Chapter 23 Electric Fields by HC12042100257

VIEWS: 15 PAGES: 12

									     Chapter 23
   Electric Fields
23.1 Properties of Electric Charges
23.3 Coulomb’s Law
23.4 The Electric Field
23.6 Electric Field Lines
23.7 Motion of Charged Particles
in a Uniform Electric Field

             Nadiah Alenazi           1
        23.1 Properties of Electric Charges
• There are two kinds of
  electric charges in
  nature:
   – Positive
   – Negative
• Like charges repel one
  another and Unlike
  charges attract one
  another.
• Electric charge is
  conserved.
• Charge is quantized
  q=Ne
e = 1.6 x 10-19 C
N is some integer     Nadiah Alenazi          2
       23.3 Coulomb’s Law
From Coulomb’s experiments, we can
  generalize the following properties of the
  electric force between two stationary
  charged particles.

The electric force
• is inversely proportional to the square of the
  separation r between the particles and directed
  along the line joining them.
• is proportional to the product of the charges q1
  and q2 on the two particles.
• is attractive if the charges are of opposite sign
  and repulsive if the charges have the same sign.
                     Nadiah Alenazi                   3
• Consider two electric charges: q1
  and q2
• The electric force F between these
  two charges separated by a
  distance r is given by Coulomb’s
  Law
• The constant ke is called Coulomb’s
  constant
•  is the permittivity of
                                                                               2
                                              1                          12 C
    0
                                         k        where  0  8.85  10
  free space                                4  0                          Nm2

• The smallest unit of
  charge e is the charge on
  an electron (-e) or a
  proton (+e) and has a
  magnitude e = 1.6 x 10-19
  C
                              Nadiah Alenazi                                 4
Example 23.1 The Hydrogen Atom
The electron and proton of a hydrogen
 atom are separated (on the average)
 by a distance of approximately 5.3 x
 10-11 m. Find the magnitudes of the
 electric force.




                Nadiah Alenazi          5
• When dealing with Coulomb’s
  law, you must remember that
  force is a vector quantity

• The law expressed in vector
  form for the electric force
  exerted by a charge q1 on a
  second charge q2, written F12,
  is


•   where rˆ is a unit vector directed from q1 toward q2


• The electric force exerted by q2 on q1 is
  equal in magnitude to the force exerted
  by q1 on q2 and in the opposite direction;
  that is, F21= -F12.

                                      Nadiah Alenazi       6
• When more than two charges are present,
  the force between any pair of them is
  given by Equation

• Therefore, the resultant force on any one
  of them equals the vector sum of the
  forces exerted by the various individual
  charges.
• For example, if four charges are present,
  then the resultant force exerted by
  particles 2, 3, and 4 on particle 1 is



                  Nadiah Alenazi              7
• Double one of the charges
  – force doubles
• Change sign of one of the charges
  – force changes direction
• Change sign of both charges
  – force stays the same
• Double the distance between charges
  – force four times weaker
• Double both charges
  – force four times stronger
                    Nadiah Alenazi      8
Example:
• Three point charges are aligned
  along the x axis as shown. Find the
  electric force at the charge 3nC.




                Nadiah Alenazi          9
Example 23.2 Find the Resultant Force

• Consider three
  point charges
  located at the
  corners of a right
  triangle, where
  q1=q3= 5.0μC, q2=
  2.0 μC, and a=
  0.10 m. Find the
  resultant force
  exerted on q3.
                  Nadiah Alenazi        10
Nadiah Alenazi   11
Nadiah Alenazi   12

								
To top