
Remain current in Continuous Quality Improvement developments by locating and reviewing
relevant articles from professional and general publications.
Understanding the internal and external changes that occur with aging and their impact upon the
way a person functions and responds to daily life.
Analyze approaches to health promotion and wellness for older adults, regardless of potential
chronic conditions which may accompany aging.
Differentiate between the changes that occur within the normal aging process and those changes
that are the result of a disease.

Understand the myths regarding the process of aging and their dissimilarity to the realities.
Identify and compare the myths and the realities of the aging process.
Describe how a person’s lifestyle choices significantly impact the physical changes of the aging
process.
Demonstrate ability to discuss how the physiological changes that occur with aging affect
appearance, strength, stamina and resistance to disease.
Identify and explain factors that promote or help maintain good mental and physical health for older
adults.
Analyze the implications of a population that is biologically and psychologically aging at a much
slower rate than ever before in history, resulting in an increased life expectancy.
Compare and analyze the biological theories of aging.
Describe the conceptual framework of the case management model.
Differentiate case management practice from other health care roles within the U.S. health care
system.
Explain the position of case management in the context of U.S. Health care reform.
Define the philosophy, process, and goals of case management.
Explain the role of the case manager.
Describe the accountability of the case manager.
Identify the resources that are available to support case management practice.
Comprehend the various applications of case management practice within the health care delivery
and finance systems.
Relate the history and development of case management practice to health care reform.
List the resources available to those working in the field of case management.
Review the health care delivery system relative to levels and settings of care.
Elucidate the primary legal issues in case management practice.
Recognize the ethical framework for the case management model.
Contrast the process of case management to other managed care strategies.
Describe how the principles of case management achieve clinical and financial outcomes.
Formulate standards to promote collaborative and coordinated health care.
Describe the various methods of health care financing and reimbursement within the U.S. health
care system.
Explain the cause and effect of the various methods of health care financing and reimbursement at
both the macro (system) and micro (individual or institution) levels.
Demonstrate familiarity and competency with accounting and financial methods and with the tools
utilized in the financing and reimbursement of healthcare.
Discuss the complex interrelationships between the various mechanisms of health care financing
and reimbursement and the delivery of services within the U.S. Health Care System.
Demonstrate analysis of important dilemmas in health care such as (but not limited to) patient
rights, health care worker integrity, truth-telling in medicine, allocation/cost control and informed
consent.
Analyze cases from readings and learners’ work experience incorporating concepts from paradigm
cases.
Discuss and demonstrate how to maintain institutional, as well as individual integrity.
Apply interactive skills, theoretical knowledge and established criteria in a collaborative effort to
make and justify recommendations on specific cases.
Evaluate current legal/ethical issues by locating and reviewing relevant articles from professional
and general publications and the Internet.

Identify how and by whom legal and ethical issues in health care are decided in our society.
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                                          Learning Outcomes
HUMN=Humanities
Define "humanities" and "technology"--focusing on shifting nuances and connotations of those
terms in historical context.
Analyze the arguments of both proponents and critics of technological change.
Examine and analyze works of literature, philosophy, and social criticism in which the critique of
technology is the primary dialectic.

Explore and understand diverse personal, ethical, and aesthetic principles expressed by
contemporary artists and philosophers in response to various facets of technological change.
Develop and articulate a personal stance regarding the major contemporary issues raised by
modern technology and scientific discovery.

Examine and define popular culture, particularly in contrast to traditionally identified high culture.
Acquire and apply the basic vocabulary and concepts of cultural analysis.
Acquire and apply an analytical language or lexicon for cultural analysis.
Examine and evaluate the theories and approaches of major cultural critics in terms of connecting
underlying values to vehicles of popular culture.
Conduct a field study of various phenomena of popular culture—such as shopping malls, video
arcades, text messaging—with extensive notes and historical research.

Analyze in writing various popular culture artifacts, activities, or media in terms of what these
phenomena communicate about the values inherent in the culture from which they evolved.
Demonstrate an understanding of central theological and philosophical issues particular to each
religion.
Demonstrate familiarity with specific terminology of individual religions.
Identify cultural aspects of religious experience.
Compare and contrast theological and philosophical concepts of comparative religions.

Identify philosophers associated with each of the major philosophical perspectives on ethics.
Explain the basic tenets of major ethical perspectives including relativism, hedonism, stoicism,
utilitarianism, Christian ethics, deontology, and virtue theory.
Compare and contrast the historical development and interrelations among the various ethical
perspectives.
Analyze how different ethical perspectives can be applied to evaluate contemporary ethical
dilemmas.
Consider modern perspectives like feminist ethics and environmental ethics and multicultural
perspectives like Islamic or Buddhist ethics.
identify and critically evaluate one's own ethical principles in the context of ordinary experience and
personal choices.

Have an understanding of the relationship between the human condition and the humanities.
Reason logically and critically about questions and connect them to one's own life; and understand,
interpret and express ideas clearly and effectively in oral and written presentation.
Define concepts and principles central to philosophy.
Explain philosophical questions and their importance.
Analyze arguments presented by philosophers.
Compare and contrast positions of different philosophers.
Debate with others issues of philosophical relevance.
Summarize arguments and positions of one's own and of others.
Identify the causes of deafness and implications on language development.

Create a timeline highlighting key events in the history of deafness and American Sign Language.
Examine the different philosophies of education for the Deaf.
Compare and contrast the differences between American Sign Language, Pidgin Sign Language,
Signed English and English.
Demonstrate expressively the differences between American Sign Language, Pidgin Sign Language,
and Signed English.
Demonstrate expressively 500 ASL vocabulary words, concepts or idioms.
Recognize receptively 500 ASL vocabulary words, concepts or idioms.
Analyze significant issues encountered as Deaf and hearing cultures interact, e.g. eye contact,
mainstreaming, etc.

Discuss the implications of cochlear implants on education, Deaf Culture, and the Deaf Community.
Choose a piece of music or literature and present it using ASL concepts and vocabulary.
Compare and contrast the life and educational experiences of three deaf individuals to develop a
deeper understanding of the Deaf Community.

Explore the concept of identity as it relates to Hard of Hearing individuals and their deafness.
Independently observe or interview a member of the Deaf Community or a professional in the field
of deafness.
Expressively demonstrate 750 ASL vocabulary words, phrases, concepts and/or idioms in
conversation.
Receptively recognize 750 ASL vocabulary words in phrases, concepts and/or idioms.
Complete an educational project designed to increase the hearing community’s awareness and
understanding of Deaf Culture.
Write and speak in [Spanish] using vocabulary related to one's immediate world and other topics of
general interest.
Formulate sentences using [Spanish] verbs in the present, past, and future tenses.
Express basic ideas and wishes in [Spanish] through speaking in spontaneous situations.
Explore elements of [Spanish]-speaking cultures and discuss cultural differences and similarities with
other cultures in the United States.
Gain proficiency in the comprehension of spoken and written [Spanish].
Write and use numbers in in Spanish in both the formal and informal approach.
Write, speak and understand [Spanish] vocabulary related to foods, weather, technology, and other
topics of general interest.

Use regularly conjugated Spanish verbs appropriately in two past tenses (preterite and imperfect).
Reinforce the use of the present tense and the expression ir a plus infinitive as a substitute for the
future tense in Spanish.

Express complex ideas and wishes in [Spanish] about oneself and others in authentic situations.
Identify different [Spanish] accents and their particular intonation and idiosyncrasies.
Explore elements of [Spanish]-speaking cultures and geography at an intermediate level.

Build on basic proficiency of spoken and written Spanish to achieve an intermediate level of fluency.
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IDIS        Lower

IDIS       Lower

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IDIS       Lower
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                                        Learning Outcomes
IDIS=Interdisciplinary Studies
 Explore and discuss the culture, norms, practices, and terminology that characterize higher
education.

Demonstrate comprehension of readings on diverse topics at increasing levels of complexity.
Write clear and precise goal statements.
Distinguish among the modes of summary, opinion, and analysis.
Investigate information sources appropriate to college learning and responsibly document research
gleaned from those sources.
Accurately assess and demonstrate quantitative reasoning capabilities through real-world problem-
solving.
Become an informed consumer of research literature.
Write in discipline-appropriate research modes, including APA style.
Reflect on research ethics; discuss both historical and recent examples.

Demonstrate an understanding of the requirements for safeguarding human research participants.
Explore quantitative research design, methods and analysis.
Explore qualitative research design, methods and analysis.
Identify the role of program evaluation in the social/behavioral sciences and education.
Generate an appropriate research question, determine the corresponding research method(s), and
recognize the inherent epistemological relationship.
Generate a viable research proposal.
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                                          Learning Outcomes
INST=Instructional
Gain a knowledge of the relevance of one's experiences to the work environment.
Acquire a knowledge of how the training role fits within different organizations.
develop knowledge and skills related to involvement in the work environment including taking
initiative to network, conducting interviews and being interviewed, and promoting their own
capabilities and assets in field settings.

Acquire knowledge of career relevance, realities and opportunities with regard to related training in
a particular industry, including range of salary, benefits and other compensation.
Demonstrate professionalism and standards of ethics while working in a field setting.
Compare and contrast the principles of major theories of learning and cognition and how they relate
to adult learners.
Explain the development of cognitive processes throughout adulthood.

Provide a rationale for instructional strategies based on specific cognitive and/or learning principles.
Formulate and articulate a personal philosophy of adult education informed by principles and
theories of adult learning.
Incorporate one's personal philosophy of learning in the design of instructional strategies for
teaching in a variety of learning environments.
Analyze various instructional strategies and their relationship to learning styles, other individual
differences, and experiential learning.
Compare and contrast the characteristics of instructor-centered versus learner-centered teaching
and their effectiveness in promoting active learning, collaborative learning, self-direction and
reflection by learners.
Explain the importance of critical reflection of both learners and teachers for personal and
professional development.
Reflect on how issues of race, gender, disabilities, class, age and sexual orientation influence
teaching and learning.
Analyze classroom assessment techniques and how they correspond to various instructional
strategies used in teaching adults.
Discuss future direction for research and practice in teaching and learning in adulthood.
Identify and explain the forces which are making it necessary for the workplace to become a
learning workplace.
 Trace the history of workplace learning in the United States..
Define what is meant by the term "learning organization," and examine the major themes that have
emerged in the field.
Describe and evaluate the full continuum of the kinds and levels of learning that are presently
incorporated in one or more major workplaces.
Outline the major components of the training and development function within selected
organizations.
Illustrate the ways in which adult learning and development theory inform the design and practice
of selected workplace learning environments.
Research and describe "best practice" in workplace learning within an industry or field with which
the participant is familiar.
Explain the "global" dimension of learning organizations that identify themselves as players in this
arena.
Demonstrate the elements of an instructional design process.

Illustrate the role instructional design plays in developing effective interactive learning systems.

Compare and contrast various interactive learning systems by examining their intended use in the
classroom and/or how they can be used to produce multimedia instructional content.
Explain how an interactive learning tool could enhance or detract from an androgogical strategy
while developing instruction.
Design and develop a comprehensive Instructional Design Project plan for a real or hypothetical
training/educational program that incorporates an instructional design process and integrates
interactive learning theory and systems as appropriate.

Develop and apply criteria to evaluate interactive learning systems based on best practices.

Analyze current trends in instructional design and interactive learning educational technology
Understand the training role and function within the organization.
Integrate and apply their education and training knowledge, skills, and methods to a specific work
setting.
Acquire an experientially based knowledge foundation to inform and guide future career choices in
the education and training field.
Demonstrate professionalism and standards of ethics while working in a training capacity.

Understand the federal legislation governing the protection of human participants in research.
Apply principles of adult learning and development to the program development process.

Examine and evaluate alternative program development models for a given training need.

Integrate and apply concepts of program development and learning in an area of professional
interest by developing a learning experience that includes: Needs assessment; Learning outcomes;
Types and sequencing of skills; Learner characteristics; Appropriate instructional strategies;
Formative evaluation and revision of design and/or materials
Create, assemble, and test instruction.

Determine an evaluation strategy that is appropriate to the program and its intended outcomes.
Develop a metacognition self-reflection that facilitates the learner’s work and evaluates it against
best practices in program learning and development.
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                                         Learning Outcomes
MATH=Mathematics
Select appropriate approaches and methods, such as logic, set theory, estimation and proportional
reasoning, to solve problems.
Assess reasonableness of answers, identify alternatives and select the best solutions.

Extract quantitative data for a given situation from different types of mathematical models.
Translate word problems into their symbolic representations.

Use mathematical modeling to solve application problems symbolically, numerically and graphically.
Use probability to make inferences and informed decisions.
Organize data and make predictions about real-world situations using statistical methods and
models.
Recognize and demonstrate the use of best practices in design of experiments including sampling
procedures and data collection methods.
Construct and interpret basic data visualization techniques, such as frequency distributions, bar
charts, histograms, boxplots, scatterplots, and time series.
Compute and evaluate measures of central tendency and dispersion including means, medians and
modes; and variance, standard deviations, z-scores, and percentiles.
Perform and interpret a correlation and a linear regression analysis.
Identify and apply basic probability rules and characteristics of discrete and continuous probability
distributions to solve and interpret real-world problems.
Explain the concepts of confidence interval and statistical significance based on comprehension of
the underlying principles of probability theory.
Explain how sample statistics and sampling distributions are used to estimate population
parameters and draw inferences.
Construct and interpret confidence intervals.
Formulate and perform hypothesis testing in real-world situations.

Using real-world data, perform and interpret tests such as t-tests and one-way analysis of variance.
Analyze and demonstrate an understanding of current ethical standards that pertain to the use of
statistical methods, data, and research results.

Apply algebraic notation, using symbols and operations in solving linear equations and inequalities.
Use factoring to solve linear and quadratic equations.
Apply the quadratic formula to solve polynomial equations.
Analyze and evaluate complex numbers and equations involving complex numbers.
Demonstrate knowledge of elementary properties of functions.
Find and interpret the inverse of a function.
Graph polynomial functions and graph rational functions.
Solve exponential and logarithmic equations.
Graph exponential and logarithmic functions.
Apply exponential and logarithmic functions to applied problems involving processes of growth and
decay.
Construct and use linear and quadratic models and systems to solve application problems.
Write equations for conic sections.
Graph conic sections, including circles, parabolas, and ellipses.
Define a function verbally, numerically, visually and algebraically as well as define and find its
domain and range.
Perform operations on functions such as: addition, multiplication, division, composition and finding
inverse functions.

Graph and specify the algebraic characteristics of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential,
logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, both by hand and by graphing calculators.
Identify the characteristics of the conic sections, both graphically and algebraically.
Manipulate and evaluate algebraic, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions.
Employ mathematical modeling techniques to solve problems using polynomial, rational, radical,
exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions.
Solve problems involving the intermediate value theorem, the division algorithm of polynomials, the
remainder theorem, the factor theorem, and zeros of a polynomial.
Solve problems involving systems of equations and inequalities in two unknowns.
Interpret and define the six trigonometric functions, in terms of both right triangles and the unit
circle.
Graph trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, with and without the aid of a graphing
calculator.
Verify and apply trigonometric identities and formulas and apply them to solve trigonometric
equations and word problems.
Gain skill in the use of polar coordinates, specifically perform conversions between polar and
Cartesian coordinates and sketch graphs of polar curves in both Cartesian and polar coordinates
both by hand and using technology.
Acquire a base knowledge of the rich history of geometry.
Use experimentation and inductive reasoning to construct geometric concepts, discover geometric
relationships, and formulate conjectures.

Employ deductive logic to justify conclusions concerning geometric ideas and relationships.
Create constructions with straightedge and compass, dynamic geometry software and other
mathematical tools.
Identify and describe geometric objects and relationships among various geometric objects, such as
angles, polygons, side lengths, perimeters, areas and volumes.
Utilize measurement tools, formulas, and techniques to explore geometric relationships and solve
problems.
Describe and classify relationships among types of two- and three-dimensional objects using their
defining properties.
Recognize and apply the Pythagorean Theorem.
Use the language and operations of algebra to explore geometric relationships with coordinate
geometry.
Recognize and use symmetry and transformational geometry.
Deduce properties of figures using transformations and using coordinates.
Identify congruent and similar figures using transformations.
Explore the historic development of calculus.

Develop and express an appreciation of the development of calculus from the limit concept.
Demonstrate the various applications of basic calculus.
Develop and strengthen both written and verbal skills for communication of mathematical ideas and
solutions.
Demonstrate proficiency in using the graphing calculator to explore mathematical concepts and to
solve problems in calculus.
Build and strengthen connections between the calculus concepts taught in the course and NCTM
(National Council of Teachers of Mathematics) and Advanced Placement Standards based concepts
taught at the high school level.
Accurately solve problems requiring calculus and express the problems and solutions graphically,
numerically, analytically, and verbally.
Apply derivatives for the Mean Value Theorem, total curve sketching, optimization problems, and
related rates.

Apply integration for solving differential equations, finding general anti-derivatives, computing exact
areas under curves and between curves, finding the average value of functions, and using numerical
integration for approximating areas under curves of unknown functions and practical applications.
Demonstrate pattern recognition with integrands and change of variables and of the limits of
integration by u-substitution.

Follow the development of mathematics from early number systems to the invention of calculus.
Survey the development and use of methods of computation.

Describe the development of various areas of mathematics within and across various civilizations.

Give examples of significant applications of mathematics to commerce, science, the arts and society.
Recognize the difference between formal and intuitive mathematics.
Compare and contrast the mathematics of various different civilizations: their conception and use of
mathematics, and how the historical conditions of those civilizations affected and were affected by
mathematics.
Give examples of how the interpretation of historical facts influenced the development and
interpretation of mathematics
Research historical questions in mathematics and present conclusions to others.
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                                     Learning Outcomes
MGMT=Management
Articulate an understanding and appreciation of the systems approach as it is applied to
human and organizational behavior.
Identify and explain the role of personality and perception affecting behavior in
organizations.
Compare and contrast approaches to building employee motivation and performance.
Discuss the importance of groups in organizations and how they can influence
organizational decision-making, efficiency, and effectiveness.

Examine the influence of organizational power and politics on managerial decision making.
Describe the importance of effective communication within organizations.
Evaluate the role and effectiveness of leadership within organizations.
Identify and analyze the impact of globalization on individual, group and systemic
functioning within organizations.
Apply ethical decision-making to business practices and principles associated with
organizational behavior.
Describe and value the scope, role and function of effective managers in diverse settings in
a variety of sectors.
develop and articulate one's own management style and assess how one's strengths and
weaknesses impact others and the organization.
Identify key management theories and trace their evolution to current management theory
and practice.
Compare and contrast current management theories, including their evolution to current
management practices.
Demonstrate the ability to work as a member of a team toward achieving a predetermined
goal.
Explain four traditional management functions: planning, organizing, leading and
controlling.
assess how planning, organizing, leading and controlling are supported by team building,
coaching, communication, presentation and ethical reasoning.
Apply the four traditional management functions to diverse global contexts.
Be familiarized with the concepts and ideas which comprise the study of public
administration.
Be able to assess the underlying assumptions about bureaucracies and their relationship to
democratic government.
Be able to recognize the complexities of developing, managing, and assessing public sector
services.
Be able to define public administration.
Be able to identify and discuss alternative bases of organizational theory.

Be able to identify and discuss alternative public sector personnel procedures and policies.
Be able to identify and discuss qualities and techniques of leadership, as well as the limits of
leadership.
Be able to identify and discuss alternative budgeting processes and their applications.

Be able to identify and discuss areas of change in public administration: Planning,
Management information systems, Indepartmental committees, Study commissions and
task forces, Consultants, Limits on administrative discretion, Issues in administrative law

Be able to identify problems with and changes in the role of politics in the bureaucracy.

Explain the financial planning process and the impact of decisions made in the process.
Differentiate the purposes of personal income statements, statement of cash flow, and
balance sheet.
Generate individual and/or family financial statements including projections 12 months into
the future.

Discuss the impact of inflation and the time value of money in personal financial decisions.
Explain the lending process and considerations necessary for making informed decisions
regarding establishing credit and borrowing.
Evaluate housing decisions regarding the advantages and disadvantages of home ownership
versus renting.
Describe and evaluate the components of personal risk management and determine
appropriate strategies for different life situations.
Compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of selected investment
strategies/choices.
Explain the impact of taxes on personal finances.
identify and evaluate the essential considerations in retirement and estate planning.
Evaluate the credibility of financial services and instruments.
explain the importance of being a smart consumer and the techniques and tools that smart
consumers use.
Demonstrate the ability to properly record financial transactions.

Distinguish between and describe the four different financial statements (balance sheet,
income statement, statement of cash flow and statement of shareholder equity).
Create financial statements.
Identify and evaluate the key components of the financial statements.

Calculate key financial ratios such as the current ratio, return on equity, and profit margin.
Summarize the overall financial condition of an organization, relative to previous periods,
competitors, and industry averages.
Identify the ethical issues inherent in the practice of accounting and apply those principles
to business practices.
Understand the importance, nature and scope of contemporary marketing and the
marketing environment.
Describe the various methods of market research and how they are used to identify market
opportunities.
Identify the various aspects of strategic marketing and how they can be used to
differentiate products and services.
Compare the various tactics used by marketers (marketing mix) and describe their
application in satisfying customer needs.
Describe and compare methods used to control, evaluate and improve marketing initiatives
that lead to product or service success.
Define marketing ethics, consumerism and social responsibility and discuss their affect on
marketing strategies.
Discuss and examine the role of the Internet in expanding and creating market
opportunities.
Examine organizational structures, missions and values.
Assess interviewing,selection, and retention techniques.
Analyze performance evaluations and strategies for giving performance feedback.
Recognize and apply specific motivation techniques.
Selectively analyze an organization’s concerns relative to the following: workplace safety,
training & development needs, human resource information, systems, compliance and
employment law, strategic planning, employee compensation and benefits, organizational
climate, communication techniques/effectiveness, leadership style, administering/managing
change, union activity.
Identify, research, and critically analyze contemporary management issues developments
for their impact on the contemporary business environment.
Examine the effect on an organization of current external driving forces such as
globalization and technological innovation.
Examine the effect on an organization of current internal driving forces such as
empowerment, team building, diversity and changing organizational structure.
Apply new knowledge of contemporary management issues to the practice of managerial
decision making.
Understand the behaviors essential to productive and positive work groups and participate
as an effective member.
Research a topic relating to one of the managerial issues faced by an organization
identified and produce a written project (white paper or proposal).
Describe the history of leadership theory and trace its evolution to current developments in
the field.
Explore current leadership models in the context of contemporary leadership practice.
Recognize the potential of leaders as agents of change and vision in organizations.
Use current leadership models as a framework for analyzing leaders within their
organizational culture.
Explore the mentor – protégé relationship by interviewing leaders in the community.
Experience the leadership role among peers.
Identify personal leadership strengths and areas for self-development and develop them to
lead effectively in various circumstances.
Trace the forces from inside and outside the organization that have transformed the role of
human resources in the organization.
Use current human resource function models as a framework for analyzing human
resources managers within their organizational culture.
Identify and propose strategies to meet the development needs of internal organizational
constituents by serving as a problem-solver and process and workforce consultant to
employees and management.
Develop skills to be an effective agent of change.
Negotiate between employees and employers for maximum benefit to improve employee
and organizational performance.
Experience team-building, collaboration and conflict management roles by developing and
facilitating group activities.
Identify personal team building and leadership strengths and their uses in various
circumstances; identify areas for self-development.
Identify key indicators and sources to research the environment and anticipate changes in
laws and regulations relevant to the organization.
Demonstrate strategies for addressing a wide range of various employment laws and
employment issues using an analytical approach.
Assess the capabilities and role of internal resources and know when it is appropriate to
consult outside council.
Communicate to senior management the need for, and budgetary implications of,
compliance with employment laws.
Experience the role of negotiator among and between employees, employer, and other
constituencies.

Identify necessary employee and staff training programs that address workplace policies.
Identify and manage outside resources and expertise necessary to perform certain training,
negotiating, or other specialized tasks.

Analyze the reasons for and the nature of increasing workforce diversity and globalization.
Identify and evaluate the issues confronting managers that result from increasing workforce
diversity and globalization.
Analyze and debate the ethical and business-related reasons why managers should address
diversity issues.
Explore the meaning and nature of oppression and discrimination in the workplace.
Identify, examine, and evaluate strategies for effective alleviation of discrimination and
harassment as they relate to issues as age, gender, race, sex, and disabilities.
Reflect upon and examine one's personal biases and recognize how these may impact one's
managerial effectiveness.

Describe how vital financial markets and intermediaries are to a well-functioning economy.
Discuss the functions and aggregate measurements of money in our economy.
Demonstrate increased understanding of the lending process.
Summarize the history of banking and banking regulation in the U.S.
Review the major functions of the Federal Reserve System.
Discuss the increased interdependence of world economies and monetary policies.
Use supply and demand framework to analyze the bond market and interest rates, and
differentiate between current yields and rates of return.
Critique the management of a commercial bank, including: asset, liability, liquidity, and
capital management, as well as the management of credit and interest rate risks.
Evaluate the contributing reasons for the relative decline of commercial banks, as well as
the financial intermediaries gaining in importance.
Discuss recent changes in U.S. banking laws and regulations, as well as the rationale for
changes.
Analyze monetary policy tools, targets and goals within the context of current economic
conditions.

Understand that there is a tradeoff between risk and return with financial investments.
Differentiate between different types of investments.
Describe the principles of asset allocation.
Accurately perform time value of money calculations, using formulas, financial tables,
financial calculators and/or financial spreadsheets.

Differentiate among and critically evaluate the large variety of investment literature,
including newspapers, periodicals, financial websites, prospectuses and annual reports.
Compare and contrast the major investment vehicles available today, including stocks,
bonds, money markets, and mutual funds.
Construct an asset allocation that is consistent with a given risk tolerance profile, target
return and time frame.
Select individual investments with the use of criteria such as investment objectives and
risk/reward profiles; historical, expected and required returns; fees and expenses, and
expected cash flows.
Calculate present and future values, payoff dates, payments, and rates of return using time
value of money techniques, in order to meet investment goals.

Relate the concepts reviewed in this course to current economic and investment news.
Calculate tax liabilities and after-tax returns, and discuss the impact that taxes and marginal
tax rates have on financial decision making.
Construct interest rates using an assumed risk free rate, as well as the risk premiums that
may apply.
Evaluate the pros and cons of the alternative forms of business organization and provide a
rationale for organizational decisions.
Identify investment risks and compare expected and historical rates of return to calculated
required rates of return.

Analyze financial statements and calculate financial ratios, in order to compare one period
to the next, as well as to compare a company to its industry averages and competitors.
Develop forecasted (pro-forma) financial statements, and determine assets required to
meet these forecasts.

Use cash flow analysis to construct a cash budget and analyze working capital components.

Analyze capital budgeting projects, including replacement and expansion decisions.
Formulate stock and bond valuations, using various models.

Determine a firm’s cost of capital, using its actual and/or stated optimal capital structure.
Demonstrate the ability to clearly communicate financial information to a broad spectrum
of audiences.
Identify the ethical issues inherent in the financial management of a business.
Analyze and evaluate one's personal capacity for entrepreneurship.

Explore issues and opportunities unique to starting a new venture, buying an existing
organization or franchise, forming a family business, or opening a home-based business.
Identify regional and federal sources of information to aid small businesses
Identify a new venture opportunity and formulate a business concept .
Identify trends that impact the business concept that has been selected.
Conduct quantitative market research to assess the demand for a proposed business’
product(s) and/or service(s).
Estimate costs and breakeven and develop a preliminary feasibility analysis to determine
whether the business is worth pursuing.
Analyze various sources of start-up capital and determine the best strategy to pursue
funding for the proposed venture.
Identify legal issues that could affect the proposed venture and determine the most
appropriate legal form for the business.
Construct a marketing plan for a proposed venture.
Formulate forecasted financial statements and cash budgets for a three-year period and
compare business ratios with industry standards.

Consolidate the above information into a formal business plan suitable for investor review.
Discuss the history and evolution of advertising over the past 100 years.
Integrate an understanding of advertising as part of the marketing concept/creative
strategy

Analyze and adapt advertising plans, compare and evaluate various media, and identify
consumer segments within the comprehensive process of advertising management

Explore the impact of the economic, social, and regulatory environments on advertising
Apply consumer behavior and related theories to practices in the field.
Define professional/organizational roles and terminology applicable to the management of
advertising and promotion.
Debate the moral issues and ethical dilemmas inherent in advertising.
An understanding of the evolution of consumer behavior as a discipline.
Knowledge of consumer behaviors function in developing marketing strategy.
Exposure to key psychological, sociological, and anthropological concepts as they relate to
consumer behavior.
Exposure to the research process and function in the context of marketing.
Understand the evolution of the marketing concept and the reasons for the need for a
market/consumer.
Knowledge of learning theory, motivation theory, perception principles as they relate to
consumer behavior.
Knowledge of attitude formation and attitude change.
Understand the effect of social class, reference groups and opinion leaders on consumer
decision making
Describe the segmentation concept and identify the descriptive bases for consumer
segmentation.
Understand the effect of key consumer behavior variables on the marketing mix. Analyze
marketing mix strategy for innovative products.
Relate the decision making process to specific purchase situations.

Design a primary research instrument for investigating a specific consumer behavior topic
Describe the characteristics of functional and dysfunctional organizations.

Articulate the nature and impact of personality dynamics, group dynamics and system
dynamics in an organizational context.
Practice mentoring and accountability partnering processes.
Organize, present, and evaluate a training module on a topic relevant to effecting positive
change in organizations.
Learn and apply the consultation process with regard to individual, group, management,
system and organizational issues and problems.
Design a training manual composed of resources (information, models, materials, tools and
strategies) that are relevant to addressing change in organizations.
Demonstrate knowledge, methods and expertise in the following interventive processes:
problem-solving, conflict resolution, team building, strategic planning and action planning.
Employ the skill of process observation in order to serve as a resource in organizational
consultation.
Describe and apply the principles of effective group leadership and process in an
organizational context.
Compare and contrast conflict management styles using theoretical frameworks.

Evaluate the impact of different conflict management styles on situations and individuals.
Diagnose situations and apply theory to analyze conflict through case studies and personal
experience.
Describe and evaluate the impact of skills and attitudes on management of conflict, with a
focus on collaborative conflict resolution.

Distinguish positions from interests, reframe conflicts as mutual problems to be resolved.
Employ skills in communicating, listening, and using feedback in prevention and/or
management of conflict.
Describe classical database theory and the conceptual structures that underlie database
management systems
Demonstrate a working knowledge of the function, role, and structure of database systems
from start to finish.
Design, build, modify, normalize, and generate queries (QBE) on database tables.
Design and generate reports for a variety of functional areas of business and facilitate end user
access.
Set up interfaces with in-house or point of sale database software.
Understand data security and integrity including back up strategies.
Develop familiarity with both small office database systems (ie.MS Access) and with a "big
system" database (Oracle).
Describe the role of systems analyst within the organization.
Discuss the skills required to conceptualize an information system.
Successfully complete the initial analysis, problem definition, requirements definition,
process modeling and design phases of a realistic information systems case.
Communicate the nature and requirements of the information system to all colleagues,
regardless of their technology orientation or knowledge, through written and verbal
proposals.
Demonstrate the skills required to translate user requirements into concepts understood by
designers/technicians.
Use collaborative tools and techniques to function as an effective member of the
information technology team in order to achieve system objectives. Of particular
importance is the use of Web-based technologies to participate in team activities.
Complete limited prototyping and programming associated with a project.
Design high level database requirements for the information system, and develop the
analytical skills necessary to evaluate vendor designs. These requirements include, but are
not limited to, conceptual design and logical design documents resulting in entity-
relationship diagrams and identification of key attributes.
Present recommendations and findings in a public face-to-face or online forum and
facilitate ensuing discussions.
Identify legal issues inherent in business operations.

Analyze the legal complexities inherent in the practice of ethical business management.
Describe how an issue travels through the legal process of administrative hearings, trials,
and appeals.
Explain the levels of the court system and their interaction with business and industry.
Recognize a challenge to one's own rights by individuals or corporations, as well as by the
government and identify the available means to assert and protect fundamental individual
rights.
Distinguish the intent and effect of industry-specific legislation, e.g., mining, music, e-
commerce, and the internet.
Explain how legislative changes at all levels (federal, state, and local) can affect business
decision policy.
Apply one's understanding of legal issues to managerial contexts and ethics-related
business decisions.
Demonstrate critical insight into the ethical relationships among business, government, and
society.
Distinguish between legal and ethical issues in business and identify practices that may be
legal but unethical.
Evaluate the growing significance of globalization and analyze the forces affecting global
integration and global marketing.
Analyze and assess the global economic and trade environment including such forces as
balance of payments, international finance, the role of international rade organizations (i.e.,
World Trade Organization, World Bank, NAFTA, etc).
Compare and contrast the differences in the political, social, cultural and legal
environments in which global marketing takes place and assess the impact of those factors
on the development of global marketing strategies.
Discuss global market opportunities by examining techniques of market research,
segmentation, positioning, and target market strategy options.
Develop global marketing strategies that include alternative product, pricing, promotion,
and distribution decisions in the formulation of a global marketing mix.
Evaluate methods of planning, leading, organizing, and controlling the implementation of
global marketing strategies.
Apply the concepts and principles of global marketing to specific situations by analyzing and
constructing solutions to case studies.
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POL       Lower

POL       Lower

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POL       Lower

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POL       Upper

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POL       Upper

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POL   Upper
                                          Learning Outcomes
POL=Political Science
Describe the historical and philosophical premises underlying the constitutional basis of American
politics and government.
Describe and analyze the purpose of separation of powers and checks and balances.
Explain how federalism accommodates the politics of states and a continental nation.
Identify the essential values contained in the Bill of Rights and their relationship to personal liberty
and civil rights in constitutional government.
Describe the electoral processes for staffing public offices and appraise the influence of the New
Hampshire Presidential primary on the national presidential election.
Explain and assess the role of interest groups and Political Action Committees in elections and in
national policy-making.
Apply systems modeling to the policy-making process and translate such a model to other decision-
making settings in and out of politics.
Describe the history and development of modern law.

Discuss the need for the social contract: lost freedoms in exchange for governmental protection.
Analyze the interrelationship between law and society and the impact of social change on
legislation.
Explore the Bill of Rights, the relativity of constitutional rights, and the balancing of the
government's interests against individual rights.
Outline the organization and structure of the law including U.S. federal and state governments,
courts and administrative agencies.
Analyze the effects of such categories as gender, race, culture, socioeconomic status, and religion
on law and litigation.
Describe the law-making process and the forces that influence law-making.
Compare and contrast three primary functions of law: dispute resolution, social control, and social
change.
Describe the international political, military, economic, social, and other contexts that affect U. S.
foreign relations.
Identify and describe the purposes of the major national and international governmental institutions
in the conduct of international relations.
Distinguish and evaluate roles and interests of non-governmental organizations, national and
international, in the conduct of foreign affairs.

Assess the challenges to the stability of the international system from trans-national terrorism.

Distinguish the enduring as well as transient national interests that U. S. foreign policy leaders must
address, showing how different theoretical frames for defining interests shape policy alternatives.
Examine the influence that leaders representing diverse interests - traditional (defense, diplomatic,
congressional) and non-traditional (labor, environmental, gender) exercise in foreign affairs
decisions.
Analyze how policy options are shaped by considerations of competing and conflicting interests:
past, present, and future, and available resources of the various players.
Contrast the various common power arrangements available to carry out policy, from unilateralism,
to alliances, to collective security arrangements.
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                                     Learning Outcomes
PSY=Psychology
Understand the historical development of Psychology as a discipline.
Explain the scientific method used in psychological research (such as Independent Variable,
Dependent Variable, hypothesis testing, and validity) and relate it to the formation of
theoretical models using examples from different specialty areas.
Develop library and citation skills to locate and report on professional research literature
using American Psychological Association (APA) guidelines.
Identify the components and functions of the central and peripheral nervous systems.
Explain the connection between biological processes in the brain and behavior, using
specific examples.
Relate sensory processes such as vision and hearing to perceptual events experienced by
individuals in a social context.
Describe the information processing model of cognitive processes as it relates to pattern
recognition, attention, memory, and problem solving.

Discuss the major theories of human development across the life span including issues such
as language acquisition, gender identity development, Piaget’s cognitive development,
Erikson’s psychosocial development, adolescence, adult transitions, and aging.
Illustrate the similarities and differences between Classical Conditioning, Operant
Conditioning, and Social Learning theory.
Describe the major Psychoanalytic, Behavioral, Cognitive, Trait, and Humanistic Personality
Theories, including Freud, Skinner, Bandura, Allport, Maslow, and Rogers.
Trace how Abnormal Psychology developed from Personality and Biological Psychology
theories and research. Discuss the impact of these theories on the definitions and
treatments of “abnormal” behavior.
Explain the processes by which social contexts and norms affect individual behavior (i.e.
conformity and obedience), attitudes (i.e. cognitive dissonance and stereotypes) and sense
of self (i.e. expectations and gender roles).
Apply one's understanding of Social and Biological Psychology to the issues of stress, health
and illness.
Explain the purpose of ethical standards of conduct for psychologists in their roles as
researchers and clinicians.
Explore professional opportunities related to psychology; identifying specific training
requirements, local employment opportunities, adherence to ethical standards, and
specialty area most utilized.
Identify and explain three major issues addressed by developmental theories, e.g., the role
of biology vs. the environment, the nature of change (qualitative vs. quantitative), and the
role of the individuals in their own development (active vs. passive).
Compare and contrast the world views from which developmental theories arise.
Identify major developmental theories including ethological, psychoanalytic, psychosocial,
behavioristic, social learning, and cognitive theories and compare them in light of their
basic principles and tenets.
Differentiate between the major research methods and techniques employed in the study
of development.
Identify and describe the major milestones in the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional
development of infants and children.
Summarize current research findings on factors that impact development, e.g., genetics,
nutrition, environmental stimulation, and human interaction.
Analyze the dynamic interaction between biological, psychological, sociocultural and
ecological factors and explain how they affect development.
Apply knowledge of child development in making recommendations for enhancing
development in various situations (e.g., family, child care, education, community).
Critically reflect on best practices to promote children’s development.
Demonstrate reflective learning skills and professional growth in the NAEYC Standards
through a written assignment.
Identify and describe the major theoretical perspectives on human development:
biological, biopsychosocial, cognitive, and learning theories.
Compare and contrast the paradigms and conceptual assumptions from which
developmental theories arise.
Compare and contrast the basic concepts of specific theorists such as Erikson, Piaget, and
Bowlby.
Identify and describe the major milestones in physical, cognitive, emotional, and social
development occurring in each period throughout the life span.
Describe the ecological system in which a developing person is embedded.
Discuss the dynamic interaction among biological, psychological, and social factors and their
contribution to development.
Describe and analyze the development and behavior of specific individuals using the
perspectives of developmental theories and research findings.
Explain the effects of culture, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status on various aspects of
development.

Articulate and discuss the ethical considerations and parameters that guide the conduct of
research and govern the use of research results in the field of human development.

Identify and explain major theories and basic principles of infant and toddler development.

Compare and contrast biological and environmental factors that influence development.
Articulate the major physical, cognitive and social milestones of infant and toddler
development.
Discuss the significance of the development of attachments and trust in infants, explain
factors that influence the development of attachment, and develop examples of
environments and interactions that are likely to promote secure attachments.
Describe the sensorimotor orientation of infants and toddlers and explain how it is their
primary path for learning.
Observe and record the physical, cognitive and social development of an infant and a
toddler and evaluate the quality of the environment for promoting development in these
domains.
Analyze the research regarding the significance of the development of autonomy in
toddlers.
apply principles of development in the design of a physical environment which will
maximize freedom to explore and learn.
Identify and share appropriate resources to support parents of infants and toddlers.
Critically reflect on best practices to promote children’s development.

Identify and explain three major issues addressed by developmental theories: e.g., the role
of biology vs. the environment (nature vs. nurture), the nature of change (qualitative vs.
quantitative), and the role of individuals in their own development (active vs. passive).
Compare and contrast the world views from which developmental theories arise.
Outline major developmental perspectives, including ethological, psychoanalytic,
psychosocial, behavioristic, social learning, and cognitive theories and compare them in
light of their basic principles and tenets.
Identify and explain basic research methods including experimental and correlational
methods.
Differentiate between cross-sectional and longitudinal research designs used to study
development and explain the strengths and weaknesses of each.
Identify and describe the major milestones in the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional
development of children and adolescents.
Summarize current research findings on factors that impact development: e.g., genetics,
nutrition, environmental stimulation, and human interaction.
Analyze the dynamic interaction among biological, psychological, sociocultural and
ecological factors and explain how they affect development.
Apply principles of development in analyzing selected child/adolescent behaviors.

Apply knowledge of child and adolescent development in making recommendations for
enhancing development in various situations: e.g., family, child care, education, community.
Evaluate the effectiveness of various learning and/or social environments for children and
adolescents in promoting development.
Discuss the importance of a mentoring relationship for improving the chance for at-risk
adolescents to succeed academically.
Apply principles of adolescent development in planning mentoring activities.
Describe and demonstrate effective communication and tutoring skills.
Discuss the importance of self-confidence for adolescents and develop strategies to
increase self-confidence.

Compare and contrast demographic variables such as gender, ethnicity, and socio-economic
status among adolescents and their needs, persistence, and success in school.
Describe challenges faced by first generation college students and articulate strategies that
mentors might use to help students overcome those challenges.
Discuss identity development in adolescents including gender identity and the socialization
factors that contribute to it.
Compare and contrast various pressures on girls and boys including peer pressure.
Describe how math anxiety can interfere with mathematics achievement in girls and devise
strategies to counteract its effects.
Reflect on why boys fail to succeed in school and discuss ways to support them.
Research and discuss factors that contribute to problems experienced by some adolescents
such as eating disorders, performance anxiety, depression, bullying, substance abuse,
sexual harassment and violence.
Describe ways to mentor middle school boys and girls to promote their well-being and
success.
Describe challenges faced by first generation college students and articulate strategies that
mentors might use to help students overcome those challenges.
Demonstrate a cognitive understanding of what has been the prevailing attitude toward
death and loss in our culture and how that is changing.

Identify the tasks required for healing from grief and give examples from their own personal
experience and a case study of some other person to illustrate understanding of the phases
and tasks and questions that need to be answered for healing to occur.
Identify and describe the emotional, physical, behavioral, cognitive and spiritual dimensions
that accompany each phase of the grief process.
Demonstrate awareness of the issues and tasks for children who are grieving.

Be familiar with funeral practices and options and be able to describe different rituals and
practices for marking endings(for divorce, death, moving, state of life changes, etc.)

Summarize some of the current issues and controversies in our culture about death and
dying (euthanasia, Aids, media coverage, violence, living wills, organ donation, suicide) etc.
Be able to think, discuss and write about the differences between grief and depression; and
some of the things that happen when grieving stops and is not completed. (“complicated
grief, or pathological grief”)
Examine the nature and role of theory and the use of the scientific method to organize,
test, and predict various aspects of personality.
Examine and understand the historical context, basic assumptions, hypothetical constructs
and relevant research supporting each theory of personality considered.
Describe and explain the structure, development, dynamics, and motivation of normal and
abnormal behavior using the Psychoanalytic, Cognitive, Behavioral/ Social Learning, Trait,
Humanistic, and Existential perspectives.
Describe and employ the findings from personality research to understand how the
purpose, underlying assumptions, and cultural context of each theory affect its content and
applications.
Apply personality theories and specific constructs to situations to improve an individual’s
understanding of self and others.
compare and contrast dynamics of and motivation for behavior from the perspective of
each theory of personality.

Describe and explain personality development according to each theoretical perspective.
Explore the interaction between personality and the situational factors in determining
behavior.
Demonstrate how personality assessment differs from personality research.
Determine the theoretical relevance of each theory to the helping process and identify the
various therapeutic methods that stem from each theory (e.g. free association, behavior
modification, rational emotive therapy, and person-centered therapy, etc.).
Differentiate between three general types of crises: Maturational crises (e.g., infancy,
adolescence, adulthood, old age) Situational crises (e.g., rape, divorce, physical illness,
natural disaster) Socio-cultural
Define a crisis state, identify the crisis origins, and analyze whether the primary
contributors are situational, social/cultural or maturational.
Explain the phases of a crisis event.
Describe crisis intervention techniques and methods and differentiate them from other
forms of psychotherapy.
Apply crisis planning to a case example with reference to its origins and its crisis
manifestations.

Compare and contrast a healthy grieving process with an incomplete or maladaptive one.
Differentiate between self-destructive and suicidal behaviors and recognize when
professional mental health treatment is needed.
Discuss the impact of violence or other trauma on vulnerable individuals.
Examine and evaluate the crisis plan of a social institution or a business in light of the
research in the field.

Describe community resources such as the Red Cross, domestic violence agencies, and
rescue squads which are key elements of a community’s ability to manage crisis events.
Design a plan for managing the stressors experienced by crisis workers to minimize
burnout.
Identify the key elements characteristic of a formal counseling relationship.
Identify the key concepts of major theories and illustrate how they correspond to their
developed techniques.
Describe an assessment process used to establish a working diagnosis.
Compare and contrast how several theorists would evaluate a case study.
Analyze research findings evaluating the effectiveness of therapeutic modalities.
Analyze how the requirements of major funding sources such as a school system or a
managed care company impact diagnostic decisions.
Examine several ethical dilemmas which counselors may encounter when working in a
human service agency.
Describe how counselors frequently have to manage the conflicting requests of the
individual client, the family system and outside influences.
Illustrate how the counselor needs to develop an effective level of self knowledge to be
able to make good use of this asset in the counseling process.
Discuss the meaning and uses of assessment in various fields.

Explain the differences between objective and subjective assessments and evaluations.
Compare and contrast the psychometric properties of assessment instruments, i.e.,
objectivity, reliability and validity, and how they influence the interpretation of assessment
data.
Explain basic statistical concepts used in testing including: measures of central tendency
and variability, e.g., mean, median, mode, range, and standard deviation.
Compare and contrast norm-referenced and criterion-referenced tests including an
explanation of normative data, e.g., normal curve, percentiles, z -scores, T -scores, and
stanines and discuss appropriate uses of each.
Use various types of observational methodology in assessment and discuss the usefulness
of each.
Examine and discuss how information from both formal and informal assessment measures
can be used to plan individualized programs.
Explain the importance of multifaceted approaches to both formative and summative
evaluation with particular attention to the relationship of outcomes to assessment and
evaluation
Analyze and explain possible interpretations of the testing and assessment data from case
studies of hypothetical individuals in order to begin to learn to synthesize information from
assessments.
Discuss the ethical and legal implications of assessment, including right to privacy, right to
know, informed consent, intellectual property rights, user qualifications, protection of test
materials, and confidentiality.
Articulate the differences between behavioral and cognitive theories of learning
Describe the relationship between cognitive and instructional theories and their application
in organizing for and preparing and presenting effective instruction.
Compare and contrast theories, principles and techniques of classroom management and
motivation.
Recognize individual differences and exceptionalities among students and maximize their
potential for learning.
Understand basic research methodology and appreciate the importance and usefulness of
empirical research to education.
Describe principles of assessment and evaluation of student learning
Articulate the role of the teacher in the teaching/learning environment
Apply principles of cognitive theory in one's own teaching strategies.
Utilize instructional theory in the development and implementation of instructional
material and in its delivery.
Develop specific classroom management strategies
Develop various motivational strategies and explain the learners who would benefit most
from them.
Discuss individual differences including those related to ethnicity, socioeconomic status,
gender and exceptionality in the teaching/learning environment.
Develop specific assessment strategies and measurement instruments for assessing student
learning.
Interpret standardized tests accurately and report the information effectively to parents
and school officials.
Facilitate students to be active in their own learning.
 Think critically about theories, research, and issues that are current in the study of
adolescent development.
Identify the historical/contextual influences of age, race, ethnicity, class, gender and ability
on adolescent development.
Construct a personal theoretical paradigm of adolescent development.
Recognize general descriptive categories and demonstrate an appreciation of human
diversity in the context of adolscent development.
Define concepts and principles of the major theoretical paradigms of adolescent
development: organismic, psychoanalytic, mechanistic, contextual, and dialectic.
Identify and analyze theoretical assumptions informing the theoretical paradigms of
adolescent development, and discuss implications for practice.
Critically analyze and discuss the developmental processes, experiences, and issues of
specific adolescents using the major theoretical paradigms.
Critically analyze and discuss the policies and practices of American institutions for their
impact on adolescent development.
Discuss the evolution of the field of social psychology and describe the work of pioneers in
the field.

Explore how social environmental variables impact behavior, belief systems and affect.
Describe how cognitive, biological/evolutionary, and multicultural perspectives are
integrated into social psychology and contribute to an understanding of behavior.
Critically evaluate the methods and conclusions of selected classic and contemporary
studies in the field of social psychology.
Describe factors influencing perceptions and beliefs about other people and ourselves, and
the impact of these factors on behavior, relating this information to the learner’s own
experiences or observations.
Examine attitude formation and change, persuasion, and social influence, and ways to resist
persuasion and influence.
Explore the development of prejudice and discrimination, interpersonal conflict and
aggression, and evaluate methods for reducing them.
Discuss variables affecting the development and maintenance of friendships and romantic
relationships and evaluate strategies for improving these relationships.
Describe the influence of groups on decision-making and performance.
Analyze factors that contribute to the development of group behavior, uninhibited
behavior, and bystander apathy utilizing real world applications.
Develop and evaluate strategies for encouraging self-awareness, personal responsibility,
and helpfulness.
Explain and differentiate the components of cognitive functioning: sensation and
perception (attention and recognition), memory (formation, structure, and retrieval),
language processing, and thinking (reasoning, problem solving, and metacognition).
Analyze and articulate the role of perceptual process (verbal and non-verbal) in various
cognitive processes such as memory and problem solving.
Discuss and evaluate the various models of memory.
Diagram the process of language acquisition and processing from a developmental
perspective.
Demonstrate and explain a variety of reasoning and problem solving strategies such as
inductive vs. deductive reasoning, hypothesis testing and decision making.
Delineate the changes in cognitive functioning as adults age.
Compare and contrast the components of Classical & Operant Conditioning.
Develop classical & operant conditioning explanations for various human behaviors.
Illustrate the neurological connections between learning and cognitive theories.
Compare and contrast the use of experimental, quasi-experimental, and qualitative
research techniques in specialty areas of Cognition and Learning.
Synthesize theories of cognitive functioning, learning, and neuroscience to develop a theory
of consciousness.
Trace and analyze the evolution of the field of art therapy within the context of the history
and philosophy of art and psychological theory.
Examine formal elements within art and develop a sensitivity to what they reflect about the
artist.
Employ various art therapy techniques and art media and explore the rationale behind their
use.
Demonstrate primary art therapy approaches.

Propose how art therapy interfaces with and enhances the goals of two other disciplines.
Appraise art therapy as a treatment in the context of various psychological theories.
Compare and contrast art therapy to other treatment modalities.

Assess the clinical, administrative, and ethical roles and responsibilities of the art therapist.

Explain the principles and basic tenets of the major theoretical perspectives on adulthood.
Critically analyze each theoretical perspective of adult development with regard to the age,
socioeconomic status, gender, and race/ethnicity of the researcher and subjects.
Compare and contrast the main developmental research methods and the difficulties
inherent in the study of age-related change.
Describe the research regarding change/stability in biological, behavioral, cognitive and
social processes of adulthood.
Discuss how the social and cultural context of adult experiences influences the
developmental process.
Identify and explain the major issues and controversies concerning the nature of adult
development and aging.

Articulate the developmental process from the perspective of the traditional theoretical
models, e.g., biological, psychoanalytic, psycho social, cognitive and personality theories.

Compare and contrast traditional perspectives on adult development and aging with more
recently developed perspectives such as those of Arlin, Gilligan, Belenky, et. al. and Miller.

describe changes in the biological, perceptual, and cognitive processes associated with age,

Describe the research regarding age-related change/stability in identity and personality.

Examine the social processes associated with adulthood, for example, intimacy, marriage,
sexuality, career choice/adjustment, parenting, divorce, retirement, and widowhood.
Analyze the perspectives and processes of aging related to gender, ethnicity and
socioeconomic status.
Discuss death and dying as the final stage of life.
Discuss the various conceptualizations of the term "stress," as well as present the
difficulties that more than one definition poses for this area of research.
Critically evaluate the methods and conclusions of job stress and occupational health-
related psychology studies.
Summarize the models employed to understand the relationship between the psychosocial
environment, work organization, the individual, and the stress reaction.
Identify characteristics of healthy workplaces.
Recognize sources of job stress and individual reactions to this stress.
Describe the effects of job stress on organizations and diverse groups.
Suggest approaches for the individual and the organization on how to effectively deal with
job stress.

Describe occupational differences in the incidence of job stress (epidemiological findings).
Describe the role of government, private industry, unions, and the individual in developing
and implementing social policy pertaining to work conditions in the United States and other
countries.
Integrate the theoretical and practical findings and any personal observations to develop a
program for promoting workplace health and reducing stress in a specific work
organization.
Compare and contrast historical and contemporary conceptions of abnormal and deviant behavior.
Describe different theories used to explain the following disorders and compare and contrast
different treatments for each: Anxiety disorders, Dissociative disorders and somatoform disorders,
Psychological factors affecting medical conditions, Personality disorders and impulse control
disorders, Substance-related disorders, Mood disorders and suicide, Schizophrenia, Cognitive
disorders, Disorders of childhood and adolescence, Eating disorders and sleep disorders
Compare and contrast therapeutic interventions for abnormal behavior and disorders.
Examine differing philosophical perspectives on mental illness in literature.
Evaluate the perception of mental illness in different societies and the resultant impact on
treatment.
Distinguish between the biomedical (dualistic) and biopsychosocial (holistic) models of
health and illness and describe the influences of each on contemporary and historical
medical practice.
Summarize currently accepted knowledge regarding the effects of lifestyle, stress, social
support, personality, and perceived control on health and illness.
Critically evaluate the methods and conclusions of (selected) studies investigating health-
related topics.
Describe reasons for, and approaches to incorporating stress management, social support,
perceived control, and cognitive-behavioral techniques into programs for managing chronic
conditions.
Distinguish individual and social influences on the practice of healthy behaviors, delay in
seeking medical attention, and adherence to medical advice.
Recognize the health implications of engaging in unhealthful behaviors, delaying seeking
medical care, not following medical advice and identify programs/approaches to improve
health behavior and adherence.
Distinguish characteristics of individuals, health care practitioners, and health care settings
that influence perceptions of and satisfaction with the health care system.
Integrate theoretical and practical findings to develop strategies and programs for
improving health care, patient-practitioner interaction, and the psychological impact of
hospitalization. Evaluate the feasibility, practicality, and utility of implementation.
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                                      Learning Outcomes
SCI=Science
Describe the basic nutrients, their sources and their relationship to major physiological
functions.
Explain the digestion, absorption and metabolism of nutrients.
Recognize normal nutritional requirements as well as diseases associated with deficiencies
and excesses.
Calculate the energy needs of individuals at different ages and activity levels.
Illustrate the special nutritional needs of people at different life cycle stages.
Assess a person's nutritional status and make recommendations for dietary improvement.
Evaluate fad diets, processed, convenience, and fast foods for nutritional adequacy.
Recognize spurious nutrition claims and identify reliable sources of sound nutrition
information.
Illustrate the role that adequate nutrition and exercise play in disease prevention.
Describe how metabolic disorder can synergistically increase the risk for diseases, including
cardiovascular disease.
Explain how nutrition is related to the development of, risk factors for, and general treatments
of the following diseases: diabetes, atherosclerosis, hypertension, and cancer.
Articulate knowledge of the organization of the human body.
Describe basic concepts in cell biology and how they relate to normal and abnormal function.

Identify how the body detects external (environmental, exogenous cues) and internal (nervous
system and endocrine system endogenous cues) changes and adjusts to maintain homeostasis.
Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of support and movement in the body.
Illustrate the importance of a healthy immune system and how it reacts to invaders.
Explain the basic concepts in biochemistry and how they are related to normal and abnormal
aspects of life.
Develop a working knowledge of the heredity, reproduction, development, and maintenance
of the human body.
Design several types of monohybrid crosses and identify risk of disease in offspring.
Discuss recent advances in biotechnology and predict future technologies.
Describe homeostasis of the body and how all the systems of the body work together to
maintain overall health.
Identify and explain the components of a well-designed scientific study in order to evaluate
the quality of health-related information.
Compare and contrast bacterial and viral infections and the role of the immune system in
fighting infection.
Differentiate the components of a cholesterol test and discuss the implications on health of
high cholesterol readings.
Describe the long-term impact of hypertension on overall coronary and vascular health.
Illustrate how the digestive system works, utilizing the correct anatomical structures and
processes.
Recognize the components of a healthy diet and identify and evaluate fad diets.
Explain the role of the hormone insulin in the body; differentiate Type I and Type II diabetes,
including treatments for each type.
Calculate if a person will inherit a disease and the likelihood that a carrier for a genetic trait
will pass it on to future offspring.
Analyze the relationship between obesity and exercise and evaluate the long-term effects of
each on health, particularly the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems.
Articulate how the respiratory system works on the anatomical and cellular levels and the
detrimental effects that cigarette smoking has on smokers and on nonsmokers.
Describe basic biological processes and features of human anatomy that pertain to women’s
health.
Identify the major endocrine organs, the hormones produced and their effects on their target
tissues
Explain hormonal negative feedback
Illustrate the coordination of the ovarian and uterine cycles
Describe the biological processes and medical procedures related to women’s health care
issues, such as pregnancy, breast feeding, infertility, contraception, cancer, heart disease,
diabetes, venereal disease, and menopause.
Formulate factors which are important in becoming an educated consumer of our health care
system.
Explain the value of self-care to preventive health care practices of women.
Discuss the major issues in health care for women, and that there are numerous contentious
perspectives on these issues in the scientific community.
Demonstrate an appreciation of the interrelatedness of social, political, and economic issues
with women's health care
Articulate the significance of the establishment of the Germ Theory and recognize the
contributions of Pasteur, Jenner, and Koch.
Differentiate the identification and treatment of bacterial, fungal, mycoplasm and viral
infections.
Contrast epidemic and pandemic and know the differences between different types of
epidemiological studies.
Identify how the immune system works, and the different types of immunity that are
conferred on the individual
Analyze how the polio vaccination is used worldwide to prevent disease. Compare the
incidence of the disease and distribution of vaccines throughout several countries.
Describe the global distribution of malaria and how the protist Plasmodium has become more
drug resistant over time.

Identify the risks of food borne illnesses such as Salmonella , Botulism and Mad Cow disease.
Investigate diseases spread by insect vectors (Lyme disease, West Nile virus and Plague) and
how these can be prevented.
Analyze the relationship between obesity, diet and exercise and evaluate the long-term effects
of each on blood pressure and heart disease.
Articulate the history of tuberculosis and how it has become more drug resistant with time.
Discuss the detection and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.
Explain why regular cancer screenings and early detection is important in beating breast,
prostate and colon cancer.
Discuss the history of AIDS and compare treatments in the US and other countries.
Develop an understanding of the principles of observation and how theories are constructed to
explain and predict new observations.
Develop an appreciation for the continual, on-going interaction between observation and the
development of sound theoretical frameworks and models.
Trace the historical development of Astronomy from naked eye observations to observations
made using modern telescopes, electronic detectors, computers and mathematical models.
Acquire a fundamental understanding and a hands-on working knowledge of the tools that
modern astronomers utilize and how those tools operate and perform and what their
limitations are.
Observe the night sky and recognize and find the major constellations of the season, including
the zodiacal constellations of the season. From these observations, explain why we see
different constellations in the different seasons.
Observe the Moon and the Sun over the course of the semester and illustrate why the Moon
goes through different phases each month and why we have lunar and solar eclipses.
Observe the night sky with the unaided eye, with binoculars and with a telescope and
maintain an astronomer’s journal and evaluate whether maintaining a journal aided in
understanding how the universe operates.

Understand and appreciate the interaction between observation and theory in modern
astronomical research. Describe and debate some of the more recent theoretical formulations.
Describe current theoretical understanding of stars, planets, galaxies, and cosmology.
Describe and explain the operation of the tools of the modern astronomer and how advances
in technology have helped them to unlock key aspects of the workings of the universe.
Examine and explain how knowledge of objects and events that exist and take place out in
space, away from Earth, can help ensure the survival of the human species.
Demonstrate an understanding of a sense of scale for the solar system, our galaxy, and the
universe as a whole, including factors such as distance, age, and structure in the universe.
Demonstrate an understanding of scientific powers of ten notation.
Observe the universe through field experience(s) in astronomy.
Define key terms as used in astronomy including latitude and longitude; reference points and
ranges; the Astronomical Unit; the light year; and the parsec.
Explain the motion of the stars and planets over different durations, the precession of the
Earth's axis, equinoxes and solstices, ocean tides, and eclipses.
Identify some of the early astronomers and describe their tools as well as their contributions
to the field.
Discuss the main differences between families of planets and articulate at least one unique
feature of each of the eight classical planets that comprise our solar system in increasing order
from our Sun.
Summarize significant explorations of other planets in our solar system that have taken place
in recent decades.

Differentiate among meteoroids, meteors, and meteorites and between asteroids and comets.
Discuss the probability for life elsewhere in the solar system, in the galaxy, and in the
Demonstrate knowledge of fundamental concepts relating to stars, including the major stages
of stellar evolution, the electromagnetic energy spectrum, color and temperature, the H-R
diagram, sunspots, and nucleosynthesis.
Define the classification system for galaxies, the structure of the universe’s galaxies and
galaxy clusters including the Milky Way.
Describe the Big Bang Theory of the Universe and other theories that attempt to explain the
origin and time line of the universe.
Articulate how the fundamental forces of the universe play a role in its expansion.
Describe, measure and interpret the basic physical properties of the atmosphere, and relate
them to observed weather phenomena.
Demonstrate an increased understanding of daily and seasonal weather changes and the daily
weather reports and forecasts provided by the media.
Analyze, interpret and evaluate numerical weather data; maps of surface, upper-air and
forecast weather, and satellite and radar images.
Demonstrate an understanding that apparently random weather conditions are related to
organized weather systems, that develop and move in ways that can be understood and
predicted.
Compare and contrast the structure and development of basic weather systems, and relate
them to associated weather conditions;
Describe forms of severe weather, articulate the hazards associated with each, and prescribe
safety practices to protect life and property.
Discuss the intricacies and limitations of weather forecasting;
Discuss and appreciate the complexity of the earth’s climate system and the uncertainties
regarding global climate change.
Explain the origin and structure of the geologic time scale.
Employ the four principles of relative age determination to organize geologic events in
chronological order.
Describe Earth’s internal structure by identifying its major layers (crust, mantle, and core) and
their subdivisions, and explain the processes that operate within each.
Summarize the theory of Plate Tectonics, and explain how tectonic activity changes the
Earth’s surface and produces earthquakes, volcanoes, and mountain ranges.
Summarize the surface processes of weathering and erosion, and explain how they work to
wear away the Earth’s surface produced by plate activity.
Identify and describe common rock-forming minerals.
Identify and describe the texture and composition of common igneous rocks and explain the
processes which form them.
Identify and describe the texture and mineral composition of common sedimentary rocks and
explain the processes which form them.
Identify and describe the texture and protolith of common metamorphic rocks and explain the
processes which form them.
Observe rocks and geologic structures and describe geologic events of the past which
produced them.
Analyze topographic maps and describe the origin of the landscape features that are shown.
analyze geologic maps and trace the geologic history of the region depicted.
Describe the nature of the six spheres (atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, geosphere,
biosphere, and anthrosphere), explain the processes within each sphere, and summarize the
interactions between the spheres.
Utilize a variety of maps to access information about the world.
Identify and describe the three types of rock which make up the geosphere, and explain how
one type of rock is transformed into another in the rock cycle.
Describe Earth’s internal structure by identifying the major layers (crust, mantle, and core)
and their subdivisions, and explain the processes that operate within each.
Summarize the theory of Plate Tectonics, and explain how tectonic activity changes the
Earth’s surface and produces earthquakes and volcanoes.
Describe the interactions between the geosphere, atmosphere and biosphere which control
weathering, mass wasting and wind erosion, and explain how specific landscape features are
produced.
Observe in the field and describe the interactions between the geosphere, atmosphere and
hydrosphere which control river and wave erosion, and explain how specific landscape
features are produced.
Explain the interactions between the geosphere and the cryosphere which control glacial
erosion, and explain how specific landscape features are produced.
Analyze a variety of human activities (anthrosphere) which, either intentionally or
unintentionally, affect the other sphere and assess the impact of human activity on the world
around us.
Describe at least one theory of the origin of the earth, the origin of the oceans, and plate
tectonics.
Examine the diverse aspects of the biological, chemical, physical, and geological processes
which affect our oceans and atmosphere.
Describe significant historical marine expeditions and their role in the development of
oceanography.
Explain the general characteristics and features of each of the three major zones of the
continental margin.
Discuss the origins and classification of marine sediments, their distribution and their
relationship with geosynclines.
Classify and describe shorelines shaped by marine and non-marine processes.
Contrast the estuarine environments of particular coastal regions in the United States.
Explain the greenhouse effect and its impact on life in the sea.
Discuss the causes and effects of problem waves, such as tsunamis, monsoons, storm surges,
seiches, and internal waves.
Compare thermohaline circulation in the Atlantic Ocean with that of the Pacific Ocean.
Classify the common marine invertebrates and discuss their role in the marine food chain.
Recognize the ancestry of marine mammals and report on the current status of the various
endangered marine mammals.
Classify the different marine environments and explain the nutrient cycling at the various
trophic levels.
Compare the origin and inhabitants of the four sub-zones of a rocky coast in the intertidal
(littoral) environment.
Illustrate the many causes of marine pollution and the problems faced by both
environmentalists and industrial groups in remediation and prevention.
Define ecology and explain the hierarchical nature of ecological systems.
Identify how the processes of natural selection drive evolution.
Examine the development, organization and structure of communities
Explain how topography and climate can influence aquatic and terrestrial environments.
Illustrate the interactions in a predator-prey relationship
Interpret how two populations that interact can undergo coevolution over time.
Analyze the importance of biodiversity and human impact on the environment.
Articulate a working knowledge of the primary concepts and fundamentals of ecology,
evolution and adaptation of species.
Interpret the climate induced changes and weather patterns within the ecosystems of northern
New England.
Identify the ecological importance of decay and nutrient recycling within the ecosystems of
northern New England.
Describe the concepts of predator-prey relationships, carrying capacity and how they relate to
faunal migrations, hibernation, and population dynamics.
Recognize the seasonal cycles of northern New England as an integrated series of adaptive
strategies for species survival.
Illustrate the Pleistocene history of northern New England and the effect of the ice age on the
ecology of northern New England.
Explain the physiological adaptations of plant species for different seasons and how these
adaptations affect the abundance and distribution of birds and mammals.
Explain the binomial system of plant nomenclature.
Describe and appreciate the role early botanists played in advancing the knowledge field
botany and the role field botany has played in the White Mountains.
Identify the morphological features of plants, explain the tools of plant identification –
dichotomous keys – and apply this knowledge to identify plants in the field.
Differentiate the identifying characteristics of flora of the region including representations
from woody and herbaceous higher plants and the ferns and fern allies.
Select a plant and research and present its characteristics, uses, and importance to the
economy of the region.
Identify common bird species and describe the basic ecology of each species.
Articulate an understanding of the theories of bird migration, orientation, and navigation and
how these theories are observed in the local bird populations.
Demonstrate a working knowledge of the most commonly used terminology associated with
the study of bird behavior and migration.
Employ observational abilities in order to discern the details and subtleties of bird behavior
and appearance.
Describe the intricate relationships that exist between bird populations and their habitats.
Illustrate how humans’ impact can disrupt and alter the delicate balances that many
ecosystems are based upon.
Recognize and define basic energy nomenclature.
Identify different forms of energy, including those currently being developed.
Illustrate the history of energy use.
Differentiate between consumption, production and generation of energy resources.
Contrast the interaction between energy science and the ethics and values of our society.
Assess how utilization of different forms of energy impacts the global environment.
Explain the past and present global, political and social issues of energy supply and
demand.
Examine and analyze how degradation and pollution of air, water, and land compromise their
ecological functions and generate serious health hazards for living organisms, including
humans.
Compare and contrast approaches to mitigating global environmental problems, including
application of technology, and explain the limitations of technology in solving many
environmental problems.
Describe how the growth of human populations is related to the use and depletion of
resources and increases in pollution.
Describe the carrying capacities of ecosystems and their ability to respond to perturbations.
articulate the difficulty of addressing and ameliorating the ecological impact of population
growth and its subsequent socio-political and cultural conflicts.
Describe how environmental planning is a complex endeavor that requires commitment and
cooperation among governments and their citizens.
Explore how technological, environmental, and social change can serve human needs in a
sustainable fashion.
Explain the basic design of the UNESCO Biosphere Reserve concept as a blueprint for better
use and management of land and water resources in developing nations.
Describe the major natural processes of land, water, and air.
Explain how current environmental problems have evolved.
Review and interpret current environmental research issues and perspectives.
Discuss the effect of human activity in creating and resolving local and global environmental
problems.
Identify conditions that are amenable to technological solutions and recognize the limitations
of technology.
Apply the scientific method in carrying out laboratory experiments and field projects which
necessitate gathering, evaluating, and interpreting data.
Describe how enforcement of governmental regulations affect environmental pollution
Express the problems associated with global warming, acid rain, nuclear waste, agricultural
runoff, heavy metal contamination and the potential solutions.
Identify and illustrate the basic principles of the forest ecosystem
Articulate the changing relationship of human beings and the forest.
Examine current trends in both political and scientific decision making for forest
management, including principles of public land management.
Identify and analyze perspectives on controversial forest issues based on scientific evidence.
explain the rationale for protecting unique and important areas
Describe methods of planning for human use of the forest
Explain the economic global impact of changing forest resources
Appreciate the concept of biodiversity and how conversion to a non-forest contributes to its
loss
List the variety of species that are found in different types of forest ecosystems
Develop a working knowledge of gross neuroanatomy and physiology, and of neural and
synaptic anatomy and physiology.
Understand the role of neural systems in producing basic functions such as eating, drinking,
sex, and sleep, and higher-level functions such as sensation and perception, stress and
emotions, learning and memory, language and cognition.

Describe and explain the mind-brain problem from historical and contemporary perspectives.
Integrate traditional nature versus nurture dichotomies into a dynamic understanding of the
biopsychosocial underpinning of human behavior.
Develop critical thinking skills as consumers of neuroscientific information from professional
and popular sources.
Discuss the dynamic interactions among evolution, genetics, brain structure, brain function,
environment and behavior across the lifespan.
Define psychoneuroimmunology and summarize current stress- and health-related research
findings.
Describe the evolution of the central nervous system emphasizing the process of
encephalization.
Discuss typical brain development from zygote to death, including lateralization,
neuroplasticity, neural networks and processes of cell death such as apoptosis.
Analyze the biopsychological basis of contemporary behavioral health problems such as
depression, anxiety, schizophrenia and violence and their pharmacological treatments.
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                                     Learning Outcomes
SOC=Sociology
Develop and employ a sociological perspective to examine familiar experiences.
Differentiate between sociological and psychological theories of human behavior.
Explain the broader social context of behavior by looking at individuals’ social location and
the social structure.
Discuss the differences in three major theoretical perspectives: symbolic interactionism,
functional analysis, and conflict theory.
Describe appropriate steps and methodologies in sociological research.
Demonstrate an understanding of ethical norms that apply to sociological research with
human participants.
Define culture and discuss its formation, including concepts of ethnocentrism, cultural
relativism, and pluralism.
Compare and contrast cultures as they interact through globalization.
Explain the importance of the socialization process, the role interaction plays in the social
construction of the individual and society, and “the social construction of reality.”
Discuss the role both nature and nurture plays in the social development of people.
Explore the sociological significance of stratification and inequality, including class, race,
ethnicity, gender, age, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness.
Analyze the significance of changes in society brought about by the social evolutionary
processes of technology, globalization, social revolution, and other catalysts.
Describe how informal racial and gender based discrimination persist after formal legal
segregation has been dismantled.
Recognize how the civil rights acts as well as the changes in reproductive health methods
have impacted sexism in American culture.
Evaluate whether strategies of forced school integration and affirmative action in hiring new
employees have proven effective in reducing the impact of racism on the minority populations
in the United States.
Explain the impact of state civil rights commissions on the lives of “protected populations.”
Describe how race and gender shape political debate and national discourse, using current
examples.
Describe the process of socialization and discuss how individual differences affect the
socialization process and shape life experiences.
Discuss the development of attitudes, beliefs and values and explain how these may evolve
into prejudice or bigotry.

Compare and contrast the gender-based differences which influence individual experiences.
Analyze how aspects of personal power are exercised and how individuals can make changes
to increase their ability to influence others.
Explain how people’s sense of personal effectiveness influences their social behavior;
recognize how a sense of impotence can lead to aggressive outbursts.
Discuss how cultural attitudes towards devalued groups such as elders, minorities, homeless
people or people with disabilities influence public policy.
Compare and contrast related theoretical perspectives, e.g., symbolic interactionism,
functional theory, and/or conflict theory, in the analysis of human social behavior.
Describe the major trends in the history of work as society's economic base changes from
agriculture to industry to service:
Define sociological perspectives on work including those of Weber and Marx;
Identify major sociological concepts such as the work ethic, bureaucracies, and alienation;
Demonstrate "hands-on" familiarity with sociological methods including observation, survey,
and interview;
Discuss the impact of technology on workers and the workplace, focusing on automation and
computers;
Compare-and contrast work structures and organization in North American, European, and
Asian industrial societies.
Define child abuse and neglect from historical and cultural perspectives.
Identify the types and indicators of child maltreatment.
Recognize child and family risk and protective factors associated with child abuse and
neglect.
Outline character attributes and family dynamics often found within abusive families.
Explain the probable outcomes of child abuse and neglect on child development and adult
well-being.
Summarize current research regarding childhood trauma and outcomes for adults.
Recognize multiple perspectives on ethical issues such as mandated reporting, parents’ rights,
and sex offender registries.
Explore individual biases and their impact on professional fields when confronting
controversial issues in child abuse and neglect.
Chart the child protection and legal systems in terms of prevention, intervention and
treatment.
Explain the importance of empathy and a non-judgmental approach when working with
victims, offenders, family members, and others affected by child abuse and neglect.
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                                      Learning Outcomes
SOSC=Social Science
Acquire an appreciation of the diversity of human beings and their cultures in both the past
and the present.
Explore the complex interrelationships between biology, environment, and culture in human
behavior.
Develop the ability to view other cultures from a relativistic perspective and gain new insights
regarding one's own culture.
Acquire familiarity with basic anthropological concepts and terminology, and be able to relate
them to everyday life.
Acquire an understanding of the basic methodologies social scientists employ with the goal of
greater critical awareness of the processes involved in the collection, analysis, and
presentation of data.
Describe the classification of humans within the natural world, specifically within the primate
order.
Illustrate the basic principles of human genetics as they apply to human physical variation in
time and space.
Distinguish major traits of fossil hominids and compare and contrast the alternate hypotheses
regarding early man on the basis of appropriate criteria.
Chronologically order major milestones of human cultural evolution such as tool-making, the
transition from food collection to food production, and the emergence of state-level
civilizations.
Identify and evaluate the major theoretical positions apropos the relationship of language and
culture as well as the arguments concerning language as a marker of human uniqueness.
Identify the major social institutions of human societies and distinguish the basic criteria that
anthropologists use to categorize societies.
Illustrate the processes of social and cultural change.
Demonstrate familiarity with anthropological methods of inquiry and major theoretical
orientations.
Illustrate any of the above phenomena with ethnographic examples from readings, lectures,
audiovisual materials, and student-centered activities.
Demonstrate a working knowledge of basic internet technology and its vocabulary.
Describe the tensions between the ideals of a free society and the dangers posed by open
access to internet information.
Examine the ways the internet challenges current laws of copyright, free speech, and privacy
that were developed before this technology became widely available.
Identify and discuss the effects of the internet on trends and changes in society including its
impact on communication, the way people work, how community is defined, and
globalization.
Evaluate the potential effects of the internet on the political process including its use as a
resource for information, a strategy for campaigning, and a vehicle for voting
Analyze whether the internet will increase the gap between the “haves” and the “have nots” of
the world.
Develop an increased understanding of human sexuality.
Explore a variety of theoretical perspectives related to human sexuality, including biological
development, social learning, and cognitive development.
Apply fact and theory to the analysis of current sexual issues.
Identify barriers that exist in American society relative to effective examination of sexual
issues.
Articulate how sexual issues impact various aspects of contemporary life, including their
effects on individuals, institutions, and public health and welfare.
Demonstrate an ability to discuss sexual issues objectively.
Define the differences between sex and gender and explain the role that each plays for
individuals in society.
Explore the biological basis for differences in sex, gender and sexual orientation.
Summarize the research regarding sex-differentiated behavior.
Identify and compare and contrast psychological and sociological theories of gender role
development.
Analyze factors that contribute to gender differences including biological, social, and
psychological factors, e.g., genetics, hormones, cognition, parents, peers, teachers, schools,
media and employers.
Consider anthropological evidence on gender role development by exploring how gender
roles vary across cultures.
Identify gender bias and expectations in communication and interaction patterns between
males and females.
Review the power differential (e.g., economically, politically, socially) between men and
women historically and the consequences of this differential for each.
Explore the topics of health and adjustment with respect to gender.
Review milestones in the “women’s” and “men’s” movements and discuss the consequences
of each.
Distinguish historical archaeology from prehistoric archaeology
Trace the development of historical archaeology and identify its role within the context of the
broader field of archaeology
Describe the basic principles that guide historical archaeologists in their study

Identify and describe the basic tasks that a historical archaeologist must carry out in an
archaeological project (e.g., background research, site preparation, excavation, and recording)
Identify major archaeological discoveries in North America and relate their significance to
our understanding of the continent's historic past
Explain the impact that Indian, European, and black interaction and settlement had on each of
these groups and on the natural surroundings of historic North America
Pursue an interdisciplinary approach to learning about and discussing gender roles in
societies.
Articulate the impact of culture, history, and biography on how men and women perceive
themselves and each other in relation to the rest of the social world and describe how they act
on these perceptions.
Research and explore how race, class, and ethnic differences complicate shared gender
experience.
Describe what similarities exist across the boundaries of groups.
Describe current American courtship patterns and explain processes couples use in deciding
to begin their families.
Define contemporary patterns of American families including single parent families, nuclear
families, blended families and alternative families.
Recognize stages of family life and development of its members.
Construct a family genogram and demonstrate how it can be used in health and clinical
settings.
Define communication patterns and illustrate how they impact a family’s ability to manage
problems as they arise.
Illustrate causes of disruptions in family development.
Discuss the research on the coping styles of healthy families and methods of intervention
which increase the resilience of family systems.
Describe the composition of a family and identify patterns of interaction.
Articulate and apply the ethical considerations and parameters that guide the conduct of
research and govern the use of research when working with families.
Describe the essential tasks of the family, the stages of development through which families
pass, and characteristic patterns of family functioning.
Utilize systems theory to analyze how well an individual family is functioning.
Explain the typical changes a family must make to adapt to each stage of the developmental
sequence
Examine how normal stressors can cumulatively damage some family’s adaptive mechanisms
Describe how extraordinary stressors such as job loss, economic downturns or military
actions can impact a family’s stress levels
Analyze several maladaptive strategies used by family members including violence, running
Compare substance abuse.
away and and contrast strategies of effectively functioning families with maladaptive
strategies, focusing on aspects of family life such as parenting, communication, and support
networks.
Inventory local community resources available to support family functioning.
Develop a plan to help foster resilience in family systems with their local community.
Identify and compare theoretical perspectives of family systems, including structural,
strategic, developmental, intergenerational and contextual family constructs.
Discuss how all members of an addicted family are affected and how they often share
symptoms with the addict.
Explain the etiology of addictions and invasive nature of addiction in the family system.
Analyze the symptoms of addiction in its various forms and diagnose addiction in a family
system.
Explain the systemic perspectives of family dysfunction.
Describe the role of family members, friends, employers and others in supporting addictive
behavior, thereby contributing to family dysfunction.
Describe the prognosis of children who grow up in addicted families, based on their
characteristics and difficulties.
Assess the components of effective intervention (treatment) and prevention strategies.
Evaluate prevention, intervention and treatment resources and explain the referral process.
Identify and define the following four aspects of aging: social, psychological, physical and
economic.
Analyze the relationship among and between the four aspects of aging and their impact on the
individual and group within society.
Recognize the role of societal norms and values in determining the attitudes toward the
elderly in America.
Relate the diverse social and cultural values of the elderly to the social, economic, physical
and psychological aspects of aging.
Identify and discuss the demographics of the United States’ aging population.
Discuss findings from major research studies in the field of aging and gerontology and apply
to case studies and readings.
Examine factors that have an impact on the well-being of the elderly including program
funding, health care, housing and retirement.

				
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