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					                                    CABLE Gram
                  Collecting and Broadcasting for Law Enforcement
               Subscription information available at www.cablegram.org
                              Publisher, Zhi Hamby-Nye


The CABLE Gram is a weekly publication started in July 2004, currently distributed at no
charge to members of the law enforcement, operations security and intelligence
communities. The CABLE Gram is produced by and is the intellectual property of Real
Trends, Inc. Back issues are available online at http://www.cablegram.org.


CABLE Gram Volume 4 Issue 23

19 June 2007 CABLE Gram™

Good Morning All,

In the Current Update:

FEDERAL
1. Bush: How about $4.4 billion for border? (Washington Times, 14 June 2007)
2. Faulting Allies' Anti-Terrorism Efforts (Washington Post, 14 June 2007)
3. Homeland Security spending bill passes without veto-proof majority (By Peter Cohn,
CongressDaily, 18 Jun 2007)
4. Homeland Security under fire for plans to finance new facility (By Chris Strohm,
CongressDaily, 13 Jun 2007)
5. FBI Finds It Frequently Overstepped in Collecting Data (Washington Post, 14 June
2007)
6. FBI hails U.S.-China terrorism co-op (Xinhuanet, 13 Jun 2007)
7. Illegals using fire to clear border (Washington Times, 18 June 2007)
8. House Delays Rules Requiring Passports (AP, 15 June 2007)
9. Committee draft of terrorism coverage bill divides industry (By Bill Swindell,
CongressDaily, 19 Jun 2007)
10. U.S. Eyes Antiterror Rules for Small Jets and Boats (New York Times, 16 Jun 2007)
11. Security focus driving away foreign tourists, former DHS chief says (By Chris
Strohm, CongressDaily, 18 Jun 2007)
12. Canada introduces no-fly list amid fear of abuses (Reuters, 18 Jun 2007)

STATE AND LOCAL NEWS
13. CT: Chertoff Defends New Haven Immigration Sweep (AP, 19 Jun 2007)
14. MD: Decontamination unit used during avian flu outbreak featured (The Daily Times,
19 Jun 2007)
15. OH: Kent State gets one of two bioterrorism labs in the country (Stater Online, 13 Jun
2007)
16. SC: Lexington County to test response to weapon of mass destruction (WIS, 19 Jun
2007)
17. TX: DOD trains with FEMA, state during Texas hurricane exercise (All American
Patriots, 19 Jun 2007)
18. TX: Potential for Identity Theft a Concern at A&M-Corpus Christi (KLBJ, 19 Jun
2007)
19. UT: Missile detection tests planned for Utah in 2010 (AP, 18 Jun 2007)

KEY PEOPLE
20. Remarks by Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff to the National Council
of Farmer Cooperatives (Release Date: 14 Jun 2007)

GANG ACTIVITY
21. CA: Injunction would ban gang activities (The Press-Enterprise, 12 Jun 2007)
22. CA: Assembly Approves Bill Mandating Anti-Gang Classes for Parents (KCBS, 13
Jun 2007)
23. CO: Solutions sought for Carson's gang problem (Nevada Appeal, 14 Jun 2007)
24. CO: Growing Gang Presence Lurks At City's Jazz Concerts (The Denver Channel, 13
Jun 2007)
25. IL: Reputed Chicago Mafia boss's brother pleads to paying murder witness (AP, 14
Jun 2007)
26. IL: FBI increases reward for arrest of South Side gang leader (Times Online, 13 Jun
2007)
27. IA: Sioux City Police Department reforms gang unit (Sioux city Journal, 13 Jun
2007)
28. KS: Police to alert bars of gang pressure (The Wichita Eagle, 19 Jun 2007)
29. NJ: North Jersey raid nets 22 gang members (The Record, 14 Jun 2007)
30. NM: Police seek 2 suspects in slaying (The New Mexican, 18 Jun 2007)
31. NC: School board approves gang policy (Times-News, 19 Jun 2007)
32. OH: Gang crackdown nets more arrests (The Plain Dealer, posted by Mike Tobin, 13
Jun 2007)
33. RI: Ex-gang member faces weapons, drug charges (Providence Journal, 16 Jun 2007)
34. SC: Sanford signs gang violence bill into law (Herald Online, 19 Jun 2007)
35. VA: Gang violence on the decline, but not gone (The Fairfax County Times, 12 Jun
2007)
36. WA: Parents worried about gang activity at elementary school (KING 5 News, 13 Jun
2007)
37. Canada: Toronto gang sweep nets 60 suspects, drugs (UPI, 13 Jun 2007)
38. Italy: Cops Shut Down Alleged Mafia Station in Italy (RW Online, 15 Jun 2007)

NARCO TRAFFICKING
39. CA: Drug cartel leader pleads guilty to selling cocaine (Los Angeles Times, 19 Jun
2007)
40. FL: "Operation Crack Down" Lands Cocaine Dealers In Jail (First Coast News, 15
Jun 2007)
41. LA: St. Martin Parish traffic stop yields 83 kilograms of cocaine (The Daily
Advertiser, 16 Jun 2007)
42. NY: Reputed Cocaine Smuggler Convicted (AP, 15 Jun 2007)
43. TX: Grandmother accused of distributing heroin for Mexican Mafia (KENS 5
Eyewitness News, 16 Jun 2007)
44. TX: Ex-Cop Sells Pot Tips on DVD (AP, 19 June 2007)
45. Canada: RCMP seizes cocaine found in frozen mango puree (CTV.ca News Staff, 19
Jun 2007)
46. US, Mexican and Congo suspects charged in Venezuela drug bust on Caribbean
island (AP, 16 Jun 2007)
47. Spanish police intercept cocaine ship on Atlantic (DPA, 18 Jun 2007)
48. US Congress urges military to tackle Afghan opium (Christian Science Monitor, 14
June 2007)
49. How Cocaine Defies the First Rule in Economics (Shared Responsibiity, 16 Jun
2007)

CYBERTHREAT & THEFT
50. Police Smash Global Pedophile Ring (AP, 19 June 2007)
51. FBI tries to fight zombie hordes (BBC, 14 June 2007)
52. VA sets aside $20 million to handle latest data breach (GovExec.com, 15 Jun 2007)

TECHNOLOGY
53. House, Senate security bills differ on tech projects (By Chris Strohm, National
Journal's Technology Daily, 19 Jun 2007)
54. House science panel backs increase in airport security funding (By Elaine S. Povich,
CongressDaily, 15 Jun 2007)
55. Coast Guard considering drones to watch long coastlines (By Jon Fox, Global
Security Newswire, 19 Jun 2007)
56. FDA Releases New Software Tool to Help Keep Food Facilities Safe from Attack
(FDA, 15 Jun 2007)
57. Nanogen announces collaboration with Canadian agencies to develop veterinary and
bioterrorism diagnostics (Animal Lab News, 18 Jun 2007)

RESOURCES
58. "National Continuity Policy: A Brief Overview," Congressional Research Service
Report June 8, 2007
59. "Border Security: The San Diego Fence," Congressional Research Service Report
updated May 23, 2007

OPPORTUNITIES
60. Coast Guard searches for handheld card readers for TWIC (FCW, 18 Jun 2007)
61. Position Title: Program Assistant - The Jamestown Foundation, Washington, D.C.

EVENTS
62. Former agent to give bioterrorism talk (newsleader.com, 19 Jun 2007)

FULL REPORTS

63. U.S. Law Officers Take New Approach To Combat Prostitution - Maryland police
treat trafficked persons as victims, not criminals (By Lea Terhune, USINFO Staff Writer,
19 Jun 2007)
64. U.S. Allies Urged To Move Decisively Against Terrorism Financing - Political will,
legal tools required, U.S. Treasury secretary says (Dept. of State, 14 Jun 2007)
65. Avian Flu Vaccine Stockpile Being Planned for Developing Nations - International
rules in effect June 15 to promote global health security (By Cheryl Pellerin,, USINFO
Staff Writer, 14 Jun 2007)

Take care,

Zhi Hamby-Nye, Editor
Henry Ziegler, Associate Editor
Electronic Distribution provided by Richard Forno and Bill Feinbloom of G2-Forward

The CABLE Gram is a weekly publication, distributed in PDF format and is currently
included as a benefit of membership in the OPSEC Professionals Society and the
National Military Intelligence Association.

Issues covered in the CABLE Gram include: Homeland Defense, Homeland Security,
Terrorism, Federal Law Enforcement, First Responders, Money Laundering, Identity
Theft, NBC Weapons, Cybercrimes, Smuggling, Narco Trafficking, Hazardous Materials
and other related topics.

We search the topics and Websites that you request, so it is important for you to provide
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make it. Please let us know the topics and keywords that will assist you in your
professional endeavors. Send all comments and suggestions to zhi@cablegram.org –
please type CABLE Gram in the subject line.


FEDERAL

1. Bush: How about $4.4 billion for border? (Washington Times, 14 June 2007)
President Bush this morning proposed spending $4.4 billion on border security as the first
step in a comprehensive immigration reform bill, in the White House's latest effort to
resurrect the bill that failed last week. "We're going to show the American people that the
promises in this bill will be kept," Mr. Bush said, in a speech to a meeting of the
Associated Builders and Contractors. Mr. Bush said he understands that "Americans are
skeptical about immigration reform," saying that an attempt at immigration reform in
1986 "failed." The White House has acknowledged this week that the bill, which stalled
last week and was pulled off the Senate floor, failed in part because there is massive
grass-roots skepticism about the government's sincerity and ability to secure the border.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.washtimes.com/national/20070614-100304-8049r.htm

2. Faulting Allies' Anti-Terrorism Efforts (Washington Post, 14 June 2007)
The Treasury Department tried to persuade other nations to target an Iranian bank
involved in financing missile deals but ultimately took unilateral action because such
nations lacked the necessary legal tools and "political will," Treasury Secretary Henry M.
Paulson Jr. will disclose today in a speech on the department's worldwide campaign to
target financial institutions connected to illicit activities. In the speech, to be delivered to
the Council on Foreign Relations in New York this morning, Paulson will press other
countries to pass laws that target terrorist financing and to implement sanctions already
on the books. "Everyone acknowledges that we must find effective ways to deal with
these threats, short of military measures," he will say, according to a copy of his prepared
remarks. "Yet other nations are not moving quickly enough to accomplish that goal."
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://tinyurl.com/2uhufk

3. Homeland Security spending bill passes without veto-proof majority (By Peter
Cohn, CongressDaily, 18 Jun 2007)
The House passed a $37.4 billion fiscal 2008 Homeland Security spending bill Friday on
a 268-150 vote in the face of a White House veto threat over its price tag that is $2.1
billion above President Bush's request. Forty-five Republicans crossed the aisle to
support the bill but not enough to override a veto if Bush follows through on his threat. "I
urge the president to back off his veto threat and sign this important bipartisan legislation,
which passed so overwhelmingly in the House of Representatives," said House Majority
Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md. Republicans demonstrated that even on the popular
Homeland Security measure they have the votes to uphold a veto, which bodes ill for
Democratic hopes to increase spending on education, the environment and social
services. But Democrats expressed confidence the bill would eventually be signed.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=37222&dcn=e_gvet

4. Homeland Security under fire for plans to finance new facility (By Chris Strohm,
CongressDaily, 13 Jun 2007)
House appropriators are questioning the Homeland Security Department's plan to help
finance and staff a new computer investigations center in Alabama, saying the project
smacks of an administration "earmark" that might have been allowed to proceed without
competitive bidding or congressional approval. Appropriators criticized the department's
hand in developing the National Computer Forensic Institute in Hoover, Ala., in their
report accompanying the fiscal 2008 Homeland Security appropriations bill, scheduled to
be on the House floor Tuesday. The center, located in the district of Rep. Spencer
Bachus, R-Ala., will train state and local law enforcement officials on how to do cyber-
investigations and forensic analysis of computers and other electronics equipment,
Homeland Security officials said.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=37166&dcn=e_gvet

5. FBI Finds It Frequently Overstepped in Collecting Data (Washington Post, 14
June 2007)
An internal FBI audit has found that the bureau potentially violated the law or agency
rules more than 1,000 times while collecting data about domestic phone calls, e-mails and
financial transactions in recent years, far more than was documented in a Justice
Department report in March that ignited bipartisan congressional criticism. The new audit
covers just 10 percent of the bureau's national security investigations since 2002, and so
the mistakes in the FBI's domestic surveillance efforts probably number several thousand,
bureau officials said in interviews. The earlier report found 22 violations in a much
smaller sampling.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://tinyurl.com/38fknd

6. FBI hails U.S.-China terrorism co-op (Xinhuanet, 13 Jun 2007)
BEIJING - A deputy director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) of the United
States on Wednesday hailed its cooperation with China on terrorism. "I am satisfied with
the level of cooperation on terrorism with China," Thomas Fuentes, assistant director of
the FBI, told a briefing on Wednesday. He said the FBI is working with Chinese public
security officials to track the role of "East Turkistan" groups in China's northwest in
terrorist activities and their possible links with al Qaeda. The hour-long briefing took
place in U.S. Embassy in Beijing and came one day ahead of the sixth meeting of Joint
Liaison Group between China and the United States on law enforcement cooperation.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2007-06/13/content_6238987.htm

7. Illegals using fire to clear border (Washington Times, 18 June 2007)
U.S. Border Patrol agents seeking to secure the nation's border in some of the country's
most pristine national forests are being targeted by illegal aliens, who are using
intentionally set fires to burn agents out of observation posts and patrol routes. The
wildfires also have resulted in the destruction of valuable natural and cultural resources in
the National Forest System and pose an ongoing threat to visitors, residents and
responding firefighters, according to federal law enforcement authorities and others.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.washingtontimes.com/national/20070618-051221-2641r.htm

8. House Delays Rules Requiring Passports (AP, 15 June 2007)
Congress is moving to postpone until June 2009 requiring passports for land and sea
travel to Canada, Mexico, Bermuda and the Caribbean after complaints about vacation-
ruining delays by the State Department in issuing them. The House passed the 17-month
delay Friday after a key Senate committee approved it a day earlier. The State
Department has been flooded with applications since new rules went into effect in
January requiring passports for air travelers returning from the same destinations. The
resulting backlog has caused delays of up to three months for passports and ruined or
delayed the travel plans of thousands of people. In response, the government last week
temporarily waived a passport requirement for air travel, provided people can
demonstrate they've applied.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.wtopnews.com/?nid=116&sid=1167999

9. Committee draft of terrorism coverage bill divides industry (By Bill Swindell,
CongressDaily, 19 Jun 2007)
The House Financial Services Committee is poised to unveil legislation that would
reauthorize the federal government's terrorism risk insurance program with a provision
that would require carriers to make available coverage of a nuclear, biological, chemical
or radiological attack. The draft bill, according to sources, would pit different segments
of the insurance industry against each other over the provision to include coverage of a
nuclear, biological, chemical or radiological attack with a 7.5 percent insurer deductible.
"The jury is still out on this [provision]," said one lobbyist. The American Insurance
Association and large policyholders with hotel and retail properties back the inclusion for
such coverage, but it is opposed by the Property Casualty Insurers Association of
America and the National Association of Mutual Insurance Companies, which argue that
it would result in massive risk exposures for smaller companies.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=37236&dcn=e_gvet

10. U.S. Eyes Antiterror Rules for Small Jets and Boats (New York Times, 16 Jun
2007)
WASHINGTON, June 15 — Acknowledging that the nation remains too vulnerable to
terrorist attack by small planes and recreational boats, the Department of Homeland
Security is considering new requirements to allow authorities to identify operators and
passengers in millions of these vehicles as they ply the coasts and skies. Department
personnel have been touring the country meeting with trade groups and elected officials
to gauge their reaction to the proposed changes, to be issued by the Transportation
Security Administration and the Coast Guard.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/06/16/washington/16secure.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

11. Security focus driving away foreign tourists, former DHS chief says (By Chris
Strohm, CongressDaily, 18 Jun 2007)
Backed by the travel and tourism industry, former Homeland Security Secretary Tom
Ridge said Friday that the federal government needs to adjust its policies for attracting
visitors to the United States, acknowledging that some security programs put in place by
Congress and the Bush administration after 9/11 have created a negative backlash around
the world. Ridge, who was responsible for implementing security programs as the
nation's first Homeland Security secretary, said the government needs to strike a new
balance between having security while welcoming travelers and tourists. "I'm saying right
after 9/11 the Congress and the administration rightly focused primarily on security and
we made significant adjustments in policy and protocol," Ridge said in an interview on
Capitol Hill. "Now I think it's time, after five years of experience, we've seen where some
of it worked and some of it hasn't worked. Clearly in some areas where it hasn't worked it
has created a misimpression that we aren't welcoming."
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=37223&dcn=e_gvet

12. Canada introduces no-fly list amid fear of abuses (Reuters, 18 Jun 2007)
OTTAWA, Canada - Canada introduced a no-fly list Monday to ground potential air
passengers "who may pose an immediate threat to aviation security" and tried to play
down concerns that the list could be abused. Airlines will be obliged to check the names
of passengers who appear to be 12 or over against the list, which was compiled using
information from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police as well as Canada's counter-
intelligence agency. "Canadians need protection against terrorism. That's the basic point
... we're looking at the terrorist challenge and we're looking at ways of addressing it," said
Allan Kagedan, chief of aviation security policy at Transport Canada.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/americas/06/18/canada.no.fly.reut/index.html

STATE AND LOCAL NEWS

13. CT: Chertoff Defends New Haven Immigration Sweep (AP, 19 Jun 2007)
Hartford - The nation's homeland security chief says the recent immigration sweep in
New Haven was not in retaliation for the city's approval of identification cards for illegal
immigrants.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.theday.com/re.aspx?re=aff3c918-1497-4cb7-82c1-d2c865ea3f4c

14. MD: Decontamination unit used during avian flu outbreak featured (The Daily
Times, 19 Jun 2007)
OCEAN CITY - Members of the Worcester County Fire Marshal's Office showcased
their hazardous materials decontamination unit to visitors at the 115th annual Maryland
State Firemen's Association Convention in Ocean City. The Fire Marshal's Office and the
Worcester County Special Hazards response team set up the decontamination trailer unit,
the only one on Maryland's Eastern Shore, so visiting firefighters could see how the unit
could help in situations involving hazardous materials. "Sept. 11 brought everything to
light about hazardous materials," said Matt Owens of the Worcester County Fire
Marshal's Office. "Now it's at the front of everybody's mind." Brian Winter, another
member of the Fire Marshal's Office, gave visitors tours of the unit, which also featured a
collapsible outdoor shower.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://tinyurl.com/yuwmrq

15. OH: Kent State gets one of two bioterrorism labs in the country (Stater Online,
13 Jun 2007)
Since 2005 Kent State has unofficially been at the forefront in the battle against
bioterrorism, but it was only this past May that the university officially created and
recognized the Center for Public Health Preparedness. "The goal of the center is to
involve business, community and academic groups to address biopreparedness and
homeland security issues through education, research and workforce development," said
Shannon Helfinstine, the program coordinator for the center. Helfinstine, a former
doctoral student in biological sciences at Kent State, has been working with the center
since its training lab opened in October 2005.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://tinyurl.com/2ykj26

16. SC: Lexington County to test response to weapon of mass destruction (WIS, 19
Jun 2007)
LEXINGTON COUNTY, SC - In Lexington Tuesday, expect to hear some loud
explosions and see lots of law enforcement. The Lexington County Sheriff's Department
is partnering with 50 local, state and federal agencies to conduct a full scale weapons of
mass destruction exercise.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.wistv.com/Global/story.asp?S=6675573

17. TX: DOD trains with FEMA, state during Texas hurricane exercise (All
American Patriots, 19 Jun 2007)
June 18, 2007 - Whether the participants were new to civil support operations or veterans
of real-world missions, all say they found opportunities to learn during the Texas
Hurricane Exercise June 4-7. The event in Austin, Texas, allowed the state and its federal
partners to evaluate Brownsville and Houston-Galveston evacuation plans as the notional
Category 4 “Hurricane Debbie” approached the Texas coast.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://tinyurl.com/yvakue

18. TX: Potential for Identity Theft a Concern at A&M-Corpus Christi (KLBJ, 19
Jun 2007)
As many as 8,000 current and former students at Texas A&M University in Corpus
Christi could be facing identity theft. Schools officials say math department chair Blair
Sterba-Boatright was on vacation in Africa when he lost the flash drive that may have
contained students' social security numbers. Stephen Mason, president of the Capital City
A&M Club, says we should all be careful about sharing our information because we
could end up sharing it with organizations that may not be as careful.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.590klbj.com/News/Story.aspx?ID=69819

19. UT: Missile detection tests planned for Utah in 2010 (AP, 18 Jun 2007)
The Army plans tests in 2010 in Utah's west desert for a system to detect incoming cruise
missiles. It's called the Joint Land Attrack Cruise Missile Defense Elevated Netted Sensor
System. That's a long name to describe a system that use balloons carrying radar to give
troops on the ground information about enemy missiles. The tests are expected to use
unmanned aerial vehicles in place of missiles. Program manager Christopher Johnson
says the tests will show whether the technology works.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.sltrib.com/news/ci_6169666

KEY PEOPLE

20. Remarks by Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff to the National
Council of Farmer Cooperatives (Release Date: 14 Jun 2007)
Secretary Chertoff: Thanks for that kind introduction, and thank you for welcoming me
and introducing me to the head table. I really appreciate the opportunity to talk this
morning before this group. I know the National Council of Farmer Cooperatives has been
a very vigorous and valued supporter of comprehensive immigration reform. And I
appreciate your efforts in the Senate. As you know, this is a very, very important bill, and
I would venture to say, the last chance and the best chance we have to fix a problem
which is getting increasingly difficult for all sectors of the economy, and is also posing a
real challenge to our social fabric. We have an opportunity to get it right, but this is an
area where your personal and vigorous engagement is very important, because there are
lots of forces who are working very vigorously and actively to prevent there being
comprehensive immigration reform.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.dhs.gov/xnews/speeches/sp_1181915713176.shtm

GANG ACTIVITY

21. CA: Injunction would ban gang activities (The Press-Enterprise, 12 Jun 2007)
The Riverside County district attorney's office is drafting its first-ever civil injunction
against more than 100 members of a street gang. The injunction will prohibit members
from certain activities or behaviors in public spaces within a roughly 3-square-mile
section of western Riverside County they claim as their turf. For instance, they will not
be allowed to associate with other members of that gang; they will not be able to wear
certain clothes specific to that gang; and they will not be allowed to possess weapons or
graffiti tools. They will also have to adhere to a curfew.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://tinyurl.com/3yrv48

22. CA: Assembly Approves Bill Mandating Anti-Gang Classes for Parents (KCBS,
13 Jun 2007)
SAN FRANCISCO - Parents whose children are convicted of gang-related crimes could
be ordered to attend anti-gang education classes at their own expense, under an obscure
bill making its way through the state legislature. The bill’s author, southern California
Democrat Tony Mendoza, said too many parents fail to recognize the signs that their
children have become involved in gang life. “One of the things that kept coming up is
that parents are not being held responsible, not being held accountable,” he told KCBS
reporter George Harris. Although his bill, approved unanimously by the Assembly
yesterday, would apply only to parents of first-time offenders, it places the burden of
preventing future gang-related offenses squarely inside the home.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.kcbs.com/pages/577178.php?contentType=4&contentId=606210
23. CO: Solutions sought for Carson's gang problem (Nevada Appeal, 14 Jun 2007)
Carson City has received a number of grants in recent days aimed at combating street
gangs. District Attorney Neil Rombardo announced Wednesday that Carson City has
been selected as one of six jurisdictions nationwide that will participate in an initiative
known as the Gang Response Model created by the National District Attorneys
Association. "The Carson City Sheriff's Office has identified at least nine gangs in
Carson City, and various factors are drawing more gang members to the Carson City
area," Rombardo said. In the application for the assistance, Rombardo noted that the
city's location geographically makes it an ideal rest stop for Mexican drug traffickers and
the estimated 400 gang members in Carson City are easy prey for large drug cartels
looking for people to move their merchandise.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.nevadaappeal.com/article/20070614/NEWS/106140084

24. CO: Growing Gang Presence Lurks At City's Jazz Concerts (The Denver
Channel, 13 Jun 2007)
DENVER - They are not calling it a "turf war," but Denver city officials are admittedly
concerned about a growing number of reported gang problems in City Park. During the
first couple of weeks of the summer-long Sunday night jazz series, attendees and
organizers reported seeing dozens of suspected gang members dressed in all blue and
others in all red. The park is considered one of the Mile High City's treasures by Mayor
John Hickenlooper.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/13499185/detail.html

25. IL: Reputed Chicago Mafia boss's brother pleads to paying murder witness (AP,
14 Jun 2007)
CHICAGO: The brother of reputed mob boss James Marcello pleaded guilty to
racketeering and other charges and admitted he paid a witness $4,000 ( 3,000) a month
to keep silent about unsolved underworld murders. Michael Marcello was one of three
men to plead guilty in the case before federal Judge James B. Zagel on Thursday, five
days before the scheduled start of Chicago's biggest mob trial in years. Marcello, 56,
listened Thursday as lead prosecutor Mitchell A. Mars accused him of paying former
mobster Nicholas Calabrese $4,000 ( 3,000) a month — Mars did not specify for how
long — in hopes that Calabrese would not talk to federal agents and tie brother James to
the killings.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2007/06/15/america/NA-GEN-US-Mafia-Trial.php

26. IL: FBI increases reward for arrest of South Side gang leader (Times Online, 13
Jun 2007)
The FBI has doubled its reward for information leading to the arrest of a reputed South
Side gang leader who has been known to frequent the south suburbs, including South
Holland. The FBI announced Tuesday a $20,000 reward for 39-year-old Donnell Jehan,
whose last known address was 6522 S. Ashland Ave. in Chicago, said Robert D. Grant,
special agent in charge of the Chicago Office. Jehan has been the subject of a nationwide
manhunt since May 2004 after being charged in a criminal complaint with multiple
violations of federal drug laws, officials said.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://tinyurl.com/2uadc7

27. IA: Sioux City Police Department reforms gang unit (Sioux city Journal, 13 Jun
2007)
Sioux City Police Chief Joe Frisbie announced Wednesday the department has reformed
its gang unit to combat the increasing incidents of criminal activity linked to gang
members. About 15 years ago, the department had another gang unit. "A lot of people
went to jail and a lot of people left town," Frisbie said. "It got to the point where it was
almost unnecessary. I hope that's what happens this time." Gang unit members already
are out on the streets gathering intelligence and passing it on to uniform officers and
detectives. The unit will operate out of the detective bureau.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://tinyurl.com/353hom

28. KS: Police to alert bars of gang pressure (The Wichita Eagle, 19 Jun 2007)
In response to a gang shooting that killed a Wichita bar owner earlier this month, police
are planning a citywide campaign to warn neighborhood bars about gangs. The idea is to
prevent violence and alert club owners that gangs could be trying to set up new hangouts
in their businesses, Deputy Chief Tom Stolz said. Officers will be visiting the clubs and
spreading the message soon. The outreach will focus on smaller bars that don't have all
the security staff and safety measures of larger clubs. Already, police had targeted some
bars that cater to gangs. As a result, Stolz said, some gangs have been looking for new
hangouts. Gangs try to move in and take control of little venues like Half-Time Sports
Bar, at Harry and Hillside, where owner 42-year-old Teresa Hastings was fatally shot
June 5, said Lt. Jeff Easter, head of the police anti-gang unit.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.kansas.com/news/local/story/100552.html

29. NJ: North Jersey raid nets 22 gang members (The Record, 14 Jun 2007)
An unknown suspect arrived at the New Jersey State Police Totowa barracks after being
arrested during a raid. Local and State police rounded up top alleged gang members this
morning during multiple raids in northern New Jersey. New Jersey State Police this
morning rounded up nearly two dozen people who they say are members of one of the
most violent street gangs in the state, in a series of quick, coordinated strikes in Paterson,
Passaic and Hackensack. Police began fanning out about 7 a.m. this morning to arrest
alleged members of Sex Money Murder, a Bloods subset, including three men identified
as leaders of the 3,000-member group. At the same time, federal and local authorities in
Newark conducted their own sweep, arresting 15 suspected Bloods street gang members.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://tinyurl.com/yqqaml

30. NM: Police seek 2 suspects in slaying (The New Mexican, 18 Jun 2007)
Santa Fe police are looking for two men in connection with last weekend’s slaying of a
26-year-old man. Jacob Patrick Chavez, 25, and Michael Martinez, 24, both of Santa Fe,
are named in arrest warrants for open counts of murder in the death of Max Valdez,
whose body was found at his south-side mobile home at 1299 Zepol Road, Lot No. 125,
police Sgt. Aric Wheeler said. “They’re dangerous individuals that have shown patterns
of violence in the past,” Wheeler said Sunday night.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.santafenewmexican.com/news/63364.html

31. NC: School board approves gang policy (Times-News, 19 Jun 2007)
Wearing gang colors, showing gang tattoos or jewelry, and using hand gestures won’t be
tolerated at local public schools. Those are some of the provisions in the school system’s
new gang policy, which was approved unanimously by the Alamance-Burlington Board
of Education on Monday night. Before, gang activity was punished under a variety of
policies on topics like dress code and defacing school property. Now, principals will have
an all-encompassing policy that bans just about any gang activity and provides
punishment for students who are caught. Some of the gang activities that are prohibited in
the policy include trying to recruit new members, inciting violence by others and
requiring payment of protection money.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://tinyurl.com/26b9ht

32. OH: Gang crackdown nets more arrests (The Plain Dealer, posted by Mike
Tobin, 13 Jun 2007)
Federal and city officials are halfway through their top-10 list of the most dangerous
street gangs in Cleveland after police rounded up members two more gangs. More than
150 people have been arrested in the past year as part of the $2.5 million federal gang
initiative. Authorities arrested 38 people on drugs and weapons charges Wednesday.
"We're focusing on the most violent, dangerous gangs and going after them," said Special
Agent Christopher Sadowski, head of the local Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms
and Explosives.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://tinyurl.com/2p258w

33. RI: Ex-gang member faces weapons, drug charges (Providence Journal, 16 Jun
2007)
SCITUATE — Two Providence men, one a former Latin Kings gang member who
served time in a federal prison, were arrested yesterday on numerous charges, the state
police said at a news conference. In an early morning raid yesterday, state police
detectives arrested Kareem Abdullah, 31, identified by the police as the former gang
member, and Francisco Perez, 25, in their first-floor apartment at 362 Carpenter St.,
Providence. The police charged Abdullah with 16 separate crimes including possession of
firearms, drugs, fireworks and counterfeit money. Perez faces 13 similar charges.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://tinyurl.com/2fdcyv
34. SC: Sanford signs gang violence bill into law (Herald Online, 19 Jun 2007)
COLUMBIA - Supporters of a newly signed law say police now have important weapons
to combat South Carolina's growing gang problem. Critics contend it gives the state too
much power, and they worry that a proposed gang database would be used to deprive
people who haven't been convicted of a crime of some basic rights. When Gov. Mark
Sanford signed the law Tuesday, South Carolina joined 36 other states and the District of
Columbia with anti-gang laws. "The biggest obstacle was getting communities to
understand they have a gang problem," said Sen. Jake Knotts, R-Lexington, who has been
pushing anti-gang legislation since 1999.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.heraldonline.com/109/story/49795.html

35. VA: Gang violence on the decline, but not gone (The Fairfax County Times, 12
Jun 2007)
More than two years after Fairfax County announced its efforts to curb gang activity,
officials say gang-related violence has decreased in the area, despite recent initiations and
violent acts attributed to gang members. The county police department estimated there
were at least 1,500 gang members in more than 80 gangs in the area in 2005, and those
numbers have not changed much, said public information officer Eddy Azcarate, a former
detective with the county's gang unit. "There has been a significant decrease in gang
activity from '05 to '06 almost across the board in every category, particularly the violent
crime area," said Robert Bermingham, the county's gang prevention coordinator, who
was appointed in March 2005.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://tinyurl.com/2vtcgg

36. WA: Parents worried about gang activity at elementary school (KING 5 News,
13 Jun 2007)
MARYSVILLE, Wash. – Some parents in Snohomish County are worried about gang
activity in a Marysville elementary school. The kids allegedly involved in the gang
activity are third- and fifth-grade students at Sunnyside Elementary. Some parents say the
school district isn't doing enough. Allegedly, a small group of kids at has been
threatening other students trying get them to join their gang. One mom says the
youngsters wear gang colors and even have their own gang symbol.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.king5.com/education/stories/NW_061307EDBgangsKC.453e15bb.html

37. Canada: Toronto gang sweep nets 60 suspects, drugs (UPI, 13 Jun 2007)
TORONTO, ON, Canada - Some 700 police officers conducted a gang sweep in Toronto
Wednesday and arrested 60 suspects, seizing $1 million worth of street drugs and scores
of weapons. The main target in the pre-dawn raids involving more than 130 search
warrants was an area in northwestern Toronto known for violent gang activity. Arrests
were also made across the entire southern Ontario region following an 11-month
investigation, the Toronto Sun reported. Officers from the Ontario Provincial Police, the
Royal Canadian Mounted Police and 11 other regional forces took part in the operation,
dubbed Project Kryptic.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://tinyurl.com/3242xv

38. Italy: Cops Shut Down Alleged Mafia Station in Italy (RW Online, 15 Jun 2007)
Police closed down a mafia-run radio station they say was being used to broadcast secret
messages to imprisoned members through song “dedications.” The story was reported by
The Times Online in the U.K. “The illegal station, set up by a clan of the Camorra (the
Naples mafia) at Ercolano — ancient Herculaneum — broadcast ‘requests’ for
Neapolitan songs with dedications, which in reality were messages to clan members who
tuned in while they were in jail,” the Times reported. “Some of the songs and dedications
were a prearranged code to mafia gangsters at large, police said.” The closure was part of
a crackdown involving 54 arrests in the south of Naples on charges of drug trafficking,
extortion and murder. “Police confiscated mafia properties, seven armored vehicles and
video surveillance systems, as well as the offices and equipment of the radio station,” the
Times reported.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.rwonline.com/pages/s.0100/t.6666.html

NARCO TRAFFICKING

39. CA: Drug cartel leader pleads guilty to selling cocaine (Los Angeles Times, 19
Jun 2007)
An accused leader of one of Mexico's most notorious drug cartels pleaded guilty Monday
to federal charges of selling cocaine in a San Diego motel. Francisco Rafael Arellano
Felix, one of seven brothers allegedly behind the Tijuana-based Arellano Felix cartel,
admitted selling about half a pound of cocaine to an undercover police officer in 1980.
He faces up to 15 years in prison, said Assistant U.S. Atty. Laura Duffy.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://tinyurl.com/3de3jm

40. FL: "Operation Crack Down" Lands Cocaine Dealers In Jail (First Coast News,
15 Jun 2007)
ST. JOHNS COUNTY, FL - "Operation Crack Down" is what landed 14 out of 23 people
in Jail Friday morning. The St. Johns County Sheriff's Office and the St. Augustine
Police Department developed "Operation Crack Down" to target cocaine base distributors
within the Lincolnville area. Many distributors ended up being convicted felons and had
been selling cocaine base within 1,000 feet of a place of worship. The drug bust was a
two-month investigation where undercover narcotic detectives bought the cocaine base
from 23 suspected dealers.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.firstcoastnews.com/news/local/news-article.aspx?storyid=84355

41. LA: St. Martin Parish traffic stop yields 83 kilograms of cocaine (The Daily
Advertiser, 16 Jun 2007)
Six people have been arrested following a traffic stop in St. Martin Parish that yielded 83
kilograms of cocaine. According to a news release, agents apprehended the men during a
traffic stop in the parish earlier this week. They were reportedly found in possession of
three bags of cocaine, which authorities believe had been sent by a Colombian drug
trafficking organization via a petroleum vessel that arrived in Norco on Wednesday night.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.theadvertiser.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070616/NEWS01/70616008

42. NY: Reputed Cocaine Smuggler Convicted (AP, 15 Jun 2007)
NEW YORK — A man labeled by the United States as one of the world's biggest drug
lords was convicted Friday of smuggling more than $100 million in cocaine from
Colombia into the U.S. Manuel Felipe Salazar-Espinosa was convicted of drug
importation conspiracy, cocaine distribution and money laundering conspiracy in U.S.
District Court in Manhattan. Designated by the Justice Department as one of the most
powerful and dangerous drug traffickers in the world, Salazar-Espinosa faces a
mandatory minimum of 10 years in prison when he is sentenced Oct. 2. As a condition of
the 55-year-old's extradition from Colombia, prosecutors agreed not to seek the
maximum sentence of life in prison.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.foxnews.com/wires/2007Jun15/0,4670,DrugExtradition,00.html

43. TX: Grandmother accused of distributing heroin for Mexican Mafia (KENS 5
Eyewitness News, 16 Jun 2007)
Authorities call her the Black-Tar Granny. They said one minute she's taking care of kids
and her elderly father, and the next, she's working as a high-level heroin distributor for
the Mexican Mafia. However, officials said that double life came crashing down Friday
night in the 3000 block of Sugar Foot, a quiet neighborhood off Loop 410 and Marbach.
Rosie Cruz is in federal custody at the Wackenhut Detention Center, and authorities said
last night's Spurs championship win may have been her downfall. Authorities said Cruz
went out Friday afternoon to drop off the black-tar heroin to a lower-level dealer. "Our
intelligence tells us that she distributes for the Mexican Mafia, so somebody's gonna be in
big trouble over this one," said Sgt. Ron Tooke, with the Bexar County Sheriff's Office.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://tinyurl.com/2bnoqk

44. TX: Ex-Cop Sells Pot Tips on DVD (AP, 19 June 2007)
Barry Cooper sells a DVD on how to stash pot in your car without getting caught. This
fall he will release a second one on how to keep police from raiding your home for
marijuana. Now for the kicker: Cooper is a former narcotics officer once considered
among the top cops in Texas, where more marijuana is seized each year than in any other
state. The formerly straight-laced lawman has become a shaggy-haired militant for the
legalization of weed. Six months ago he released "Never Get Busted Again," in which the
former star of West Texas' Permian Basin Drug Task Force gives tips on hiding
marijuana (dashboards are rife with nooks and crannies) and throwing off drug-sniffing
dogs (coat your tires in fox urine).
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.wtopnews.com/?nid=104&sid=1170570
45. Canada: RCMP seizes cocaine found in frozen mango puree (CTV.ca News
Staff, 19 Jun 2007)
Close to 160 kilograms of cocaine from Mexico, hidden in buckets of frozen mango
puree, have been seized by the RCMP and the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)
in Montreal. "Indicators" led the CBSA to a container that arrived in the Port of Montreal
from Mexico, the RCMP said in a press release Tuesday. "It's very significant," RCMP
Staff Sgt. Andre Potvin said Tuesday about the bust. "Basically if you look at street level
-- at $20-a-gram -- you're looking in the vicinity of $38 million (worth of drugs)."
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://tinyurl.com/369scg

46. US, Mexican and Congo suspects charged in Venezuela drug bust on Caribbean
island (AP, 16 Jun 2007)
CARACAS, Venezuela: A U.S. citizen, two Mexicans and a Congolese have been
charged along with six Venezuelan suspects for attempting to traffic more than 2 metric
tons (2.2 U.S. tons) of cocaine through a Venezuelan airport, the government said
Saturday. Robert Charles Gagnon, identified as an American; Mexicans Carlos Gaona
Salas and Jose Fernando Acosta; and Georges Masudi from the Democratic Republic of
Congo are being held at a jail in Margarita Island, the Public Ministry said in a statement.
The Venezuelan suspects — an airport employee and five officers from the division of
investigative police — are being held at the same location, it said. Police on June 9
arrested the gang as it loaded 2 metric tons (2.2 U.S. tons) of cocaine bound for Africa
onto a private plane at the international airport on Margarita Island, a popular tourist
destination.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://tinyurl.com/38xcvk

47. Spanish police intercept cocaine ship on Atlantic (DPA, 18 Jun 2007)
Madrid - Spanish police have intercepted a ship carrying four tons of cocaine on the
Atlantic, police said Monday. About 150 drug bundles were hidden inside the vessel,
which had set sail from Venezuela. Police said the traffickers intended to unload the
cocaine onto smaller boats, which were to take it ashore in the northwestern Spanish
region of Galicia. The operation had been planned by Colombian, Mexican and Spanish
traffickers. The six crew were detained, as well as a total of five people in northern Spain
and Madrid.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://tinyurl.com/2q6lns

48. US Congress urges military to tackle Afghan opium (Christian Science Monitor,
14 June 2007)
A bumper crop of poppies in Afghanistan is prompting Congress to push a reluctant US
military into a bigger role to rid the country of the illegal trade. The reason? Officials
have long suspected that the centuries-old opium industry is funding the Taliban and
other insurgents in Afghanistan. But direct intervention is tricky for US troops. If a key
part of their counterinsurgency campaign is to win the hearts and minds of Afghans, the
thinking goes, Americans can't be seen as the face of an effort to burn fields and eradicate
a livelihood that is illegal but central to the country's fragile financial system. Currently,
the US provides only indirect support. Its policy leaves it to the Afghan government to
contain the opium trade. By international agreement, British military forces are
designated to support the Afghan effort, but they generally do not take an active role
against the trade. With opium production there skyrocketing, the US House of
Representatives last week passed a $6.4 billion aid and reconstruction package for
Afghanistan that contains a major counternarcotics component.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.csmonitor.com/2007/0614/p02s01-usmi.html

49. How Cocaine Defies the First Rule in Economics (Shared Responsibiity, 16 Jun
2007)
Top economics journalists try to explain why cocaine is getting cheaper, despite stable
demand and decreased supply, with shaky results. Colombia’s Vice-President adds in
underhanded marketing to steady the equation. It all started with an article written for
The Atlantic Monthly’s July/August edition by Ken Dermota and published last
Wednesday. That same day, the Wall Street Journal’s Informed Reader blog summarized
Dermot’s detailed fundamental analysis, in which cocaine is treated like any other
commercial product, and that attempts to rationalize dropping street cocaine prices in the
face of constant demand and falling supply.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.sharedresponsibility.gov.co/index.php?idcategoria=697

CYBERTHREAT & THEFT

50. Police Smash Global Pedophile Ring (AP, 19 June 2007)
A team of international investigators infiltrated an Internet chat room used by pedophiles
who streamed live videos of children being raped, rescuing 31 children and identifying
more than 700 suspects worldwide. Undercover officers in Britain, the U.S., Canada and
Australia busted up the pedophile ring using surveillance techniques more commonly
associated with fighting terrorism and organized crime. The chat room, which was called
"Kids the Light of Our Lives," featured images, including live videos, of children _ some
only months old _ being subjected to horrific sexual abuse, said Jim Gamble, chief
executive of Britain's Child Exploitation and Online Protection Center.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.wtopnews.com/?nid=383&sid=1169477

51. FBI tries to fight zombie hordes (BBC, 14 June 2007)
The FBI is contacting more than one million PC owners who have had their computers
hijacked by cyber criminals. The initiative is part of an ongoing project to thwart the use
of hijacked home computers, or zombies, as launch platforms for hi-tech crimes. The FBI
has found networks of zombie computers being used to spread spam, steal IDs and attack
websites. The agency said the zombies or bots were "a growing threat to national
security".
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/6752853.stm
52. VA sets aside $20 million to handle latest data breach (GovExec.com, 15 Jun
2007)
The Veterans Affairs Department has set aside more than $20 million to respond to its
latest data breach, the agency's top technology officer said Thursday. The department
does not expect to spend the full $20 million, but designated that much because the
breach potentially puts the identities of nearly a million physicians and VA patients at
risk, said Bob Howard, the department's chief information officer. Howard spoke at The
E-Gov Institute's Government Health IT Conference and Exhibition in Washington. "We
have no evidence that [information is at risk]. None whatsoever, but we don't take the
chance," Howard said. "The attitude of the VA right now is if we think we've put
anybody's information at risk, then we need to step up to the plate and try to remedy
that."
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=37191&dcn=e_gvet

TECHNOLOGY

53. House, Senate security bills differ on tech projects (By Chris Strohm, National
Journal's Technology Daily, 19 Jun 2007)
The Senate and House versions of legislation to fund Homeland Security Department
programs in fiscal 2008 track closely in many areas, but major differences for conference
appear to include funding for the US-VISIT system for tracking foreigners, state and
local grants, and the Coast Guard's fleet-modernization program. The Senate
Appropriations Committee recommended about $36.4 billion total for the department in
its budget released last week, about $200 million more than what the House passed on
Friday. While the bills are similar in many ways, lawmakers in the two chambers diverge
over how much funding should be provided for several of the department's largest
spending programs and technology efforts.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=37235&dcn=e_gvet

54. House science panel backs increase in airport security funding (By Elaine S.
Povich, CongressDaily, 15 Jun 2007)
The House Science and Technology Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics approved a
bill Thursday calling for increased funds for research and development of the next
generation of airport surveillance and security systems. The bill (H.R. 2698) provides a
total of $1.8 billion over the next four fiscal years for research and development of airport
projects under the jurisdiction of the Federal Aviation Administration. The total is
approximately $117.4 million more than President Bush's request for fiscal 2008-fiscal
2011. Both Republicans and Democrats on the subcommittee were in agreement on the
measure, which now goes to the full committee for consideration. It was approved on a
voice vote with no audible dissent.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=37212&dcn=e_gvet
55. Coast Guard considering drones to watch long coastlines (By Jon Fox, Global
Security Newswire, 19 Jun 2007)
The Coast Guard is exploring the possibility of deploying unmanned "drone" aircraft to
monitor coastlines that go largely unwatched, the service's head of vessel inspections said
Friday. The planes would be able to linger over stretches of coast and improve the
tracking of small vessels under 300 gross tons that are largely below the threshold of
Coast Guard attention, Rear Adm. Brian Salerno said at a breakfast meeting held by the
National Defense University Foundation. Salerno did not offer any details of what a
drone-based surveillance and detection network might look like or how exactly the planes
would be deployed.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=37237&dcn=e_gvet

56. FDA Releases New Software Tool to Help Keep Food Facilities Safe from Attack
(FDA, 15 Jun 2007)
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today released a new tool to help
growers, packers, processors, manufacturers, warehousers, transporters, and retailers in
the food industry determine the vulnerability of individual food facilities to biological,
chemical, or radiological attack. The software program, called the CARVER + Shock
Software Tool, is a science-based prevention strategy to safeguard the food supply. This
tool is an example of the type of approach currently being developed as part of a broader
food protection strategy currently under development by FDA. "FDA's goal in
developing the CARVER + Shock software is to maximize protection of the American
food supply," said FDA Assistant Commissioner for Food Protection David Acheson,
M.D. "The relative risk-ranking methodology used by the CARVER + Shock software
tool has been designed to assist facility operators in identifying potential vulnerabilities
and assist in providing preventive measures to increase the defense of products and
operations."
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/NEWS/2007/NEW01652.html

57. Nanogen announces collaboration with Canadian agencies to develop veterinary
and bioterrorism diagnostics (Animal Lab News, 18 Jun 2007)
Nanogen, Inc. announces that it has received project funding from several Canadian
agencies, including the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). The purpose of the
funding and collaborative agreement is to develop diagnostic tools for the detection of
natural or potential bioterrorism threats to livestock, such as foot and mouth disease and
avian flu, employing the company's NanoChip® platform.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.animallab.com/News_Articles.asp?pid=191

RESOURCES

58. "National Continuity Policy: A Brief Overview," Congressional Research
Service Report June 8, 2007
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/secrecy/RS22674.pdf

59. "Border Security: The San Diego Fence," Congressional Research Service
Report updated May 23, 2007
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/homesec/RS22026.pdf

OPPORTUNITIES

60. Coast Guard searches for handheld card readers for TWIC (FCW, 18 Jun 2007)
The Coast Guard has pushed its implementation of the Transportation Worker
Identification Credential forward by publishing a request for information for rugged
handheld card readers. The maritime patrol organization wants to acquire the readers
before it begins implementing TWIC later this year at several of its 3,200 facilities and on
some of its 10,000 vessels. The Coast Guard wants a single service provider to deliver a
card reader that can handle TWIC’s three-factor authentication. The reader must also be
able to withstand adverse sea conditions and environmental factors such as seawater. The
contractor would also field test and support the hardware and software. The TWIC
program seeks to issue a biometric-based identification credential for workers at maritime
ports of entry. The final rule for TWIC — released in January — doesn’t include a
requirement for card readers at the ports.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://www.fcw.com/article103021-06-18-07-Web

61. Position Title: Program Assistant - The Jamestown Foundation, Washington,
D.C.
The Jamestown Foundation seeks a Program Assistant. The position is full-time and
based in Washington, DC.

The Jamestown Foundation is a non-profit research organization specializing in conflict,
instability and security issues in Eurasia and the Middle East. Utilizing our global
network of indigenous sources, Jamestown enlists world-class experts to analyze and
interpret new challenges facing the U.S. in the post-9/11 world. The Foundation is
nonpartisan and has earned a reputation for providing valuable insights and objective
analysis to the diplomatic, intelligence, business and academic communities.

Job Description: The tasks of the Program Assistant are not only administrative, but also
research-oriented with a strong emphasis on publications and marketing. The Program
Assistant is also responsible for minor bookkeeping, proposal writing and donor
correspondence. Other administrative tasks relate to Jamestown's events management
including: travel arrangements for analysts, catering arrangements, event invitations,
announcements and conference set-up and clean-up.

The Publications and Research elements of the Program Assistant's position require copy-
editing of Jamestown's regular publications—China Brief, Terrorism Focus, Terrorism
Monitor and Chechnya Weekly—as well as occasional papers, conference transcripts and
book publications. Other projects include: the production of the quarterly newsletter,
invitations and book marketing mailers, etc. The Assistant is also responsible for many of
the aspects of the publishing process: editing, lay-out, graphic design, author/publisher
relations, promoting and marketing, maintenance of databases and inventory reports.

Qualifications: The ideal candidate should have: outstanding research and writing skills;
experience with Adobe InDesign; proven organizational skills and attention to detail;
flexibility; demonstrated interest in terrorism, security studies, international relations, or
current affairs in Eurasia and the Middle East. Experience and language skills in these
regions are a plus; a strong candidate will have experience working with publications or
analysis for the defense, intelligence and policymaking community or an international
affairs journal. BA/MA in international relations, history, political science or regional
studies are preferred, but not required.

Salary is commensurate with experience. Position provides paid sick leave, vacation,
health, dental and retirement benefits. To apply, send resume and cover letter to
jobs@jamestown.org.

EVENTS

62. Former agent to give bioterrorism talk (newsleader.com, 19 Jun 2007)
HARRISONBURG — Drew Richardson will be giving a talk about bioterrorism at 7
p.m. Thursday at the Rockingham County adminsitration center in the board of
supervisors meeting room. Richardson is a former special agent for the FBI, who
specialized in counterterrorism. The meeting is being sponsored by the Rockingham
County Democratic Committee. Richardson is the former head of the FBI laboratory's
chemical/biological response team. During his service at the FBI, Richardson served as
the coordinator for nuclear, biological and chemical scientific assets at the Atlanta
Olympic Games and other special events. Since retiring, he has appeared as an expert
consultant on CNN, Fox News and other media.
CABLE Gram Suggested URL:
http://tinyurl.com/32crl9

FULL REPORTS

63. U.S. Law Officers Take New Approach To Combat Prostitution - Maryland
police treat trafficked persons as victims, not criminals (By Lea Terhune, USINFO
Staff Writer, 19 Jun 2007)
Washington – A new trend in U.S. law enforcement is the way police handle prostitution,
at least in Montgomery County, Maryland. Investigators go after pimps who smuggle
people for forced prostitution, while extending a helping hand to their victims, the
prostitutes.

“The way we treat prostitution is completely different from when I first came up here,”
Montgomery County vice squad Detective Thomas Stack told USINFO. “It was go out,
pick them [the prostitutes] up, take them over to jail, that was it.” But not anymore, he
said. “We treat every person as a victim, and it’s important that we should do that.
Everyone is a victim first.”

Stack and his partner, Detective Leland Wiley, recently assisted in the successful
prosecution of six people for crimes including transporting illegal immigrants from New
Jersey and New York to engage in prostitution and money laundering. The investigation
was coordinated among local police, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Immigration
and Customs Enforcement, and the Internal Revenue Service.

Stack and Wiley described how Elsy “Yolanda” Aparicio and her family transported
hundreds of women, mostly from Mexico, over several years to Maryland to service a
primarily Latino clientele in brothels set up in apartments. The women were charged $70
for food and $40 for condoms each week; of the $30 the women received for 30 minutes
of sex, they kept $15 to take back to their “padrotes.”

“Padrotes are pimps. They are responsible for the actual trafficking aspect, getting the
girls over here to the States, and they lure them in the usual ways, [promising] marriage
or domestic work around here at a restaurant,” Wiley told USINFO. But when they get
here, they are forced into prostitution.

The padrotes threaten to kill the women’s families in Mexico or shame them by
disclosing they are prostitutes. The women are beaten and abused by the pimps, and are
often victims of violence in brothel robberies. Gangs such as Mara Salvatrucha, or MS-
13, extort payments or simply rob the brothels of cash. Each woman can bring in
hundreds of dollars a day.

The detectives recounted cases of girls kidnapped or duped into coming to the United
States. One girl, kidnapped from her remote village by a family of traffickers when she
was 15 years old, was thrown in a basement and repeatedly raped by the father and
brothers for a month before they put her in a brothel. She eventually was trafficked into
the United States. After authorities discovered her, she took advantage of the assistance
offered and has turned her life around. After being exploited for more than a decade, she
now has a job, studies English and awaits her T-visa, a special visa given to trafficking
victims in exchange for their cooperation with law enforcement officials.

Many victims do not cooperate out of fear or misplaced loyalty to their pimps. “Our
success rate is not very high in getting females to admit that they are victims,” Stack said,
but it is “not through lack of effort.” Although women are interviewed with sensitivity
and offered help, he said, most remain mistrustful of police.

A number of nongovernmental organizations work with police to assist victims. Polaris
Project and Ayuda are two such support groups. (See related article.)

HUMAN TRAFFICKING A DOMESTIC ISSUE IN THE UNITED STATES
The detectives say most of their cases today involve illegal immigrants trafficked for sex
or labor. According to U.S. Department of Justice figures, an estimated 17,500 foreign
nationals may be trafficked annually into the United States.

Wiley told USINFO, “When you say ‘trafficking,’ people think it’s an international issue.
[But i]t’s not, it’s a domestic issue, too.” Runaway teenagers are frequent victims.

Much investigative work is done on the Internet. “It is absolutely out of control on the
Internet,” Stack said. Instead of streetwalking, prostitutes and pimps now advertise on
Craigslist or other Web sites.

Stack and Wiley speak at police academies, colleges, to firefighters, building inspectors
and community groups on how to recognize the signs of trafficking. They say education
is an important tool. Their informants range from paid contacts to apartment house
managers and alert citizens.

Local and federal agencies work together -- if state lines are crossed, the FBI becomes
involved. Federal penalties are stiffer. “These guys who are doing these heinous crimes,”
who “force these women into prostitution” deserve long prison sentences, Stack said,
“and they should get every day that’s coming to them.”

Hollywood contributes to the problem, Stack said. Films such as Hustle and Flow that
glamorize pimps are used in the sex trade. “That’s a recruiting video for the pimps,”
Stack said, adding that pimps make the girls watch movies and read books to learn the
trade.

“These girls, for the most part, they are the victims … because they are trafficked into
this country and they are forced into prostitution,” Stack said.

For more information, see Human Smuggling and Trafficking.

(USINFO is produced by the Bureau of International Information Programs, U.S.
Department of State. Web site: http://usinfo.state.gov)

64. U.S. Allies Urged To Move Decisively Against Terrorism Financing - Political
will, legal tools required, U.S. Treasury secretary says (Dept. of State, 14 Jun 2007)
Washington - U.S. allies need to accelerate the use of financial sanctions to address
terrorism and weapons proliferation, U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson says.

“Everyone acknowledges that we must find effective ways to deal with these threats,
short of military measures. Yet other nations are not moving quickly enough to
accomplish this goal,” Paulson said in a June 14 speech to the Council on Foreign
Relations in New York.

He did not specify which countries have failed to act aggressively enough to counter
terrorist threats.
Paulson outlined the U.S. campaign to cut off weapons proliferators, terrorists and money
launderers from the global financial system and highlighted the campaign’s major
achievements.

He also called on countries to muster their political will and upgrade their legal
capabilities so that they can share responsibility for mutual security.

Paulson said U.S. allies need to enact legislative and regulatory changes that would
enable better targeting of financial sanctions in the fight against global threats and
facilitate coordination of actions with related multilateral efforts. He cited as needed
measures criminalizing money laundering and terrorist financing and allowing finance
ministries to access and use intelligence.

“These authorities may not deal a knock-out-punch, but they can and will produce results
and change behavior,” Paulson said.

The treasury secretary said the United States always has sought multilateral actions
because they have proven to be a potent and effective tool against drug cartels, rogue
regimes and terrorist groups.

When the Treasury has made such efforts, the multilateral action has been quite
successful, he said, citing as an example the isolation of North Korea from the global
financial system.

A U.S.-led financial campaign also has discouraged some foreign investors and bankers
from doing business with Iran, dealing a blow to the Iranian economy, he said. (See
related article.)

However, this action is not likely to persuade Iran to stop its nuclear program, according
to experts cited in a report published by the Council on Foreign Relations, an independent
policy research group.

Nevertheless, the experience so far, Paulson said, puts the administration in a better
position to discuss with allies broader measures against the Iranian regime.

“While the financial isolation of the entire regime may impose costs on our partners and
on us, it would be far less costly than a nuclear-armed Iran,” Paulson said.

He disclosed that in 2006 the administration was trying to persuade another country to
“take the lead” in action against Iranian state-owned Bank Sepah, engaged in
proliferating missile technology. Ultimately, though, the United States decided to take
unilateral action because that nation lacked the necessary legal authority and political
will. (See related article.)
When other countries lack the political will to ostracize a targeted group or individual,
the United States can act unilaterally, Paulson said. It can do it effectively, he said,
because U.S. financial markets are key to the global financial system.

“We are the banker to the world,” Paulson said.

He said private banks and financial institutions are able to act faster than governments
when presented with solid evidence of their clients’ wrongdoings or deceptive practices.

And Treasury’s designations make an impact beyond their formal, legal reach, Paulson
said, as some banks around the world become more vigilant against suspicious clients and
deals and others follow their lead, unwilling to risk their reputation.

A transcript of Paulson’s remarks and a related fact sheet are available on the Treasury
Department Web site.

For more information on U.S. policies, see Arms Control and Non-Proliferation and
Terrorist Financing.

(Distributed by the Bureau of International Information Programs, U.S. Department of
State. Web site: http://usinfo.state.gov)

65. Avian Flu Vaccine Stockpile Being Planned for Developing Nations -
International rules in effect June 15 to promote global health security (By Cheryl
Pellerin,, USINFO Staff Writer, 14 Jun 2007)
Washington – Progress is being made in establishing a global stockpile for developing
nations of a vaccine to protect against avian influenza, which has caused 190 deaths in
312 human cases identified since 2003.

The World Health Organization (WHO) announced June 14 that it is working with
vaccine manufacturers to create a global stockpile of vaccine for the H5N1 avian
influenza virus that it can distribute to the world’s poorest nations on short notice in the
event of an H5N1 pandemic.

On the same day, pharmaceutical firm GlaxoSmithKline said it would donate 50 million
doses of a “pre-pandemic” flu vaccine that could help 25 million people (two injections
per person) through the first several months of a worldwide outbreak while a pandemic-
specific vaccine is being produced. (See related article.)

Three other manufacturers – Omninvest of Hungary, Baxter International and Sanofi
Pasteur, the vaccine division of the French Sanofi-Aventis Group – also have offered
unspecified amounts of H5N1 vaccine for the stockpile.

“The United States is committed to working with member states and the WHO to explore
other avenues to meet the near-term need for greater access to influenza vaccines,
including pre-pandemic vaccines,” U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Michael
Leavitt said in a May 23 statement.

GLOBAL STOCKPILE

Details about the stockpile have yet to be worked out, said WHO spokesperson Christine
McNab during a June 14 USINFO interview.

“There will probably be a meeting or series of meetings to look at the operational use of
[the stockpile],” she said, “and there are still lots of questions – is it a virtual stockpile; if
not, where will it be stored; how and when would it be used; and which countries would
use it?”

The announcement follows a request by the World Health Assembly – WHO’s supreme
decisionmaking body – in May that WHO establish such a stockpile.

"WHO welcomes this contribution from the vaccines industry,” said WHO Director-
General Dr. Margaret Chan in a June 14 statement, “and is also working with countries to
develop capacity for the production of influenza vaccines."

WHO is preparing for a potential flu pandemic with rapid containment plans to stop a
pandemic by using public health measures (isolation, quarantine, personal hygiene and
social distancing) and anti-virals, helping countries increase vaccine-production capacity
and promoting vaccine technology transfer to developing countries.

The stockpiled vaccines will be useful only if the H5N1 flu strain initiates the next flu
pandemic, McNab said, but added that even if an entirely different strain of flu produces
a global outbreak, the experience gained in establishing the stockpile will be valuable.

INTERNATIONAL HEALTH REGULATIONS

The revised International Health Regulations become effective June 15, bringing a
comprehensive, tested set of rules and procedures into force for WHO and member states.
The rules are intended to limit the international spread of pandemics, epidemics and other
public health emergencies and minimize disruption to travel, trade and economies. (See
related article.)

The revisions, approved in 2005, updated 1969 regulations that addressed only four
diseases – cholera, plague, yellow fever and smallpox, a disease now eradicated.

The regulations are adopted by most countries as legally binding rules to contain disease
threats that could spread rapidly from country to country. Threats include emerging
infections like a new human flu virus or severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS),
which caused a major epidemic between November 2002 and July 2003 with more than
8,000 known cases and 774 deaths.
"SARS was a wake-up call for all of us,” Chan said. “It spread faster than we had
predicted and was only contained through intensive cooperation between countries which
prevented this new disease from gaining a foothold."

Threats also could come from chemical spills, leaks and dumping, contaminated food and
nuclear accidents.

TESTING THE SYSTEM

On June 15, WHO will hold the first of a series of exercises to sharpen its preparedness
under the revised rules.

The exercise will verify new procedures for receiving, analyzing and responding to
information about potential public health emergencies, and test and improve mechanisms
in place in and between member states and at different WHO levels.

A unexpected test of the fledgling system occurred in May, when a U.S. citizen with
extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis, an airborne infectious disease, boarded
commercial flights to and from Europe, and crossed the border from Canada into the
United States despite an international alert about his condition. (See related article.)

In testimony June 4 before a U.S. Senate Appropriations subcommittee, Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Director Dr. Julie Gerberding described the
process of contacting WHO about the traveler, and said that CDC’s notification process
could be improved.

The International Health Regulations “are wonderful,” she told the subcommittee, “but
there’s no operational planning around them. This is going to be the perfect case study for
us to sit down with affected health ministries and the TB officials at WHO [to discuss]
how we are going to create operational and tactical plans.

“Every country is going to have to come to grips with the same thing CDC did,”
Gerberding added. “How do we keep people from [traveling internationally], how do we
find out where they are, how do we handle them when we need to isolate them in
someone else’s country, and who pays?”

More information about the International Health Regulations is available on the WHO
Web site.

For more information on U.S. and international efforts to combat avian influenza, see
Bird Flu.

(USINFO is produced by the Bureau of International Information Programs, U.S.
Department of State. Web site: http://usinfo.state.gov)
ABOUT CABLE GRAM SOURCES

The CABLE Gram is intended to be non-biased in its news coverage and we strive to use
sources that we consider reliable. For any story that might be considered controversial or
“unbelievable”, we always ensure that more than one reputable news service has included
that story in its’ public offering. It is important for you, the reader, to remember that press
services around the world may interpret news differently than do press services in the
United States. It is equally important to remember that the readers of foreign press
services believe those news stories as readily as we believe stories from US sources. As
defense and security professionals, you know the value of understanding the beliefs of
people we are trying to either protect or protect our citizens from – it’s vital. We do not
endorse any particular publications or coverage, but we certainly feel you need to know
what’s being written.

				
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