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					                                              MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

                                                                                  of the

                BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM


                                                                    Madison, Wisconsin

                                                            Held in Memorial Union
                                                          Main Lounge, 2nd Floor Central
                                                                  UW-Madison
                                                           Thursday, December 9, 2010
                                                                   10:00 a.m.


PRESIDENT’S GREETING ......................................................................................................................................... 3
UW MADISON PRESENTATION: “UW-MADISON IN CHINA” .................................................................................. 4
        Purpose of the China Visits ...................................................................................................................................4
        UW-Madison’s Relationships with China .............................................................................................................5
        Goals and Results of the 2010 Visits ....................................................................................................................5
        Future Opportunities ............................................................................................................................................7
        Student Perspective: The Value of Study-Abroad in China ..................................................................................7
        Historical Changes in China ..................................................................................................................................8
        Benefits to UW System and the State ..................................................................................................................9
        Chinese Champions Program .............................................................................................................................11
REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD ......................................................................................................... 11
    WISCONSIN TECHNICAL COLLEGE SYSTEM BOARD REPORT...................................................................................................11
    ADDITIONAL ITEMS THAT THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD MAY REPORT OR PRESENT TO THE BOARD ..............................................11
      Transition to New Governor ...............................................................................................................................12
      Principles for Progress and Prosperity ................................................................................................................12
      National Politics .................................................................................................................................................12
REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE UW SYSTEM ................................................................................................. 13
        Relationship between State and University .......................................................................................................13
        Call for Civility.....................................................................................................................................................14
        UW-Madison Professor Teri Balser named U.S. Professor of the Year ...............................................................14
        UW-Madison Faculty Member Dr. William Cronon elected President of the American Historical Association .14
        UW-Madison Professor Bassam Shakhashiri voted President-elect of the American Chemical Society ............14
        UW-Oshkosh College of Nursing Re-accredited .................................................................................................15
        National Study to Update Two-Year Associate of Arts and Sciences Degree .....................................................15
        UW-Milwaukee Physicist Awarded National Grants ..........................................................................................15
        Wisconsin Public Television Honored .................................................................................................................15
        UW-La Crosse and UW-Oshkosh Graduate Named Wisconsin’s New Poet Laureate ........................................16
        UW-Stout Opens Jarvis Hall................................................................................................................................16
        UW-Platteville Recognized at Annual Conference for Women Engineers ..........................................................16
        UW-Milwaukee Hosts Wisconsin Idea Forum ....................................................................................................16
        UW-Oshkosh Hosts New North Summit .............................................................................................................16
       “James Huff Stout Remembrance Day” ..............................................................................................................17
       UW-Whitewater Warhawks ...............................................................................................................................17
       Wisconsin Badgers Invited to Rose Bowl ............................................................................................................17
UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM ECAMPUS ................................................................................................... 17
                          MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

                                              of the

         BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM


                                      Madison, Wisconsin

                                  Held in Memorial Union
                                Main Lounge, 2nd Floor Central
                                        UW-Madison
                                 Thursday, December 9, 2010
                                         10:00 a.m.

                                  – President Pruitt presiding –


PRESENT: Regents Jeffrey Bartell, Mark Bradley, Judith Crain, Danae Davis, Stan Davis, John
Drew, Anthony Evers, Michael Falbo, Thomas Loftus, Edmund Manydeeds, Charles Pruitt,
Jessica Schwalenberg, Brent Smith, Michael Spector, and David Walsh

UNABLE TO ATTEND: Regents José Vásquez, Aaron Wingad, and Betty Womack

                                               ---


PRESIDENT’S GREETING
        President Pruitt welcomed everyone to the meeting and commented that he thought it was
slightly easier to get to Madison than it had been a year ago, when all were challenged by nearly
19 inches of snow. President Pruitt noted that this month, the meeting was being hosted by UW-
Madison, providing an opportunity to showcase this extraordinary university. President Pruitt
thanked Chancellor Martin for her warm hospitality, and the UW System staff for their
assistance.

       President Pruitt noted that UW-Madison is one of only four public universities in the top
20 universities in America. That did not happen by accident or overnight. Staying at that
exalted level takes dedication, commitment, and ongoing work. President Pruitt indicated that
the Board would be hearing more about much of the work being done at UW-Madison.

                                               ---
UW MADISON PRESENTATION: “UW-MADISON IN CHINA”
       President Pruitt introduced UW-Madison Chancellor Biddy Martin, who thanked and
welcomed the Regents, chancellors, provosts and other campus staff and media to the meeting.
Chancellor Martin also thanked Becci Menghini, who led the effort to organize the program,
along with Tricia Dickinson, Amy Toburen, Heidi Zoerb, Eden Inoway-Ronnie, Peter Kleppin,
and Scott Hildebrand, and Georgene Pomplun.

       Purpose of the China Visits

        Chancellor Martin introduced a short slide show of her recent trips to China.
The chancellor stated that the purpose of her presentation was to tell the Regents and the
community about the importance of having a presence in China, and why UW-Madison staff
spend time there. Chancellor Martin indicated that UW-Madison staff have multiple aims for
their work in China, such as improving the quality of education offered at UW-Madison by
ensuring that undergraduate and graduate students have opportunities to learn more about this
important part of the world, but also to study there and secure internships with businesses there.

        Chancellor Martin indicated that during a recent visit, she met with six Wisconsin-based
companies in Beijing to discuss their willingness to take interns from UW-Madison’s
undergraduate student body. Saying that UW-Madison wants to attract investment from East
Asia to Wisconsin, Chancellor Martin indicated that the university would like to help investors
understand that discoveries worth investing in do not occur only on the east and west coasts of
the United States. One of the best kept secrets when it comes to research and technology
development is Madison, Wisconsin.

        UW-Madison staff are also in China to elevate the brands, not only of the university, but
of the state of Wisconsin, and to build different kinds of relationships. Some of these
relationships are institution to institution, but also support collaborations on the ground that
faculty and students are building themselves. Chancellor Martin noted that the following day
there would be a delegation of seven from the University of Shanghai Jiao Tong, including the
President of Jiao Tong, visiting UW-Madison to pursue collaborative opportunities. She also
noted that this visit was just one of many such visits. Students benefit directly from UW-
Madison’s presence in China by virtue of student exchange, internship possibilities, study
abroad, and opportunities on campus to learn about China.

        Chancellor Martin introduced several speakers: Gilles Bousquet, Dean of the Division of
International Studies and also Vice Provost for Globalization; student Matt Payne, who would
talk about his experiences in Tianjin, where UW-Madison has a summer program, and his future
plans; and Political Science Professor Edward Friedman, who has been working in China for
decades.
       UW-Madison’s Relationships with China

         Dean Bousquet provided highlights of the trips to China, led by the chancellor. He
emphasized the strength of the China studies program at UW-Madison and the relevance of the
trips, given the role that places like China, India and Brazil play in today’s economic and
geopolitical stage. Dean Bousquet referred to the first slide of his presentation, which described
the depth and breadth of UW-Madison’s relationships with China. UW-Madison has more than
300 China-related doctoral degrees, dating back to 1924; some distinguished centers, including
the federally-funded Center for East Asian Studies and the East Asian Legal Studies Center, have
trained dozens of legal professionals all over China. UW-Madison also has dozens of projects
and exchange relationships. Currently, 30 faculty across campus teach courses about China in a
range of disciplines, including law, religion, history, popular culture, and sociology.

        Dean Bousquet stated that the connections between China and Wisconsin are very strong.
UW-Madison has about 2,000 degree-seeking students from China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. In
a decade, UW-Madison went from approximately 100 scholars, including Ph.D. students, post-
doctoral students, and researchers on campus, to 425 scholars. Every semester, more than 300
students study modern and classical Chinese, which is also very important for the relationship
with our partners in China. A number of UW students study in China, as well. Dean Bousquet
stated that he and the Chancellor want to make China the number one study abroad destination
for UW-Madison students. About 1,700 UW-Madison alumni currently live in China, many of
them in key positions, enabling them to broker meetings for the university. He noted that alumni
have done very well, and have “a warm spot” for UW-Madison.

         In 2007, UW-Madison established the Wisconsin China Initiative to coordinate efforts to:
(1) focus the campus on deepening and expanding education and research about China; (2)
provide a clear point of contact for the campus, the state, and the public; (3) disseminate
knowledge more effectively to benefit Wisconsin citizens; and (4) partner business and
government entities on issues related to China. UW-Madison brought together a group of
faculty, led by Professor John Ohnesorge from the Law School, to form the Wisconsin China
Initiative. An advisory board that consists of 20 business and government leaders from the
United States and China provides feedback and advice on how to approach the Wisconsin-China
relationship.

       Goals and Results of the 2010 Visits

         In 2010, the Chancellor made two trips to China, which was very important to the
Chinese. A lot of chancellors and presidents make one trip, but UW-Madison and Chancellor
Martin herself, have been on the ground in China more than once, which is very meaningful to
UW-Madison’s Chinese partners. Dean Bousquet referred to a slide which summarized the two
trips, including visits with partner universities, alumni and friends, media coverage and public
events, economic development events, and high-level government, business or individual events.
The chancellor’s two visits covered all of the major Chinese markets and included a range of
events, from engagement with students to meetings with business and economic leaders, to high-
level government events to enhance the profile of Wisconsin. The goals of the trips were to: (1)
increase UW-Madison’s visibility in China and East Asia; (2) develop strategic relationships
with top Chinese universities; (3) deepen alumni relations and meet top prospects; (4) assist in
recruitment of the most talented Chinese students; and (5) assist the state in its economic
development efforts. Dean Bousquet noted that all of the universities have assets to contribute to
the state’s economic efforts, and UW institutions have key connections in areas where growth is
occurring.

        Dean Bousquet provided a summary of the outcomes of the trips, including visits to 13
universities; seven memoranda of understanding; five business and economic events; eight VIP
events; and more than 450 alumni, parents, and students in attendance at events. Also, more than
nine delegations from China have visited UW-Madison since April 2010.

        Dean Bousquet indicated that the institutional outcomes have also been impressive. UW-
Madison has been invited by Tsinghua University to develop a service learning exchange
program, and the director of UW-Madison’s Morgridge Center is currently finalizing that
agreement; UW-Madison signed a major agreement related to biomedical engineering with
Zhejiang University; the Chinese Champions program is up and running, and will continue for
the next three years; a pre-college program is in the pilot phase; and UW-Madison received a gift
of 30 feature films for the film studies program at UW-Madison.

        Dean Bousquet indicated that the media presence during the trips was outstanding. He
referred to a slide which summarized the media contacts during the trips, which included several
television interviews that were widely disseminated to newspapers, radio, and magazines.
During those trips, through the use of social media, such as Twitter and Facebook, the chancellor
was able to connect with UW-Madison to get feedback and reactions from students and faculty.
Dean Bousquet referred to a slide which featured a China Daily photo of the chancellor
presenting a Wisconsin sweatshirt to the vice president of Beijing Sports. The article
accompanying the photo stated, “This is the first time in the history of new China that such a
large group of elite athletes has been sent abroad to study.” Dean Bousquet indicated that this
was significant because it was an official sanction by the Chinese news of this program. This
article was also picked up by major media markets throughout China and by Asian-Americans in
the United States. He estimated that more than 20 million people have seen the article and the
accompanying photo.

        Dean Bousquet said that the business contacts were also impressive, not only at a
government level with the Chinese Investment Promotion Agency, which handles investment in
China as well as foreign-directed investments, but also with the vice mayor of Tianjin (a city of
12 million), who is interested in technologies. UW-Madison also made contact with leaders
from Inner Mongolia and Heilongjian provinces, who flew to Beijing to meet with the
chancellor. These provinces have strong economies in dairy, agriculture, and the environment,
and are very eager to partner with Wisconsin. Provincial leaders have been invited to come to
Wisconsin to discuss how to broker relationships with businesses here. Meetings were also held
with senior managers of Wisconsin companies, and meetings are continuing to secure internships
for students.

        Dean Bousquet continued, saying that delegations from universities and provinces have
visited Wisconsin and have met with some of the other UW System chancellors and President
Reilly. Representatives from the Shaanxi Province have visited because they are interested in
technologies and partnerships. Zhejian University, East China Normal University, and Shanghai
Jiao Tong University and others have visited, creating opportunities to deepen relationships at
strategic and institutional levels.

       Future Opportunities

        Dean Bousquet referred to several opportunities in the future, including strategic
academic relations and innovative programs, such as internships, the service learning exchange,
and graduate cooperation. He indicated that UW-Madison can play a role in economic
development by training students how to negotiate the complexities of the Chinese environment
and speak Chinese. He indicated there is a hunger from global companies to be connected to the
talent of UW students, and alumni are very dedicated to Wisconsin. There was a strong
attraction in China for the Wisconsin Idea; the idea that a university can harness the power of
research and education through innovation resonated with the Chinese. The Chinese are aware
of the magnitude of challenges that China faces with the environment, in education, in
economics, and in health. The university is approaching this relationship in a humble way,
acknowledging that the United States has had some of these same problems. The Chinese want
to partner with the university because they recognize the university does work on campus but
also reaches out to partners.

       Student Perspective: The Value of Study-Abroad in China

         Dean Bousquet introduced Matt Payne, a junior majoring in Economics and Chinese.
Mr. Payne participated in an intensive summer program in Tianjin, China. Mr. Payne started his
presentation by saying hello in Chinese. He remarked that he started studying Chinese because
he realized that if he could communicate with one-fifth of the world, it would increase the
opportunities available to him. He acknowledged that his competition isn’t limited to those
sitting next to him in his Economics 301 lecture, but instead is sitting in lecture halls in Beijing
and Shanghai. China has been growing by leaps and bounds during his lifetime, and will
continue to grow well into the 21st century.

       Mr. Payne studied abroad in Tianjin through the university’s study abroad program, after
completing two years of Chinese at UW-Madison. Mr. Payne stated that while in Tianjin, he
studied at Nankai University, the fourth best university in China. He indicated that the study
abroad program was rigorous and that his language skills improved dramatically during his stay
in China. Part of his program included a 10-day trip in Inner Mongolia with a small group. Mr.
Payne remarked that everywhere he visited during his stay in China, the Chinese loved
Americans.

        After graduation, Mr. Payne hopes to move to China to work or start his own business,
but is also considering Navel intelligence or working for a government organization. Mr. Payne
said that he is starting a new student organization on campus called Global China Connection,
which will host speakers, connect with Chinese universities, and provide networking
opportunities for students interested in China.
         Mr. Payne said that the value of his degree comes largely from what he put into it, but
also from the opportunities and resources provided by the university. He indicated that he would
not have had the experiences in China if UW-Madison had not offered a program that allowed
him to study Chinese in such an extraordinary way. As China’s impact in the world grows, so
will its impact on campus. He stated that 50 percent of incoming international freshmen this
year were from China, and ensuring a strong relationship with that part of the world holds
unlimited potential for the University of Wisconsin in the future. According to Mr. Payne, China
and the state of Wisconsin share similar economic characteristics, such as the importance of
agriculture and industry. Allowing students to take advantage of the opportunities in those fields
and in others will strengthen the value of a degree from UW-Madison, and allow graduates to
attain even higher levels of success. Mr. Payne stated that he hoped the university would
continue to maintain a presence in China, and expand on its great work; the investments the
university makes now will benefit the university and the state of Wisconsin for years to come.

       Historical Changes in China

       Chancellor Martin then reintroduced Professor Edward Friedman and asked him to
comment on how China has changed and the challenges and opportunities going forward.
Professor Friedman indicated that he was part of the first academic group that was allowed to do
research in China in May 1978. At the time, there were no private cars in Beijing and only 2
percent of the government offices in Beijing had landline phones. Today, China is another
universe and will soon be the largest economy in the world. The Chinese government has just
committed over one trillion renminbi a year to lead technologies. China is already a leader in
wind power and electric cars.

        Chancellor Martin asked Professor Friedman to provide a more visual sense of China
now, compared to before. Chancellor Martin also asked that he address the issue of human
rights. Professor Friedman referred to the upcoming Nobel Prize for Peace that would be
awarded on December10 in Oslo, Norway to Liu Xiaobo, a Chinese supporter of democratization
who is in prison. He indicated that China is a major human rights violator; there is no reason to
expect any change, and this greatly complicates relations.

       Professor Friedman also stated that when one talks about China, there are often
contradictions in what is said. If asked, most Chinese will say that China now allows an
enormous amount of personal space, and they view themselves as free people. They can travel
here and take any classes they want to take. Most Chinese say that China has never had it so
good. There is a religious revival all over China, yet China represses religion. He remarked that
China is a very complicated place, but the correct way to approach it is the way in which the
chancellor is approaching it. The seven largest economies in the world will soon be the E7, or
the emerging markets economies -- China, Indonesia, India, Brazil Turkey and two others -- and
the weight of their economies in the world will soon be larger than the G7 economies. UW-
Madison’s program involves rethinking the globalized nature of the university and the world, and
China is a significant part of that. It is complex and contradictory, but it is the right place to be.

        According to Professor Friedman, the university has been involved with China for a long
time, starting with the first ambassador to the new republic of China, who was a faculty member
from UW-Madison. In addition, UW-Madison had the first Buddhist Studies program that
awarded Ph.D.s According to Professor Friedman, there is no part of the faculty that has not, on
its own, become deeply involved with China, because the university is an extraordinarily
energetic, robust, and dynamic place. Professor Friedman stated that while the university hasn’t
had a brand, the chancellor’s efforts are creating a brand called “Wisconsin.” After one year and
two visits, the presence and awareness of Wisconsin has increased. Students, alumni, the state,
and businesses will all benefit from this effort, the professor said.

       Benefits to UW System and the State

        Chancellor Martin noted that Interim Chancellor Lovell was recently in China, and other
chancellors may have been there, as well. She remarked that there seem to be great opportunities
to leverage more students at UW-Madison and other campuses. Professor Friedman agreed,
saying that he had dinner the night before with other faculty who teach Chinese politics at
campuses throughout the state. UW-Madison sees itself as part of the entire state of Wisconsin,
and the hope is that this initiative reaches out to the world, and back again, to the entire citizenry
of the state of Wisconsin.

       Regent Loftus commented that he had the opportunity to go to China in 1981 with
Governor Dreyfus, when Regent Loftus was the Democratic Majority Leader of the Assembly.
He indicated that Governor Dreyfus relished in introducing him to the Chinese as the leader of
the opposite political party. He indicated that the idea of two major political parties seemed
unique to those in a one-party state. Regent Loftus said they met a graduate of the class of 1927.
Many people asked in very private moments if there was a way to get their children to Madison.
Regent Loftus stated that he also went to China in 2007 with Governor Doyle, and he noted the
amazing amount of change that had taken place.

       Regent Loftus indicated that Professor Friedman’s description of the two realities of
China was correct. He added that he was supportive of engaging and nurturing relationships,
welcoming students and sending students, being a main presence in intellectual life, but
acknowledged that there is another reality and that there will be an empty chair in Oslo when the
Nobel Peace Prize is awarded.

        Professor Friedman, in response to Regent Loftus’s comments, indicated that he agreed
with everything Regent Loftus said. He also stated that students still want to come to this
country from China. Higher education in China is not very good, and parents make great
sacrifices to send their children to the United States. Professor Friedman stated that he is a
member of Amnesty International and cares very much about human rights, and he has fears
about China’s direction on human rights. However, it is also true that the Chinese government
experiences itself in the world, not as an economic power that is becoming a military power, but
as a moral poll; and China cares about its reputation in the world. The Chinese government
wants to be seen as a good actor in the world, doing good things for the world. For example, the
Chinese government would say China has been holding up the world economy and has prevented
the economic crash from being worse. They would also say that their investments in Africa may
be the first to create great inroads in Africa, and if they can do something that turns around the
poorest parts of the world, that is a significant achievement. To understand China, it is important
to understand how the Chinese view themselves as part of the world.

        Regent Bartell remarked that he has had the privilege of participating in the UW-Madison
Law School’s legal exchange program with judges in Shanghai. Several years ago he traveled
with a group of American judges, including his wife, to Shanghai to teach. He was responsible
for teaching corporate law to the judges there. While there, they had the opportunity to meet the
Chinese people and get to know them, and have since hosted Chinese visitors here. He indicated
that the Chinese judges were less concerned with their legal system than with the one-child rule
in China; they were jealous of Americans’ ability to have more than one child. Regent Bartell
asked about the massive growth that has taken place in China during the last 30 years, how
population control will affect China in the years ahead, and how population control will change
economic advancement.

        Professor Friedman said that despite the belief in the United States that a one-child policy
exists in China, China has never had a one-child policy. He provided historical information on
what led to the massive population growth during the early years of the Peoples Republic of
China, and indicated that a program was implemented to limit population growth. It was not an
unpopular program, but how it was carried out was unpopular. In his research in the poorest
parts of China, Professor Friedman said that he has never seen a one-child family. Contrary to
the image that the Chinese do not care about their daughters, the basic view of the Chinese is that
a good family includes a boy and a girl. The real problem is in the cities. He remarked that he
thought the “policy” would eventually be abandoned, and is already slowly being abandoned,
because China is the first country to face the problem of growing old before growing rich. In
China, they refer to it as the 4-2-1 problem -- four grandparents, two parents, and one child
working to support all of them; it is unsustainable. In addition, with the current demographics,
the Chinese economy will eventually slow in growth.

        Regent Walsh commented that other major universities must also be forging relationships
with China. Regent Walsh asked, at a time when it is important to dialog with the Legislature
about the future of the state and the UW System and about the university’s ability to help in the
pursuit of 250,000 jobs, what the university can do to enhance the relationship with China.
Professor Friedman agreed that major universities were involved with China long before UW-
Madison was, and the UW is playing a game of catch-up. Chancellor Martin stated that the
university has an opportunity to not only catch up, but to go its own way. The resonance for the
Wisconsin Idea is startling, and is related to the Ministry of Education in China trying to decide
if it wants universities in the model of Harvard, Yale, Princeton and Cornell, or prestigious
universities that are great but that also serve communities.

        Chancellor Martin indicated in addition that the university will need funding to do more.
However, higher education officials in China have indicated that if UW-Madison does something
different from all of the other universities, by continuing to talk about and pursue efforts that are
not strictly academic, but are business related and draw on the state’s resources as well as the
university’s, the Chinese officials would help to support UW-Madison’s presence there.
Chancellor Martin stated that UW-Madison is very well positioned to take advantage of the
generosity of the high-level Chinese officials and to do something that is not exclusively
academic, but something more integrated. She indicated that UW-Madison needs to move
relatively quickly and needs the state to be interested. The moment is opportune because of
some of the connections the university has been able to make through alumni and some liaisons
in Beijing.

       Chinese Champions Program

        Chancellor Martin stated that one of the greatest success stories in the university’s efforts
to build relationships with China is the Chinese Champions program. The Chinese Champions,
Olympic-level athletes and coach, have been at the university since the summer of 2010 and have
been working hard, studying English, kinesiology, management, and training, things that put
them in a position to be international leaders in sports. The Chinese student-athletes have been
at UW-Madison for a thrilling football season, a visit from President Obama, and Halloween on
State Street. The athletes and coaches received a warm welcome at Eagle Heights, where they
became part of the international community.

        Chancellor Martin stated that the aim of the program is to provide the student athletes
with a great experience, but also to provide our own students with the opportunity to get to know
such remarkable young people from China. The university recently reached an agreement with
Beijing Sport University to extend the program for three years. She remarked that the Chinese
athletes and coaches have been very generous with their time. She thanked them for their
generosity.

        Chancellor Martin introduced Li Li Ji, Professor of kinesiology at UW-Madison, and
leader of the Chinese Champions program and asked him to introduce the athletes and coaches.
Professor Ji indicated that the Chinese Champions had been in Madison for four and one-half
months, had received a warm welcome, and had become local Madison boys and girls. Professor
Ji introduced the coaches and student- athletes and presented them with certificates. The students
presented Chancellor Martin with a gift, as well, and a brief video summary of the Champions
program was shown. President Pruitt thanked the chancellor and her colleagues for the
wonderful presentation.
                                                ---


REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD
Wisconsin Technical College System Board Report
       A written report was provided. There were no questions or comments.

Additional items that the President of the Board may report or present to
the Board
       President Pruitt noted that he and President Reilly typically share their presidents’ reports
on Friday morning, but because of a special guest on Friday, Terry Hartle of the American
Council on Education, the reports would be presented on Thursday. Before proceeding with his
report, President Pruitt recognized Regent Vice President Spector, who expressed his pleasure at
being back with the Board, having missed the November meeting due to health concerns. He
thanked all for their phone calls, cards, flowers, and support.

       Transition to New Governor

        President Pruitt began his report, noting that at the November meeting, the Board was
privileged to welcome Governor-elect Scott Walker to the meeting of the Board, just two days
after the election. All are becoming familiar with the new faces and new ideas in the Capitol.
President Reilly and his staff have been reaching out to the Governor-elect’s transition team,
helping to establish open lines of communication on a number of fronts, including briefings
about the December Board agenda. Similar conversations are occurring with legislators in both
houses. Many of the conversations focus on specific issues, such as the work of Legislative
Council Study Committees that are examining such issues as workforce development and
financial aid, where the UW System has a strong interest and a central role.

       Principles for Progress and Prosperity

        Other meetings that have occurred are related to the university’s call for a new compact
between the UW System and the State of Wisconsin, as laid out in the “Principles for Progress
and Prosperity” document. President Pruitt said that he and former Regent President Jay Smith
were in the process of updating the “Principles” paper to include the latest figures, and to turn the
conversation from one related to the elections to one directly relevant to the 2011-13 state budget
and the overall future of a new compact between the State of Wisconsin and its public university.
One change to this document is the addition of excerpts from editorials from around the state.
One editorial, in the November 27th Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, reiterated that it is time for a
broader discussion of what it means to be a state university, and asked whether this means “state
supported” or simply “state located.” This is a fair question to be asked and answered, President
Pruitt said.

        President Pruitt said that he had recently had the opportunity to speak with the Rotary
Club in Appleton, where many members of the Fox Valley community expressed their support
for the compact. President Pruitt thanked Dean Jim Perry from UW-Fox Valley for his help in
setting up his visit and joining him for lunch with the Appleton Rotarians. In addition, President
Pruitt said that he was invited to be a guest on the “UPFRONT” television news program with
Mike Gousha to discuss the new landscape in Madison and the UW’s efforts to gain stable
funding and increased flexibility from the state.

       National Politics

        On the national front, President Pruitt congratulated those who have been elected or re-
elected to represent Wisconsin in the U.S. Congress, including re-elected U.S. Representatives
Ryan, Baldwin, Kind, Moore, Sensenbrenner, and Petri and newly-elected U.S. Senator Johnson,
and Representatives Duffy and Ribble. The new Congress will have serious responsibilities,
including finding ways to spur economic growth and create jobs. The 112th Congress will have
some important and unfinished business in continuing to support a world class education system
so that people of all generations and all income levels will have the chance to succeed. There
will be important debates and decisions to be made about support for Pell Grants, so that students
will have the chance to remain in college during difficult economic times, and the DREAM Act,
so that 55,000 young people who currently cannot attend college will have the chance to live the
American dream.

                                               ---


REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE UW SYSTEM
       Relationship between State and University

        President Pruitt called upon President Reilly to present his report. President Reilly began
his remarks by describing efforts to invite people to re-visit, and perhaps re-think, the
relationship between Wisconsin and its public university. He visited the Madison Downtown
Rotary Club on December 1, to speak to them on this topic, and Wisconsin Eye was there to
capture the presentation on video. Two weeks before, Chancellor Biddy Martin spoke to the
Rotary Club and other service groups with her message about the “New Badger Partnership,”
and how the Madison campus could benefit from efforts to provide the UW System with greater
administrative flexibility.

         Earlier in the month, President Reilly reported, the UW System announced that UW
campuses reported 181,782 students – an increase of 2,873 over last year’s final enrollments, and
an all-time record for the System. Over the past decade, UW System enrollment has grown by
about 11 percent – representing a gain of more than 18,000 students. The System’s success in
this area is particularly noteworthy during a time of tight resources. President Reilly expressed
pride in the System’s productivity gains and efficiency; at the same time, maintaining
educational quality and achieving the Growth Agenda goal of 80,000 additional graduates by
2025 will require state reinvestment and new flexibility to employ more efficient business
practices.

        President Reilly said that he had recently welcomed about 60 people to the concluding
session of the Wisconsin Economic Summits, the culmination of a shared effort to help develop a
bold strategy for Wisconsin’s economic revitalization. As one of the “conveners” of the
summits, the university had the opportunity to brief Governor-elect Walker and members of his
transition team about the university’s vision for job creation and economic development. The
final “Be Bold” Prosperity Strategy that resulted from the summits included many
recommendations that align nicely with the Growth Agenda, the university’s call for new
flexibility, and the need for higher education to play a central role in boosting the state’s
economy. UW chancellors, provosts, faculty, and staff participated in every planning meeting
and every summit, demonstrating the seriousness with which the UW System takes its role in
economic development.
       Call for Civility

        Chancellors and other UW leaders have been working hard on campus and community
behavior issues this fall. Some horrendous incidents occurred on a number of campuses this
year. President Reilly said that “this is something we cannot and will not accept.” On behalf of
the UW System, President Reilly and all chancellors issued an open letter calling for civility.
Campus communities all across the state are actively engaged in addressing such issues, whether
through existing programs or new initiatives from the grassroots, such as a rally at UW-
Platteville, an upcoming event at UW-Stout, and a systemwide conference on “Civility and
Everyday Life,” to be held Feb. 22-24 at UW-Oshkosh. Quoting from the letter, President
Reilly said that “nobody has a right to engage in abusive behavior, and we each have an
obligation to challenge that kind of conduct whenever it occurs on our campus or in our
communities.”

       UW-Madison Professor Teri Balser named U.S. Professor of the Year

        Turning to positive news from around the system, President Reilly announced that UW-
Madison associate professor of soil science Teri Balser was honored in November as the U.S.
Professor of the Year. Four professors are selected nationally each year, one each from doctoral,
masters, and baccalaureate degree-granting institutions and community colleges. The U.S.
Professors of the Year program is sponsored by the Council for the Advancement and Support of
Education (CASE) and The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Winners
are selected for their impact on and involvement with undergraduates; a scholarly approach to
teaching and learning; contributions to undergraduate education in the school, community, and
profession; and support from colleagues and current and former students. President Reilly
expressed congratulations to Dr. Balser.

       UW-Madison Faculty Member Dr. William Cronon elected President of the
       American Historical Association

        President Reilly reported that historian William Cronon of UW-Madison was elected
president of the American Historical Association, a position considered one of the highest honors
in the profession. Dr. Cronon is a national leader in studying past human interaction with the
natural world, and is the first environmental historian ever elected to lead the association.
President Reilly congratulated Dr. Cronon.

       UW-Madison Professor Bassam Shakhashiri voted President-elect of the
       American Chemical Society

        UW-Madison chemistry professor Bassam Shakhashiri was voted President-elect of the
American Chemical Society. Dr. Shakhashiri, the first holder of the William T. Evjue
Distinguished Chair for the Wisconsin Idea, will serve on the ACS board of directors for a three-
year term, beginning in January. The American Chemical Society is the largest scientific
organization in the world, with more than 160,000 members from academia, government, and
industry. Dr. Shakhashiri has been a member of ACS for 49 years and will become the third ACS
president from UW-Madison. President Reilly congratulated Dr. Shakhashiri.

       UW-Oshkosh College of Nursing Re-accredited

       The College of Nursing at UW-Oshkosh recently marked its 40th anniversary. The
College also learned that its undergraduate and graduate programs have received the maximum
10-year re-accreditation, the highest honor given by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing
Education. UW-Oshkosh’s College of Nursing has seen tremendous growth in recent years,
through innovative program options, such as the Accelerated Bachelor’s of Science in Nursing,
which allows individuals who already have a bachelor’s degree to earn a BSN in 12 months.
President Reilly congratulated Dean Rosemary Smith, Chancellor Wells, and their UW-Oshkosh
colleagues.

       National Study to Update Two-Year Associate of Arts and Sciences Degree

        A team of five scholars from UW Colleges has been chosen to participate in a national
study to determine how to update the two-year Associate of Arts and Sciences degree to keep it
valuable to students in a rapidly changing world. UW Colleges is one of 32 institutions chosen
out of 140 applicants to serve on the national group sponsored by the Association of American
Colleges and Universities. The study will look at how teaching and learning are changing
because of technology and demographic shifts, and what students will need to know tomorrow to
be effective citizens. President Reilly congratulated Interim Chancellor Marv Van Kekerix and
his UW Colleges colleagues.

       UW-Milwaukee Physicist Awarded National Grants

        Physicist Xavier Siemens was awarded two prestigious grants from the National Science
Foundation (NSF), both related to his work in the international effort to detect gravitational
waves, ripples in space-time produced when massive objects in space move violently. The direct
detection of these gravitational waves will provide a new means to study the universe. In
addition to receiving a $500,000 Early Career Development Award, the NSF’s most prestigious
award for young researchers, Siemens also is a senior investigator on a $6.5-million grant from
NSF’s Partnerships for International Research and Education. President Reilly expressed his
congratulations.

       Wisconsin Public Television Honored

       Wisconsin Public Television (WPT), a service of the Educational Communications Board
and UW-Extension, was honored with three Emmy Awards in November from the
Chicago/Midwest Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. WPT was
honored for two programs related to Vietnam Veterans and also for news reporting on allegedly-
fraudulent childcare providers in Wisconsin. President Reilly said that the honors were well-
deserved and congratulated James Steinbach, Director of Television, and the many others
involved in these productions.
       UW-La Crosse and UW-Oshkosh Graduate Named Wisconsin’s New Poet
       Laureate

       President Reilly reported that Governor Jim Doyle recently named Bruce Dethlefsen of
Westfield as Wisconsin’s new poet laureate. Mr. Dethlefsen is a graduate of UW-La Crosse and
earned his master’s degree from UW-Oshkosh. His most recent collection of poems is "Breather"
(Fireweed Press, 2009).

       UW-Stout Opens Jarvis Hall

        UW-Stout recently celebrated the grand opening of its state-of-the-art Jarvis Hall. The
$43.2 million building is home to UW Stout’s College of Science, Technology, Engineering and
Mathematics. The building has nearly 160,000 square feet of new and renovated space, with
state-of-the-art labs and classrooms. Focus on Energy has presented UW-Stout with more than
$78,000 in incentive grants to recognize the energy-saving measures instituted as part of the
project. President Reilly congratulated Chancellor Sorenson and the UW-Stout campus
community.

       UW-Platteville Recognized at Annual Conference for Women Engineers

        At the recent annual Conference for Women Engineers, UW-Platteville received
recognition for the highest retention rate of women in engineering in the nation, at 77.8 percent.
Starting in the fall of 2009, the university’s Society of Women Engineers started hosting a
welcome for new members. Mentoring relationships and a personal community experience are
key to this success. President Reilly congratulated Chancellor Dennis Shields and his colleagues
at UW-Platteville.

       UW-Milwaukee Hosts Wisconsin Idea Forum

        The fourth Wisconsin Idea Forum took place in November, hosted by UW-Milwaukee.
The Wisconsin Idea Forum is the Wisconsin Idea in action, tapping into the UW’s longstanding
tradition of leveraging its resources to benefit the citizens of Wisconsin. Topics addressed in
previous forums have included alcohol abuse, financial aid policy issues, and building
sustainable communities. In Milwaukee, the subject was water issues, with discussions ranging
from groundwater issues, to aging infrastructure, to climate change. President Reilly
congratulated Interim Chancellor Mike Lovell; Mark Harris, Acting Dean of the School of
Freshwater Sciences; and others at UW-Milwaukee.

       UW-Oshkosh Hosts New North Summit

         UW-Oshkosh hosted the seventh annual New North Summit last, where about 700
leaders from throughout northeastern Wisconsin met to foster collaboration, share success
stories, and map out a game plan for the continued prosperity of the region. Featured speakers
included Governor-elect Scott Walker and Mark Murphy, President and CEO of the Green Bay
Packers. President Reilly complimented Chancellor Wells and the UW-Oshkosh community for
a productive summit.
       “James Huff Stout Remembrance Day”

        On December 8 Governor Jim Doyle declared it to be “James Huff Stout Remembrance
Day,” in honor of the 100th anniversary of the death of the founder of UW-Stout. James Huff
Stout, an executive in his father’s lumber company, had an early vision for higher education that
introduced manual training and domestic science. This eventually led to the founding, in 1891,
of the institution that would become known as UW-Stout. More than a century later, as
Wisconsin’s Polytechnic University, UW-Stout continues to prepare its graduates for successful
careers and fulfilling lives. James Stout served as a member of the UW Board of Regents.
President Reilly expressed congratulations to Chancellor Sorenson and the UW-Stout
community.

       UW-Whitewater Warhawks

       President Reilly acknowledged defending Division III national champion, the UW-
Whitewater Warhawks, who were undefeated and due to meet the Wesley College Wolverines
on December 11 in the semifinal game in Dover, Delaware. President Reilly wished all the best
to Head Coach Lance Leipold, Chancellor Telfer, and the Warhawks.

       Wisconsin Badgers Invited to Rose Bowl

      President Reilly also congratulated Coach Bielema, the UW-Madison football team, and
Chancellor Martin for the invitation they received to the 2011 Rose Bowl. This will be the
Badgers’ sixth appearance in the Rose Bowl, their first since 2000.

                                                ---


UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM eCAMPUS
        President Pruitt called upon President Reilly to introduce the next agenda item. President
Reilly said that November marked the official launch of the University of Wisconsin System
eCampus, which places the UW System at the forefront of online education. Online learning is
booming because it offers a convenience that is very attractive, especially to adults who may be
interested in pursuing new fields of study or returning to college to finish a degree.

         The returning-adult market is one the university is keenly interested in, as part of the
More Graduates for Wisconsin initiative, and the drive to grow the number of well-prepared
college graduates in the state. To achieve that goal, it is essential to provide more opportunities
for non-traditional students to access college courses and degree programs, while still attending
to their work, family, and life obligations.

       The University of Wisconsin System eCampus is a central portal that provides access to
more than 70 diverse online degree and certificate programs offered through 26 campuses of the
UW System. The eCampus portal simplifies the student search process; students can now find
all online opportunities available across the System in one place.

         President Reilly introduced Interim Chancellor Marv Van Kekerix to further describe
eCampus. Chancellor Van Kekerix begin his remarks by saying that the University of Wisconsin
System eCampus is an important and exciting initiative that will benefit thousands of students
across Wisconsin and thousands more across the nation. Technology has become a vital part of
learning; therefore, UW-Extension and UW Colleges have collaborated with the four-year UW
institutions to expand on-line learning, with a particular focus on making opportunities available
to adult learners. The University of Wisconsin System eCampus is a comprehensive approach to
the on-line opportunities that the System provides; it serves as a gateway to a UW education.
Interim Chancellor Van Kekerix recognized the leadership, dedication, and effort of Provost
Christine Quinn, Vice Chancellor and Provost for UW-Extension; Greg Lampe, UW Colleges
Provost; and David Schejbal, the Dean of Continuing Outreach and E-Learning.

       The UW System eCampus is the result of collaborative work between UW-Extension and
UW Colleges that took place over many months. UW Colleges and UW-Extension were part of
a UW System distance learning workgroup; this was truly a systemwide effort. Interim
Chancellor Van Kekerix thanked President Reilly and all who worked together to make eCampus
possible.

        Next, Rovy Branon, Interim Associate Dean of Online Learning, said that distance
education is up for degree seekers by about 16 percent nationwide annually; the UW Colleges
online associate degree has grown by 10 percent in the past year; one of these, the totally-online
B.S. degree in sustainable management has grown by 66 percent in the past year. UW System
eCampus allows students to find more than 70 programs online, including bachelors, masters, a
couple of doctoral programs, the associate degree, and certificates.

        Online offers the flexibility and convenience of anytime, anywhere learning for such
people as working parents or returning veterans. People from varying backgrounds may come
together in a virtual classroom through online learning. The eCampus initiative represents the
power and quality of a University of Wisconsin degree. In designing the website, the
development team worked extensively with potential students. Interim Dean Branon then
provided a demonstration of the website, highlighting some of the user-friendly features. The
site helps to drive more traffic to campus websites.

       Interim Associate Dean Branon reported the following results so far, after only three
weeks: extensive media coverage; 6,000 unique visitors to the website; and 100 students who
have gotten in direct contact with eCampus. The site is located at ecampus.wisconsin.edu.

        Interim Chancellor Van Kekerix then introduced Laura Pedrick, Special Assistant to the
Provost at UW-Milwaukee and co-chair of UW-Milwaukee’s online program council. She was a
member of the UW System distance learning workgroup. On behalf of the other UW-institution
participants on the council, Ms. Pedrick expressed excitement about the launch of eCampus,
because it will increase awareness of and access to institutions’ programs. Guiding principles of
the workgroup included: expand educational opportunities to develop new markets; be user
friendly; and maximize the impact of the shared “University of Wisconsin” brand. The site
reflects those principles. At UW-Milwaukee online courses fill first, and demand has increased
significantly. Students know and trust UW institutions; recent online focus groups of online
learners reinforced the benefits of online programs. UW System eCampus will help get the word
out about programs, and the site sends a message to users that there is an array of online
programs and that the UW understands the needs and motivations of online learners.

       Regent Spector asked about the cost of UW online programs. Interim Chancellor Van
Kekerix said that the programs are well below the cost of for-profit institutions’ online courses.

        Regent Crain said that she thinks the new initiative is very important and asked that there
be reports to the Board periodically on results. Regent Evers asked about the quality of online
education. Interim Chancellor Van Kekerix responded that quality control lies with the faculty
involved in putting together online programs. Ms. Pedrick provided a UW-Milwaukee example,
saying that UW-Milwaukee has a robust faculty-development process, which has been used as a
national model. A peer evaluation program also reinforces the importance of quality. Online
learning involves a high degree of interactivity and must be handled differently from classroom
structure; everyone participates online. There is a growing cadre of experienced faculty teaching
online courses. Interim Chancellor Van Kekerix added that online student services and advising
also contribute to a quality educational experience.

       President Pruitt thanked Interim Chancellor Van Kekerix for the presentation.

                                                ---

The meeting was adjourned at 12:14 p.m.

                                                      Submitted by:
                                                      /s/ Jane S. Radue
                                                      Jane S. Radue, Secretary of the Board




                           MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING
                                                                                of the

               BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM


                                                                   Madison, Wisconsin

                                                           Held in Memorial Union
                                                         Main Lounge, 2nd Floor Central
                                                                 UW-Madison
                                                          Friday, December 10, 2010
                                                                   9:00 a.m.

APPROVAL OF MINUTES OF THE OCTOBER 7 AND 8, 2010 AND NOVEMBER 4, 2010 MEETINGS. ......................... 22
NATIONAL PERSPECTIVES: “THE FUTURE OF HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE CHANGED POLITICAL ENVIRONMENT”
AND “SURVEY OF YOUNG ALUMNI, UW AND NATIONWIDE” .............................................................................. 22
   INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................................................................22
   FUTURE OF HIGHER EDUCATION .....................................................................................................................................23
      November Election Results .................................................................................................................................23
      Public Perception of Government and Higher Education ...................................................................................23
      Recent Federal Policy and Higher Education ......................................................................................................24
      Future Federal Policy and Higher Education ......................................................................................................24
   SURVEY OF YOUNG ALUMNI...........................................................................................................................................26
      Nationwide and UW Young Alumni Satisfaction-Survey Results ........................................................................26
      Messages from Survey Results ...........................................................................................................................27
REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE ........................................................................................................... 28
     UW-Madison Presentation on Madison Initiative ..............................................................................................28
   EDUCATION COMMITTEE BUSINESS .................................................................................................................................28
     Student Success Programs for Populations of Opportunity through High-Impact Practices..............................29
     Annual Program Planning and Review Report ...................................................................................................29
     Reports from the Office of Operations Review and Audit ..................................................................................29
     Report of the Senior Vice President ....................................................................................................................30
   CONSENT AGENDA .......................................................................................................................................................30
     Amendments to Faculty Personnel Rules University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh ......................................................31
REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE & AUDIT COMMITTEE ................................................................................. 31
     UW-Madison Presentation on the “New Badger Partnership” Proposal ...........................................................31
   BUSINESS, FINANCE & AUDIT COMMITTEE BUSINESS ..........................................................................................................31
     Competitive University Workforce: 2011-13 Unclassified Pay Plan Recommendations and Distribution Plan
     and Guidelines ....................................................................................................................................................31
     Operations Review and Audit Quarterly Status Update .....................................................................................33
     Trust Funds: Acceptance of New Bequests over $50,000 ..................................................................................33
     Trust Funds: Investment Policy Statement Review/Affirmation ........................................................................33
     Status Update on the Human Resource System .................................................................................................34
     Report on Quarterly Gifts, Grants, and Contracts (1st Quarter) ........................................................................34
     Tax Sheltered Annuity Program -- Annual Program Participant Fee ..................................................................34
      Authorization to Recruit a Limited Appointee at UW-Madison at a Salary above 75% of the UW System
      President’s Salary ...............................................................................................................................................34
    CONSENT AGENDA .......................................................................................................................................................34
      2011-13 Unclassified Pay Plan Recommendations and Distribution Plan and Guidelines .................................35
      UW System Trust Funds Acceptance of New Bequests ......................................................................................36
      UW System Trust Funds Investment Policy Statement .......................................................................................37
      UW System Tax Sheltered Annuity Program Annual Program Participant Fee ..................................................37
      Authorization to Recruit a Limited Appointee at UW-Madison at a Salary above 75% of the UW System
      President’s Salary ...............................................................................................................................................37
REPORT OF THE CAPITAL PLANNING & BUDGET COMMITTEE .............................................................................. 38
       UW-Madison Sustainability Initiative: Integrating Teaching, Research, and Operations .................................38
    CAPITAL PLANNING AND BUDGET COMMITTEE BUSINESS.....................................................................................................38
       Authority to Lease Space for UW-Extension .......................................................................................................38
       Real Property Exchange Agreement ...................................................................................................................39
       West Campus Cogeneration Facility...................................................................................................................39
       UW-Milwaukee Lease for School of Public Health .............................................................................................39
       UW-Platteville Waiver Request ..........................................................................................................................39
       Enumeration Projects .........................................................................................................................................40
       All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects.....................................................................................................41
    CONSENT AGENDA .......................................................................................................................................................41
       Authority to Lease Space for the Division of Continuing Education, UW-Extension...........................................41
       Authority to Accept Land Parcels Pursuant to the Real Property Exchange Agreement between Wisconsin
       Alumni Research Foundation and the Board of Regents, UW-Madison.............................................................41
       Authority to Plan the West Campus Cogeneration Facility Addition and Chiller Installations Project, UW-
       Madison .............................................................................................................................................................42
       Authority to Lease Space for the School of Public Health, UW-Milwaukee ........................................................42
       Authority to Seek a Waiver of Wis. Stat. §16.855 to Allow Selection of a Design-Build Entity to Design and
       Construct a Storage Facility Project, UW-Platteville ..........................................................................................42
       Authority to Seek Enumeration of Seven Additional Major Projects as Part of the 2011-13 Capital Budget, UW
       System ................................................................................................................................................................43
       Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects, UW System ............................................43
    REPORT OF THE ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT......................................................................................................................43
RESOLUTION OF APPRECIATION FOR UW-MADISON ........................................................................................... 44
UNFINISHED OR ADDITIONAL BUSINESS .............................................................................................................. 45
CLOSED SESSION .................................................................................................................................................. 46
        Authorization to Appoint: Chancellor, University of Wisconsin Colleges and University of Wisconsin-Extension
         ...........................................................................................................................................................................46
        Student Request for Review of a UW-Milwaukee Decision ................................................................................46
        Student Request for Review of a UW-Milwaukee Decision ................................................................................47
        Student Request for Review of a UW- Madison Decision ...................................................................................47
                        MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING

                                            of the

         BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM


                                    Madison, Wisconsin

                                Held in Memorial Union
                              Main Lounge, 2nd Floor Central
                                      UW-Madison
                               Friday, December 10, 2010
                                        9:00 a.m.

                                – President Pruitt presiding –


PRESENT: Regents Jeffrey Bartell, Mark Bradley, Judith Crain, Danae Davis, Stan Davis, John
Drew, Anthony Evers, Michael Falbo, Thomas Loftus, Edmund Manydeeds, Charles Pruitt,
Jessica Schwalenberg, Brent Smith, Michael Spector, David Walsh and Aaron Wingad

UNABLE TO ATTEND: Regents José Vásquez and Betty Womack

                                             ---



APPROVAL OF MINUTES OF THE OCTOBER 7 AND 8, 2010 AND
NOVEMBER 4, 2010 MEETINGS.

      The minutes of the October 7 and 8, 2010 and November 4, 2010 meetings stood
approved as distributed.
                                            ---



NATIONAL PERSPECTIVES: “THE FUTURE OF HIGHER
EDUCATION IN THE CHANGED POLITICAL ENVIRONMENT” AND
“SURVEY OF YOUNG ALUMNI, UW AND NATIONWIDE”

Introduction
        President Pruitt called upon President Reilly to introduce the morning’s guest speaker,
Terry Hartle, American Council on Education (ACE) Senior Vice President of Government and
Public Affairs. President Reilly described the two topics that Dr. Hartle’s presentation would
cover: (1) a unique project that Dr. Hartle’s office undertook to understand how younger alumni
feel about their education and their alma maters; and (2) the future of higher education in the
changed political environment.

         ACE represents presidents and chancellors of all types of accredited higher educational
institutions throughout the U.S. Dr. Hartle is responsible for ACE’s work with federal policy
makers on a broad range of issues, including student aid, academic research, and government
regulation. Prior to joining ACE in 1993, Dr. Hartle served as education staff director for the
U.S. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources. He holds a doctorate in public policy
from George Washington University.


Future of Higher Education

       Dr. Hartle began his remarks by saying that the federal government has quickly become
very important in higher education. The federal government this year will make $150 billion
available for student aid and scientific research, to be spent at college and university campuses.
In comparison, total state spending on higher education will be about $75 billion. Higher
education would look nothing like it does without the support it receives from the federal
government.


       November Election Results

        November’s election will result in significant changes in Congress. Dr. Hartle showed a
slide showing that the Republicans gained, and the Democrats lost, five seats in the Senate; two
Independents caucus with the Democrats, giving Democrats 53 seats, while Republicans have
47. The Republicans gained 63 seats in the House of Representatives, and the Democrats lost 62
seats, giving the Republicans 242 seats, and the Democrats 193.

        Offering some election observations, Dr. Hartle noted: (1) 49 percent of voters with
family income of less than $100,000 per year voted for Democrats, compared to 48 percent for
Republicans, while 58 percent voters with family income of greater than $100,000 voted for
Republicans, compared to 40 percent for Democrats; (2) Democrats won the votes of those who
did not complete high school and who did complete graduate school, and this segment of the
electorate totals 24 percent of the electorate; and (3) in 2006, Democrats got 57 percent of
Independents’ votes, and Republicans 39 percent, and in 2010, Democrats got 38 percent of
Independents’ votes, and Republicans 56 percent. Therefore, as the Independents went, so went
the election.


       Public Perception of Government and Higher Education
         A trend going back to the Carter administration is the public’s growing dissatisfaction
with the political process. This period has been characterized by increasing distrust of elected
officials, increasing skepticism about the effectiveness of government activities and a perception
that elites are running “the show” for themselves and not for the average voter. Presidents
Reagan and Clinton were the only two presidents to cope successfully with this trend. Much of
the public has reason to be unhappy, given decreases in family incomes and an increase in the
number of Americans living in poverty. The last decade was essentially a lost decade for many
Americans, Dr. Hartle indicated. The public is afraid of large institutions with too much
authority and too little responsibility for what they do. The public was very angry about Wall
Street, BP, and the federal budget deficit, as these exemplify institutional recklessness that can
make lasting negative changes in our society. Elites are suspect. This includes post-secondary
educational institutions. Many educational institutions see themselves as a gateway to
opportunity, and educational institutions are respected and admired; however, these same
institutions also establish and validate privilege. It is important to appreciate the level of
discontent and fear among many Americans.


       Recent Federal Policy and Higher Education

        The last two years of federal policy were very good for higher education, Dr. Hartle said.
The Obama administration increased investment, providing more student aid money for
individuals. This administration believes intuitively in the value of higher education. This
administration also believes that they can micromanage higher education from Washington,
D.C., creating many regulations that may look good in theory, but not at the campus level.

        Dr. Hartle mentioned four major federal policy changes: (1) Pell grant increases in the
past couple of years will increase maximum grants by about $800, will serve more students, and
will more than double the total cost to taxpayers; (2) the American Opportunity Tax Credit
replaced and is more generous than the Hope Tax Credit, and it will continue for another two
years; (3) the federal government moved from a bank-based student loan program to a U.S.
Department of Education-based program, and this has so far worked smoothly; and (4) funding
for the National Institutes of Health and National Science Foundation, much of it to be spent on
higher education, will increase substantially. Therefore, this administration has made investment
in student aid and scientific research a priority. At the same time, the administration thinks it
should have more say in the spending of the money on college campuses.


       Future Federal Policy and Higher Education

         Dr. Hartle discussed three key concepts for the future: (1) partisanship is likely to
continue; (2) the deficit is $1.4 trillion, and there may be greater attention paid to the size of the
deficit; and (3) the 2012 presidential election cycle will start quite early. The conventional
wisdom is that President Obama is in a difficult situation, based on the results of the 2010
elections. The key will be how much work is done in the first six to nine months of 2011.
        Dr. Hartle then posed three key questions: (1) whether Republicans can govern, given
the lack of a clear agenda and division within the party; (2) whether the President can regain his
edge after the past year, during which liberal democrats have expressed concern about his
movement away from the principles of his base; (3) whether the Republicans and Democrats can
work together, as the problems facing the country become more acute and serious, and the far
ends of both parties sometimes drive party decisions.

        In response to a question from Regent Danae Davis about the new regulations of the
Obama administration, Dr. Hartle said that the U.S. Department of Education recently
federalized the definition of “credit hour,” for example, which is a very ominous step. The
federal government has historically stayed away from academics. As another example, he cited
new federal regulations on incentive compensation, which try to prevent for-profit schools from
paying admissions/sales staff on a commission basis. Unfortunately, the regulations appear to
require all traditional colleges and universities to review their compensation plans. These same
regulations include a provision giving state governments more control over private colleges and
universities. Christian colleges and universities are particularly concerned because of their
distinctive missions. In addition, upcoming gainful-employment regulations will affect 53,000
individual programs at colleges and universities.

         Regent Bartell, referring to the distrust among the public that Dr. Hartle had mentioned,
asked if there is evidence of public distrust of public higher education institutions in particular.
Dr. Hartle said that the evidence suggests that, in general, the public’s enthusiasm for large social
institutions, such as the military, organized religion, and colleges and universities, is declining;
the public skepticism is not unique to higher education institutions.

         In response to a question from Regent Walsh, Dr. Hartle said it is necessary to continue
to talk about the effect of higher education on communities and states. The average age of
college students is about 27 years old, which is very different from a generation ago. The debate
has changed in the past couple of years, with the president’s goal of being first in the world in
college attainment by 2020. This will take a great deal of work and is unlikely to be achieved,
even though nobody disputes that this is a worthy goal. For a generation, the emphasis in
Washington has been on access to higher education; graduation and completion rates have
become more strongly emphasized in the past two years.

       In response to a question from Regent Bradley about the increases in funding for the
National Institutes of Health and National Science Foundation, Dr. Hartle expressed admiration
for Wisconsin Congressman Obey’s efforts over the years. With the departure from Congress of
Representative Obey and Senator Specter, it is possible that funding for the National Institutes of
Health will be less available in the future.

        Regent Loftus commented on a speech by President Obama and a subsequent meeting in
Washington, D.C. on the need to improve completion rates for community and two-year
colleges, and asked what happened after this. Dr. Hartle said that the administration wanted to
direct a substantial amount of funding to community and two-year colleges. The funding did not
come through in the economic stimulus package due to a parliamentary problem, but a couple of
billion dollars were provided through another program, for very specific purposes related to these
colleges; also, a White House summit was planned. Dr. Hartle opined that the administration
would like to provide stronger support for community and two-year colleges. At the same time,
community colleges do not necessarily exist to award degrees; many students have a successful
community-colleges experience, transfer to another institution, and then are counted as drop-outs
from the community college. Community colleges are critical for meeting President Obama’s
goals of producing more graduates. Regarding the summit, a community college summit was
held, chaired by Jill Biden, the Vice President’s wife; the summit was deemed successful, but as
with any White House summit, it highlighted the issues, but is unlikely to result in long-term
solutions.


Survey of Young Alumni

         Moving on to the other topic of the morning, and saying that he had good news to share
with the Board, Dr. Hartle explained that the American Council on Education (ACE) conducted a
survey of young college and university alumni on a nationwide scale; thereafter, 22 institutions
represented on the ACE board paid for surveys of their institutions. The “young alumni” survey
participants received their bachelor’s degrees between five and fifteen years before. In
Wisconsin, 11 of the 13 four-year institutions agreed to participate in the survey; two-year
institutions did not maintain their alumni data in a way that would make it easily accessible.

        To provide a context for the survey results, Dr. Hartle described Gallup public-
confidence poll results from July 2010: 76 percent expressed a great deal or some confidence in
the military, 66 percent expressed a great deal or some confidence in small business, 59 percent
in police, 48 percent in church/organized religion, 40 medical system, 25 percent in newspapers,
23 percent in banks, 22 in TV news, and 11 percent in Congress.


       Nationwide and UW Young Alumni Satisfaction-Survey Results

         Dr. Hartle then presented the ACE young-alumni data, showing a series of slides, with
the UW institutions represented as UW-A through UW-K; the agreement with the participating
institutions was that it would be up to them to decide to release their own data. In the ACE
survey, 88 percent of young alumni nationally have a favorable impression of their alma mater;
at the UW institutions, the numbers ranged from 93 to 99 percent, stunningly high results.
Asked if colleges are prepared to meet the challenges of the future, national results were 61
percent responding in the affirmative; in Wisconsin, the numbers ranged from 72 to 78 percent,
depending on the institution. (Individual institutions were not identified for purposes of Dr.
Hartle’s presentation.) Asked if colleges are preparing students for the modern workforce,
national results for young alumni were 62 percent; in Wisconsin, the numbers ranged from 67 to
72 percent. Asked how well their college experience prepared them for their current job,
national data showed that 85 percent of young alumni said that college exceptionally or more
than adequately or adequately prepared them for their current job; at the participating Wisconsin
institutions, responses ranged from 81 percent to 96 percent.
        Asked if they would attend the same school, nationwide 79 percent said that they would;
in Wisconsin between 68 and 92 percent said that they would attend the same school, with
responses from UW institutions in the 80-to-90-percent range. According to pollsters, everything
over 85 is essentially unanimous; it does not get any better than these results. Asked if their
college charged a fair price, 76 percent nationwide said that it did; in Wisconsin, 86 to 96 percent
said that it did. In the nationwide survey, respondents were asked if all colleges charge a fair
price, and 34 percent said yes, suggesting that the more people know about an institution, the
greater the value it has to them.

        Asked if their college education was worth it, given the time and money, nationwide 89
percent of young alumni said yes; in Wisconsin between 89 and 97 percent said yes. This is
clear, unambiguous good news.


       Messages from Survey Results

        Dr. Hartle said that several messages can be taken from the survey results: (1) young
alumni reported an exceptional level of satisfaction; (2) the results show very strong favorable
reactions; (3) young alumni are saying that an employment focus is critical (based on results not
reported during Dr. Hartle’s presentation); and (4) there may be some price/affordability
vulnerability, as shown by the results that young alumni think their school charges a fair price,
but they do not think that others do. Dr. Hartle’s message to the UW System is to keep doing
what the System is doing, because those who spend a lot of time and money on their education at
the UW are very happy. He offered kudos to the leadership and faculty of the UW institutions,
as the survey results are a testament to their efforts.

        President Reilly commented that it is important to find ways to use the young-alumni
data. It is important for the Governor-elect and legislators to be aware of this data, showing how
positively their constituents view the UW.

        Regent Bartell said that he assumed that the percentage responding was statistically
significant, which Dr. Hartle confirmed. Regent Bartell asked how this compared to the national
response rate. Dr. Hartle said that he did not have this number with him. He commented that
phone numbers no longer work well for surveys, and as a result, it was necessary to draw a very
large sample for the survey, to get enough respondents.

        Asking about price and affordability, Regent Loftus referred to the new U.K.
government’s argument that students should pay more tuition. Dr. Hartle said that ten years ago,
there was no tuition in the U.K., and now the discussion is about full-price cost, a huge
difference. This is a problem all higher-education systems in the industrialized world have
faced. In the U.S. this is coupled with increasing state expenditures for Medicaid, K-12
education, and corrections. In a number of states, flagship universities receive 7 or 8 percent of
their support from state government. The rapidly-rising price of higher education in the public
sector is a concern with respect to the ability to meet President Obama’s goal. Ironically, despite
a decade of tuition increases, enrollments at the UW institutions have never been higher.
However, as costs continue to go up for higher education, the public will be increasingly
unhappy and concerned.

       President Reilly thanked Dr. Hartle for taking the time to speak to the Board, for the very
informative presentation, and for sharing his expertise on the federal scene and higher education.
President Pruitt added his thanks and remarked that Wisconsinites are traditionally modest, but
the Board owes the chancellors, provosts, and the more than 40,000 employees of the UW
System a round of applause for their hard work.

       Before turning to the committee chairs for their reports, President Pruitt introduced Jason
Culotta, from Governor-elect Walker’s transition team, who was attending the meeting.
President Pruitt said that he and the Board look forward to working with the new administration.

                                               ---



REPORT OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE
       President Pruitt called upon Regent Crain to present the report of the Education
Committee. Regent Crain said that the Education Committee held an interesting meeting; most
items did not require action, but a useful discussion occurred.


       UW-Madison Presentation on Madison Initiative

        Regent Crain reported that the Education Committee heard an excellent presentation on
the Madison Initiative for Undergraduates (MIU) from UW-Madison Provost Paul DeLuca;
Aaron Brower, Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning; and students Adam Sheka and Tom
Templeton. Two years into the initiative, UW-Madison reported that the Initiative is going very
well and meeting all of its expectations. Provost DeLuca explained that half of the MIU funds
are distributed to need-based financial aid for undergraduates. The other half go to fund campus
projects that are developed through a rigorous and competitive call for proposals. Funding is
being directed toward hiring new faculty in high-demand areas, as well as to academic and career
advising, academic and student support, and high-impact practices and innovation. The third
round of proposal review is just getting underway.

        The two students were very articulate in describing the significant student involvement in
the decision-making process. Also impressive is the increased accountability involved in
tracking the success of the funded projects; the projects are being monitored to ensure that they
are meeting their goals and expected outcomes.


Education Committee Business
       Student Success Programs for Populations of Opportunity through High-
       Impact Practices

         The committee’s next topic was “Student Success Programs for Populations of
Opportunity through High-Impact Practices.” High-Impact Practices (HIPs) are those
educational practices that have proven effective at deepening student learning and retention.
HIPs are especially effective in improving the learning of historically under-represented students
or, in the context of the More Graduates Initiative, populations of opportunity.

         The committee heard from Provost Fernando Delgado from UW-River Falls, Provost Pat
Kleine from UW-Eau Claire, and Vice Provost Aaron Brower from UW-Madison. Each
described campus projects focused on increasing participation of under-represented students in
specific high-impact practices. The results thus far have been impressive, particularly in regard
to how HIPs confront the achievement gap and succeed in closing it. The committee agreed that
this is exciting work. All UW campuses are working on expanding their offering of HIPs, and
working to retain more of their under-served students.

        Regent Crain said that it was implicit throughout the discussion that this work crystallizes
the integration of some of the System’s most important initiatives: LEAP, Inclusive Excellence,
and More Graduates for Wisconsin, which all involve engaging, retaining, and graduating more
students for successful life and livelihood in the 21st-century.


       Annual Program Planning and Review Report

         Regent Crain reported that Associate Vice President Kolison presented key findings from
the 2009-10 Annual Program Planning and Review Report, reviewing the program activity in the
last year and providing summary data and trends from the past five years. There was a slight up-
tick in the number of programs in the last couple of years but the discussion, with input from the
provosts, indicated that the System is unlikely to go back to its peak of 1,200 programs from the
early 1980s. Associate Vice President Kolison reminded committee members of the program
realignment initiative undertaken last year, resulting in guidelines for addressing low-degree
producing programs.

        One of the key discussion points was the extent to which most new academic programs
being proposed and implemented by the institutions are funded through differential tuition or a
cost-recovery model. This is an indication of the changes that have emerged in the last decade in
state funding; the current economic climate is unlikely to change this.


       Reports from the Office of Operations Review and Audit

       The committee heard two reports from the UW System Office of Operations Review and
Audit, presented by Director Julie Gordon and Assistant Director Josh Smith. The first report
covered Student Evaluation of Instruction. Regent policy gives discretion to institutions in the
implementation of this kind of evaluation. It was clear from the report that Student Evaluation of
Instruction is a complicated endeavor, with several issues at stake: timing and frequency of
conducting student evaluation of instruction, the work involved in doing so, and the variety of
ways that these evaluations are used as a part of faculty review for tenure and promotion and for
the improvement of instruction.

         The second report, on Prior Learning Assessment, reviewed how the UW System awards
credit for prior learning. Prior Learning Assessment evaluates for college credit the knowledge
and skills gained from life experiences outside the university (e.g., from employment, military
service, etc.). The report covered the objectives and potential benefits for students and
institutions of prior learning assessment, and also detailed the variation of assessment methods
used by UW campuses, some of which currently award credit for prior learning more than others.
There are a number of administrative and programmatic challenges in doing this, including
transfer and transcript issues.

         Regent Crain said that, as is standard practice for the Office of Operations Review and
Audit, both of the reports contained a number of recommendations for UW System and the
institutions. The committee would like to follow the model of the Business, Finance, and Audit
Committee in asking that a management response be prepared for the report on Student
Evaluation of Instruction, indicating a response to some of the report’s recommendations. This
is less necessary for the Credit for Prior Learning Report, given the update the committee also
received from Associate Vice President Larry Rubin, on a $800,000 grant the UW System
received from the Lumina Foundation. The grant funding is going directly to further the
development of Prior Learning Assessment programming at the institutions, thereby addressing
many of the report’s recommendations


       Report of the Senior Vice President

         In Senior Vice President Rebecca Martin’s absence, the Education Committee heard an
abbreviated report from Associate Vice President Kolison that covered two aspects of the UW
System’s Sabbaticals Program: (1) all Regents were sent the assignments for those faculty who
will take sabbatical leave in 2011-12, and this report does not require action; (2) every two years,
the Education Committee reviews Guidelines for the System’s Sabbatical Program, as required
by Regent policy. The Guidelines recommend areas of emphasis or priority for use in
institutional sabbatical decisions. The guidelines are not meant to be prescriptive; the authority
for making sabbatical decisions rests unequivocally with the faculty and institutions. The
committee decided to maintain the existing Guidelines for the next two years and to add a
reference to Inclusive Excellence as one of the System’s priority areas.


Consent Agenda

       Regent Crain moved that the Board adopt as a consent agenda item Resolution 9843,
which was approved by the committee. The motion was seconded by Regent Danae Davis and
approved unanimously by the Board on a voice vote.
       Amendments to Faculty Personnel Rules University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh


       Resolution 9843:              That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor of the
                                  University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh and the President of the
                                  University of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves
                                  the amendments to the UW-Oshkosh Faculty Personnel Rules.

                                              ---


REPORT OF THE BUSINESS, FINANCE & AUDIT COMMITTEE
      President Pruitt called upon Regent Smith to present the report of the Business, Finance
and Audit Committee.


       UW-Madison Presentation on the “New Badger Partnership” Proposal

        Regent Smith reported that UW-Madison Vice Chancellor Darrell Bazzell presented
information and background on the institution’s “New Badger Partnership” proposal for
increased autonomy and flexibility from the state. Vice Chancellor Bazzell noted the importance
of protecting the state’s investment and maintaining the university’s competitive position as a
world-class research university. He indicated that additional flexibility would come with
appropriate oversight. The committee had several questions about the details of the proposal,
and was told that additional details will be developed as more is learned about possible
legislative and gubernatorial interest.


Business, Finance & Audit Committee Business


       Competitive University Workforce: 2011-13 Unclassified Pay Plan
       Recommendations and Distribution Plan and Guidelines

         Given the importance of the 2011-13 unclassified pay plan recommendations, Regent
Smith said that President Reilly and Associate Vice President Al Crist would present this item to
the full Board, as they had to the committee on Thursday. President Reilly began his remarks by
reminding Regents that in August 2010, they had been asked to approve a budget request for the
2011-13 biennium. That request was later submitted to the state Department of Administration.
In August, he said that the proposed budget was focused on things that the university can do to
help the state emerge from the economic slump stronger than before. This would require new
investment from the state, as well as increased management flexibility, to make better use of
existing resources.
        President Reilly said that just as the Board recommends a biennial operating budget and a
two-year capital budget, the Board must submit a recommendation to the Director of the Office
of State Employment Relations (OSER) for adjusting compensation and employee benefits for
faculty and academic staff. A pay plan request is required by state statutes. Following approval
by the Board, President Reilly said that the pay plan request would be forwarded to OSER,
which will present a biennial compensation plan for approval by the Legislature’s Joint
Committee on Employment Relations, which will then recommend it to the full Legislature.

        The Competitive University Workforce Commission, comprised of business leaders from
around the state, faculty and academic staff representatives, academic leaders, and Regents
Spector and Falbo, offered advice on this subject. In addition to receiving that Commission’s
thorough review, presented to the Board in June, President Reilly said that he also consulted with
the President’s Compensation Advisory Committee, comprised of faculty and academic staff
members from each UW institution. The university’s goals remain to produce more well-
prepared college graduates and help create more better-paying jobs across the state; a
competitive UW workforce is needed to reach those goals. Unlike most governmental entities,
the UW System competes in national and international markets for its employees.

        President Reilly said that he is recommending a pay plan request for 2 percent increases
in each year of the 2011-13 biennium, to address merit and solid performance at a level
estimated to be equal to increases given to faculty and staff at the UW’s peer universities. As the
Competitive University Workforce Commission noted, UW salaries are already lagging those
earned by faculty and staff at peer universities, by significant margins in many cases. This pay
plan request will not close that gap, but he said it is hoped that 2 percent will keep the gap from
widening.

        Along with other recommendations from the Board, including the elimination of
mandatory unpaid furloughs and restoration of previously approved pay plans, the 2 percent pay
plan would begin to address some of the university’s strategic compensation needs. President
Reilly said that the UW is also asking the state to help with lagging pay in other ways.
Specifically, the UW is restating its need for flexibilities that were part of the biennial budget the
Board approved in August, changes that would provide UW institutions and chancellors with
greater latitude in the use of a variety of resources to address compensation challenges. For
instance, it would make good sense for the university to be able to generate or reallocate some of
its own resources to get to a genuinely competitive pay plan.

        The UW has to take a lead in working on the state’s broader economic and social well-
being, such as through bold plans to increase annual degree production by 30 percent, granting
80,000 more degrees between now and 2025. The university is also working to leverage UW
research more effectively, in ways that spin off new companies and new jobs in the private
sector, and help ensure that our staple industries are competitive in the 21st century.

       The quality and access of the University System cannot be maintained, nor the bold goals
pursued, without a strong, high-performing workforce. President Reilly expressed pride in UW
employees, who produced the kinds of results Dr. Hartle described earlier. He said that he wants
to give chancellors the tools they need to retain that talent, recruit new talent, and preserve the
investment that Wisconsin taxpayers have made in the UW System.

       UW faculty and staff are deeply committed to the success of UW students and the UW’s
mission as a public university. Their commitment has not diminished in any way. However,
President Reilly said he is worried about their morale. He posed the question of how employees
can best be supported in their vital work, saying that the pay plan is one part of the answer.

        Following President Reilly’s remarks, Associate Vice President Al Crist provided some
detail on the resolution before the Regents. He added that the pay plan was influenced and
guided by the recommendations of the Competitive University Workforce Commission, as
incorporated in the pay plan resolution and in the Board’s earlier budget request. Pay plan
dollars would only be awarded to individuals based on solid performance. In the current year,
many peers received 1.5 to 3 percent increases, while UW faculty and staff received no increases
and had their pay cut through furloughs; the UW is losing ground. Associate Vice President
Crist responded to questions from Regents Loftus and Schwalenberg regarding the resolution
under consideration, the Board’s earlier budget request, and collective bargaining; those faculty
who have voted to unionize would not be affected by the pay plan resolution.

        Regent Walsh asked about the composition of the Competitive University Workforce
Commission and whether there was any dissent; Associate Vice President Crist listed some of
the members; Regent Falbo, who was among the members, commented that business people on
the Commission were surprised by the lack of flexibility to award people for performance and
said that the members were all in agreement with the recommendations. Regent Spector, one of
the co-chairs of the Commission affirmed that the final version of the Commission’s report was
unanimous.


       Operations Review and Audit Quarterly Status Update

        Regent Smith continued his report, saying that Director Julie Gordon presented a
quarterly status update on eight projects currently underway in the UW System, two of which
were discussed during the Education Committee’s meeting.


       Trust Funds: Acceptance of New Bequests over $50,000

       In accordance with Regent Resolution 8559, the committee formally accepted five
bequests and/or gifts, with a total value of $2,972,000.


       Trust Funds: Investment Policy Statement Review/Affirmation

       The committee approved a resolution reaffirming the existing Investment Policy
Statement (IPS). Trust Funds Director Doug Hoerr indicated that no substantive revisions to the
IPS were recommended. He explained that the only revisions made to the document are updates
to the current market values of the funds. An in-depth asset allocation analysis and review is
anticipated during the first half of 2011.


       Status Update on the Human Resource System

        Regent Smith reported that Senior Vice President Morgan reported that testing is running
slightly behind due to additional system testing in order to ensure readiness for going live in
spring 2011, which the project remains on schedule to do.


       Report on Quarterly Gifts, Grants, and Contracts (1st Quarter)

        Regent Smith reported that Vice President Durcan reported that gifts, grants, and
contracts for the first quarter were $672 million, an increase of $87.6 million over the same
period in the prior year. She also noted that federal awards increased $69.6 million, and non-
federal awards increased by $18 million. The major driver of the federal awards increase this
quarter is due to the shift of all institutions to the federal direct lending program.


       Tax Sheltered Annuity Program -- Annual Program Participant Fee

        The committee approved a resolution granting the President of the UW System authority
to approve changes to the UW System Tax Sheltered Annuity Program’s annual program
participant fee. Sue Chamberlain, Assistant Vice President for Human Resources, reported that
changes initially come through recommendations from the Tax Sheltered Annuity Review
Committee, an advisory committee created by the Board of Regents to oversee the program.
Assistant Vice President Chamberlain explained that the fee is charged only to UW System
employees who participate in the 403(b) program, and only covers the cost of administering the
program.


       Authorization to Recruit a Limited Appointee at UW-Madison at a Salary above
       75% of the UW System President’s Salary

      The committee approved a resolution granting UW-Madison authority to recruit a Vice
Chancellor for Research and Dean of the Graduate School at a salary that may exceed 75% of the
UW System President’s salary.


Consent Agenda

       On behalf of the Business, Finance, and Audit Committee, Regent Smith then moved
adoption of Resolutions 9844, 9845, 9486, 9847 and 9848. The motion was seconded by Regent
Falbo and approved unanimously by the Board on a voice vote.
REVISED
2011-13 Unclassified Pay Plan Recommendations and Distribution Plan and
Guidelines

Resolution 9844:       Whereas, pursuant to s. 230.12(3)(e) Wis. Stats., the Board of
                       Regents is charged with the responsibility to recommend to the
                       Director of the Office of State Employment Relations (OSER)
                       a proposal for adjusting compensation and employee benefits
                       for faculty, academic staff, and academic and administrative
                       leaders (limited appointees) for the 2011-13 biennium, and,

                       Whereas, the UW System Board of Regents adopts the
                       Competitive University Workforce Commission’s
                       recommendation for a UW System total compensation
                       philosophy that the average salaries of faculty, academic staff,
                       and academic and administrative leaders (limited appointees)
                       should reach their respective peer median salary levels, while
                       retaining/attaining competitive benefits, by no later than the
                       end of the 2015-17 biennium, and

                       Whereas, since salaries represent approximately 73% of total
                       compensation, peer salary analyses will be the principal
                       determinant in setting the target compensation levels for
                       faculty, academic staff, and academic and administrative
                       leaders (limited appointees) in the System, and

                       Whereas, the Board of Regents requested in the 2011-13
                       budget: (1) the restoration of the rescinded pay plan which was
                       to have been paid to unclassified staff in June of 2009, (2)
                       additional recruitment and retention base funding, and (3) the
                       base funding which was removed from the 2009-11 budget that
                       resulted in mandatory furloughs for all staff, and

                       Whereas, in addition, the Board of Regents requested
                       flexibilities in the 2011-13 budget that would provide
                       additional funding and greater latitude in the use of base funds
                       by Chancellors to further the goal of closing the gaps between
                       peer median salaries and our average salaries by no later than
                       the end of the 2015-17 biennium, and

                       Whereas, the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers
                       (CPI-U) is projected to increase on average by 1.8% each year
                       of the biennium, and

                       Whereas, salary increases at peer institutions are estimated to
                       increase on average by 2.0% each year of the biennium;
                     Now, therefore be it resolved;

                     That the Board of Regents supports the pay plan
                     recommendation of the UW System President providing for a
                     2% increase each year of the 2011-13 biennium so that average
                     salaries will not fall farther behind peer salaries for faculty,
                     academic staff, and academic and administrative leaders
                     (limited appointees). Whether or not there will be a
                     compensation adjustment for faculty at UW-Eau Claire and
                     UW-Superior, who have elected to be union represented and
                     any other unclassified bargaining unit electing to be union
                     represented before a pay plan is approved by the Joint
                     Committee on Employment Relations (JCOER), will be
                     determined as the result of collective bargaining; and

                     Further, pursuant to 230.12(3)(e) Wis. Stats., the Board directs
                     the UW System President to transmit to the Director of the
                     Office of State Employment Relations currently available
                     information on unclassified salaries for UW System peer
                     institutions and related economic indices, and the Board’s
                     request that the Director recommend to the JCOER a salary
                     increase for each year of the biennium of 2.0% and the
                     necessary related increase for unclassified salary ranges and
                     salary minima; and

                     Further, to reiterate the Board of Regents 2011-13 budget
                     requests for authorization to increase and redistribute resources
                     to address competitive compensation gaps at each institution in
                     the UW System. These include: (1) the authority to approve
                     compensation levels and salary ranges for employees serving
                     as Vice Presidents or comprehensive institution Provosts; (2)
                     the ability to determine pay plan increases for faculty,
                     academic staff, and academic and administrative leaders
                     (limited appointees), while taking into consideration state
                     funding and the availability of resources; (3) the ability to
                     make base adjustments for salary increases associated with
                     performance; and (4) to consider compensation needs within
                     the UW System as part of the tuition authority provided under
                     Section 36.27, Wis. Stats.; and

                     Further, the Board of Regents adopts the attached pay plan
                     distribution guidelines for 2011-13.

UW System Trust Funds Acceptance of New Bequests
Resolution 9845:       That, upon the recommendation of the President of the
                       University of Wisconsin System and the Chancellors of the
                       benefiting University of Wisconsin institutions, the bequests
                       detailed on the attached list be accepted for the purposes
                       designated by the donors, or where unrestricted by the donors,
                       by the benefiting institution, and that the Trust Officer or
                       Assistant Trust Officers be authorized to sign receipts and do
                       all things necessary to effect the transfers for the benefit of the
                       University of Wisconsin System.

                       Let it be herewith further resolved, that the President and
                       Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System, the
                       Chancellors of the benefiting University of Wisconsin
                       institutions, and the Deans and Chairs of the benefiting
                       Colleges and Departments, express their sincere thanks and
                       appreciation to the donors and their families for their
                       generosity and their devotion to the values and ideals
                       represented by the University of Wisconsin System. These
                       gifts will be used to sustain and further the quality and
                       scholarship of the University and its students.

UW System Trust Funds Investment Policy Statement

Resolution 9846:       That, upon recommendation of the President of the University
                       of Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents approves the
                       recommended revisions to, and otherwise reaffirms its adoption
                       of, the Investment Policy Statement for the University of
                       Wisconsin System Trust Funds.

UW System Tax Sheltered Annuity Program Annual Program Participant Fee

Resolution 9847:       That, upon recommendation of the Tax-Sheltered Annuity
                       Review Committee and the President of the University of
                       Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents authorizes the
                       President of the University of Wisconsin System to assess an
                       annual fee to each employee participating in the UW System
                       Tax Sheltered Annuity Program to cover the costs of
                       administering the program. This resolution supersedes 1994
                       Regent Resolution 6774.

Authorization to Recruit a Limited Appointee at UW-Madison at a Salary above
75% of the UW System President’s Salary

Resolution 9848:       That, upon recommendation of the Chancellor at the University
                       of Wisconsin-Madison and the President of the University of
                       Wisconsin System, the Board of Regents authorizes UW-
                                 Madison to recruit for a Vice Chancellor for Research and
                                 Dean of the Graduate School at a salary that may exceed 75%
                                 of the UW System President’s current salary.

                                 Further, the Board of Regents authorizes the President of the
                                 University of Wisconsin System to approve the appointment
                                 and the salary for this position.

                                              ---



REPORT OF THE CAPITAL PLANNING & BUDGET COMMITTEE
      President Pruitt called upon Regent Bartell to present the report of the Capital Planning
and Budget Committee.

       UW-Madison Sustainability Initiative: Integrating Teaching, Research, and
       Operations

         Regent Bartell first reported that Dr. Greg Mitman, Director of the Nelson Institute of
Environmental Studies at UW-Madison, told the Capital Planning and Budget Committee about
the UW-Madison Sustainability Initiative, which grew out of Chancellor Martin’s strategic
priorities. A task force of faculty, staff, students and community members got together to study
issues related to the stewardship of resources at UW-Madison and to make recommendations for
how UW-Madison can become a model for sustainability. The task force issued a
comprehensive and thoughtful report, which was distributed to the Capital Planning and Budget
Committee. The final report has two basic recommendations: the creation of an office of
sustainability to coordinate efforts taking place across campus, and a system for connecting
office operations, education, and research to meet identified sustainability goals.


Capital Planning and Budget Committee Business


       Authority to Lease Space for UW-Extension

        Regent Bartell reported that Resolution 9849, brought by UW-Extension, requests
authority to lease space located at 5602 Research Park Boulevard, Madison, for the Division of
Continuing Education. This-ten year lease will replace an existing lease at University Research
Park and will consolidate space for the UW-Extension Division of Continuing Education,
Outreach, and E-Learning (CEOEL), as well as UW Colleges Online and the Academic
Distributed (ADL) Co-Lab. This co-location will allow all three of these groups which develop
online courses an opportunity to work together in a single building.
       Real Property Exchange Agreement

        Regent Bartell reported that Resolution 9850, brought by UW-Madison, requests
authority to accept seven land parcels, pursuant to the Real Property Exchange Agreement
between Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF) and the Board of Regents. All of the
properties are within the campus boundary, and six of them were identified in the 2005 Campus
Master Plan as sites for future academic, research, or support buildings. The seventh parcel,
which is located at 1221 West Johnson Street, is within the campus boundary, but was originally
designated for private development by the 2005 Campus Master Plan. With the construction of
the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery/Morgridge Institute for Research (WID/MIR), this block
will now be available for development by UW-Madison. The total value of the properties being
exchanged is slightly more than $6 million.


       West Campus Cogeneration Facility

       Regent Bartell said that Resolution 9851 seeks authority to begin planning the West
Campus Cogeneration Facility Addition and Chiller Installations project. The entire project will
cost about $67 million; the current action seeks to release about $1.6 million for preliminary
planning.


       UW-Milwaukee Lease for School of Public Health

        Resolution 9852, brought by UW-Milwaukee, seeks authority to lease space for the
School of Public Health. This lease will create the initial spaces to support the new School of
Public Health that will be located in downtown Milwaukee as part of the redevelopment of the
historic Pabst Brewery. The project will renovate the existing five-story Building 7 in the
Brewery, as well as construct a five-story addition. The resulting facility will provide space to
support the initial research, core facilities, collaboration, administration, teaching/instruction, and
external partners’ needs of the School of Public Health.

       This project is financially assisted by a generous $10 million gift from Joseph J. Zilber’s
Brewery Project, LLC, which Mr. Zilber’s estate is fulfilling by honoring his pledge to UW-
Milwaukee. The lease includes an option to purchase the project upon completion or in
subsequent years. It is intended that authority to purchase will be sought at the time of
occupancy using the Zilber gift to cover the majority of the $12.3 million cost.


       UW-Platteville Waiver Request

       Regent Bartell reported that Resolution 9853, brought by UW-Platteville, seeks authority
to request a waiver to allow a request for proposals for a design-build entity to design and
construct a $1.7 million storage facility project.
       Enumeration Projects

        Regent Bartell next described Resolution 9854, through which UW System is seeking the
enumeration of seven additional projects in the previously-submitted 2011-13 Capital Budget,
five of which will be totally funded by program revenues and/or gift/grant funds:

(1) The UW-Stout Harvey Hall Renovation - Phase II is a $29-million project and is the second
    of two that renovate and remodel deteriorated space in Harvey Hall. The project will
    upgrade the building infrastructure and remodel space to renew the service life of the
    building, provide improved functionality, and restore the building’s architectural character.
    Improvements include building envelope repairs and upgrades of all plumbing, mechanical,
    building automation, electrical, telecommunications, card access, and life safety systems.

(2) A $1 million storage facility project at UW-La Crosse would design and construct a new pre-
    engineered metal storage building that will be located on the north campus, adjacent to other
    service buildings, to alleviate the university’s lack of storage space for materials and
    grounds/maintenance equipment.

(3) A $1.5 million UW-Madison Materials Distribution Services (MDS) General Library System
    Storage addition will construct an addition to the existing MDS warehouse in Verona to
    provide climate-controlled storage space for approximately one million volumes of library
    materials for the UW-Madison General Library System.

(4) A $2.5 million gift-funded project, funded by two donors, at the UW-Madison University
    Ridge All Seasons Golf Practice Facility will construct an all-seasons practice facility at
    University Ridge Golf Course that will be the home for the men’s and women’s golf teams.

(5) The UW-Whitewater Drumlin Hall $4.6 million remodeling project will upgrade the 45-year-
    old Drumlin Dining Hall HVAC systems and replace the building’s inefficient single-glazed
    windows. The project will remodel the kitchen and seating area and include improvements
    that will provide better accessibility.

(6) The UW-Whitewater Young Auditorium Dance Studio Addition will construct a $900,000
    cash addition to the Young Auditorium that will provide a sprung-wood-floor dance studio
    and create classroom and rehearsal space for the university’s growing dance program that
    meets the standards of the National Association of the Schools of Dance.

(7) The final project is a 2013-15 advance enumeration request to construct a new Health and
    Human Performance/Recreation Building for Health and Human Performance Programs
    (HHP), athletics, and student recreation as an addition to the existing Hunt/Knowles complex
    at UW-River Falls. The building will include classrooms, a human performance laboratory, a
    large gymnasium, dance studio, auxiliary gym, offices, locker rooms, training rooms, and
    other supporting spaces. The badly-needed $63 million project will also remodel existing
    program-related space in the adjoining Hunt/Knowles complex and consolidate the HHP
    program into one primary location.
       All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects

        Resolution 9855 requests authority to construct 15 all-agency maintenance and repair
projects at nine UW System institutions, totaling $15.7 million, including $5 million of program
revenue. These projects include UW-Madison and UW-Platteville storm water improvements
and utility repairs on eight campuses.


Consent Agenda

        Stating that these seven resolutions were passed unanimously by the committee, Regent
Bartell moved that the Board adopt as consent agenda items Resolutions 9849, 9850, 9851, 9852,
9853, 9854, and 9855. Regent Drew seconded the motion, and the resolutions were adopted on a
unanimous voice vote:


       Authority to Lease Space for the Division of Continuing Education, UW-
       Extension

        Resolution 9849:         That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Extension
                                 Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin
                                 System, authority be granted for the Department of
                                 Administration to enter into a new lease agreement for 26,704
                                 square feet to replace three existing leases totaling 24,684
                                 square feet on behalf of the UW-Extension.


       Authority to Accept Land Parcels Pursuant to the Real Property Exchange
       Agreement between Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation and the Board of
       Regents, UW-Madison

        Resolution 9850:         That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison
                                 Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin
                                 System, approval be granted to accept seven parcels of land
                                 listed below from WARF Properties, LLC pursuant to the
                                 terms of the Real Property Exchange Agreement between
                                 Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF) and the
                                 Board of Regents, contingent upon the receipt of acceptable
                                 environmental audits.
                                 Parcel                                       Value
                                 924 West Dayton Street
                                 Madison, Wisconsin                           $374,000

                                 914 West Dayton Street
                                 Madison, Wisconsin                           $403,500
                       1221 West Johnson Street
                       Madison, Wisconsin                           $437,000

                       201 North Charter Street
                       Madison, Wisconsin                           $450,000

                       210 Bernard Court
                       Madison, Wisconsin                           $527,500

                       26 North Charter Street
                       Madison, Wisconsin                           $1,000,000

                       305 North Charter Street
                       Madison, Wisconsin                           $2,900,163


Authority to Plan the West Campus Cogeneration Facility Addition and Chiller
Installations Project, UW-Madison

Resolution 9851:       That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Madison
                       Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin
                       System, authority be granted to request the release of
                       $1,417,800 Building Trust Funds–Planning and the use of
                       $140,200 Program Revenue-Cash to prepare preliminary plans,
                       a design report, and construction documents for the West
                       Campus Cogeneration Facility Addition and Chiller
                       Installations project for an estimated total project cost of
                       $67,553,000 ($61,473,200 General Fund Supported Borrowing
                       and $6,079,800 Program Revenue Supported Borrowing).


Authority to Lease Space for the School of Public Health, UW-Milwaukee

Resolution 9852:       That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Milwaukee
                       Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin
                       System, approval be granted for the Department of
                       Administration to enter into a new lease of 57,460 square feet
                       on behalf of the UW-Milwaukee for the School of Public
                       Health.


Authority to Seek a Waiver of Wis. Stat. §16.855 to Allow Selection of a Design-
Build Entity to Design and Construct a Storage Facility Project, UW-Platteville
      Resolution 9853:     That, upon the recommendation of the UW-Platteville
                           Chancellor and the President of the University of Wisconsin
                           System, authority be granted to seek a waiver of Wis. Stat. §
                           16.855 under provisions of Wis. Stat. § 13.48 (19) to allow a
                           design-build entity, selected through a Request for Proposals
                           (RFP) process, to design and construct a Storage Facility
                           project at a total project cost of $1,700,000 Program Revenue-
                           Cash.


     Authority to Seek Enumeration of Seven Additional Major Projects as Part of
     the 2011-13 Capital Budget, UW System

      Resolution 9854:     That, upon the recommendation of the President of the
                           University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to seek
                           enumeration of the following seven additional major projects
                           as part of the 2011-13 Capital Budget:

                           (1) UW-Stout: Harvey Hall Renovation – Phase II
                           (2) UW-La Crosse: Storage Facility
                           (3) UW-Madison: Materials Distribution Services GLS
                               Storage Addition
                           (4) UW-Madison: University Ridge All Seasons Golf
                               Practice Facility
                           (5) UW-Whitewater: Drumlin Hall Remodeling
                           (6) UW-Whitewater: Young Auditorium Dance Studio
                               Addition
                           (7) UW-River Falls: Health and Human
                               Performance/Recreation Building-Planning (2013-15
                               Advance Enumeration Request)


     Authority to Construct All Agency Maintenance and Repair Projects, UW
     System

      Resolution 9855:     That, upon the recommendation of the President of the
                           University of Wisconsin System, authority be granted to
                           construct various maintenance and repair projects at an
                           estimated total cost of $18,363,500 ($11,609,500 General Fund
                           Supported Borrowing; $4,546,200 Program Revenue
                           Supported Borrowing; $1,992,800 Program Revenue-Cash; and
                           $215,000 Gifts and Grants Funding).


Report of the Associate Vice President
         Regent Bartell continued his report, noting that Associate Vice President David Miller
distributed the UW System 2011-17 Physical Development Plan. Senior Architect Jeff Kosloske
described the six-year plan, which is submitted to the Department of Administration on behalf of
all 15 System institutions. The plan balances state investment with university accountability and
allows UW institutions and the Board of Regents to better understand and manage educational
facility needs. The plan identifies the need for critical facility improvements, including the
renovation of existing facilities and the construction of new buildings.
                                                 ---



RESOLUTION OF APPRECIATION FOR UW-MADISON
        Regent Pruitt called upon Regent Walsh to present the resolution of appreciation to UW-
Madison for hosting the December meeting. Regent Walsh first stated that UW-Madison is a
special place for him. He grew up in the shadows of Camp Randall, and his father was a coach
at UW-Madison. Regent Walsh was involved three years ago in raising $1.2 million related to
photo-receptor research. The University of Wisconsin was cutting-edge in this research and
shared the research with other universities. A Harvard professor commented that UW-Madison
is unique and different from Harvard in that the doors are open at UW-Madison, where world-
class researchers share their research. Regent Walsh said that UW-Madison, like the Wisconsin
Idea, is world class in this field. As the university fights for funds, it is important to remember
what this great university, and this great System is about: it is about working together for the
people of Wisconsin. Regent Walsh then read the resolution, which was adopted by
acclamation.

        Resolution of Appreciation for UW-Madison

        Resolution 9856:          WHEREAS, the members of the Board of Regents of the
                                  University of Wisconsin System are proud of the global impact
                                  and international reach of the University of Wisconsin-
                                  Madison in research, teaching and outreach; and

                                  WHEREAS, Chancellor Biddy Martin’s administration is
                                  identifying innovative new ways to make the campus even
                                  more efficient and effective and provide enhanced quality for
                                  the entire state through the New Badger Partnership and the
                                  Madison Initiative for Undergraduates; and

                                  WHEREAS, by aligning research and education on
                                  sustainability with campus operations, UW-Madison is aiming
                                  to become a living model for sustainability, exemplifying
                                  values and actions that demonstrate a deep commitment to
                                  stewardship of resources; and

                                  WHEREAS, the university conducts more than $1-billion
                                  worth of research each year in the sciences, arts and humanities
                                 and provides Wisconsin with a powerful economic engine that
                                 has the potential to lead the state out of the economic
                                 challenges it faces; and

                                 WHEREAS, UW-Madison continues to prepare students to
                                 compete successfully in a global economy by developing their
                                 critical thinking skills and encouraging them to apply their
                                 knowledge in and out of the classroom; and

                                 WHEREAS, UW-Madison has reached out to promote exciting
                                 new partnerships and initiatives with universities in East Asia
                                 and has brought a group of some of China’s most talented
                                 athletes to campus to gain leadership skills for the future as
                                 part of the Chinese Champions Program; and

                                 WHEREAS, the university’s faculty has demonstrated
                                 continued excellence in the classroom, most recently with the
                                 naming of soil scientist Teri Balser as U.S. Professor of the
                                 Year by the Council for the Advancement and Support of
                                 Education; and

                                 WHEREAS, UW-Madison has just opened impressive new
                                 facilities, such as the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery and
                                 the revamped Education Building, and is looking ahead with
                                 projects like the Wisconsin Energy Institute, the Charter Street
                                 Heating Plant renovation and the new Union South;

                                 BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the University of
                                 Wisconsin Board of Regents hereby thanks Chancellor Biddy
                                 Martin and all of her colleagues for making the campus a
                                 valued Wisconsin asset that benefits the world—educationally,
                                 economically, culturally and socially—and for sharing their
                                 campus’s hospitality and engaging presentations as they hosted
                                 this December 2010 Board meeting.

                                               ---


UNFINISHED OR ADDITIONAL BUSINESS
        Regent Pruitt recognized Regent Crain, who, following up on the reports made by
President Pruitt and President Reilly, said that she heartily applauds the efforts System
Administration and the chancellors have made regarding civility. Reading of some of the
incidents of incivility has been very disturbing. “Civility” is perhaps an inadequate word; the
issue is respect and appreciation for other people. The Board of Regents cares about these
issues. Regent Drew, adding to Regent Crain’s comments, commended the students who have
stood up and participated in activities in opposition to race- and sexual-orientation-based
vandalism on campuses.

The meeting was adjourned at 11:17 a.m. and reconvened at 11:30 a.m.

                                                ---


CLOSED SESSION
       The following resolution was moved by Regent Manydeeds. seconded by Regent
Spector, and adopted on a roll-call vote, with Regents Bartell, Bradley, Crain, Danae Davis, Stan
Davis, Drew, Evers, Falbo, Loftus, Manydeeds, Pruitt, Schwalenberg, Smith, Spector, Walsh and
Wingad voting in the affirmative. There were no dissenting votes and no abstentions.

       Resolution 9857:           That the Board of Regents move into closed session to consider
                                  UW-Milwaukee honorary degree nominations, as permitted by
                                  s. 19.85(1)(f), Wis. Stats.; to consider appointment of a UW
                                  Colleges and UW-Extension chancellor, as permitted by s.
                                  19.85(1)(c), Wis. Stats.; to discuss the report of the Committee
                                  on Faculty and Academic Staff Collective Bargaining, as
                                  permitted by s. 19.85(1)(e), Wis. Stats.; to consider two student
                                  requests for review of UW-Milwaukee decisions and a student
                                  request for review of a UW-Madison decision, as permitted by
                                  s. 19.85(1)(f), Wis. Stats.; and to confer with legal counsel
                                  regarding pending or potential litigation, as permitted by
                                  19.85(1)(g), Wis. Stats.

The following resolutions were approved during closed session:

       Authorization to Appoint: Chancellor, University of Wisconsin Colleges and
       University of Wisconsin-Extension

       Resolution 9858:               That, upon recommendation of the President of the University
                                  of Wisconsin System, Raymond W. Cross be appointed
                                  Chancellor of University of Wisconsin Colleges and University of
                                  Wisconsin-Extension, effective on or about February 15, 2011, at
                                  a salary of $225,000.

       Student Request for Review of a UW-Milwaukee Decision

       Resolution 9859:              That the Board of Regents adopts the attached Proposed
                                  Decision and Order as the Board’s final Decision and Order in the
                               matter of a student request for review of a UW-Milwaukee
                               decision.

       Student Request for Review of a UW-Milwaukee Decision

       Resolution 9860:           That the Board of Regents adopts the attached Proposed
                               Decision and Order as the Board’s final Decision and Order in the
                               matter of a student request for review of a UW-Milwaukee
                               decision.

       Student Request for Review of a UW- Madison Decision

       Resolution 9861:           That the Board of Regents adopts the attached Proposed
                               Decision and Order as the Board’s final Decision and Order in the
                               matter of a student request for review of a UW-Madison decision.

                                           ---

The meeting was adjourned at 1:30 p.m.

				
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