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                           Harry S. Truman (CVN-75)


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HULL NO. /      FOREIGN         AIR           TAIL       DEPART        RETURN FLEET
FLEET           WATER           WING          CODE                            D. NO.
                DEP.

CVN-75 – 2nd    1st WestLant    CVW-1         AB         Aug 1998      Sep 1998      721
(Shakedown
cruise)

CVN-75 – 6th,   1st Med       CVW-3           AC         28 Nov        23 May        737
5th & Central   Suez Canal                               2000          2001
Command         x2
(1st Arabian    1st & 2nd Red
Sea and         Sea & Gulf
Persian Gulf)   of Aden

            1st Operation Southern Watch and Exercise Arabian Gauntlet
CVN-75 – 6th, 2nd Med         CVW-3       AC      5 Dec       23 May    752
 th
5 & Central      Adriatic Sea                     2002        2003
Command
 2nd Operation Southern Watch, 1st Operation Enduring Freedom and 1st Operation
                                   Iraqi Freedom
           th     rd
CVN-75 – 6       3 Med        CVW-3       AC      2 Jun       25 Jul    763
                                                  2004        2004

                    Summer Pulse ’04 and Exercise Majestic Eagle
CVN-75 – 6th,   4th Med       CVW-3     AC         13 Oct      18 Apr                767
5th & Central   Suez Canal                         2004        2005
Command         x2
 (2nd Arabian   3rd & 4th Red
Sea and         Sea & Gulf
Persian Gulf)   of Aden

                2nd Operation Iraqi Freedom and Exercise Arabian Gauntlet
CVN-75 –            5h Med       CVW-3      AC        5 Nov      4 Jun               787
2nd, 6th, 5th &     Suez Canal                        2007       2008
Central             x2
Command             4th & 5th
   rd
 (3 Arabian Red Sea &
Sea and             Gulf of

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Persian Gulf)    Aden

          1st Maritime Security Operations and 3rd Operation Iraqi Freedom
The Harry S. Truman (CVN-75), the 63rd aircraft carrier of the United States Navy keel
was laid down on 29 November 1993 at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp.,
Newport News, Virginia and is the ninth nuclear-powered aircraft carrier and the eighth
Nimitz-class supercarrier, named after named after the 33rd President of the United States
Harry S. Truman
Launched on 7 September 1996 by Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp.,
Newport News, Virginia
Commissioned on the East Coast on 25 July 1998, with Captain Thomas G. Otterbein,
USN in command
Delivered to the U.S. Navy 30 June 1998
Equipped with two nuclear reactors used for propulsion (the ship is capable of steaming
more than one million miles before refueling) turning 4 five-bladed screws that weigh
66,220 pounds (30 t) each driving the ship at speeds over 30 knots (56 km/h). George
Washington (commonly known as GW) is 1,094 ft (333 m) long, 251 ft (78 m) wide and is
as high as a twenty-four story building, and has a flight deck 4.5 acres (18,000 m²) in size;
using four elevators that are 3,880 ft² (360 m²) each to move planes between the flight deck
and the hangar bay.
With a combat load, the GW displaces almost 97,000 tons and carries over 6,000 crew
members. The warship uses two anchors that weigh 30 tons each, with each link of the
anchor chain weighing 360 pounds (160 kg); at a cost of about $4.5 billion. She can distill
400,000 U.S. gallons (1,500 m³) of water and serves 18,000 meals per day. There are over
2,500 compartments on board requiring 2,520 tons (2.1 MW) of air conditioning capacity
(enough to cool over 2,000 homes). The ship carries approximately three million gallons
(11,000 m³) of fuel for her aircraft and escorts, and enough weapons and stores for
extended operations without replenishment; at a cost of about $4.5 billion and and a
projected service life: 50 years
Eight squadrons and one detachment, with more than 80 aircraft. Three arresting cables
can stop a 28-ton aircraft going 150 miles per hour in less than 400 feet
Armament: NATO MK 29 Sea Sparrow launchers, 20mm Phalanx MK 15
In mid September 1998, Harry S. Truman with CVW-1 embarked arrived Norfolk,
Virginia, with Captain Thomas G. Otterbein, USN in command, ending her first Western
Atlantic deployment and Shakedown cruise conducting flight deck certifications, an
evolution designed to test the ship’s ability to successfully launch and recover aircraft
while underway in the Western Atlantic on 10 August 1998, 19 to 26 August 1998 and on
14 September 1998; her first deployment since her commission
Harry S. Truman was underway in the Western Atlantic from 2 to 18 November 1998;
conducting CQ for "Fleet and Training Command from 28 January to 4 February 1999.

Harry S. Truman underway in the Western Atlantic on 23 March 1999.

Harry S. Truman conducted Post Shakedown Availability Sea Trials from 18 to 19
August 1999.


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Harry S. Truman underway for Flight Deck certification on 25 August to 2 September
1999.

Harry S. Truman departed from Norfolk to evade Hurricane Floyd on 14 September
1999; returning to Norfolk, Va. on 18 September 1999.

Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) departed from Norfolk, Va. on 22 September 1999;
conducting Carrier Qualifications from 22 September to 29 September 1999; making a port
call at Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada on 30 September 1999; returning to Norfolk, Va. on 7
October 1999.

Harry S. Truman conducted Carrier Qualifications in the Virginia Capes from 26 October
to 3 November 1999
Captain David L. Logsdon, USN relieved Captain Thomas G. Otterbein, USN (25 July
1998 to 19 November 1999) as the second Commanding Officer of Harry S. Truman on
19 November 1999
Harry S. Truman departed from Norfolk to the Virginia and North Carolina capes for
training and carrier qualification on 3 December 1999; returning to Norfolk, Va. on 14
December 1999.

Harry S. Truman underway in the Western Atlantic on 7 February 2000.

Harry S. Truman underway in the Western Atlantic from 13 to 27 March 2000.

Harry S. Truman underway in the Western Atlantic from 8 to 15 May 2000.

Harry S. Truman underway in the Western Atlantic on 26 June 2000.

Harry S. Truman underway in the Western Atlantic on 31 July 2000; conducting its first
COMPTUEX (Composite Training Unit Exercise) off Vieques Island range, Puerto
Rico from 3 to 24 August 2000.

Harry S. Truman underway in the Western Atlantic on 28 August 2000; conducted a
one day "Friends and Family Day Cruise" off the Virginia coast on 30 September 2000.

Harry S. Truman) departed from Norfolk for JTFEX (Joint Task Force Exercise) on 16
October 2000. USS San Jacinto (CG 56) joined Harry S. Truman in JTFEX 01-1 and
NATO exercise Unified Spirit 2000; underway off the N. Carolina and Virginia coasts 17
to 23 October 2000; returning to Norfolk, Va. on 26 October 2000
On 23 May 2001, Harry S. Truman with CVW-3 embarked arrived Norfolk, Virginia,
with Captain David L. Logsdon, USN in command, ending her first Mediterranean Sea
deployment (2nd voyage) operating with the 6th Fleet, her first Arabian Sea/Gulf
(Persian Gulf) deployment in support of Operation Southern Watch enforcing the no-
fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq and Exercise Arabian Gauntlet, operating
under operational control of the US Naval Forces Central Command and 5th Fleet., the
US 5th Fleet, reactivated with operational control of the Persian Gulf, Red Sea, and

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Arabian Sea, headquartered in Manama, Bahrain in July 1995, while U.S. Naval Forces
Central Command operational control extends to the Indian Ocean following the war with
Iraq (Operation Desert Storm), with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval
component commander for Central Command, at the beginning of Operation Southern
Watch (commencing 26 August 1992, when President George H. W. Bush announced that
the United States and its allies had informed Iraq that in 24 hours Allied aircraft would fly
surveillance missions in southern Iraq and were prepared to shoot down any Iraqi aircraft
flying south of the 32nd parallel, while President George Bush declared Kuwait had been
liberated at 9 p.m. EST 27 February 1992, flight operations ending at midnight), with
Operation Desert Storm commencing in the early morning hours of 17 January 1991 until
27 February 1992, when President George Bush declared Kuwait had been liberated and
Operation Desert Storm would end at midnight) and Operation Desert Shield commencing
2 August 1990 (Iraqi occupation of Kuwait). Underway in the Western Atlantic on 30
November 2000 and the Atlantic on 4 December 2000, Harry S. Truman entered the
Mediterranean Sea, her 1st voyage in the Med on 10 December 2000. Underway in the
Mediterranean Sea from 11 to 18 December 2000, Harry S. Truman made a port call at
Souda Bay, Crete from 20 to 24 December 2000, making her first Suez Canal transit on 27
December 2000, relieving USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) in support of Operation
Southern Watch (OSW) on 2 January 2001, entering the Persian Gulf on 4 January
2001. Underway in the Persian Gulf from 4 to 22 January 2001, Harry S. Truman made
a port call at Jebel Ali, UAE on 30 January 2001. Called into action in support of OSW on
16 February 2001 in response to surface-to-air missile fire against coalition forces
enforcing United Nations Security Council resolutions, aircraft from Carrier Air Wing 3
took part in a sanctioned response and struck Iraqi integrated air defense system sites.
Underway in the Persian Gulf from 31 January to 26 February 2001 and the Persian Gulf
from 31 January to 26 February 2001, Harry S. Truman made a port call at Jebel Ali,
UAE from 4 to 5 March 2001. Underway in the Persian Gulf on 12 March 2001, Harry S.
Truman participated in numerous international exercises during 2001, including the
world's largest mine countermeasures exercise, "Arabian Gauntlet”, a joint multinational
military exercise to maintain the vital sea lines in and out of the Persian Gulf, with 11-
nations involved and more than 20 ships, commencing 11 March 2001, making a port call
at Bahrain, UAE on 28 March 2001, Arabian Gauntlet ended on April 1 and Harry S.
Truman was underway in the Persian Gulf from 2 to 25 April 2001, relieved by USS
Constellation (CV-64) in support of OSW, operating in support of OSW from 2 January to
25 April 2001, CVW-3 flew 869 combat sorties during 84-days flight operations, totaling
more than 16,800 flight hours and achieved a 98.1 percent sortie completion rate.
Underway in the Red Sea on 30 April 2001, Harry S. Truman made her second Suez
Canal transit to northward on 3 May 2001, entering the Mediterranean Sea on 7 May 2001,
her 2nd voyage in the Med, underway in the Med from 7 to 11 May 2000, a port call at
Rhodes, Greece on 11 May 2001 followed, getting underway in the Mediterranean Sea on
16 May 2001. Underway in the Atlantic on 20 May 2001, Harry S. Truman participated
in Exercise Mediterranean Shark, a bilateral training exercise conducted in Morocco by
a U.S. Marine Expeditionary Unit MEU/SOC (Special Operations Capable), to show the
effectiveness of the Marine Air Ground Task Force (MAGTF). Deployed nearly 180 days,
Harry S. Truman traveled more 44,000 nautical miles, while CVW-3 squadron pilots
made 2,700 flight hours with 16,263 catapult launches and arrested landings; her second
deployment since her commission
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USS San Jacinto (CG 56); USS Arleigh Burke (DDG 51); USS Mitscher (DDG 57); USS
Porter (DDG 78); USS Stump (DD 978); USS Deyo (DD 989); USS Carr (FFG 52); USS
Norfolk (SSN 714) and USS Alexandria (SSN 757) joined Harry S. Truman task group.
USS San Jacinto (CG 56) severed as the Air Warfare Commander and only AEGIS cruiser
in the Harry S. Truman Battle Group and used its SPY-1 Radar and command and
control communications suite to help maintain regional stability through the enforcement
of the Iraqi Southern ‘No-Fly’ zone and the conduct of Maritime Interception Operations
in the Northern Arabian Gulf
Harry S. Truman underway in the Western Atlantic operating off the coast of Florida,
participating in JTFEX 03-1 (Joint Task Force Exercise) from 16 to 23 July 2001. After
successfully completing the JTFEX 03-1 (Joint Task Force Exercise), the crew of Harry
S. Truman enjoyed a liberty port visit to Key West, Fla.
On 5 September 2001, Harry S. Truman underwent a 6-month maintenance and upgrade
program and improvements to the chill water supply system, flight operation support
systems and almost all of the fuel tanks on board by Planned Incremental Availability
(PIA) at Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth; completing PIA at Norfolk Naval
Shipyard in Portsmouth on 21 February 2002
Capt. Michael R. Groothousen, USN relieved Captain David L. Logsdon, USN (19
November 1999 to 2002) as the third Commanding Officer of Harry S. Truman in 2002
Five HST Sailors Set Standard for the Fleet
Story Number: NNS020415-05
Release Date: 4/15/2002 9:48:00 AM

By Journalist 3rd Class Thomas Zappacosta, USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs

PORTSMOUTH, Va. (NNS) -- Five USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Sailors recently took
on an improbable task and made it a reality. They reworked, sanded and repainted the
ships's A/S32-35 aircraft salvage crane -- affectionately known as "Tilly" -- from the tip of
the boom to the stern of the chassis in record time.

It usually takes six to eight Sailors anywhere from four to five months just to spot-sand the
carrier's aircraft salvage crane -- not including the time it takes to repaint the crane or
rework its components. The five HST crew members completed the task in less than three
months.

"We cannot fly without Tilly," said Senior Chief Aviation Support Equipment Technician
(AW) Joann Brooks, IM4 division's leading chief petty officer, referring to the fact that air
operations can come to a grinding halt if an aircraft crashes on the flight deck. Tilly is the
only way to remove that aircraft from the flight deck so that air operations can safely
resume.

When "HST" pulled into the Norfolk Naval Shipyards in September 2001, Tilly was taken
to the Aviation Command Naval Airforce Atlantic Fleet (NATEC) facility to begin the
reworking process.

The team was given the first Naval Air Technical Data and Engineering Services

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Command (NATAC) certificate of excellence. The award recognizes the successful efforts
of the Truman team going above and beyond what anyone thought could be accomplished.

"It was a pleasure working with the professionals on board Truman so we took it upon
ourselves to reward them as they were the best we've ever seen," said Ralph Holland,
supervising engineering technician, NATEC detachment representative for HST. "It's the
first time we've ever done anything like this that I've seen during my 23 years as a
technical representative."

According to Aviation Support Equipment Technician 1st Class (AW/SW) John Riter, the
leading petty officer of the five-man crew, their biggest challenge was the working
environment they had to endure.

"The compound where we were working was out in the middle of a helicopter tarmac,"
Riter said. "We had no power or air to run our pneumatic tools. Not even running water."

Even with these obstacles, the five-man team got the job done right and ahead of schedule.

Riter said they sanded and painted Tilly by hand, using only sandpaper, paintbrushes,
rollers and elbow grease. According to Riter the Tilly crew was made up of a group of
highly motivated Sailors. "A flight deck trouble shooter is a different breed of Sailor," said
Riter.

According to Riter, his team of troubleshooters are more then just co-workers. "We work
so close together, we not only have a good working relationship, we are like a family," he
said.

According to Riter, the effects their work has been and will be felt in the rest of the fleet
for many years to come. "We have now set the standards, and carriers will not be able to
say we cannot get the job done," he said. "Truman once again has set a milestone, and now
the rest have to play catch-up." http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=1272


Harry S. Truman departed Norfolk Naval Shipyard for a few days’ sea trials off the coast
of Virginia, making a port call at Port Everglades, FL. for a "McDonalds Fleet Week" from
29 April to 4 May 2002.

Harry S. Truman was underway in the Western Atlantic on 11 May 2002.

Harry S. Truman was underway in the Western Atlantic on 4 June 2002.

Harry S. Truman was underway in the Western Atlantic on 14 June 2002, training for
its next deployment with Tailored Ship’s Training Availability (TSTA) I/II.

Harry S. Truman was underway in the Western Atlantic on 27 June 2002 and from 20
July to 5 August 2002.

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Harry S. Truman was underway in the Western Atlantic from 27 August to 2 September
2002 for TSTA III (Tailored Ship Training Availability) and the carrier’s final
evaluation period.

Harry S. Truman conducted COMPTUEX (Composite Unit Training Exercises) on the
Vieques Island inner range, southern Puerto Rican Operating Area on 3 September 2002.

On 10 September 2002, one of VS-22's S-3B aircraft operating from Harry S. Truman
was reported missing. Search and rescue efforts involving the TRUMAN Battle Group and
other ships and aircraft operating in the southern Puerto Rican Operating Area covered
more than 3,600 square miles of water. A debris field was discovered about 25 miles
south-southeast of Puerto Rico. There were no survivors. The three deceased crewmembers
have been identified as: Lt. Cmdr. Jeffrey J. Gray, 40, of Mound, Minn.; Lt. Cmdr.
Michael D. Chalfant, 36 of Jacksonville, Fla.; and Lt.(jg) Thomas Brandan McCombie, 25
of State College, Penn. At the time of the accident, the TRUMAN Battle Group was
conducting training exercises as part of a Composite Unit Training Exercise
(COMPTUEX); conducting COMPTUEX on the Vieques Island inner range, southern
Puerto Rican Operating Area from 3 to 22 September 2002; anchoring at Key West, FL on
27 September 2001; returning to Norfolk, Va. on 4 October 2002.

Harry S. Truman commenced JTFEX (Joint Task Force Exercise) off the Virginia and
North Carolina coasts on 28 October 2002; conducting JTFEX (Joint Task Force
Exercise) off the Virginia and North Carolina coasts from 28 October to 6 November 2002
Captain James P. Gigliotti relieved Capt. Michael R. Groothousen, USN as the
Commanding Officer of Harry S. Truman sometime after was reassigned from command
of USS Seattle (AOE 3) from August 2001 until February 2003
On 23 May 2003, Harry S. Truman with CVW-3 embarked arrived Norfolk, Virginia,
with Capt. Michael R. Groothousen, USN in command, with more than 20,000 loved ones
waiting on the pier to welcome the crew home, ending her second Mediterranean Sea
deployment (3rd voyage) operating with the 6th Fleet in support of Operation Southern
Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq, Operation Enduring
Freedom and what turned out to be the end of Afghan combat and the beginning of
Operation Iraqi Freedom operating under operational control of the US Naval Forces
Central Command and 5th Fleet., while U.S. Naval Forces Central Command operational
control extends to the Indian Ocean following the war with Iraq (Operation Desert
Storm), with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander for
Central Command. Underway in the Western Atlantic for TSTA (Tailored Ship
Training Availability) on 6 December 2002, Harry S. Truman operated in the
Mediterranean Sea from 19 to 21 December 2002, making a port call at Marseille, France
from 22 to 26 December 2002. Underway in the Mediterranean Sea from 27 to 29
December 2002, Harry S. Truman made a port call at Souda Bay, Crete, Greece on 30
December 2002 to 2 January 2003. Departing Souda Bay on 3 January 2003, Harry S.
Truman was underway in the Mediterranean Sea from 4 to 24 January 2003, participating
in Joint Exercise with the Albanian military forces near the Albanian port of Vlora, 85
miles southwest of Tirana, Adriatic Sea from 25 to 30 January 2003, arriving in Koper,
Solvania on 31 January 2003, she made a port call at Koper, Solvania from 31 January to 5

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February 2003. Departing Koper, Solvania on 6 February 2003, Harry S. Truman was
underway in the Adriatic Sea from 6 to 9 February 2003, conducting a Joint Exercise set
to end on 10 February 2003, taking up station in the eastern Mediterranean on early
February 2003, with their skills sharpened, the Truman team waited for word to launch
strikes against Saddam Hussein’s regime in Iraq and when the order came in the late-night
hours of 19 March 2003, the mission was no longer training, as the 2003 invasion of Iraq
had begun. Operating until relieved of its duties in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom
on 18 April 2003, Harry S. Truman’s air wing, CVW-3 successfully launched 1,280
sorties and dropped more than 700 tons of ordnance in support of special operations forces
in northern Iraq and helped liberate the people of Iraq. Underway in the Mediterranean Sea
from 11 February to 2 May 2003, Harry S. Truman entered the Northern Atlantic on 5
May 2003, arriving in Portsmouth, UK on 6 May 2003 and after a port call at Portsmouth,
UK from 6 to 9 May 2003, was underway in the Northern Atlantic, operating from 12 to
15 May 2003 and from 19 to 22 May 2003; her third deployment since her commission
USS San Jacinto (CG 56); USS Oscar Austin (DDG 79); USS Mitscher (DDG 57); USS
Donald Cook (DDG 75); USS Briscoe (DD 977); USS Deyo (DD 989); USS Hawes (FFG
53); USS Pittsburgh (SSN 720); USS Montpelier (SSN 765); USNS Mount Baker (T-AE
34) and USNS Kanawha (T-AO 196) joined Harry S. Truman task group
Harry S. Truman conducted CQ (carrier qualifications) for Fleet Readiness Squadrons
and Training Command squadrons off the Eastern seaboard from 10 to 23 July 2003.

Harry S. Truman conducted Friends and Family Day Cruise on 26 July 2003.

On 20 August 2003, Harry S. Truman United States Navy underwent her second
maintenance and upgrade program by Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) at Norfolk
Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth; completing her second PIA at Norfolk Naval Shipyard in
Portsmouth on 13 February 2004
On 13 February 2004, Harry S. Truman pulled out of the shipyard ahead of schedule and
got underway once again for sea trials, where the ship’s seaworthiness was successfully
tested, transiting the Elizabeth River following completion of a six-month PIA at Norfolk
Naval Shipyard on 13 February 2004. After completing the yard period early and under
budget, Harry S. Truman returned to its homeport of Norfolk, Va., 14 February 2004 to
begin its first work-up cycle under the Fleet Response Plan; underway in the Western
Atlantic for Sea trials from 14 to 16 February 2004.; conducting carrier qualifications and
flight deck certification off the Atlantic coast from 23 February to 5 March 2004.

Harry S. Truman underway in the Western Atlantic for its third TSTA and
COMPTUEX (Composite Unit Training Exercises) from 12 April to 4 May 2004;
returning to Norfolk, Va. on 5 May 2004.
“USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) with CVW-3 embarked departed Norfolk, Virginia,
with Captain James P. Gigliotti USN in command 2 June 2004, on her third
Mediterranean Sea deployment (5th voyage) operating with the 6th Fleet in support of
Summer Pulse ’04, as one of seven carriers worldwide to participate in the exercise,
which demonstrated the Navy’s Fleet Response Plan and took part in Exercise Majestic
Eagle, the culmination of Summer Pulse '04 which is the Navy's first deployment under
its new FRP. Underway in the Atlantic from 2 to 28 June 2004, the Western Atlantic

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from 2 to 20 June 2004 conducting COMPTUEX (Composite Unit Training Exercises).
She will under go her fourth deployment since her commission (2 June to 25 July 2004)”
(Ref. 72, 76, 84A, & 382).

“On 25 July 2004, Harry S. Truman with CVW-3 embarked arrived Norfolk, Virginia,
with Captain James P. Gigliotti USN in command, ending her third Mediterranean Sea
deployment (5th voyage) operating with the 6th Fleet in support of Summer Pulse ’04, as
one of seven carriers worldwide to participate in the exercise, which demonstrated the
Navy’s Fleet Response Plan and took part in Exercise Majestic Eagle, the culmination of
Summer Pulse '04 which is the Navy's first deployment under its new FRP. Underway in
the Atlantic from 2 to 28 June 2004, the Western Atlantic from 2 to 20 June 2004
conducting COMPTUEX (Composite Unit Training Exercises). Her fourth
deployment since her commission (2 June to 25 July 2004)” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, & 382).

“HST strike group comprises Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3, Commander, Cruiser Destroyer
Group (CCDG) 2 and Commander, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 26 staffs, guided-
missile cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61), guided-missile destroyers USS Mason (DDG 87)
and USS Barry (DDG 52), and attack submarine USS Albuquerque (SSN 706); USNS
Arctic (T-AOE 8)” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, & 382).

“On 2 June 2004, the Navy announced the simultaneous deployment of seven carrier strike
groups (CSGs) to demonstrate the Navy’s ability to provide credible combat power across
the globe by operating in five theaters with other U.S., allied and coalition military forces.
Dubbed Summer Pulse’04, this exercise was the first of the Navy’s new Fleet Response
Plan (FRP) slated to result in increased force readiness and the ability to provide combat
power in response to a crisis. Along with USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67), the other carriers
involved were USS George Washington (CVN-73), USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74), USS
Kitty Hawk (CV-63), USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75), USS Enterprise (CVN-65), and
USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76)” (Ref. 549).

HST Strike Group Certifies, Pulses East
Story Number: NNS040624-08
Release Date: 6/24/2004 10:14:00 AM


By Journalist 1st Class (SW/AW) April Phillips, USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs, for
Commander, U.S. 2nd Fleet/NATO Striking Fleet Atlantic Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- The USS Harry S. Truman (HST) (CVN 75)
Carrier Strike Group received its combat operations efficiency certification June 16 as part
of the strike group's Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX), which was
completed June 20. The ship is now heading east in support of Summer Pulse ’04.

Formerly known as blue water operations certification, this certifies the strike group as
ready to conduct open-ocean operations.



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“Achieving combat operations efficiency certification is a key milestone for the ship and
air wing team; it allows us to depart from the ties to land,” said HST Executive Officer
Capt. Ladd Wheeler.

Commander, Carrier Group (COMCARGRU) 4, Rear Adm. Richard Gallagher and his
staff were aboard HST throughout COMPTUEX. Wheeler said Gallagher had high praise
for the Truman team.

“During the out-brief, it was reported that we had achieved new standards for event factor,
which is how quickly you can launch and recover aircraft. We also set new standards for
boarding rates,” said Wheeler. Boarding rates are the percentage of how many aircraft are
able to land aboard the carrier on their first try.

Part of the reason the strike group was so successful during COMPTUEX was the level of
teamwork that exists, not just between the ship and air wing, but also between the
individual warfare commanders on the different platforms, led by Commander, Harry S.
Truman Strike Group, Rear Adm. Michael Tracy.

“Teamwork was critical,” Wheeler said. “It involves all warfare areas from surface to
subsurface, electronic, information, intelligence, and air warfare. Although Truman is often
the hub for coordinating the activity, in many cases we are not the platform for execution.
Therefore, we rely on the participating units under the lead of our DESRON [Destroyer
Squadron 26] commodore.”

The exercise strengthened the already considerable level of interoperability within the
strike group units.

“Some units joined up with us at different levels of training, but they were all quickly
brought up to speed with the rest of the strike group,” said Wheeler.

He also pointed out that the level of teamwork did not go unnoticed by the COMCARGRU
4 staff. “They enjoyed being aboard and noted the obvious teamwork that was present
among the warfare commanders, and spread all the way down to the deckplates.”

He also commended “Team Truman” for how quickly it was able to get back into the war-
fighting mindset.

“This ship and air wing team picked up, after knocking off some rust, pretty much where
we left off after deployment," Wheeler said. "The team is now certified and will head east
to participate in Summer Pulse '04 and join the other six carrier and air wing teams doing
the same thing.”

As Truman crosses the Atlantic Ocean, the executive officer encouraged all aboard to use
the transit time to reflect on the recently completed exercise and refine areas that need
improvement, while continuing to practice the areas in which the crew proved itself to be
proficient. He is also very proud of all that has been achieved to this point.

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“I think we maintained the right attitude throughout the exercise, and having the right
attitude is 90 percent of the battle," Wheeler said. "There is still a lot of work to do before
we return to home port, but achieving combat operations efficiency certification is an
important step toward returning to the global war on terrorism.”

For related news, visit the USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Navy NewsStand page at
www.news.navy.mil/local/cvn75

http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=13905

Hornet, Marine Pilot Missing
Story Number: NNS040627-01
Release Date: 6/27/2004 8:08:00 PM


From USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs

ABOARD USS HARRY S. TRUMAN (NNS) -- A U.S. Marine Corps pilot and F/A-18
Hornet aircraft operating from USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) were reported missing
June 27. The missing pilot has been identified as Capt. Franklin R. Hooks, II, 32, of Pasco,
Fla.

Aircraft wreckage has been recovered approximately 60 miles south of the Azores in the
eastern Atlantic Ocean. Harry S. Truman and its embarked aircraft have covered more than
200 square miles of water in search of the pilot. Search and rescue efforts are continuing.

The pilot was conducting a routine training exercise when the incident occurred. The
aircraft was reported missing at 12:30 a.m. Zulu June 27. The plane is one of 11 aircraft
assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 115 “Silver Eagles” operating from
Harry S. Truman. The squadron is based out of Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, S.C.,
and is one of eight squadrons that make up Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3.

The Harry S. Truman Strike Group is currently operating in the eastern Atlantic Ocean as
part of Summer Pulse 04, the Navy’s first exercise of its new operational construct, the
Fleet Response Plan.

The cause of the incident is under investigation.

For related news, visit the USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Navy NewsStand page at
www.news.navy.mil/local/cvn75

http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=13961

Recovery Operations for Marine Fighter Jet Conclude
Story Number: NNS040628-01
Release Date: 6/28/2004 8:13:00 AM

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From USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs

ABOARD USS HARRY S. TRUMAN (NNS) -- Recovery operations for a missing U.S.
Marine Corps pilot and F/A-18C Hornet aircraft operating from the aircraft carrier USS
Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) have concluded. The pilot, Capt. Franklin R. Hooks II, 32, of
Pasco, Fla., was killed in the accident.

Aircraft wreckage was recovered approximately 60 miles south of the Azores in the eastern
Atlantic Ocean, where the Harry S. Truman Strike Group is operating as part of the
Summer Pulse ‘04 exercise. The ship, its embarked aircraft, and rigid hull inflatable boats
covered more than 250 square miles of water during the search.

The pilot was conducting a routine training mission when the incident occurred. The
aircraft was reported missing at 12:30 a.m. Zulu June 27. The plane is one of 11 aircraft
assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 115 “Silver Eagles” based out of
Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, S.C.

Harry S. Truman, homeported in Norfolk, Va., will continue with its present mission.

The U.S. Navy has initiated a mishap investigation into the cause of the accident.

http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=13963

Harry S. Truman underway in the Eastern Atlantic from 26 to 28 June 2004, Harry S.
Truman entered the Med and was underway in the Mediterranean Sea from 29 June to 2
July 2004, making a port call at Naples, Italy from 2 to 7 July 2004.

Truman Says “Ciao” to Naples
Story Number: NNS040713-16
Release Date: 7/13/2004 2:07:00 PM

From USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs

NAPLES, Italy (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) wrapped up a five-day port visit
to Naples, Italy, July 7, after crossing the Atlantic as part of Summer Pulse ’04.

This was the first chance at liberty for the ship’s crew and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3
since Truman left its homeport of Norfolk, Va., June 2.

The port of Naples was an easy launching point to see other parts of Italy, including Rome,
Florence, the Amalfi coast and nearby islands. Then there was the city of Naples itself,
with the omnipresent street vendors and seemingly random traffic patterns. No matter
where Truman/CVW-3 Sailors went, everyone was happy to spend five days enjoying


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some well-deserved rest and relaxation after nearly a month at sea.

http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=14205

Underway in the Mediterranean Sea from 8 to 9 July 2004, and the Mediterranean Sea
from 11 to 15 July 2004, Harry S. Truman participated in Exercise Majestic Eagle off
the coast of Morocco, joining forces with nine other allied nations July 11 to begin an
exercise known as Medshark/Majestic Eagle. bringing 20,000 men and women from 10
allied nations together with 30 ships from the United States, United Kingdom, France,
Spain, The Netherlands, Turkey, Italy, Germany, Portugal and Morocco, including four
aircraft carriers from three different countries and more than 350 aircraft, enhancing
interoperability between allied maritime forces, as part of Summer Pulse 2004, during
which time Commander, Striking Forces NATO Vice Adm. H.G. Ulrich visited Truman
during the exercise, and had high praise for the entire strike group and the unique role
these six ships played, with Truman designated as the opposition force, and the rest of the
ships designated the NATO force under NATO command and control procedures. The
leader of Truman Strike Group, Rear Adm. Michael Tracy, said the entire group was
crucial to the success of the exercise,” while ready, capable and flexible is exactly what
FRP is all about. Truman and the other ships in its strike group wrapped up a first-of-its-
kind multinational exercise known as Majestic Eagle July 15. Majestic Eagle was the
culmination of Summer Pulse '04, the simultaneous deployment of seven aircraft carrier
strike groups, demonstrating the ability of the Navy to provide credible combat power
across the globe, in five theaters, with other U.S., allied and coalition military forces,
proving that this type of synergy is possible not just within the U.S. fleet, but also with our
maritime allies throughout the world, underway in the Atlantic from 19 to 24 July 2004;
her fourth deployment since her commission” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, & 382).
HST Strike Group Begins Medshark/Majestic Eagle
Story Number: NNS040713-17
Release Date: 7/13/2004 7:45:00 PM


By Journalist 1st Class (SW/AW) April Phillips, USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) (HST)
joined forces with nine other allied nations July 11 to begin an exercise known as
Medshark/Majestic Eagle.

http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=14218

HST Strike Group Completes Majestic Eagle
Story Number: NNS040719-18
Release Date: 7/19/2004 7:57:00 PM

By Journalist 1st Class (SW/AW) April Phillips, USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) (HST) and

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the other ships in its strike group wrapped up a first-of-its-kind multinational exercise
known as Majestic Eagle July 15.

The exercise, designed to enhance interoperability between allied maritime forces, was
conducted off the coast of Morocco as part of Summer Pulse 2004.

Under NATO command, the exercise included ships and aircraft from the United States,
United Kingdom, France, Spain, The Netherlands, Turkey, Italy, Germany, Portugal and
Morocco.

Commander, Striking Forces NATO Vice Adm. H.G. Ulrich visited Truman during the
exercise, and had high praise for the entire strike group and the unique role these six ships
played.

http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=14300

Truman's EOD Exercises with Moroccan Troops
Story Number: NNS040721-20
Release Date: 7/22/2004 2:56:00 AM

By Journalist 3rd Class (SW) Rosa Larson, USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- U.S. Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal
(EOD) members, currently aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), teamed up with a
Moroccan EOD team during the multi-national exercise Majestic Eagle in July, which
included joint forces from Morocco, France, Italy, The Netherlands, Portugal, Spain,
Turkey and the United Kingdom.

EOD Mobile Unit 6 Det. 10, homeported in Charleston, S.C., landed by helicopter July 11
initially to provide emergency ordnance disposal for the four-day operation. Poor weather,
however, prevented bombs from being dropped on the designated bomb range by any of
the eight foreign services participating in the exercise.

The two teams instead created a training environment, with the American EOD team
facilitating hands-on training for Royal Moroccan armed forces members.

http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=14364
HST strike group comprises Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3, Commander, Cruiser Destroyer
Group (CCDG) 2 and Commander, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 26 staffs, guided-
missile cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61), guided-missile destroyers USS Mason (DDG 87)
and USS Barry (DDG 52), and attack submarine USS Albuquerque (SSN 706); USNS
Arctic (T-AOE 8)
Harry S. Truman was underway in the Western Atlantic from 8 to 15 September 2004

Truman Sailors Reflect on Summer Pulse ‘04
Story Number: NNS040902-05

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Release Date: 9/2/2004 2:22:00 PM

From USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs

NORFOLK, Va. (NNS) -- Since the return of USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) (HST) to
homeport after wrapping up Summer Pulse '04, HST crew members have had time to
reflect on the tasks completed.

Summer Pulse '04, the first exercise of the Fleet Response Plan (FRP), was directed toward
teamwork and joint operations, with seven carrier strike groups simultaneously operating
in five theaters with other U.S., allied and coalition military forces.

“It was the first time something of that magnitude has taken place,” said Cryptologic
Technician (Technical) 3rd Class (SW) Jacob Wells. “It was a good show of force as far as
the United States in foreign countries [is concerned], and it proved our ability to be ready
with shorter notice.”

http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=15004
“USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) with CVW-3 embarked departed on Norfolk, Virginia,
with Captain James P. Gigliotti, USN in command on 13 October 2004, on her fourth
Mediterranean Sea deployment (7th voyage) operating with the 6th Fleet, her second
Arabian Sea/Gulf (Persian Gulf) deployment in support of Exercise Arabian Gauntlet
2005 and her 2nd Operation Iraqi Freedom on the US Navy’s 76th Arabian Sea and Persian
Gulf deployment since September 1945 operating under operational control of the US
Naval Forces Central Command and 5th Fleet. Her fifth deployment since her
commission (13 October 2004 to 18 April 2005)” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, & 382).

“HST strike group comprises Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3, Commander, Rear Admiral
Joeseph Kilkenny, Carrier Strike Group TEN Commander, Cruiser Destroyer Group
(CCDG) 2 and Commander, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 26 staffs, guided-missile
cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61), guided-missile destroyers USS Mason (DDG 87) and USS
Barry (DDG 52), and attack submarine USS Albuquerque (SSN 706); USNS Arctic (T-
AOE 8) ” (Ref. 72, 76, 84A, & 382).

On 18 April 2005, Harry S. Truman with CVW-3 embarked arrived Norfolk, Virginia,
with Captain James P. Gigliotti, USN in command, ending her fourth Mediterranean Sea
deployment (7th voyage) operating with the 6th Fleet, her second Arabian Sea/Gulf
(Persian Gulf) deployment in support of Exercise Arabian Gauntlet 2005 and her 2nd
Operation Iraqi Freedom on the US Navy’s 76th Arabian Sea and Persian Gulf
deployment since September 1945 operating under operational control of the US Naval
Forces Central Command and 5th Fleet., while U.S. Naval Forces Central Command
operational control extends to the Indian Ocean following the war with Iraq (Operation
Desert Storm), with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander
for Central Command. Underway in the Atlantic from 13 to 29 October 2004, Harry S.
Truman entered the Med, underway in the Mediterranean Sea, her 6th voyage in the
Med, from 1 to 5 November 2004, making a port call at Souda Bay, Crete from 6 to 9

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November 2004. Underway in the Mediterranean Sea on 10 November 2004, Harry S.
Truman made her third Suez Canal transit, and voyage through the Red Sea from 12 to
15 November 2004 and Gulf of Aden passage enroute to the Persian Gulf via the
Arabian Sea in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). Underway in the Arabian Sea
from 16 to 17 November 2004 and the Persian Gulf from 18 to 20 November 2004,
Harry S. Truman relieved USS John F. Kennedy (CVA-67) on 20 November 2004.
Underway in the Persian Gulf from 20 November 2004 to 16 February 2005, Harry S.
Truman made a port call at Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates from 17 to 20 February 2005.
Underway in the Persian Gulf from 21 February to 19 March 2005, Harry S. Truman
turned over duties in the Persian Gulf to USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) on 19 March 2005.
CVW-3 squadrons launched 2,577 sorties in support of OIF and maritime security
operations in the Persian Gulf, kicking off Exercise Arabian Gauntlet 2005 aboard USS
Duluth (LPD 6) in Manama, Bahrain, 20 March 2005, a multilateral surface, air and mine
countermeasure exercise designed to practice maritime security operations with our
coalition partners and allies in the region,” said Capt. Hank Miranda, commodore,
Destroyer Squadron 50, participating with more than 30,000 people and 19 ships from the
United States, Iraq, Pakistan and other coalition and regional allies are using the latest in
tactical detection and deterrent measures designed to improve and sharpen Maritime
Security Operations (MSO), enhancing the interoperability of coalition and regional allies
to deter international terrorist organizations’ use of the maritime environment. Departing
the Persian Gulf through the Gulf of Aden and Red Sea from 23 to 25 March 2005 on her
4th Suez Canal transit on 26 March 2005, Harry S. Truman entered the Mediterranean
Sea, her 7th voyage in the Med in which 4 were deployments. Underway in the
Mediterranean Sea from 27 March to 1 April 2005, Harry S. Truman entered the
Atlantic, underway in the Atlantic from 2 to 3 April 2005, prior to a port call at
Portsmouth, England from 4 to 9 April 2005, underway in the Atlantic from 10 to 17 April
2005; her fifth deployment since her commission
HST strike group comprises Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3, Commander, Rear Admiral
Joeseph Kilkenny, Carrier Strike Group TEN Commander, Cruiser Destroyer Group
(CCDG) 2 and Commander, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 26 staffs, guided-missile
cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61), guided-missile destroyers USS Mason (DDG 87) and USS
Barry (DDG 52), and attack submarine USS Albuquerque (SSN 706); USNS Arctic (T-
AOE 8)
Truman Takes the Reins in Persian Gulf
Story Number: NNS041203-05
Release Date: 12/3/2004 3:02:00 PM


By Journalist 3rd Class (SW) John Stevens, USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- The USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Carrier
Strike Group relieved the USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67) Carrier Strike Group Nov. 20 in
the Persian Gulf, following a vertical ammunition replenishment and official turnover.

After a full summer of training, Truman is ready to heed the nation’s call for its second
deployment in support of the global war on terror.

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http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=16114

VAW-126 Helps Defend Democracy in Afghanistan
Story Number: NNS041221-07
Release Date: 12/21/2004 4:00:00 PM

By Journalist 3rd Class (SW) Rosa Larson, USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At sea (NNS) -- Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron
(VAW) 126 provided two aircraft and approximately 30 crew members in support of the
weeklong operation for the inauguration of Afghan President Hamid Karzai in Kandahar
Dec. 7.

This marked the first time VAW-126 has been part of an expeditionary operation. The
squadron is typically attached to its air wing. However, this operation provided invaluable
support to President Karzai’s inauguration.

“We were selected as a group for expeditionary operations into Kandahar to provide air
support,” said “Seahawks” Executive Officer Cmdr. John Malfitano. “We were there to
provide a command and control platform for the operation.”

The operation began Dec. 4, when squadron members departed from USS Harry S. Truman
(CVN 75) to Kandahar Air Base, approximately 1,000 miles away from where the carrier
was operating in the Persian Gulf.

The team spent their first evening on the base setting up quarters for the week on the
Kandahar military compound. They began planning the expeditionary operation early the
next day, followed by a full day of rehearsal operations before the day of the inauguration.

http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=16373

CNO, MCPON Visit Truman
Story Number: NNS050119-13
Release Date: 1/19/2005 3:58:00 PM


By Journalist 1st Class (SW) Athena Blain, USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm.
Vern Clark and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (SS/AW) Terry Scott visited the
Sailors and Marines aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) and embarked Carrier Air
Wing (CVW) 3 Jan. 14, during the ship’s current deployment to the Persian Gulf in
support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

After receiving briefs from the Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 10 leadership and talking to
other senior officers aboard, Clark advanced 12 Sailors selected through the Command

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Advancement Program. The CNO then led the Sailors as they reaffirmed the Oath of
Enlistment.

http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=16649

Truman, CVW-3 Defend Iraqis’ Right to Vote
Story Number: NNS050202-14
Release Date: 2/2/2005 2:22:00 PM


By Journalist 1st Class (SW) Athena Blain, USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs

ABOARD USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- As the only carrier strike group
currently in the region, USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) and embarked Carrier Air Wing
(CVW) 3 helped provide on-call air support for coalition and Iraqi forces during the Iraqi
elections, Jan. 30.

“It’s a huge step [for Iraqis],” said Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 115 pilot
Capt. Benjamin Taylor. “We were there to give them every bit of support we could.”

That support came mostly with air presence provided by pilots of CVW-3. Though the
election showed an increase of air activity, presence has been the major objective for U.S.
air operations over the Middle East, and Truman and CVW-3 stepped up the tempo of their
mission to support security efforts for the elections.

“We fly over populated areas in Iraq, letting people of Iraq know we are there to support
them, as well as to let insurgents know that if they try to harm people, that we’ll be there
for the Iraqi people, as well as our friendlies on the ground,” said Taylor.

Capt. Jim Cook, deputy commander of CVW-3, said air presence is just one part of the
multi-faceted mission in Iraq. He emphasized that the mission hasn’t been altered in view
of the elections.

“We did exactly the same thing we do every day, just a little more of it.”

Truman Sailors and Marines launched and recovered 32 sorties ranging from surveillance
to strike fighter aircraft on election day. Truman’s aircraft flew 176 flight hours, and
conducted roughly 16 straight hours of flight deck operations, all without the need to
expend ordnance.

“It’s rewarding,” said Taylor. “We’ll be able to look back 30 years from now and know
that the people on the boat, the pilots, as well as the Marines and Soldiers on the ground
were part of this.”

http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=16899


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VF-32 Prepares Tomcats for Retirement
Story Number: NNS050311-10
Release Date: 3/11/2005 3:03:00 PM

By Journalist 3rd Class (SW) John Stevens, USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- Fighter Squadron (VF) 32 aviation structural
mechanics performed their last 280-day inspection on their freshly painted F-14 Tomcat
"show bird" by replacing and testing their ejection seats Feb. 27-28.

The squadron is preparing to say goodbye to the F-14 Tomcats as the squadron nears the
end of their deployment embarked aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) later this
spring. VF-32 will transition to the F/A-18 Super Hornet in October.

While the Navy is planning to decommission the birds, it doesn't stop VF-32's aviation
structural mechanics from completing maintenance with the same diligence and pride they
have always had.

“It’s to ensure the seat is going to work correctly if the pilot ever needs it,” said Aviation
Structural Mechanic 2nd Class (AW/SW) Travis Holland. “We start by, of course, de-
arming the ejector seats and pulling them out. Then we break it down to what we call
‘parade rest.’ We do this to ensure it’s going to work if the pilot ever needs it - to ensure
he’s going to live through a mishap."

Then, the aviation structural mechanics began an extensive two-day breakdown,
maintenance, rebuild and test of both seats in the aircraft. Holland said this often requires
extensive corrosion control and related maintenance, which will be substantially less for
the Super Hornet, one of the advantages of upgrading to the platform.

“We check the time-release mechanisms for altitude to make sure the seat-man separation
happens at the proper altitude when it’s supposed to,” said Holland.

The structural mechanics also remove explosive devices for the ejection itself, making sure
they fire properly, and they test the release mechanism for yield, so it’s not too difficult for
the pilot to activate the seats if needed.

Since there aren’t any new Tomcat pieces available to the squadron, discrepancies require
all the know-how and craftsmanship of the mechanics to repair existing parts on site, and
sometimes it takes a whole day to reassemble just one seat.

Once the work is finally done, the seats are craned into the waiting aircraft and fastened
into place. Then they’re inspected once more before the cockpit hatch lowers for good.

“Hopefully, we do all this work for nothing,” said Holland, “but if we need it, we’re going
to make sure it’s there to work.”

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While there are plenty of other such inspections to come with any aircraft fitted with
ejector seats, the dwindling number of two-seaters begins to weigh on the minds of the
Sailors doing the work.

“I guess for some of the older Sailors, it’ll be a sad thing,” said Holland of the forthcoming
farewell to fighters.

Holland added that working on Hornets involves a lot less corrosion work that significantly
cuts back on maintenance man-hours, allowing some very useful time for command and
personal development, such as warfare qualifications and education.

“I think things will improve overall,” said Holland, “with time for Sailors to get better at
being Sailors.”

Aside from a little less maintenance on the new platform, some still don’t know what to
expect.

“I’ve never had an ‘end of an era,’” said Aviation Structural Mechanic 1st Class (AW/SW)
Craig McClure, who has spent 17 years working on Tomcats. “I can’t say I’m looking
forward to it, but once I’m there, change is not always bad - it’s just different. It’s sad in a
way.”

Only two more of VF-32’s aircraft require another 280-day inspection before the squadron
transitions to the Hornet. From a maintenance perspective, things are truly drawing to a
close for the legendary Tomcat.

The Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group, consisting of USS Barry (DDG 52), USS
Mason (DDG 87), USS Monterey (CG 61), USNS Arctic (T-AOE 8), USS Albuquerque
(SSN 706) and the aircraft from embarked CVW-3, deployed Oct. 13 for its second
deployment in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and the global war on terrorism.

http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=17409

Truman Strike Group Heads Home, Vinson Strike Group Takes Watch
Story Number: NNS050328-05
Release Date: 3/28/2005 12:22:00 PM
By Journalist 3rd Class (SW) John Stevens, USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs
http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=17672
CSG 10 Changes Command
Story Number: NNS050411-06
Release Date: 4/11/2005 1:32:00 PM

By Journalist 1st Class (SW) Athena Blain, USS Harry S. Truman Strike Group Public
Affairs

ABOARD USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- Rear Adm. Joseph F. Kilkenny

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relieved Rear Adm. Michael C. Tracy as commander, Carrier Strike Group 10 in a change
of command ceremony while anchored off Portsmouth, England, April 8.

Tracy, who will report as director of Strategic Planning for U.S. Pacific Fleet in Pearl
Harbor, Hawaii, said the command was one of his most rewarding assignments.

“I have never worked in my career with such a fantastic group of people who, on a daily
basis, show the mettle of their character and their general dedication and commitment to
our country at war,” Tracy said.

Tracy also said he had witnessed the strike group, especially over the course of the
deployment, grow closer together as a team during times of change in the Navy.

“The most significant part of our cruise is that we have had a [cohesive] strike group here,
one with an outstanding reputation and a lot of experience,” said Tracy. “I have watched
what we have done to develop our reputation and teamwork, not just in respect to be the
first carrier to go through the entire Fleet Response Plan, but also to work with coalition
partners and regional nations. I’ve seen that level of teamwork enhanced, and watched the
synergy that already existed inside this carrier/air wing team spread to the strike group and
multinationally.”

Kilkenny, a former commander of embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3, met the ship the
first day of their most recent port visit in England. For him, coming out on the admiral’s
barge and looking up to see his old command brought back many happy memories.

“It’s good to be back home,” said Kilkenny. “The ship looked great. I could tell I was
amongst very professional people who really enjoyed what they were doing.”

Kilkenny, who recently left Commander, Naval Air Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet as the
special assistant to Commander, Naval Air Forces for Human Capital Strategy, expressed
his appreciation to the Sailors and Marines of the strike group during this deployment.

“I am honored to be out here serving as the battle group commander. I just want to thank
[the strike group] for all that you have done up to this point, but it’s not over yet,” he said.
“Don’t let your guard down.”

Tracy also added a few words of wisdom for his relief before his departure after the change
of command.

“Sit back and enjoy the ride,” laughed Tracy. “You have a great bunch of warriors working
for you, and they have it all down.”

The USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Carrier Strike Group is currently homeward bound
following a successful six-month deployment, which included four months in the Persian
Gulf supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom and Maritime Security Operations.

For related news, visit the USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Navy NewsStand page at
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www.news.navy.mil/local/cvn75

http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=17869
Harry S. Truman was underway in the Western Atlantic for carrier qualifications from
20 June to 1 July 2005.

Harry S. Truman and Carrier Air Wing Three (CVW-3) underway in the Western
Atlantic for carrier qualifications from 12 to 20 July 2005, completing sustainment
training 19 July 2005 under the Navy’s Fleet Response Training Plan (FRTP) during
Commander, U.S. 2nd Fleet’s Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX 05-2).

Truman participated in the FRTP as part of the Navy’s effort to get ships ready earlier and
keep them ready longer in the event they’re needed quickly to support the global war on
terrorism.

“Under the new alignment for the Fleet Response Plan, the sustainment phase we’re in is
an opportunity to keep us on the step we maintained throughout our previous deployment,”
said Truman Commanding Officer Capt. James Gigliotti. “The goal there is to make sure
that, if called upon on short notice once again, we can take that same fight to the enemy
quickly without having to ramp up very fast.”

Due to maintenance on the ships that normally augment the strike group alongside
Truman, new allies in the same mission took part in the recent exercise.

“USS Cole’s (DDG 63) been with us,” said Gigliotti, “and we had USS Gettysburg (CG 64)
come up from the south and join us as well, as part of a ‘plug-and-fight’ mode. We had to
introduce ourselves to them and vice versa, but it was a good chance to exercise our anti-
submarine warfare (ASW) and surface warfare capabilities.”

USS Oklahoma City (SSN 723) joined the exercise, aiding Truman’s ASW and lookout
training.

“Our goals here were just to hone the skills we already had,” said Gigliotti, who lauded the
ship and air wing team’s efforts as a complete success. “We got to dust away the cobwebs,
knock off a little rust and regain our proficiency, so when we get called upon we’re ready
to go.”

“It’s really a two-fold training evolution,” he continued. “Obviously the focus is on the
new aviators and the experienced aviators getting proficient again, but it also gives us a
chance on the flight deck to work with our air wing aircraft.” After the first few days,
Truman and CVW-3 launched straight into increasingly longer fly days and various other
evolutions, including general quarters drills, strike warfare, close air support and air
defense.

“We’re really pressing the air wing and ship team very hard,” said Gigliotti. “Those
exercises get us snapped back into our normal routine.”

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While he said Truman is not the centerpiece of the overall JTFEX led by Commander,
U.S. 2nd Fleet, Gigliotti stressed that Truman played a significant role on the periphery of
the exercise in support of USS Theodore Roosevelt’s (CVN 71) Carrier Strike Group
training, as well as fostering a relationship with international allies. “We’re working in a
geographic scenario that includes coalition forces,” he said, “and to get a chance to
integrate like that we all learn a great deal, both U.S. forces and coalition forces working
together.

Harry S. Truman was underway in the Western Atlantic participating in JTFEX (Joint
Task Force Exercise) with USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) from 27 July to 5 August
2005.

Truman Sustains Readiness During JTFEX 05-2
Story Number: NNS050725-06
Release Date: 7/25/2005 9:52:00 AM

By Journalist 3rd Class (SW) John Stevens, USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs

ABOARD USS HARRY S. TRUMAN (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) and
Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3 completed sustainment training July 19 under the Navy’s Fleet
Response Training Plan (FRTP) during Commander, U.S. 2nd Fleet’s Joint Task Force
Exercise (JTFEX 05-2).

Truman participated in the FRTP as part of the Navy’s effort to get ships ready earlier and
keep them ready longer in the event they’re needed quickly to support the global war on
terrorism.

“Under the new alignment for the Fleet Response Plan, the sustainment phase we’re in is
an opportunity to keep us on the step we maintained throughout our previous deployment,”
said Truman Commanding Officer Capt. James Gigliotti. “The goal there is to make sure
that, if called upon on short notice once again, we can take that same fight to the enemy
quickly without having to ramp up very fast.”

Due to maintenance on the ships that normally augment the strike group alongside Truman,
new allies in the same mission took part in the recent exercise.

“USS Cole’s (DDG 63) been with us,” said Gigliotti, “and we had USS Gettysburg (CG
64) come up from the south and join us as well, as part of a ‘plug-and-fight’ mode. We had
to introduce ourselves to them and vice versa, but it was a good chance to exercise our
anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and surface warfare capabilities.”

USS Oklahoma City (SSN 723) joined the exercise, aiding Truman’s ASW and lookout
training.

“Our goals here were just to hone the skills we already had,” said Gigliotti, who lauded the

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                                   documents .
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ship and air wing team’s efforts as a complete success. “We got to dust away the cobwebs,
knock off a little rust and regain our proficiency, so when we get called upon we’re ready
to go.”

“It’s really a two-fold training evolution,” he continued. “Obviously the focus is on the
new aviators and the experienced aviators getting proficient again, but it also gives us a
chance on the flight deck to work with our air wing aircraft.”

After the first few days, Truman and CVW-3 launched straight into increasingly longer fly
days and various other evolutions, including general quarters drills, strike warfare, close air
support and air defense.

“We’re really pressing the air wing and ship team very hard,” said Gigliotti. “Those
exercises get us snapped back into our normal routine.”

While he said Truman is not the centerpiece of the overall JTFEX led by Commander, U.S.
2nd Fleet, Gigliotti stressed that Truman played a significant role on the periphery of the
exercise in support of USS Theodore Roosevelt’s (CVN 71) Carrier Strike Group training,
as well as fostering a relationship with international allies.

“We’re working in a geographic scenario that includes coalition forces,” he said, “and to
get a chance to integrate like that we all learn a great deal, both U.S. forces and coalition
forces working together.”

http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=19310

Harry S. Truman departed Norfolk for support of Joint Task Force Katrina in the Gulf of
Mexico on 1 September 2005; underway in the Western Atlantic from 1 to 2 September
2005; conducted Joint Task Force Katrina, Gulf of Mexico 4 to15 September 2005;
underway in the Western Atlantic from 16 to 22 September 2005; returning to Norfolk,
Va. on 23 September 2005.

Harry S. Truman departed Norfolk on 12 October 2005; conducting carrier qualifications
and sustainment training in the Western Atlantic from 12 to 20 October 2005; returning to
Norfolk on 21 October 2005.

Harry S. Truman departed Norfolk, Va. on 2 November 2005; conducting ammunition
off load operations in the Western Atlantic from 2 to 7 November 2005; returning to
Norfolk, Va. on 8 November 2005.
Captain James P. Gigliotti, USN was relieved by Captain Herman A. Shelanski.

On 9 January 2006, Harry S. Truman entered DPIA (Docked-Planned Incremental
Availability) at Norfolk, Va.

Truman Begins DPIA 2006
Story Number: NNS060113-13

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Release Date: 1/13/2006 7:18:00 PM

By Journalist 2nd Class (SW/AW) John Stevens, USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs

NORFOLK NAVAL SHIPYARD, Va. (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) entered
Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY) in Portsmouth, Va., for the third time in its young life
Jan. 9.

The following day, Truman slipped into dry-dock, out of water for the first time since she
was built.

“I believe that since we've been doing carriers, this was one of the fastest dockings yet,”
said NNSY Project Superintendent Glenn Edwards. “I was extremely pleased with how
well the docking was orchestrated.”

“We parked overnight and waited until daylight to make the early tide into dry-dock,” said
Truman NNSY Project Officer Lt. Cmdr. Ed Bluestone, “which we needed to actually
clear the dry-dock.”

Truman’s ongoing dry-docked planned incremental availability (DPIA), is a new
experience for the ship.

“It’s unique in that we’ll do a lot of work that can’t be done waterborne,” said Bluestone.
“It’s extensive, and it creates the need for a longer availability, about 11 months.”

Bluestone added that compared to last PIA’s approximately 235,000 ship’s force man-
hours, this DPIA will see almost 800,000.

Even though Sailors won’t live aboard ship during DPIA, they’ll spend enough time
aboard that they must stay aware of the heightened industrial hazards of their new
environment.

In an all-hands address before transiting to NNSY, Commanding Officer Capt. James
Gigliotti stressed the continuum of operational risk management, which is just as important
on the blocks as it is on the ocean.

“This is a maintenance deployment,” said Gigliotti. “The environment is going to change
drastically from what we’re used to.

As always, safety is the first priority for Truman Sailors working alongside NNSY
civilians. There will be challenges above and beyond the ship’s first two shipyard
availabilities, but all hands are ready and willing to make DPIA 2006 a success.

“Safety gear is required on the ship at all times,” said Gigliotti, “including safety goggles, a
hard hat, earplugs on your person, and as always, steel-toed safety shoes.”

Truman is expected to remain in dry-dock until August, and will leave the shipyard in the
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fall.

http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=21950

Rear Adm. William E. Gortney reported to his current position as Commander, Carrier
Strike Group TEN in July 2006. Rear Adm. Gortney has flown more than 5300 flight
hours. http://www.truman.navy.mil/sg10_admiral.html

In late August 2006, Harry S. Truman moved to the shipyard from the dry dock.

Truman Leaves Dry Dock
Story Number: NNS060817-02
Release Date: 8/17/2006 10:27:00 AM

From Harry S. Truman Public Affairs

PORTSMOUTH, Va. (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) left dry-dock Aug. 4 and
transited to Norfolk Naval Shipyard’s (NNSY) Pier 5, entering the last stages of her dry-
docked planned incremental availability (DPIA).

Prior to getting underway, though only for 1,000 yards or so, Truman’s Sailors had to
prepare the ship for the move. Eighty Sailors from Deck Department prepared mooring and
message lines for the first time since the ship has touched water in eight months. When all
was said and done, the preparation paid off.

“It was a good day because no one got hurt,” said Seaman Nick Bacoka.

Like Bacoka, many newly reported Sailors were inexperienced with line handling. Luckily,
the department trained tirelessly for the move.

According to 1st Division Officer, Lt. j.g. Jonathan Gereige, they conducted four hour-and-
a-half-long training sessions for the move, with fruitful results.

“This was one of the smoothest evolutions since I’ve been here,” Gereige said.

Deck used this short underway as valuable training for when Truman goes out to sea once
again this fall. But they weren’t the only department taking advantage of the learning
experience.

“This was a big training evolution for Navigation, because we took away what we can
improve on for next time,” said Quartermaster 1st Class (SW) Chiquita Terry. “Overall it
was an excellent evolution; especially for Navigation because we’ve been out of
commission for eight months. It gave us a chance to be QMs for the day and prepare for
our next evolution.”

Truman Sailors also helped move barges APL-66 and APL-29, where some Sailors lived

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and worked while the ship was dry-docked.

“It went according to plan,” said Aviation Boatswain’s Mate Airman Christina Lawber, a
member of the barge mayor crew. “Everything that had to be done was done, and there
weren’t any problems.”

Truman returns to sea in November to begin her next deployment cycle.

 Thanksgiving 2006, DPIA is scheduled to be completed.
http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=25156

Truman Air Department Prepares for Underway
Story Number: NNS061127-11
Release Date: 11/27/2006 2:24:00 PM

By Mass Communication Seaman Apprentice Jymyaka Braden, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

PORTSMOUTH, Va. (NNS) -- During a 12-hour Fast Cruise Nov. 21, USS Harry S.
Truman's (CVN 75) Air Department began preparing its crew to move out of Norfolk
Naval Shipyard and get underway.

Though every department aboard Truman is getting underway, the Air Department had a
vital part in the fast cruise evolutions.

Lt. Tim Castro, the catapult and arresting gear officer and the visual landing aids branch
officer, explained how the five air department divisions work together to get the Truman
moving.

“The mission of the Truman is to fly aircraft and support the commander in accomplishing
any mission, including contributing to the fight in the global war on terrorism,” said
Castro.

The V-0 division is responsible for providing administrative support for the entire
department, and support the offices for the air boss and assistant air boss. The air bosses
are officers who overlook the evolutions and are ultimately responsible for all flight
operations.

In a standard evolution, the V-3 division transports aircraft from the hangar bay to the
flight deck. The V-4 division fuels the plane on the flight deck. Then, the V-1 division
positions the plane so Sailors from the V-2 division can attach it to the catapults to launch
the aircraft.

The Sailors perform drills during general quarters to prepare for any mishaps or
emergencies that may occur during this evolution.

“We do timed evolutions to bring the plane down in a timely manner in case of an
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emergency and fight the fire if there is one,” said Interior Communications Electrician 2nd
Class Leonard Williams, the leading petty officer of the visual landing aids division.

“There are people from the safety department and medical to oversee the drills in case
there are any casualties or injuries,” said Castro.

“Each drill you learn something new. As we get savvier and get junior Sailors trained, we
bring in the squadrons from the air wing. That adds another element to the training,” said
Castro. “It’s a continuing learning process.”

Airman Neil E. Miller said he is happy to be getting back underway and out of the yards.

“I look forward to deployment,” said Miller. “I look forward to participating in day-to-day
shipboard activities underway and seeing the different cultures overseas.”

Castro added that when sailing back to homeport or traveling overseas, the preparation to
launch and receive aircraft is not much different.

“Whether in Portsmouth, Norfolk, or the Persian Gulf, we practice like we play,” Castro
said. “The drill encompasses a whole scenario that could actually happen. We have to be
ready on all fronts. Being able to respond to anything is the key."

Castro said he is very excited about the deployment and the opportunities it will bring.

“Even in the shipyard, our morale and sense of team work is very strong compared to other
Sailors. I feel like this is the best ship on the East coast and I can’t wait to get out there and
show them why,” said Castro.

http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=26519

HST Sailors Completes Overnight Fast Cruise
Story Number: NNS061211-08
Release Date: 12/11/2006 10:49:00 AM

By Mass Communications Specialist Seaman Apprentice Jymyaka Braden, USS Harry S.
Truman Public Affairs

PORTSMOUTH, Va. (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) completed its first
overnight Fast Cruise Nov. 30.

Truman Sailors ran drills and conducted training to simulate getting underway.

http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=26985

HST Volunteers Recognized
Story Number: NNS061220-09

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Release Date: 12/20/2006 12:50:00 PM

By Mass Communications Specialist 3rd Class Michael Wilken, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

PORTSMOUTH, Va. (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) (HST) Sailors were
recognized for their service to the community as part of the Junior Achievement (JA)
Program Dec. 7.

The JA Program educates and inspires young people to value free enterprise, business and
economics to improve the quality of their lives.

One-hundred-twenty three Truman Sailors volunteered more than 550 hours of service as
part of this mission to 15,000 students at 12 community schools to teach age-specific
curriculum to at-risk children.

Machinists Mate 2nd Class (SW/AW) David Gayton volunteered his time at five of the 12
school visits this year.

http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=27132

Harry S. Truman completed DPIA on 20 December 2006.

Truman’s Valve Team Saves Navy Money
Story Number: NNS061220-12
Release Date: 12/20/2006 12:55:00 PM

By Mass Communications Specialist 2nd Class (AW/SW) Edwin Bryan, USS Harry S.
Truman Public Affairs

PORTSMOUTH, Va. (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman’s (CVN 75) Valve Repair Team
saved thousands of dollars in repair costs with an effort to keep depot-level maintenance on
a ship’s force level during the carrier's Dry-docked-Planned Incremental Availability
(DPIA) Jan. 10 through Dec. 20 at Norfolk Naval Shipyard.

Working on a nearby barge with four lathes, three sandblasters, two drill presses, a hydro-
stand, three civilian contractors and seven Truman Sailors, the Valve Team finished a wide
range of cost-saving maintenance work.

Each valve repaired by the ship's force team cost about $42; by comparison, a depot-level
repair on the same valve is about $5,000.

“We are overhauling valves that weigh anywhere between five pounds to 250 pounds, .25
inch to 10 inches,” said Machinery Repairman 2nd Class Clifford Locke of Engineering
Department’s Repair Division. Not all jobs were small; any valve that weighed more than
150 pounds required a crane lift to the barge and back.

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“Almost any one of the valves brought over can be overhauled in just one hard working
day,” said Repair Division Machinery Repairman 3rd Class Shane Chapman.

For related news, visit the USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Navy NewsStand page at
www.news.navy.mil/local/cvn75

http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=26986

Truman Mustangs Donate 120 Coats to Kids
Story Number: NNS061220-15
Release Date: 12/20/2006 1:33:00 PM

By Mass Communications Specialist 3rd Class Mari Matsumoto, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

PORTSMOUTH, Va. (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman’s (CVN 75) Mustang Association
will be donating approximately 120 coats to the WAVY TV 10’s "Coats for Kids" drive on
Dec. 23. The Association held their own drive Dec. 7 through 13, while at Norfolk Naval
Shipyard in Portsmouth.

According to Chief Warrant Officer Carl Smith, Mustang Association member, the drive
was a success even though it ended early due to the ship’s schedule.

The association started the drive after Chief Engineering Officer, Cmdr. Michael Kinsey,
Mustang Association member, approached them with the idea of getting the Truman
involved in collecting coats. http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=27134

HST Sailors Completes Overnight Fast Cruise
Story Number: NNS061211-08
Release Date: 12/11/2006 10:49:00 AM

By Mass Communications Specialist Seaman Apprentice Jymyaka Braden, USS Harry S.
Truman Public Affairs

PORTSMOUTH, Va. (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) completed its first
overnight Fast Cruise Nov. 30.

Truman Sailors ran drills and conducted training to simulate getting underway.

"The closer we get to being underway, the more drills we will do,” said Chief Boatswain’s
Mate Mark Bixby, Deck Department’s 2nd Division leading chief petty officer. “The drills
are important to flex the ship and the people, so we can fight the ship and the ship can fight
the war.”

Bixby explained fighting the ship as the Sailors’ ability to keep it afloat and maintain

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equipment without outside help.

Throughout the day, Truman Sailors ran drills for each stage of setting sail, including sea
and anchor detail, general quarters, and flight operations.

“The drills are great. We screw up, they stop us and tell us what to do,” said Air Aviation
Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) Seaman Apprentice Darin Stenglein. “The next time we
know what to and not to do.”

On the bridge during fast cruise, the quartermasters and the operations specialists
explained the bridge team’s role during fast cruise.

“When we are underway, we stand four-hour watches on the bridge. When we’re on watch,
we study a chart. The chart shows where we are [in the water] to make sure we continue on
the right path,” said Quarter Master 3rd Class Shereka Dabney.

The operations specialists monitor what’s around the ship and the ship’s position using
radar and navigation points, said Operations Specialist (SW) 2nd Class Johnathan Moore.

“They [Quartermasters] use visuals. We [Operation Specialists] take radar fixes with charts
to help us navigate safely through the water,” said Moore.

Moore said during the fast cruise they assumed their underway watches, and reviewed and
updated the charts.

“Our job is a lot easier to do underway. You can’t plot in port,” said Operations Specialist
2nd Class (SW/AW) Pamela Thomas.

Another week-long fast cruise is scheduled in preparation for the ship and Sailors to depart
for their 2007 deployment. http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id

On 20 December 2006, Harry S. Truman entered DPIA (Docked-Planned Incremental
Availability) at Norfolk, Va., commencing on 9 January 2006.
Harry S. Truman underway conducting sea trials from 20 to 22 December 2006 in
preparation for the ship and Sailors to depart for their 2007 deployment.

Harry S. Truman underway conducting flight deck certifications off the U.S. East Coast
from 26 January to 6 February 2007.

Truman Honors Sailor Of The Year
Story Number: NNS070127-05
Release Date: 1/27/2007 5:33:00 PM

By Communications Specialist Third Class Michael Wilken, USS Harry S. Truman Public
Affairs


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NORFOLK, Va. (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) honored 12 Sailors as their
respective department’s Sailor of the Year (SOY), and selected one as Truman’s SOY for
2006 during a ceremony held aboard the ship Jan. 20.

“SOY is for any Sailor onboard the Ship who demonstrates exceptional leadership and
outstanding performance,” explained Command Master Chief (AW/SW) Clarence Frye.
“Being selected as a candidate for SOY means that your department recognizes your
leadership and mentoring abilities, as well as helping the Sailors working for [or with]
you."

Once a department selects someone they feel has the qualifications for SOY, they submit a
package for that Sailor up the chain of command. The command master chief makes his
recommendations, but it is ultimately up to the commanding officer to make the final
decision on who the SOY will be for the command.

http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=27482

Truman Sailors Receive Retention Award
Story Number: NNS070129-05
Release Date: 1/29/2007 9:50:00 AM

By Mass Communications Specialist Seaman Jeffrey S. Troutman, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

NORFOLK , Va. (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Sailors received a Retention
Excellence Award on Jan. 5 for meeting the retention rate for the 2006 fiscal year.

The award represents the command’s high retention percentage among its crew as it
continues to develop itself for wartime effectiveness.

“It speaks of the command morale,” said Navy Counselor Senior Chief Thomas A. Albert.
“If the retention rate on the ship is high, it means people like what they’re doing.”

The retention award is presented quarterly each year when a high percentage of a
command’s crew reenlist for active duty. This year also marked the first time Navy
Reserve Sailors were eligible for inclusion in the overall percentage, Albert said.

http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=27481

Tobacco Cessation Benefits Truman Sailors
Story Number: NNS070206-21
Release Date: 2/6/2007 2:15:00 PM

By Mass Communications Specialist Seaman Jeffrey S. Troutman, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs


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NORFOLK (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) started a new program Jan. 15
aimed at helping Sailors quit using tobacco once and for all.

“Over 70 percent of all tobacco users want to quit using tobacco,” said Hospital Corpsman
1st Class Stephanie A. Smestad, the acting psychiatric technician aboard the Truman.

The problem, she said, is a lack of support. When it comes to finding help with their
addiction, tobacco users can often find themselves at a loss for ways or reason as to how or
why they intend to quit. The desire may be there, but the plan of action is often missing,
Smestad said.

Acknowledging this problem, and others, related to quitting tobacco use inspired Smestad
and Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Crystal L. Edmonds, Truman’s substance abuse
counselor, to create the Tobacco Cessation Program.

The program is held in the Substance Abuse Rehabilitation Program (SARP) treatment
room. The group meets four times over the course of two weeks.
http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=27613

Harry S. Truman off the U.S. East Coast conducting flight deck certifications from 12 to
22 January 2007.

Truman Receives Flight Deck Certifications
Story Number: NNS070205-07
Release Date: 2/5/2007 2:13:00 PM

By Mass Communications Specialist Seaman Apprentice Jymyaka Braden, USS Harry S.
Truman Public Affairs

NORFOLK, Va. (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) certified the flight deck to
launch and receive aircraft during an underway period Jan. 12-22 in preparation for an
upcoming deployment.

Each of the divisions in the air department, referred to as V-1, V-2, V-3 and V-4, all played
a different and vital role in the overall certification as Truman Sailors and Carrier Air
Wing (CVW) 3 practiced launching and recovering more than 160 aircraft without
mishaps.

“We are certifying the flight deck so that we can carry out the ship’s mission,” said
Aviation Boatswain’s Mate Electronics 1st Class (AW) Gerard Boyle, V-2 leading petty
officer. “We will continue to launch and recover after we are qualified. These guys need
the experience.”

The Sailors of V-1 practiced taxing aircraft around the hangar bay and conducted aircraft
firefighting drills.



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“We are getting our Sailors refreshed and back into things,” said Aviation Boatswain’s
Mate Aircraft Handling 1st Class (AW) John Mirance, V-1’s assistant leading petty officer.
“Some people are rusty, but we are scraping the rust off.”

V-2 manned the catapults to launch the aircraft, and the recovery lines to bring it back
down. Other Sailors stood in the engine room to ensure there were no fuel leaks.

“V-2 is the backbone of the air department. Everybody surrounds us,” said Boyle. "This is
probably the youngest and the hardest working crew I’ve ever been out to sea with.”

The Sailors of V-3 worked in the Hangar bay moving aircraft, conducting chock and chain
procedures, aircraft landing and fire fighting drills.

“The majority of them are really catching on,” said Aviation Boatswain’s Mate Aircraft
Handling 1st Class (AW) Donavan Mahiai, assistant leading petty officer.

V-4 contributed by bringing fuel on board, fueling the aircraft and working on flight deck
observer qualifications.

The new Sailors from Air and other departments must watch flight operations from
vulture’s row high above the flight deck, to observe launches and recoveries before they
can go on the flight deck during flight operations. In addition to the designated flight deck
safety gear, they wear a “T” on their cranial, which indicates training.

“They are ready to get out there and do what they joined the Navy to do. They’re so
hungry,” said Aviation Boatswain’s Mate Fuels 1st Class (AW) Hawa Jenkins.

“The air department is one of the hardest working departments on the ship. We can’t do it
with one division,” said Boyle. “We need them all together to complete the mission.”
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=27611

Harry S. Truman conducted flight deck certifications off the U.S. East Coast from 26
January to 6 February 2007.

Truman Sailor Self-Publishes Book
Story Number: NNS070206-09
Release Date: 2/6/2007 12:57:00 PM

By Mass Communications Specialist Seaman Apprentice Jymyaka Braden, USS Harry S.
Truman Public Affairs

NORFOLK, Va. (NNS) -- A USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Sailor and aspiring writer, is
breaking into the literary world with her first novel, "Once Upon a Time in the Bricks,"
which is scheduled to be re-released late February.

Fireman Leighanne Boyd of the Reactor Propulsion Office Division 2 admits that she was

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a little nervous about her shipmates reading the first edition of her novel, because the
editing wasn’t very thorough.

“I was nervous, because it was face-to-face [feedback], but a lot of people said they liked
it. They noticed the editing, but they read around it,” Boyd said.

The new edition is edited more carefully and has a new cover that depicts downtown
Newark at Broad and Market. Boyd said the story is about a lot of her own life
experiences.

“'Once Upon a Time in the Bricks' is loosely based off of people I met and things I did
growing up in Jersey,” said Boyd.

The main character Dina was formed around girls she had seen in the neighborhood. The
novel chronicles Dina’s pursuit of the drug game and criminal lifestyle.

In addition to making a statement about society, the book also touches on the levels of
emotional dependence people experience while trying to hold on through hard times.

“When we got off cruise I had more time to myself, and I would just stay up for hours at
night writing. Some people just think about writing the book, but that’s when the work
begins,” said Boyd.

She faced a few obstacles to get her book published on her terms. After some unattractive
offers from a few acclaimed authors and a financial bind with a faulty publishing company,
Boyd decided to self-publish with an online company. Boyd is currently working on her
sophomore novel, "Ugly Men Cheat Too."
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=27646

HST Sailors Run Flight Deck 5k
Story Number: NNS070210-02
Release Date: 2/10/2007 10:51:00 AM

By Mass Communications Specialist Seaman Jeff S. Troutman, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

NORFOLK (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) hosted a five kilometer (5K) run on
its' flight deck Feb. 4, as part of a shipwide celebration for Super Bowl XLI.

Plaques were awarded to the top three male and female participants, as well as awards for
the youngest and oldest runners out of the 152 Sailors that participated, including
Truman’s Commanding Officer Captain Herman A. Shelanksi and Command Master Chief
(AW/SW) Clarence M. Frye. http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=27712

Truman Sailors Practice Tool Control
Story Number: NNS070204-07

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Release Date: 2/4/2007 3:58:00 PM

By Mass Communications Specialist Seaman Apprentice Jymyaka Braden, USS Harry S.
Truman Public Affairs

NORFOLK, Va. (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman’s (CVN 75) (HST) Aviation Intermediate
Maintenance Department (AIMD) introduced their Tool Control Program (TCP) to all
shipboard work centers in February and expects to complete the task by March of 2007.

AIMD has covered 55 work centers and five departments so far.

TCP was initiated by Capt. James Gigliotti, former HST commanding officer. Gigliotti
established the program to improve ordering, storage, upkeep and accountability of tools
throughout the command. Ensign Shariva Cordero, the AIMD quality assurance officer,
continues implementing TCP throughout the command. The program also assists in the
reduction of foreign object damage (FOD), which the current commanding officer, Capt.
Herman Shelanski, continues to emphasize.

“TCP reduces FOD by having accountability for all tools," said the TCP Assistant
Coordinator, Aviation Electrician’s Mate (AW) 1st Class Michael Mihalic. "If a tool is
discovered missing, the first step is to stop all work and search for the missing or broken
tool, which in return reduces FOD. It’s important because a tool can be sucked into an
aircraft engine and cause serious damage or even death.”

http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=27616

Truman Receives Flight Deck Certifications
Story Number: NNS070205-07
Release Date: 2/5/2007 2:13:00 PM

By Mass Communications Specialist Seaman Apprentice Jymyaka Braden, USS Harry S.
Truman Public Affairs

NORFOLK, Va. (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) certified the flight deck to
launch and receive aircraft during an underway period Jan. 12-22 in preparation for an
upcoming deployment.

Each of the divisions in the air department, referred to as V-1, V-2, V-3 and V-4, all played
a different and vital role in the overall certification as Truman Sailors and Carrier Air
Wing (CVW) 3 practiced launching and recovering more than 160 aircraft without
mishaps.

“We are certifying the flight deck so that we can carry out the ship’s mission,” said
Aviation Boatswain’s Mate Electronics 1st Class (AW) Gerard Boyle, V-2 leading petty
officer. “We will continue to launch and recover after we are qualified. These guys need
the experience.”

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The Sailors of V-1 practiced taxing aircraft around the hangar bay and conducted aircraft
firefighting drills.

“We are getting our Sailors refreshed and back into things,” said Aviation Boatswain’s
Mate Aircraft Handling 1st Class (AW) John Mirance, V-1’s assistant leading petty officer.
“Some people are rusty, but we are scraping the rust off.”

V-2 manned the catapults to launch the aircraft, and the recovery lines to bring it back
down. Other Sailors stood in the engine room to ensure there were no fuel leaks.

“V-2 is the backbone of the air department. Everybody surrounds us,” said Boyle. "This is
probably the youngest and the hardest working crew I’ve ever been out to sea with.”

The Sailors of V-3 worked in the Hangar bay moving aircraft, conducting chock and chain
procedures, aircraft landing and fire fighting drills.

“The majority of them are really catching on,” said Aviation Boatswain’s Mate Aircraft
Handling 1st Class (AW) Donavan Mahiai, assistant leading petty officer.

V-4 contributed by bringing fuel on board, fueling the aircraft and working on flight deck
observer qualifications.

The new Sailors from Air and other departments must watch flight operations from
vulture’s row high above the flight deck, to observe launches and recoveries before they
can go on the flight deck during flight operations. In addition to the designated flight deck
safety gear, they wear a “T” on their cranial, which indicates training.

“They are ready to get out there and do what they joined the Navy to do. They’re so
hungry,” said Aviation Boatswain’s Mate Fuels 1st Class (AW) Hawa Jenkins.

“The air department is one of the hardest working departments on the ship. We can’t do it
with one division,” said Boyle. “We need them all together to complete the mission.”

For related news, visit the USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Navy NewsStand page at
www.news.navy.mil/local/cvn75

http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=27611

MWR Brings Super Bowl to Sailors
Story Number: NNS070206-22
Release Date: 2/6/2007 2:18:00 PM

By Mass Communications Specialist Seaman Jeff S. Troutman, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs



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NORFOLK (NNS) -- Sailors aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) celebrated Feb. 4
with a Super Bowl party sponsored by the ship’s Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR)
office.

The event featured a wide variety of entertainment for the ship’s crew, including video
game tournaments, stadium-style food stands, a dance competition, as well as professional
football players from the Green Bay Packers and cheerleaders from the New England
Patriots. http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=27640

Truman Offers Alcoholics Anonymous at Sea
Story Number: NNS070205-10
Release Date: 2/5/2007 4:29:00 PM

By Mass Communications Specialist Seaman Apprentice Jymyaka Braden, USS Harry S.
Truman Public Affairs

NORFOLK, Va. (NNS) -- The USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) sponsors Alcoholics
Anonymous (AA) meetings at sea in an effort to keep recovering alcoholics in treatment.

The meetings take place Monday thru Saturday from 8-9 p.m. in the Substance Abuse
Rehabilitation Program (SARP) office.

“We want to do whatever we can do to help them stay sober,” said Hospital Corpsman 1st
Class (AW/SW) Harry Maragh, SARP representative.

A.A. is a voluntary fellowship of more than 2,000,000 members in 146 countries. AA
offers its members a support system to aid one another in recovery. The chapter on board
serves the same purpose.

“What usually happens is people will already have a home chapter that they belong to, but
once we deploy for six months they can’t go,” said Hospital Corpsman 1st Class (AW/SW)
Crystal Edmonds, command SARP representative.

Command Drug and Alcohol Program Advisor Chief Aviation Boatswain’s Mate
Electronics Brian Morrison said the meetings are as effective as the group itself. AA
members are encouraged to lean on one another to help cope and deal with daily sobriety.

“I am extremely proud of the individuals that attend AA on board because they understand
their place in sobriety and responsibility to be a positive contributor to the USS Harry S.
Truman’s mission,” said Morrison.

For related news, visit the USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Navy NewsStand page at
www.news.navy.mil/local/cvn75

http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=27612



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Truman Sailors Find New Life in Physical Fitness
Story Number: NNS070205-14
Release Date: 2/5/2007 8:52:00 PM

By Mass Communications Specialist Seaman Jeffrey S. Troutman, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

NORFOLK (NNS) -- Walk into any weight room anywhere in the world, and chances are
good the positive atmosphere will be familiar: the clanging iron, the outpouring of
exertion, and that distinct feeling of pride which is rooted in physical accomplishment.

In the U.S. Navy and aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), a positive attitude can carry
more weight than any weight room can offer up. That’s why more than a few Sailors
serving aboard Truman feel it’s very important for Sailors – both young and old – to
maintain a strong level of commitment to physical fitness.

“Physical training is definitely for everybody, from the young to the old,” said Storekeeper
1st Class (SW) Maurico D. Croom, Truman’s safety leading petty officer and assistant
command fitness leader. “PT (physical training) is a way of life, not just for people in the
military but for everybody these days.”

However, the demanding life of a Sailor can often leave seemingly little time for a regular
PT regimen. Finding the time for a physical fitness routine while on deployment can often
be about as easy as flying a lead balloon. By the end of a 12-hour day, the last thing many
Sailors aboard Truman may feel like doing is exerting more energy in an hour’s time than
was demanded of them in the 12 or 13 hours they just walked away from.

http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=27614

Truman Welcomes Visitors for Super Bowl Party
Story Number: NNS070206-08
Release Date: 2/6/2007 12:54:00 PM

By Mass Communications Specialist Seaman James Fallon, USS Harry S. Truman Public
Affairs

NORFOLK (NNS) -- Cheerleaders from the New England Patriots and football players
from the Green Bay Packers celebrated Super Bowl Sunday with Sailors aboard USS
Harry S. Truman (CVN 75).

Team Truman created an atmosphere that simulated being at the Super Bowl. Stadium-
sized bleachers, three giant-screen TV’s and concession stands were set up in the hangar
bay. http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=27641

Truman Sailor Self-Publishes Book


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Story Number: NNS070206-09

Release Date: 2/6/2007 12:57:00 PM

By Mass Communications Specialist Seaman Apprentice Jymyaka Braden, USS Harry S.
Truman Public Affairs

NORFOLK, Va. (NNS) -- A USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Sailor and aspiring writer, is
breaking into the literary world with her first novel, "Once Upon a Time in the Bricks,"
which is scheduled to be re-released late February.

Fireman Leighanne Boyd of the Reactor Propulsion Office Division 2 admits that she was
a little nervous about her shipmates reading the first edition of her novel, because the
editing wasn’t very thorough.
http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=27646
The crews ready, but we must undergo TSTA III (Tailored Ship Training Availability)
and the carrier’s final evaluation period; Composite Unit Training Exercise
(COMPTUEX); conducting COMPTUEX and a JTFEX (Joint Task Force Exercise)
Harry S. Truman took on ammo from USNS Lewis and Clark (T-AKE-1) and USS
Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) off the U.S. East Coast from 7 to 10 February 2007.
SECDEF Visits USS Harry S. Truman Sailors
Story Number: NNS070226-14
Release Date: 2/26/2007 2:17:00 PM By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jeff S.
Troutman, USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs

NORFOLK (NNS) -- Sailors aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) received a special
visit Feb. 22 from the Honorable Dr. Robert M. Gates, the Secretary of Defense
(SECDEF). Gates’ visit to Truman was his first carrier visit as SECDEF.

The two-hour visit started on the ship’s flight deck when SECDEF arrived via helicopter
and was greeted by Commander, Fleet Forces Command Adm. John B. Nathman; Rear
Adm. William E. Gortney, commander, Strike Group 10 and Capt. Herman A. Shelanski,
Truman’s commanding officer.
http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=27984

Truman Completes CART II Phase
Story Number: NNS070319-13
Release Date: 3/19/2007 2:43:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jeff S. Troutman, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

NORFOLK (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman's (CVN 75) Afloat Training Group (ATG)
held Command Assessment Readiness Training Phase II (CART II) from Feb. 20-23 to
assess the ship's needs for the upcoming Final Evaluation Period (FEP).


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This was Truman’s first CART II in three years. The evolution lasted four days and
evaluated various aspects of the ship’s training readiness.

“The CART II was pretty much a snapshot,” said Lt. Cmdr. Darian T. Caldwell, Truman’s
training officer. “ATG came on board and took an assessment of where the ship stands in
regards to training. They used that information to help us determine where we need to be in
order for FEP completion.”

ATG’s evaluation aboard Truman looked at various administrative requirements, including
plans for watch team replacement, watch quarter and station bills and long-range training.
Those aspects of the evaluation ensure the ship has administrative processes in order so
that training and personnel turnovers go according to plan, Caldwell said.

Truman currently has eight training teams who were involved in the CART II Phase: Air
Department, Combat Systems, Damage Control, Force Protection, Medical, Nuclear
Propulsion, Seamanship and Navigation, and Weapons Department. Caldwell added,
however, that each department and major functional area within the ship has a training
team.

“CART II was an integral step in making sure we’re prepared for deployment and
conducting our mission, because there are finite requirements we have for Truman’s Final
Evaluation Period,” said Caldwell.

FEP training phase will take place on Truman in April, during her upcoming underway
period beginning March 20. The CART II evolution was a way for Caldwell and the
various training teams to assess in what areas they excelled, as well as areas in need of
further development.

“We’re going to take the feedback we got from ATG during the CART II assessment and
formulate a plan to ensure success for upcoming training events and ultimately FEP,”
Caldwell said.

To prepare for evolutions like CART II and FEP, Caldwell said the training teams
performed various general quarters (GQ) drills to test their knowledge of readiness
training.

“For each GQ we have, we want to have an initial planning phase where the various
training teams get together and decide what we’re going to do for that particular training
drill,” said Caldwell.

While many may find the lengthy GQ drills excessive, they are essential to providing
Truman’s crew as a whole with the readiness training they need to pass training evolutions
like CART II and April’s FEP.

Despite a few coordination issues between some of the training teams during CART II,
Caldwell said he was pleased with the level of motivation and execution the teams
displayed throughout the four-day training evolution.
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“It was good to see the crew so motivated, particularly during the GQ drills,” said
Caldwell. “That’s really an all-hands effort and it was great to see the motivation level of
the crew so high.”

Caldwell said the training teams would continue training through March and April leading
up to FEP, and that he was confident the teams would remedy all areas needing
improvement in time for the upcoming evolutions.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=28270

Carrier Air Wing 3 Gets New Commander
Story Number: NNS070319-01
Release Date: 3/19/2007 8:30:00 AM By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman
Apprentice Jymyaka Braden, USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs

NORFOLK (NNS) -- Capt. Fredrick Pawlowski relieved Capt. James Cook as the
Commander of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3 during a change of command ceremony aboard
Harry S. Truman on March 1.
http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=28269
Harry S. Truman conducting Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) off the U.S.
East Coast from 20 March to 12 April 2007.

Composite Unit Training Exercise (COMPTUEX) and a JTFEX (Joint Task Force
Exercise) are next.

Harry S. Truman conducting carrier qualifications in the Western Atlantic from 14 to 24
May 2007.

Harry S. Truman returned to Norfolk, Va. on 25 May 2007.

Truman Hosts Missile Exercise
Story Number: NNS070525-10
Release Date: 5/25/2007 11:43:00 AM

By Mass Communications Specialist Seaman James Fallon, USS Harry S. Truman Public
Affairs

NORFOLK (NNS) -- The USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) conducted a NATO Sea
Sparrow Missile exercise at sea May 21.

“The missile exercise was an outstanding event, the test went outstanding and we received
an 'outstanding' on the shoot,” said Lt. Cmdr. Lonnie Phillips, tactical action officer under
instruction.

Phillips said the purpose of the missile exercise is twofold. One it is to train the combat
systems team watch standards and teach the fire control men to defend the ship. He said

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the secondary purpose is to qualify the combat team, ensuring they are qualified to go to
war and launch these weapons if need be.

“If we are [deployed] and the bad guys decide to attack Truman, this exercise gave the ship
and its company confidence that this combat system team will respond correctly,” said
Phillips.

The combat systems team faced many obstacles during the missile exercise. Phillips said
the biggest was making sure all small boats and marine mammals were clear of the
exercise. He added, it was also difficult making sure the combat systems communications
worked efficiently, effectively and that everybody knew what they were doing.

The combat systems team overcame these obstacles through training and track exercises
they conducted throughout the week, explained Fire Controlman 2nd Class (SW/ AW)
Steven Deluna.

The combat systems team has been training since leaving the shipyards in January, said
Phillips, and this was their chance to put everything they have been training for into action.

“I heard from the flight deck it was miraculous,” said Fire Controlman 2nd Class Clifford
Anderson. “From what I’ve heard, we had an outstanding kill on the first target.”

Phillips said the targets that were used to test the missiles were two unmanned drones
driven by someone on land. He said the drones were launched somewhere around Oceana,
flown to an initial point and fired at the ship in air speeds of 450 knots.

“I’m the one who fired the ordnance on the two drones today,” said Fire Controlman 2nd
Class (SW) Bo Erwin.
Erwin said there was no difference between the training exercises they have with the actual
live-firing exercise.

“We train like we fight, and today’s exercise couldn’t have gone any better,” said Erwin.
“The radar tracked right on the ordnance -- right where they are suppose to go and it was
perfect.” http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=29627

Harry S. Truman conducted a daylong Friends and Family Day cruise on 2 June 2007.

Truman Hosts Friends and Family Day Cruise
Story Number: NNS070610-06
Release Date: 6/10/2007 11:09:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jymyaka Braden, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

NORFOLK (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) held a Friends and Family Day
Cruise (FFDC) aboard the ship June 2, in an effort to show loved ones what Sailors do on a

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daily basis.

During the 12-hour cruise, visitors toured the ship, learned how various departments
support the mission and enjoyed entertainment sponsored by the Morale, Welfare and
Recreation (MWR) department, including a performance by the Jacksonville Jaguars
cheerleaders.

Lt. Cmdr. Judd McLevey, Truman’s FFDC coordinator and the assistant air operations
officer, said the event is a good way for Sailors to show their families how the aircraft
carrier works and how their jobs support the mission.

“The reason for setting up an event like this is to give families an opportunity to see what
their Sailors do day-to-day,” McLevey said. “We go home and talk about what we do, but
that’s not the same as them being able to see.”

McLevey said preparing the ship for so many guests was an all-hands evolution. The Deck
Department loaded equipment and Supply Department contributed food and supported the
vendors. The Air Department helped set up in the hangar bay and flight deck. Engineering
provided the electric power.

A highlight of the day was an air-power demonstration on the flight deck and in the air,
which included F/A-18 flybys, smoke bombs in the distance and two sonic booms.
Truman's Air Department launched and recovered aircraft with the visitors watching
closely behind the foul line.

Aviation Maintenance Administrationman 3rd Class (AW) Dustin Siders said the air show
was fascinating, but the experience was enhanced because he shared it with his wife.

“My favorite part was when the Super Hornet broke the sound barrier,” said Siders. “It
flew right above the boat, you didn’t hear anything and fog was right behind it. Then all of
a sudden there was a big boom. It was a once in a lifetime experience for her. She was
really excited about that.”

The visitors were also able to travel the ship visiting different workspaces with their
Sailors for self-guided tours. Siders said he took his wife around the ship so she could get a
feel for what he did daily.

“I got to show her where I work and she put visuals with a lot of stuff that we talked
about,” Siders said. “Now, she knows what it’s like for us when we’re on the ship days,
weeks and months at a time.”

MWR sponsored video game tournaments and a magician who wowed the audience with
fire and more. An MWR representative, Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) Airman
Apprentice Narin Khongphatthana, said all the months of planning came together for a
productive day.

“Besides showing the families what we do, we wanted them to have fun. That’s where
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MWR comes in,” Khongphatthana said. “It was pretty fun playing with all the kids and
being challenged to games. The whole day was boredom-free.”

According to all the children aboard, the magician and the Jaguar cheerleaders stole the
show. The children watched the magician perform a number of tricks from swallowing fire
to making a $100 bill reappear after burning it.

Danielle Lafontaine of the Jaguar cheerleaders said she was excited about performing on
the ship, meeting Sailors and getting underway.

“I’ve never experienced anything like that air show. You get to see them fly over the
stadium sometimes, but never like that,” said Lafontaine. “We appreciate all that you do
for us and we’ll never be able to repay you. The performance is just a little bit of what we
do to show that.”

Another cheerleader, Tiffany Bowen, said she appreciated being on the ship because her
father is a retired Sailor.

“My dad met my mom when he was stationed in Guam. I was born there,” Bowen said.
“It’s really cool to be on such a big ship and not feel like you’re on a ship.”

Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Handling) Airman Apprentice Kenneth Wilson said he didn’t
know the cheerleaders were coming, but it was an interesting surprise.

“The performance was great and really creative. I thought it was a great experience for the
little girls in the crowd to come on stage and learn some cheers,” said Wilson. “It was
inspiring for the girls to hear that the cheerleaders were medical professionals, teachers and
college students as well as cheerleaders.”

Friends and Family Day was about showing the guests how the ship operates, how the
Sailors live out to sea and how Truman defends the country in wartime.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=29979v

Harry S. Truman conducted carrier qualifications for CVW-3, FRS, and CNATRA
underway in the Western Atlantic from 4 to 7 June 2007.

Harry S. Truman underway in the Western Atlantic 11 to 2 June 2007.

Harry S. Truman conducting COMPTUEX (Composite Training Unit Exercise)
underway in the Western Atlantic from 2 to 19 July 2007.

Harry S. Truman visited Fort Lauderdale, Fla. from 20 to 23 July 2007.

Harry S. Truman, underway in the Western Atlantic from 24 to 25 July 2007.

Harry S. Truman conducting JTFEX 07-2 "Operation Bold Step" off the coast of North

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Carolina from 26 to 31 July 2007 and Florida on 31 July 2007, completing JTFEX 07-2 on
31 July 2007.

Truman Conducts JTFEX
Story Number: NNS070731-21
Release Date: 7/31/2007 2:47:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kenneth R. Hendrix, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- The Nimitz-class nuclear-powered aircraft
carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 10, embarked Carrier
Air Wing (CVW) 3 and Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 26 started procedures for Joint
Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) "Operation Bold Step" on July 26 off the Southern Atlantic
coastline.

More than 15,000 service members from four countries are taking part in the pre-
deployment, sustainment training, sea trials exercise that is being called "Operation Bold
Step." The two countries participating on the blue team are the United States and United
Kingdom. In addition; Peru and Chile are participating on the red team.

"Operation Bold Step" is aimed at providing realistic training environments for the U.S.
and coalition forces, mimicking the operational challenges routinely encountered during
military operations around the world.

By and large the purpose of the training exercise is to ensure military forces are prepared to
support any mission and are ready for deployment on short notice.

Truman's commanding officer Capt. Herman A Shelanski said exercises like JTFEX help
the Navy attain the Chief of Naval Operations' goal of a "1,000-ship navy" by working
with our ally countries.

"What's unique about this now is that we are learning how to operate together in a training
cycle," said Shelanski, "which allows us to work out any type of inconsistencies up front."

In the past, ships would typically deploy to areas like the Mediterranean Sea, Persian Gulf
or north Indian Ocean and just start operating with no kind of prior training with one
another, said Shelanski.

"By operating with our allies now, we are learning how to do things before hand, which is
really important for real world operations," Shelanski added.

Aboard Truman, the Combat Direction Center (CDC) is the epicenter where all the battle
decisions are made during the exercise allowing crew members to rehearse interoperability
and to confirm their coalition bilateral and interagency lines of communication.

Lt. Mark Domenico, ship's weapons coordinator of Operations Department, OI division, is
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training to become a CDC Tactical Action Officer (TAO).

"The biggest thing is reading the message traffic," said Domenico. "Every day you read
message traffic to get a visual representation in your mind of how things will go and play
out."

Domenico said by reading the message traffic report he is able to do his job successfully
and ensure the aircraft are safe from enemy tactics.

In a scenario depicting an actual hostility, Domenico coordinates with the TAO and
weapons operator to launch weapons in self-defense.

Domenico explained that operations specialists' ability to track combat tactics, keeping
personnel like the TAO and up to date "makes my job very easy."

"They are able to keep the picture accurate and [their] updates enable us to operate and
fight effectively during major combat and high-end deterrence operations," Domenico
added.

CCSG-10, Rear Adm. William E. Gortney shared that the operations specialists manning
the Global Command in Control System Maritime are the decision-making capability, and
without an accurate and true picture the admiral could not make his decisions, said
Operations Specialist 2nd Class Phillip Cosentino, Operations Department, OI Division.

In CDC -- from the admiral to the TAO -- they all want to see a picture relative to where
the ship's position is to "ally forces, assumed enemies and anything unknown," said
Cosentino.

"By knowing that information, it allows them to plan our mission or attacks, so that's very
critical," Cosentino added.

As many as 30 ships make up three carrier strike groups playing a part in JTFEX,
enhancing the preparedness of all personnel to jointly respond to threats.

Shelanski credits the more than 5,000 Sailors on board Truman for launching the pilots off
the ship.

"We can't do it without any one of those Sailors," said Shelanski. "Therefore, they have to
be trained, know their job and be motivated, which is the reason why we do exercises like
this."

Harry S. Truman Strike Group consists of CSG 10, CVW 3, DESRON 26, guided-missile
cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66), guided-missile destroyers USS Oscar Austin (DDG 79)
and USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81), and the fast-attack submarine USS Montpelier
(SSN 765). The Royal Navy destroyer HMS Manchester (D 95) is also apart of the strike
group.

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Dwight D. Eisenhower strike group consists of CSG 8, CVW 7, DESRON 28, guided-
missile cruiser USS Anzio (CG 68), guided-missile destroyers USS Ramage (DDG 61) and
USS Cole (DDG 67), the guided-missile frigate USS Kauffman (FFG 69) and the fast-
attack submarine USS Boise (SSN 764).

The Royal Navy Illustrious Strike Group consists of the guided-missile cruisers USS
Monterey (CG 61) and USS San Jacinto (CG 56), the guided-missile destroyer USS
Carney (DDG 64), and the guided-missile frigates USS Nicholas (FFG 47) and USS
Simpson (FFG 56).

U.S. Marine Corps pilots from Marine Fighter Attack Squadrons 223, 542, and 513 are
embarked on HMS Illustrious (R 06), flying AV8-B Harriers from Marine Air Groups 13
and 14.

Other Navy ships taking part in JTFEX are guided- missile destroyers USS Farragut (DDG
99), USS Bainbridge (DDG 96), and USS McFaul (DDG 74); along with the guided-
missile frigates USS Stephen W. Groves (FFG 29), USS John L. Hall (FFG 32), USS
McInerney (FFG 8) and USS Robert G.Bradley (FFG 49).

Additionally U.S. Air Force assets are participating in the exercise to include F-15 and KC-
135 aircraft. http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=30845

Marines Participate In JTFEX With HMS Illustrious
Story Number: NNS070826-09
Release Date: 8/26/2007 3:52:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Patrick Grieco, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- The Royal Navy aircraft carrier HMS
Illustrious (R 06) and members of several marine aircraft groups perfected their skills
through joint training during July's Joint Task Force Exercise in the Atlantic Ocean.

One of these groups was Fixed-Wing Marine Attack Squadron (VMA) 542.

Illustrious is attached to the UK Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 10. Lt. Cmdr. David Cooper
said the ship won't be attached to CSG-10 for deployment, but the destroyer HMS
Manchester (D 95) will be. Illustrious is unique because they do not fly fixed-wing aircraft
off their flight deck.

"Our navy uses primarily Harriers," said Royal Navy Lt. Cmdr. Sparkey Gill, the UK
liaison naval officer with CSG-10. "We're trying to integrate with the American forces and
trying to learn how to operate an aircraft carrier like Truman."

The Royal Navy has plans to purchase two larger aircraft carriers in the near future. These
carriers will begin launching fixed-wing aircraft off their flight decks. Gill mentioned
Royal Navy forces are also learning to operate together.
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"We are trying to work closely and familiarize ourselves with how our coalition
counterparts operate," said Gill. "This is the first time we've integrated into an American
battle group and we are trying to learn fixed-wing carrier operations."

AV-8B Harrier jets have been flying fighter-bomber attacks against ships and dropping
ordnance on towed targets behind ships.

Cooper added training like this is helpful because at some point, multiple nations will have
to work together to complete certain objectives. By better understanding each other, it can
be done.

Training with foreign service members is a unique opportunity for the Marines and they
learned as much as they could from their United Kingdom allies.

"It was a once in a lifetime opportunity," commented Marine Capt. Steve Schreiber, a
Harrier pilot with VMA-542. "It was a great experience and it was great to help them."

Schreiber said Marine harriers were on hand to fill in for the Royal Navy's harriers, which
are currently serving in Afghanistan.

Schreiber said it was interesting being on board the Royal Navy carrier because, unlike the
U.S. carriers, squadrons were responsible for almost all of the aircraft's maintenance and
refueling.

Schreiber, Cooper and Gill agree that joint training is essential in the global war on
terrorism.

"It's important to familiarize ourselves with other forces," added Schreiber.

"We've been learning how the American forces communicate and trying to understand
your operations," said Gill.

Cooper gave this message to his American counterparts on Truman.

"We may be smaller, but we're nonetheless as willing and earnest to do every job alone or
with you," said Cooper.

Schreiber gave this message to his UK friends on the Illustrious.

"You guys have worked hard and it was a job well done," said Schreiber.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=30890

Harry S. Truman conducted carrier qualifications for FRS off the coast of North Carolina
from 14 to 22 August 2007.

Truman Shoots a Rolling Airframe Missile
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Story Number: NNS070828-06
Release Date: 8/28/2007 1:04:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman James Fallon, USS Harry S. Truman Public
Affairs

NORFOLK (NNS) -- Sailors on board USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) tested one of its
weapon systems, Aug. 21, by launching a RIM-116 Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM).

The RAM is a lightweight quick-reaction, fire-and-forget missile designed to destroy anti-
ship missiles and asymmetric air and surface threats.

“The RAM shoot went as perfectly as we scripted it,” said Chief Warrant Officer 3 Gilbert
Mariano, Truman’s self-defense systems officer. “Everybody was on station, and it went as
well as we’ve practiced it.”

He said a drone, which is a remote controlled aircraft, is flown at the ship and acts as an
enemy missile. Mariano said it was the first time the Truman shot off a RAM, and it
destroyed the drone brilliantly.

“When we conduct training exercises, you have comfort value that a missile is not going to
be launched,” he said. “When you are really firing, there is a little bit more adrenaline and
more of a rush. There are a lot of things that could go wrong when you hit that fire button,
and you have to take safety precautions.”

Mariano said they send out notices to mariners ahead of time and deploy a helicopter to
clear the range.

“I was the safety observer,” said Fire Controlman 2nd Class (SW/AW) Jennie White. “We
had security posted outside and on the flight deck. No one could go outside and access the
general area of the RAM and that way we ensure no one would get hurt.”

She said there are many things that could go wrong during a live-fire exercise, so safety
measures are paramount.

“It is always good to prove to everybody on the ship that we are here to protect the ship,”
White said. “Even though we don’t do live fire shots very often, we are showing the crew
that if, God forbid, we had to defend this ship, we are good at what we do.”

Mariano said the entire Combat Systems Department, and the ship, did excellent during the
RAM shoot.

“Firing the RAM is what I like best about my job,” White said. “The RAM shot was a
display of flawless execution.” http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=31429

VX20 Test C-2A Upgrade On Board Truman
Story Number: NNS070830-10
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Release Date: 8/30/2007 4:59:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Patrick Grieco, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

NORFOLK (NNS) -- Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 20, based in Patuxent River,
Md., embarked on board USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) with a 36-member test team,
including maintainers from Northrop Grumman and Rolls-Royce.

The evaluators will test the Navy Propeller 2000 (NP-2000) modification on the C-2A
Greyhound during flight ops during the ships current underway which began Aug. 14.

Test pilots, Lt. Cmdr. Geoff McAlwee and Lt. Chris Dotson performed between 80 to 100
approaches to the carrier to allow the test team to analyze performance and handling
qualities for the newly configured aircraft. Eventually the new configuration will be added
to all fleet C-2As.

“We’re trying to align the E-2Cs and C-2As logistically,” said McAlwee, who is also the
project officer. “This should lower maintenance and equipment cost. Right now,
refurbished propellers can go as high as 200,000 to 300,000 dollars.”

The C-2A is a twin-turboprop aircraft with a primary mission of transporting high priority
passengers and cargo to and from aircraft carriers. The E-2C is a carrier-based, propeller-
driven, airborne-early-warning aircraft.

McAlwee said instead of buying 100 parts for one aircraft and 100 parts for another, the
Navy can now purchase one single set of parts for both the C-2A and the E-2C aircraft,
thereby reducing costs.

Retired naval air crewman and test engineer Al Griffin said the changes began back in
1998. He said that the Department of Defense began officially looking into using 8-bladed
propellers on carrier aircraft.

“We used them first on the E-2Cs,” said Griffin. “What happened over the years is the E-
2Cs were modernized, but the C-2As have been neglected.”

Griffin said the biggest reason for the integration was a short supply of parts.

Both Griffin and McAlwee said the new propeller reduces vibration during flight. This
makes the flight quieter and protects the aircraft’s airframe and components.

“We’re not vibrating the components all the time and [because of this] they will last
longer,” McAlwee said.

McAlwee said the new propellers may also prove to save on gas.

Truman’s current underway provided an excellent chance for VX-20 to conduct testing.
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“[After this] we’ll take the aircraft back for more tests and then begin instituting it into the
fleet in late 2008,” said McAlwee.

He said the first squadron to receive them will be Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC)
30 on the West Coast.

According to Griffin, the new prop makes the job of maintaining the plane a little bit easier
too.

He said if a blade breaks on a four-propeller engine, the whole propeller has to be removed
to be fixed, where as with this new innovation, should the same scenario occur, it would
only require taking one blade off and replacing it with another.

Both test pilots agree the plane is very much the same, just improved.

“It wasn’t much of a difference [flying wise], except for less vibration and a little bit
smoother of a flight,” McAlwee said.

Griffin noted flight data from the NP-2000 C-2As will be compared to legacy C-2As to
compare changes in the aircraft.

Griffin and McAlwee said the Air Force and Navy are currently looking into adding these
changes onto the C-130 Hercules plane as well. C-130 serves multiple roles in the Navy
ranging from large-scale cargo transport to electronic surveillance.

Truman is currently in the Atlantic Ocean completing Operation Reactor Safeguard Exam
qualifications. http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=31430

Stars Visit Truman
Story Number: NNS070917-15
Release Date: 9/17/2007 4:06:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Patrick Grieco, USS Harry Truman Public
Affairs

NORFOLK (NNS) -- Two television stars and seven athletes took a tour of the nuclear
powered aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Sept. 7 as part of the ship’s
distinguished visitor program.

“This is my first visit to a carrier,” said Jamie Farr, actor for the hit T.V. show M*A*S*H.
“You see them in movies and you see them in the news, but when you get on one you just
can’t believe the size of them.”

Debbe Dunning, actress for the hit television sitcom Home Improvement, said she was also
amazed at the size of the carrier and all the training that goes on inside.

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“It gives me an insight into all the work that goes into keeping us safe,” added Dunning.
“All of the training that you all go through is incredible.”

The stars visited several parts of the ship including, the chief petty officer’s mess, the
weapons department and the radar rooms.

“Being in the magazine was the best,” said Fred Lynn, who was the only baseball player
named Rookie of the Year and Most Valuable Player in the same season. “I enjoyed just
seeing all of the different types of ordnance that was down there. I also liked the
communications room, there were just so many gadgets there.”

Lynn, sometime ago, also watched night-flight operations on board the USS John C.
Stennis (CVN 74).

After the tour of the ship, the stars sat down with the Sailors to sign autographs and pose
for pictures.
“I’ve always wanted to meet one of the people from M*A*S*H,” said Hull Maintenance
Technician Fireman Michael Fisa. “My mom and I are huge fans and it means so much to
me to finally get a chance to see one of them.”

Air Traffic Controller 1st Class (AW/ SW) Joshua Blake of Operations Department felt
their visit showed how much they appreciated Sailors and the U.S. Navy. He said it was a
dream come true for several Sailors.
“It’s a chance to meet their childhood heroes,” said Blake. “I watched Andre Reed and
Rocket as a kid and now I can finally meet them.”

The Sailors weren’t the only ones excited by the visit, the stars themselves were anxious to
meet the Sailors and the ship.

“It was truly an honor visit Truman and meet the Sailors,” Farr said.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=31876

Harry S. Truman, underway in the Western Atlantic from 17 to 21 September 2007.

Congressman Visits Truman
Story Number: NNS071101-15
Release Date: 11/1/2007 4:44:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jymyaka Braden, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

NORFOLK (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) welcomed aboard Missouri Rep.
Ike Skelton, the Chairman of the Armed Forces Committee, while in port here, Oct. 27.

He shared his memories of former President Harry S. Truman, and why he advocated
naming the carrier after him.

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"It took eight years to convince the United States government to name this aircraft carrier
after Harry S. Truman," Skelton said.

He said it was important to him to name the ship after Truman to carry on the legacy of a
man who was greater than history books could record.

"It was the highlight of my teens when my father took me to see his good friend Harry
Truman being inaugurated," Skelton said.

He said Truman was caring, kind-hearted and thoughtful toward others.

"These things are not recorded in history, but are part of my recollection." Skelton said.

Skelton shared a story about a speech he attended during Truman's famous whistle-stop
tour. The president noticed a man with no legs in the crowd and personally thanked him for
coming out to show his support.

"A photographer walked up ready to snap a picture of this, and Truman waved him away
because he didn't want the man to be embarrassed," Skelton said. "I don't know many
politicians who would've turned down a photo opportunity like that. That's just the kind of
man Truman was."

Skelton said he appreciated the Sailors and other service members for their service to the
country and wished the crew well on their upcoming deployment.

Chief Cryptologic Technician (Collection) (SW/NAC) Nzinga Henderson said she
appreciated the congressman taking time out of his day to come and share his stories.

"We learned some new things about Truman and the history of our ship," Henderson said.
"He shared a lot of wisdom and let us know that people representing us are appreciating us,
and they make sure that the rest of the nation doesn't take us for granted."

Cryptologic Technician (Technical) 1st Class Howard Bell said the visit with Skelton
helped him learn about Truman's personality better than anything else he has heard about
him.

"I have more personal pride now serving aboard the USS Harry S. Truman," Bell said.

At the completion of the visit Skelton reminded the Sailors that Truman's legacy is carried
out every day aboard the ship and it was truly an honor for him to visit.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=32939

WHO Radio Broadcasts Live from Harry S. Truman
Story Number: NNS071113-03
Release Date: 11/13/2007 11:35:00 AM

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By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kenneth Hendrix, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- The "Van & Bonnie in the Morning Show"
on WHO 1040 AM News Radio from Des Moines, Iowa, broadcasted live by telephone
line aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Nov. 5-6.

Over the past eight years the talk radio show has looked for unique places from which to
broadcast. In their most recent endeavor, they asked their sports personality, Mark Allen,
where he would like to broadcast live.

"I said an aircraft carrier," Allen said. "I've always been fascinated with the ship's history
and its evolution over the times."

In their research to make this dream a reality, the show reached out to their audience for
assistance and received a big helping hand in return.

Van & Bonnie interviewed Sailors originally from the state of Iowa to give radio listeners
an idea of what life is like on a carrier as they broadcast from the ship's flag bridge.

Aviation Ordanceman Airman Sarah Escovedo, Weapons Department, G-3 division,
shared on the airwaves how she assembles ordnance below the decks of the ship for the
aircraft.

"My sister was in the Navy and she would talk to me about the different things in the
fleet," said Escovedo. "Later on down the line, I talked with a recruiter and ended up
joining myself."

Van and Bonnie also interviewed Capt. Herman A. Shelanski, Harry S. Truman's
commanding officer. He said it was the Sailors, such as those from Iowa, who make ships
like Truman so successful.

"The best part of the ship is the Sailors," Shelanski said. "We have Sailors here from Iowa
and every place in the U.S. and all walks of life."

To have a radio show broadcast live from Truman was a first for Iowa and was absolutely
amazing, said Allen.
"You really have no idea what you are going to see next or the people that you going to
meet," shared Allen. "The chemistry of how everything works is just above and beyond all
of our expectations."

Before going off the air, the morning show presented Shelanski with a wooden plaque as a
gift to the ship and to thank all of the Sailors for their service.

"All the folks [in Iowa] should be very proud of the fact that your young people in this
country are doing such a great job," Shelanski said. "It gives me great hope for our future
as to what this next generation is going to bring to our country."
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http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=33237
Harry S. Truman with CVW-3 embarked departed Norfolk, Va., with Captain Herman
A. Shelanski in command, on 5 November 2007, with CCSG10 commanded by Rear
Admiral William E. Gortney and staff; her fifth Mediterranean Sea deployment (8th
voyage) operating with the 6th Fleet, her third Arabian Sea/Gulf (Persian Gulf)
deployment in support of her 1st Maritime Security Operations and her 3rd Operation
Iraqi Freedom operating under operational control of the US Naval Forces Central
Command and 5th Fleet., while U.S. Naval Forces Central Command operational control
extends to the Indian Ocean following the war with Iraq (Operation Desert Storm), with
the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander for Central Command.
She will make her 5th Suez Canal transit and the U. S. Navy’s 127th Suez Canal transit
enroute to the Arabian Sea via the Red Sea on the U. S. Navy’s 86th Arabian Sea/Gulf
(Persian Gulf) deployment and upon return through the Suez Canal will make her 6th
Suez Canal transit and the U. S. Navy’s 128th Suez Canal; her sixth deployment since
her commission and the approximately the U. S. Navy’s 787th FWFD.

More than 7,300 Sailors from 17 commands and three staffs left their homeports Nov. 5 as
Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group (HSTCSG) deployed to the Central Command Area
of Operations as part of the ongoing rotation to support Maritime Security Operations in
the region.

According to Rear Adm. Bill Gortney, commander, Carrier Strike Group (CCSG) 10, the
mission of the HSTCSG is to be ready, when called upon, to support theater commanders.
He emphasized that throughout all operations, safety will remain a primary focus.

Coalition forces conduct MSO under international maritime conventions to ensure security
and safety in international waters so that all commercial shipping can operate freely while
transiting the region.

The Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group is made up of CCSG-10 staff, Harry S. Truman,
Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3, Commander, Destroyer Squadron 26 staff, guided missile
cruisers USS San Jacinto (CG 56) and USS Hue City (CG 66); guided missile destroyers
USS Carney (DDG 64), USS Oscar Austin (DDG 79) and USS Winston S. Churchill
(DDG 81); the Canadian frigate HMCS Charlottetown (FFG 339); and the British
destroyer HMS Manchester (D 95).

CVW-3 consists of Strike Fighter Squadrons (VFA) 11, VFA-32, VFA-37 and VFA-105;
Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron VAQ-130; Carrier Airborne Early Warning
Squadron 126; and Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron 7.
http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=33089

For many Sailors this is their first taste of the salty seas, for others just routine, but for
Command Master Chief (AW/SW) Clarence Frye, it will be his last.

This is Frye's seventh deployment. More than 20 years ago, he set sail on his first
underway cruise for eight and a half months. He said he only stopped at one port and

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explained how there wasn't Internet access or e-mails or any of the other amenities Sailors
enjoy today. The mission however, was the same.

"It was 1980 and the enemy at the time were the Russians," said Frye. "Our job was very
much like it is today-it was a presence deployment to show the flag and be the big stick."

Frye said getting underway was really emotional for him. It was the last time he will see
the sight of 500 Sailors standing tall on the flight deck and looking sharp as their ship
deploys.

He advises Sailors embarking on their first deployment, to set little goals; whether it is
achieving qualifications, attending college classes or even learning a new language.

Aviation Boatswain's Mate Handler Airman Apprentice Lee Atkins' goals for this
deployment include all qualifications, saving money, experiencing different countries and
having fun.

"This is my first deployment and I am looking forward to it," Atkins said. "I'm expecting to
have a good time. I have never been to another country, so I am excited about going to
Italy and experiencing differences from the United States."

Information Systems Technician 2nd Class (SW) Corey Jackson deployed on the Harry S.
Truman in 2004. Some of the challenges he faced during his last deployment were getting
his work qualifications and warfare pins. To overcome some of these challenges, Jackson
looked to Sailors who were more experienced.

"I asked them a lot of questions and tried to mimic some of the good things they did,"
Jackson said. "I kept asking people for help and they started showing me some of the tricks
of the trade."

Jackson advises those Sailors on their very first deployment to carry their best attitude, be
positive and find a stress reliever.

"No matter how small, silly or big it is, find something that puts your mind at ease and it
makes the deployment easier," he said. "Some of my stress relievers are listening to music,
playing games, playing guitar and just talking to people makes the time move a little
faster."

Jackson's expectations are to carry on Harry S. Truman's standards of excellence, get his
air warfare pin and make sure no mishaps occur.

Frye also expects the Truman team to work extremely hard. However, he recommends
Sailors expect the unexpected and stay flexible.

"I don't have expectations to where we are going," Frye said.

Frye advises Sailors to use their time wisely. He said Sailors should take advantage of all
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the opportunities available to them.

"Set little goals," Frye said. "They don't have to be big goals, because little goals add up to
the bigger goals." http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=33183

Harry S. Truman began sailing across the Atlantic, beginning her deployment to the 5th
Fleet, crew members took the time out to celebrate the Marine Corps' 232nd birthday, Nov.
10.

Nearly eight months before the Declaration of Independence, in a small tavern in
Philadelphia in 1775, the Continental Congress authorized the creation of two battalions of
Marines to protect the shores of colonial America from the British Navy.

In 1921, Maj. Edwin McClellan, officer-in-charge of Headquarters Marine Corps'
historical section, put in a memorandum to the then Commandant of the Marine Corps,
Maj. Gen. John A. Lejeune, suggesting the original birthday of Nov. 10, 1775 be declared
a Marine Corps holiday and celebrated throughout the Corps.

Accordingly, on Nov. 1, 1921 Lejeune issued Marine Corps order 47, Series 1921 –
summarizing the history, mission and tradition of the Corps, and directed that it be read to
every command on Nov. 10 each subsequent year, in honor of the Marine Corps birthday.

On the evening of Nov. 10 in wardroom 3, Marine Corps order 47 was read in honor of the
Marines aboard the ship.

"This is the time that the Marine Corps takes every year to reflect on where our service has
come in the last 232 years," said Marine Corps Maj. Guy Ravey, of special projects officer
for VFA 37. "It's also an opportunity for our youngest Marines to learn more about their
history and a time for the experienced Marines to pass on some of their sea stories."

Capt. Herman A. Shelanski, Truman's commanding officer was a guest speaker at the
event and shared an experience with those in attendance, confessing that he was "raised by
Marines."

"As a Naval officer, one who loves history and to think about where we have gone as a
country, we could not have gotten here without the Marines," said Shelanski.

Lt. Cmdr. Chris Smith, Truman's chaplain and a prior enlisted Marine lance corporal
commented on how the Marines take honor, courage and commitment to heart.

"This is a way for the Corps to honor all those hard chargers who have laid down their
lives for our county in passing on the spirit of the Corps known as 'Esprit de Corps,'" said
Smith.

The celebration came to an end with the cutting of a cake and all the guests shaking the
hands of Ravey and Smith and wishing them a happy birthday.

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"I've met the best people I've ever known and had some of the most exciting and fun times
in my life because I'm a Marine," said Ravey.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=33236

Harry S. Truman Sailors held a kick-off ceremony, Nov. 14, to commemorate the
beginning of the United Through Reading (UTR) program.

UTR is a program designed to help keep families together during deployments.

"UTR is a morale booster," said Chief Navy Career Counselor (SW/AW) Gene Garland,
Administration Department. "Sailors can come and read a book to their child and then send
a DVD of that back home."

Interior Communications Electrician 2nd Class (SW/AW) Michael Bishop, a volunteer for
the program said UTR keeps families connected during the holiday season as well.

The program is actually quite easy. A Sailor signs up for a thirty-minute slot where he is
recorded reading a book to a family member. The recording is transferred to DVD and then
given to the Sailor to mail home.

"You just sit there and read to your child," said Hospital Corpsman 1st Class (SW/AW)
Sean Ehrsam, a laboratory technician with Truman's Medical Department. "I feel the
biggest thing to remember is, while you're reading, you're not the captain or the [command
master chief], you are that kid's mom or dad or grandparent." Ehrsam said when he was
reading to the camera it really felt like his kids were there.

Garland said the readings are filmed in the ship's historical museum because he believes it
embodies the essence of Truman.

"It is the best place for sound," Garland added. "And offers a sense of privacy for the
Sailor."

Garland said Sailors have a large selection of books to read. The books come from the
ship's library and they are also sent out to the ship by groups in Norfolk.

Retired Rear Adm. Stephen Loeffler, a military advisor for UTR said Sailors should get
actively involved in the readings. He recalls one time when a Sailor got into a firefighter's
suit just so he could read to his child.

This program isn't just for children, Sailors' adult family members can also benefit from it.

"One of the major benefits adults will receive is knowing their families will be able to feel
their presence while they're gone," said Bishop. "This will fill that gap or void that may
form while the parent is away."

Bishop is confident UTR will be a huge success with the crew and the squadrons.

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Garland said UTR is like an all-they-can-read buffet, since there is no limit to how many
times a Sailor can sign for a reading.

UTR will be available for Truman Sailors during their long deployment in support of to
support maritime security operations in the Central Command area of responsibility.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=33321

Harry S. Truman underway in the Atlantic from 5 to 15 November 2007.

Harry S. Truman transited through the straits of Gibraltar 16 November 2007.

Harry S. Truman underway in the Mediterranean from 16 to 19 November 2007.

Harry S. Truman visited Naples, Italy from 20 to 25 November 2007.

Harry S. Truman underway in the Mediterranean from 26 to 29 November 2007.

Harry S. Truman entered the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations on 30 November 2007,
transiting the Suez Canal.

Harry S. Truman relieved USS Enterprise (CVN-65).

Harry S. Truman underway in the Red Sea from 30 November to 1 December 2007.

Harry S. Truman Harry S. Truman underway in the Arabian Sea from 2 to 11
December 2007.

Harry S. Truman underway in the Persian Gulf on 14 to 24 December 2007.

A Sailor aboard Harry S. Truman discovered a piece of foreign object debris (FOD)
inside one of the ships catapults Dec. 16.

Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Equipment) 3rd Class Mark Noriega of Air Department, V-2
division was on steam watch making his rounds when he stumbled upon a shuttle guide in
the trough under the deck plates.

The piece is attached to the lower back of a catapult shuttle as a wear block guiding the
shuttle down the catapult track ensuring the shuttle does not fish tail back and forth and
actually wear down the shuttle frame.

"That was something extremely rare to find and see, because normally it just doesn't
happen," Noriega explained. "It is torqued on with screws tightly secured in and safety
wired, so that the screws do not come off. The only way it's going to come off is if the
screws break or something really bad happens to it."

Aircraft Launch and Recovery Equipment Maintenance Officer, Ensign Joseph L. Justice
said Noriega saved the ship thousands of dollars and the current mission by keeping
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catapult three fully operational for flight operations.

"Damage that could have been possibly done to the shuttle would have cost over $43,000
to replace the shuttle itself," Justice said.

Noriega's finding reiterates the importance of FOD walk downs conducted daily on the
flight deck and in the Hangar Bay.

"FOD walk downs are very important because anything that is found on the deck that is not
supposed to be there could damage aircrafts," Noriega said. "You might hate doing them,
but it is part of the job. FOD prevents debris from being sucked into a jet engine causing an
engine mishap, or in front of a catapult initiating a crash."

Justice said Noriega's discovery of the shuttle guide was a FOD hazard preventing any
kind of disablement on catapult three.

"The shuttle guide was actually in between the cylinders which is what we consider FOD,"
Justice said.

Noriega, a Sailor not used to the lime light, was very modest in his ways and saw what he
did as an everyday thing he is suppose to do.

"I think the reason everyone is making such a big deal about it, is because no else saw it,"
Noriega said. "For me I enjoy doing what I do aboard this ship and I'm glad that I found
the piece and we were able to repair it before any other equipment problems could
happen."

Truman, homeported in Norfolk, is attached to Carrier Strike Group (CCSG) 10, is
currently deployed to the Persian Gulf as part of the ongoing rotation to support Maritime
Security Operations in the region.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=34110

Harry S. Truman underway in the Persian Gulf from 14 to 24 December 2007.

Harry S. Truman visited Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates from 25 to 28 December 2007.

Harry S. Truman leadership offered a unique chance for Sailors to connect with their
families this holiday season via Video Teleconference (VTC).

The first round of VTCs took place Dec. 24, 26 and 27 and allowed more than 192 Sailors
to participate.

Chief Warrant Officer 4 Montana McClanahan, Harry S. Truman's automated data
processing officer, said the program was created to help increase the morale of Sailors
aboard the ship. He said Harry S. Truman has a chain of command committed to not only
supporting Sailors, but supporting their families as well.

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"Families at home are still part of the family at sea and we are very aware of that,"
McClanahan said. "We are trying to help facilitate that connection that Sailors need to have
to be able to continue to do this demanding job every day."

Seaman Eboni Foster, from Truman's Deck Department, said she had the chance to talk
with her baby, mother and stepfather. She said the setup was professional and intimate and
was relieved when she finally saw her family.

"It is really important to do things like the VTC," Foster said. "It gives us peace and let us
know things at home are fine and we shouldn't worry."

Harry S. Truman's Command Master Chief (SW/AW) Clarence Frye said although Sailors
are able to communicate underway via phone and e-mail, the VTC provides a unique
occasion for Sailors to speak to their families face-to-face.

"We so rarely get the opportunity to see our families while we are out here," Frye said. "In
the future, just like e-mail and phones came about, I think you will be able to sit in front of
your computer and punch up VTC with your family back home. It's an opportunity we
have not taken advantage of until now and [it] is something we are looking forward to."

December's VTC was only available to Sailors with family in Norfolk. According to
McClanahan, however, the next VTC will facilitate Sailors with family in Jacksonville,
Fla., and Whidbey Island, Wash.

McClanahan and Frye agree that the program is something to show Sailors that the jobs
they do everyday do not go unnoticed.

"We are out here to support a mission and this is a one team one fight effort," McClanahan
said. "Your family is part of that team and your chain of command cares about that. When
we left Norfolk we said we were going to try to do things outside of the box to keep our
families connected – it's something to say we are going to do something … it's something
else to come full circle and actually make that happen."
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=34154

Harry S. Truman underway in the Persian Gulf from 29 December 2007 to 24 January
2008.

Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) (HST) conducted a man overboard drill Jan. 9 to help sustain
the ship's state of readiness.

"We threw Oscar overboard," said Boatswain's Mate Seaman Melinda Neumann of Deck
Department's 3rd division. "We did this to make sure everyone's ready for a real man
overboard."

Oscar is Harry S. Truman's Deck Department dummy Sailor who is constantly having
difficulty staying on the ship. Somehow, every time training is needed, Oscar volunteers to
go overboard.
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"When Oscar goes in the water, it simulates a real man overboard," said Senior Chief
Boatswain's Mate (SW/AW) Darrin Cassell, leading chief petty officer of Deck
Department. "The first person to see it calls it in and notifies the Bridge."

Seaman Tenisha Mitchell of HST's 3rd division of Deck Department and Seaman Ladarius
Crenshaw of Deck's 1st division were on aft-lookout watch at the time.

"When I saw him float by, I did what I was trained to do," said Crenshaw. "I called it into
the Bridge immediately and threw the jim-buoy in the water."

Cassell said the bridge team sounded the man overboard alert over the 1MC announcement
system and the rescue began.

Cassell said the bridge team also announced the water temperature, which helped Harry S.
Truman's Search and Rescue (SAR) swimmers determine what to wear and how long the
overboard Sailor had before going into hypothermia.

"If that person was in 50-degree water for 20 minutes they could begin going into
hypothermic shock," said Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class (SW/AW) Brandon Girard, a
surgical technician in Harry S. Truman's Medical Department. "We established
communication with Medical to keep them informed of the patient's needs. We also
manned up for stretcher bearers."

Communication is a very important part of rescuing a man overboard.

"The first person on scene here manned the phone and established communication with the
Bridge," said Cassell.

Line petty officer in charge of the forward line, Boatswain's Mate 3rd Class David Searles
of Truman's 2nd division of Deck Department said deck had the rigid hull inflatable boat
(RHIB) boats ready in about four minutes.

"Everybody got out here and dressed out fast," said Searles. "It was a very safe and
successful evolution."

Mitchell said she popped a smoke buoy to help mark Oscar's position so the RHIB rescue
crew would be able to find him.

Cassell said Oscar's man-overboard indicator on his float coat also helped pin-point his
location.

The man-overboard indicator is a system, which activates global-positioning system
tracking should a Sailor fall in the sea.

Mitchell and Crenshaw stayed on station to track rescue efforts and make reports to the
Bridge.
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Aircrew Survival Equipmentman 2nd Class (AW) Ismael Rodriguez, one of Truman's SAR
swimmers said once Oscar was located, he assessed his medical condition and began
performing basic first aid.

"He had a minor cut on his leg," said Rodriguez. "My job was to help control the bleeding
and keep him conscious. We brought him back to the ship so the corpsmen on scene could
rush him to Medical."

Girard said in a real situation he would've possibly started giving him warm blankets and
intravenous injections to help stabilize him.

Girard, Rodriguez, Cassell, Mitchell, Neumann, Crenshaw and Searles agree the drill
helped prepare the crew for an actual causality. They all said they reacted as if Oscar was a
real Sailor.

"We aim to get people back on board in about ten minutes," said Cassell. "We train as we
fight, because a man could go overboard at any moment."

Searles said Oscar arrived back on board in about nine minutes.

"In the case of a real man overboard, if we don't get to him in time, he could die," said
Neumann.

Girard said these types of drills also help keep Medical in a state of readiness.

"We have new personnel coming every day," said Girard. "If someone doesn't know what's
going on, then 'how is the patient going to receive proper care?'"
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=34365

The commander of Carrier Airwing 3 logged his 6,000th hour of flight Jan. 14 after a
successful 3-wire trap aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) in an E2-C Hawkeye
assigned to Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 126, the "Seahawks".

Capt. Rick Pawlowski has spent 360,000 minutes, 250 days, 6,000 hours flying through the
air in E2-C Hawkeyes, A-6 Intruders, Helicopters, F/A 18 Super Hornets and a
conglomerate of other aircraft.

"This is an incredible squadron and an awesome ship," Pawlowski said. "To have a
milestone like this happen on this ship - it couldn't get any better than this. I certainly have
the gray hair and wrinkles to go along with the 6,000 hours."

Pawlowski said the journey to 6,000 wasn't an easy one, but it was immensely rewarding.

"I started my career as an E-1 in the Navy in 1978, and got my degree at night and on the
weekends with the only goal in mind to be a naval aviator," Pawlowski said. "I'm very glad
it worked out the way it did."
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Harry S. Truman's Commanding Officer, Capt. Herm Shelanski, reiterated the hard work
and dedication it takes to log so many hours of safe flight with no mishaps.

Shelanski congratulated Pawlowski for logging 6,000 hours, stating that it was a
significant accomplishment.

"It's a lifelong goal of flying safely and with a lot of skill. He has done it with a lot of real
accuracy and precision," added Shelanski.

It is an unusual feat for a pilot to log 6,000 hours of flight time because as pilots make rank
they are put into leadership positions that rarely allow them much time to fly, according to
Pawlowski. He said he is lucky because across nine deployments, and several squadron
assignments, he has had the opportunity to fly more than the average pilot.

"A lot has to do with the kind of aircraft I fly and the type of tours I've had," Pawlowski
said. "I am just glad this is where it happened. The people here on [Harry S. Truman] and
in the Air Wing humble me everyday with their brilliance. From the folks who maintain
the aircraft and support us everyday, to my fellow aircrew accomplishing the mission, it's
the Truman team that is so incredible."

Pawlowski said he doesn't see 7,000 hours in his future, but after more than 30 years of
proud naval service he feels pretty good about reaching this unique milestone.

"I was hoping to have this chance but you never how it will work out," he said. "I'm just
thankful it did." http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=34364

Harry S. Truman visited Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates from 25 to 28 January 2008.

Whether they were wasting away again in margaritaville or enjoying a cheeseburger in
paradise, Sailors aboard Harry S. Truman had something to cheer about as Jimmy Buffett
visited the crew aboard the ship and performed a concert, Jan. 28.

The event featured most of Buffett's big hits as well as a debut from the ship's Ripper's
band.

Storekeeper Seaman Brett Blakely, who attended the concert, said knowing that someone
as famous and busy as Jimmy Buffett cares about the crew and mission proves its
importance. He said the performance was one he will never forget.

"It was amazing to see him up close and personal, I never thought I'd get a chance to do
anything like this," Blakely said. "Having visitors such as Buffett helps keep people
motivated because you get to see that people care about what we do."

Lt. Cmdr. Will Williams, Truman's material maintenance control officer, said the event
was exciting for people of all ages, genders and backgrounds and everyone is still buzzing,
which proves the affect of Jimmy's impact on the crew. He said he was especially
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impressed with the amount of effort Buffett put forth to perform.

"I thought it was a good concert and enjoyed it thoroughly. I thought it was nice of him to
come down here and spend time with us on his own time and his own dollar. People
who've never even heard of him are now Jimmy fans," added Williams.

Cmdr. Ron Parker, the ship's intelligence officer, said although he wasn't very familiar
with Buffett's music before his visit, it didn't matter because he put on such a great show.

"I'm a fan now," Parker said. "It was very nice of him to come out here for us. I was very
impressed last night because he really seemed like he was enjoying himself up on stage
and not like it was a chore for him. He came out here and did this for free. All around this
was a great success story, for him and for us."

Machinist's Mate 3rd Class Jacob Murbach, said the concert was great, but hanging out
with Jimmy Buffett was pretty amazing as well. He said his persona and attitude just
amplified that of someone who cares about Sailors, his music and people in general. He
said while Buffett was walking around the ship you wouldn't have known he was a visitor
if it hadn't been for the excitement in the air.

"Of course the concert was awesome, but most of all I liked Jimmy himself," Murbach
said. "He's a great entertainer and seems like a great guy. He was laid back and kind and
seemed like he really wanted to be here. He was good with the Sailors. I don't know if he
was in the Navy or not, but he seemed like he was with how comfortable he was with his
surroundings."

Parker said beyond the benefit of seeing Buffett perform, Sailors were reminded of the
support and importance of the mission at hand.

"I think it shows the Sailors that the people back home are supporting us and they think
what we are doing out here is important," he said. "The fact that he would come out here
and do that for us speaks volumes."
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=34756

Harry S. Truman underway in the Persian Gulf from 29 January to 16 February 2008.

More than 400 football fans aboard Harry S. Truman, including the Miami Dolphins
cheerleaders and two professional football players attended the ship's Super Bowl XLII
party and watched the game, Feb. 4.

In this year's annual championship game of the National Football League, the New York
Giants showed they were able to beat the undefeated American Football Conference
championship winners, the New England Patriots, 17-14.

Even though crew members were half-way around the world, they celebrated like they
would have had they been home.

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"It's important we observe the Super Bowl because it has become something like a national
holiday," said Abigail Schuh, a Morale, Welfare and Recreation representative assigned to
Forward Deployed Forces Support Command. "It's such a big event that many people think
it should take place on Saturdays because everyone has to work the next day."

Abigail added that the big game allows everyone to get together with friends and family
creating a party atmosphere.

Truman's food service division went the extra mile in making sure Sailors had party goods
while watching the Super Bowl by providing hot dogs, chips, popcorn and beverages.

"We just want everyone to feel like they are at home," said Culinary Specialist 1st Class
(SW) Shawn Simmons, assigned to the "Seahawks" of Carrier Airborne Early Warning
Squadron 126. "A Super Bowl party isn't a party without good food, which is why we
made it a priority to make it available. We wanted to boost the morale for everyone so they
could enjoy themselves while watching the game with their friends."

Surprisingly, a majority of the crowd in the hangar bay was rooting for the New York
Giants to win, including Stanley Wilson of the Detroit Lions, who is currently on board
Truman visiting as part of the Super Bowl celebration festivities.

"I've always got to go with the National Football Conference team," Wilson said. "This
was a great win for the Giants and a big upset to the once undefeated Patriots."

Wilson said it was nice to see that Truman went all out for their Sailors to experience and
watch the Super Bowl because it's such a big deal in America.

"We wouldn't miss this game for anything in the world even back home," Wilson said. "It's
great to be able to be here and watch the game with all of the Sailors and to put smiles on
their faces for all the hard work they have done and continue to do on a daily basis."

Aviation Boatswain's Mate [Equipment] 1st Class (AW) Jonathan Dicolla of Air
department, V-2 division was all decked out in an Eli Manning, New York Giants jersey
and plastic hard hat with the initials "NY" in white in support of his team.

He said he had no doubt the Giants would come away victorious, despite all the nay-
sayers.

"I've been a Giants fan for many years," Dicolla said. "I've watched many Super Bowls,
and this one is better than I thought it would be because of how we came back in the last
quarter to win the game."

Dicolla added that it felt good to enjoy the championship win with friends he spends time
with in port and when out to sea.

"We watch these games all the time together and to still be able to watch the Super Bowl
while we are out to sea you just can't beat it," Dicolla said.
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Yeoman Seaman Alexander Martinez, who was showing support for the Giants because his
friend Quartermaster Seaman James Walters kept bragging that the Patriots could not be
beat, said he was so in shock by the game.

He added that he might just buy a Giants jersey, even though he is a Jacksonville Jaguars
fan.

"Truman did a really good job with this Super Bowl party putting up the big screen with
food and showcasing the Miami Dolphins cheerleaders along with the professional football
players," Martinez said. http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=34824

Harry S. Truman's weapons department, held a special memorial for one of their
shipmates, Gunner's Mate 2nd Class (AW) Christopher Bissett, Feb. 6.

Bissett served on board Truman until August 2007. He then left the ship and got out of the
Navy. Bissett was killed in an auto accident Jan. 22.

"We honored him and his family with a 21-gun salute," said Gunner's Mate 2nd Class
Adam Jacques of the weapons department. "He was so close to us and we wanted to do
something nice for him and his family."

Jacques said Truman will send Bissett's family a red aviation ordnance jersey with
signatures, shell casings from the salute and a special video.

Chief Aviation Ordnanceman (AW) Mark Matheny, gun salute squad leader said they
found out about Bissett's passing through one of the weapons department Sailor's wife.

"It was about three weeks ago we found out," said Matheny. "We found out he was killed
in a car accident in Pennsylvania. Apparently he hit some black ice and lost control of his
car."

Those who knew him best remember the fun loving and caring person he was.

"He was always there for someone," said Airman Paige Young, one of Bissett's close
friends from air department. "Even if he didn't like the person and they needed something,
he would still help the person."

Jacques said Bissett assisted in training a vast majority of Truman's security force in small
arms.

"He was an excellent teacher," said Jacques. "I feel better for having known him. He was
probably the best gunner's mate we've had."

Matheny said while Bissett and he were standing armory watch a while back, Bissett spent
the night disassembling the weapons and making sure Matheny understood every aspect of
the gun.
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"He was very passionate about it," said Matheny. "He had this ability to teach you, and not
just make you understand, but make you want to know more. He wouldn't sign any of my
personnel qualification standards until he was sure I understood everything."

Jacques said Bissett taught him not to take life too seriously and enjoy the time he has.

"We seriously lost a great man," said Young.

Matheny believes Bissett's memory will live on in the hearts of everyone who knew him.
He said Bissett was a very genuine and real person, who never felt like he had to "build
himself up."

"There was nothing fake about him," said Matheny. "He didn't need to show off."
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=34868

Gruff voices screamed touchdown with the sounds of tackles in the background as 16
video game enthusiasts turned out Feb. 8 for Harry S. Truman's Morale, Welfare and
Recreation's (MWR) Madden National Football League (NFL) 08 tournament.

It was the first competition of the new year, and the top prizes included a T-shirt and a 200
DVD case holder.

The Madden tournament was a huge success last year, said Truman's MWR representative
Ship's Serviceman 3rd Class Donovan Lavette, which is the reason why MWR decided to
hold another one.

"Video gamers seem to be talking about Madden all the time and this is a way to see who
the best Madden player on the ship is," Lavette said. "All the individuals who made it to
the finals the last two times are back again making the games entertaining to watch."

The lure of Madden NFL 08 stems from its fast-paced, yet smooth, game play that gamers
say designers have perfected.

"The last tournament I felt like I gave the game away, so, I had to come back to try it
again," said Ship's Serviceman 3rd Class Danny Shack of Supply Department, S-3
division. "I'm a true Madden player, and when I saw the flyers and posters for the
tournament, I decided I had to participate."

Fans agreed that much of Madden NFL 08 appeal is traced to its balanced game play and
the thrill of face-to-face gaming.

Aviation Machinist's Mate Edward Jones of Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance
Department, IM-3 division, who, in the past, has always come up short in the
championship matches of the tournaments, has been playing the video game since the
heydays of the original Madden NFL.

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"Even though I seem to be having this trend of losing I still enjoy playing, because I like
shattering opponents' dreams and hopes when I do win," Jones said.

Aviation Ordnanceman 3rd Class (AW) Ryan Williams assigned to the Red Rippers of
Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 11 won the tournament.

The previous Madden NFL 08 competition winner, Aircrew Survival Equipmentman
Airman Jermaine Benjamin of VFA-11, was on hand to play Williams after his
championship win. He lost, making Williams the new title holder.

"I basically used offensive audibles that are featured on the game to win," Williams said.
"I'm not trying to brag but it was rather easy to win the overall tournament. I learn what
moves and plays my opponents like to do and use defensive plays to my advantage to win."

All in all, Sailors said they enjoy it whenever MWR puts on events like the Madden NFL
tournament because it gives crew members something to do in their free time and interact
with other Sailors.

"I love these competitions," said Shack. "This is a good morale booster right here that
helps keep the cruise interesting and not boring."
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=34916

Harry S. Truman received fresh fruits and vegetables and a million-and-a-half gallons of
fuel from fast combat support ship USNS Arctic (T-AOE 8), Feb. 8, while conducting a
replenishment at sea (RAS).

Boatswain's Mate 1st Class (SW/AW) Sharrod Bobo said the RAS is a ship-wide
evolution, but it is the Deck Department that takes care of all the rigging and receiving of
all the fueling hoses.

"The RAS went pretty well," said Bobo. "All the guys are well trained and have all their
qualifications, and they had their heads on a swivel."

Before and during a RAS, safety is paramount; Seaman (SW) Nicholas Bacoka said they
always do a safety brief before the evolution.

"During the evolution, we have khakis [monitoring] the stations looking for things that
could be potentially dangerous, like pant legs not tucked in, rings or watches not taken off
and anything that could potentially get caught up in a line," said Bacoka. "Everybody plays
a role and everybody is a safety observer during a RAS."

He said because a RAS is a dangerous job, the attention to safety is constantly scrutinized
because equipment could be damaged and lives could be lost.

"You could have the span wire part and if that wire was to part, it would snap back in both
directions," Bacoka said. "When that snaps back, fuel would go all over the place. You
could have part of your station ripped out, or if somebody were to get hit by a snap back,
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they would be done."

Boatswain's Mate 3rd Class Roger Silva, the rig captain under instruction, said it is his job
to make sure that doesn't happen.

"I like being a rig captain because you have more responsibility, you have to look after
your guys and make sure they are safe," Silva said.

Bacoka shares the same sentiments as Silva and said what he likes best about the RAS is
bringing the rig over.

"When the rig initially comes over, the heave is not very fun but it's exciting," Bacoka said.
"It gets your heart rate going. It's me doing my thing. You are heaving the line, leaning
over the side of the ship and it's a little dangerous."

Bobo said the Deck Department stresses safety all day every day. He said the boatswain's
mates' rate is very safety oriented because of its inherent dangers. Everything they do,
someone else did it before them, and some may have gotten hurt doing it. They learned
safety through others' sacrifices.

"That's why we always look for better and safer ways to get the job done," Bobo said.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=34915

Harry S. Truman conducted rigid hull inflatable boat (RHIB) operations from Feb. 11 to
15 at the starboard and port RHIB decks.

Boatswain's Mate Seaman McAries Amistad, the davit operator, said the RHIB operation
went well because safety precautions were set in place.

"Everything went well with the operations because everybody came back safe with all of
their fingers and all of their body parts intact," said Amistad.

Boatswain's Mate 2nd Class Loren Page, the davit captain, said the primary purpose for
RHIBs are for man overboards. He said it is their responsibility to man up and put the
RHIBs in the water for an actual emergency.

"We usually man our stations in three to four minutes. Our goal is to have the boat in the
water in 10 minutes," said Page. "We try to get the boat in the water as soon as possible.
The best we've done is to have it in the water in six minutes."

Page said his role as the davit captain is to make sure all personnel are dressed out
properly, the safety brief is conducted and to take charge to ensure the RHIBs get into the
water safely, efficiently and as quickly as possible.

"It is a dangerous job anytime we do operations, but it's especially dangerous when the
seas are rough and it's dark because you don't necessarily know what's out there," Page
said.
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Page said during an actual man overboard, the stress level is higher and there is always a
chance that the machinery could fail, which could cause severe injury or death. He said if
the wire parted when the RHIB was over the side of the ship, the personnel inside the
RHIB could be injured and the line handlers could be pulled over the side of the ship or
they could be pulled through the cleats, which would break their hands or even cut them
off. He said that is why safety is paramount when conducting drills.

"We got the boat down safely all week and nobody got hurt," said Page. "I don't want to
say it was routine because when you start talking about routine, people get hurt, so it was a
good evolution overall. All the guys are well trained, they know what they are doing and
they did a good job."

What makes this job dangerous is what makes it fun and exciting, said Boatswain's Mate
Seaman Cordelra McCall, a line handler.

"To get physical with the line is fun," McCall said. "My job is important because there are
lives on the line." http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=35213

Harry S. Truman's Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Detachment 22, of Mobile Unit
6, offered rappel lessons for personnel Feb. 11-12.

EOD candidates opened the lessons up to the crew in order to facilitate a better
understanding of their job to the ship.

"We had a display on the mess decks and made a sign-up sheet, but we had to limit it to 20
people for each day," said Explosive Ordnance Disposal 1st Class (DV/PJ)Ron
McCalicher. "We actually had more people then we could handle, so we had a really good
turn out today."

Lt. Lawrence Cadena, an intelligence officer and participant said the rappel was his first
and he loved it.

"I'm pretty darn exited, it sure breaks the monotony of the day-in day-out routine of
deployment," Cadena said. "I'm a huge adventurist."

Before letting the Sailors jump, there were some general instructions that needed to be
given, mostly for the sake of those who had never rappelled before, but it also served as a
refresher for those who had.

"We started out with a brief for both groups, just to go over basic roping skills like hand
placement and how to brake," McCalicher said. "We also showed them how to tie the
Swiss Seat."

The Swiss Seat is a safe, makeshift harness, made of rope and tied around the waist and
legs, like a normal rappelling harness. It is used as a quick safe alternative.

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"There were also a whole set of operational risk management steps we went through to
make this a safe evolution," said Lt. Tim Teti, officer in charge for the unit. "We had safety
briefs and training on the job, and there's obviously personal protective equipment like the
gloves, harness and the helmets. All the equipment was checked out before the jump."

This was not the only opportunity for Sailors to learn rappelling. Any Sailors who were not
able to sign up for this first lesson will have more chances later on.

"We are going to try to do this every other month or so," McCalicher said. "There is a lot
of scheduling involved. We have to schedule with the handler and the hangar bay guys just
to make sure everything is kosher."

With the proper equipment and supervision, Sailors were able to enjoy a new sport, and
gain important experience that could possibly be used later in their careers.

"It's an opportunity to do something different," said Teti, "It's definitely outside your
normal comfort zone and its fun at the same time. It's a controlled risk."

Information Technician 3rd Class John Green said, the experience was one he won't forget.
Everyone should take advantage of the opportunity, he said.

"If you have the heart for it, go for it," said Green.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=35212

Harry S. Truman volunteered their liberty to three community relations projects during a
four-day port visit to a Middle Eastern port Feb. 17-21.

Lt. Cmdr. Daniel Mode, a chaplain aboard Truman, said Sailors participated in a variety of
projects which included guiding horses for disabled children, visiting disabled children in
their classrooms and doing projects with children with autism.

"What I liked best about the (community relations projects) COMREL was seeing Sailors
experience something radically different from a shopping mall or a tour," said Mode. "It is
something that allows us to integrate with the local community."

Chief Fire Controlman (SW/AW) Raymond Luck, combat systems maintenance manager,
said these projects are important for both Sailors and the host country.

Luck explained Sailors are able to learn about the host country, and it is good for the host
country to see Americans interested in their country and willing to help.

"I think everybody should participate in a COMREL at least once during a cruise because
Sailors get a chance to go out and see the local communities on a different level," Luck
said.

Fire Controlman 1st Class (SW/AW) Brian Jantzen, a leading petty officer in the combat
systems department, said the best part was learning about the local people, seeing how the
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school takes care of their students with special needs and playing ball with the children.

"One student introduced us to his whole class and recited a long poem because he was so
happy to see us," said Jantzen. "By giving your time, you receive pride in accomplishing
something good and the knowledge that you helped somebody out."

Mode noted community relations projects help strengthen the bond with the local
community in countries all over the world.

"We should come with an expectation that we're building upon a relationship," Mode said.
"We want to build relationships not for this year but for years to come so the host nations
are happy when we come to visit them and know that we provide something good in order
to become better neighbors." http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=35249

Harry S. Truman underway in the Persian Gulf from 22 February to 13 March 2008.

One of the Navy's oldest officer corps just got one year older, on Feb. 23, the Supply Corps
celebrated their 213th birthday on board the Harry S. Truman.

The celebration was a hard-earned break for the officers.

"We had all the supply khakis and some folks from the other departments come," said
Cmdr. Gregory Hajzak, the ship's supply officer. "We had a big Supply Corps birthday
cake in wardroom 3, and the captain came down and kicked it off for us."

The supply officers take care of all the ship's needs from food to parts and materials for the
aircraft, as well as the transportation needed to send the supplies.

"We provide all of the items necessary to support the ship and the aircraft on board,"
Hajzak said. "We are in charge of all logistics and support for the transportation of all the
materials that come to us, and all the ships around us as well."

The Navy Supply Corps was not always as efficient as it is today, there have been several
turning points that gave the corps the experience needed to run as a well-oiled machine.

"The Supply Corps started 213 years ago by supporting the original six frigates for the
Navy," said Hajzak. "When we moved from sails to steam, we were in charge of procuring
all of the coal and getting it to the ships. The next big leap was during World War II, when
we started working with replenishments at sea and getting supply ships whose only
purpose was supporting the Navy."

Since the needs of the Navy are always changing, the Supply Corps must be able to adapt.
With the help of automated supply functions to vertical replenishments with helicopters the
duties of the corps has been able to support all of the Navy's missions.

This requires the corps' more than 2,500 officers to have gone through extra schooling,
after receiving a college degree, in Athens, Ga., to study subjects as varied as inventory
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control to operations analysis.

"The good thing about the Supply Corps is we are embedded in all of the operational
units," said Hajzak. "I've been on a small frigate, a submarine and two aircraft carriers. It
makes you feel like you are definitely a part of the team. We get the opportunity to go out
and do a lot of really neat stuff." http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=35214

Harry S. Truman's Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department hosted its first
official spades tournament Feb. 27 to boost the spirit of the crew.

Interior Communications Electrician 2nd Class (AW/SW) Chris Mooty and Electrician's
Mate 2nd Class (SW) Travis Speight won the tournament.

Thirty-two players participated and many passersby stopped to watch the action.

Ship's Serviceman 3rd Class Donovan Lavette, MWR representative, said people already
played spades on the ship, and the goal of the tournament was to give Sailors a chance to
prove who was the best.

"It's good to be recognized as being on top," said Mooty.

Card players and bystanders alike shouted enthusiastically as cards fell. Winning teams
gave each other high fives. Winning was many a player's only thought.

"I live to win. I breathe win," said Speight. "Every time you see me breathe on a cold
winter day, you see 'win' coming out."

Lavette said MWR's events give Sailors a chance to mingle and interact with each other.

Omar Suñer, Truman's fun boss, said MWR sponsors these sorts of events to build
camaraderie between Sailors.

After a difficult climb to the top of the single-elimination bracket, Speight and Mooty
faced off against Aviation Ordnanceman 3rd Class (AW) Dantrell Chaplin and Aviation
Ordnanceman 3rd Class Candice Boston for the final round of the tournament. Speight and
Mooty won by over 200 points.

MWR provided waterproof MP3 players, headphones and travel MP3 speaker systems as
prizes for the top three teams.

Mooty and Speight said they enjoyed the tournament because it was well organized and
structured. They will be playing in the next tournament, they said.

Although everyone couldn't win, the tournament was a great success. Sailors were able to
relax and play competitively in a friendly atmosphere. MWR once again provided
entertainment for all. http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=35820

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Sailors on board Harry S. Truman conducted a replenishment-at-sea (RAS) with the fast
combat support ship USNS Arctic (T-AOE8) March 1.

During a RAS, the Supply Department plays a crucial role by unloading food and
transferring the shipments to shipboard storage areas.

Supply takes special care to ensure Sailors work safely during a RAS. Many different
safety checks are put into place to make sure no one is hurt.

"Once we get everybody mustered, we give them a safety brief," said Chief Culinary
Specialist (SW) Billy Sevier, one of the cargo chiefs. "The smallest of an injury during a
RAS we take seriously because we do not want to endanger any lives."

For supply, one of the most dangerous aspects of the job is elevator operations. In order to
combat that danger, qualified elevator operators from engineering, weapons and other
various departments around the ship are always standing by.

Sevier said keeping communications open is also a very important part of every evolution.
By every elevator, a phone-talker is present to communicate when the elevator is coming
up or down and what it is carrying.

Ship's Serviceman 1st Class (AW/SW) Erasmus McDowell said another way optimum
safety is ensured during evolutions is through senior petty officers. He said petty officers
play an important role in the process by supervising the operations. They have to know
what needs to be done and the most effective means of performing the job.

"The senior personnel direct traffic as far as where supplies need to be and make sure the
working party stays intact throughout the entire operation. They also make sure everyone is
doing what they should be," McDowell said.

RAS can be a grueling operation, but when each individual Sailor puts safety first and
works diligently, he can accomplish a lot.

It takes the coordinated effort of all Sailors involved to make each RAS a success, and
thankfully Harry S. Truman Sailors always seems to put their best foot first.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=35822

"Fore" was the word of the day as Sailors on board Harry S. Truman had the unique
opportunity to hone their golf skills on the flight deck March 1.

Sailors had the chance to practice not only their long distance drive but their short putting
skills as well.

"I'm not much of a putter," said Aviation Structural Mechanic Airman Bradley Thompson
assigned to Anti-submarine Helicopter Squadron 7. "I'm just working on my long game."

The equipment was donated by the "Fore Our Soldiers" organization, a nonprofit program
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that is dedicated to providing service members with golf equipment while on deployment.

"I let Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) know about Dan Sundt, and that he was
sending me some golf clubs and golf balls," said Aviation Boatwain's Mate Airman Travis
Rodriguez. "He wanted to send some stuff out for the whole ship. Dan actually brought the
idea up to me. I just kept contact with him. He was able to send the ship over 4,000 golf
balls and some clubs to use as well."

Golfers and non-golfers alike took their turns at the "green" just to take a break from the
monotony of ship life.

"It's a good way to relax and blow off some steam," said Command Master Chief
(AW/SW) Clarence Frye. "It's a good opportunity for some guys to come up into the
sunshine and just whack a ball."

"It's great for morale, it's definitely boosting it," said Rodriguez. "I think MWR is great,
this is one of the best things we have had out at sea, right next to the Super Bowl party we
had a little while ago."

The MWR office plans on bringing the opportunity back during no-fly days.

"I hope we will be able to do it again on the next maintenance day," said Omar Suñer,
Truman's fun boss. "This has been a blast."
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=35823

Harry S. Truman's crew will begin its "Crews Into Shape" program March 3.

When command physical training isn't enough, and there isn't any motivation to exercise
alone, the 2008 "Crews Into Shape" challenge on March 3-28, might just be the answer.

"Crews Into Shape" is a team-based Department of Defense-wide competition held every
year during "Nutrition Month."

"A key concept of this intervention is the 'crew'; people committed to help[ing] and
encourag[ing] each other in the struggle to establish healthful habits," said Bob
MacDonald, the project manager of the "Crews Into Shape" challenge.

Lt. Cmdr. Denise Milton, the resident physical therapist on board Truman said, "Natural
foods are easier for your body to process and obtain nutrients. The exercise, of course, is
just health[ier] for you."

The program is about getting people healthy and keeping people healthy. Regular exercise
has a large part to play in the process.

"As far as the exercise, the only requirement is 30 minutes a day. Most people that work
out on a regular basis work out longer than 30 minutes anyway. For those who don't
exercise as much, 30 minutes is a very reasonable and achievable goal," said Milton.
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She said Sailors may even opt to break up the 30-minute period into two 15-minute
periods.

There will be no official weigh-in at the beginning of the challenge, but rather teams will
record their own scores and report them toward their final score.

"I'm not going to monitor an official weigh-in. It's an 'on your honor' system with self
reporting. There really is no incentive to cheat, because the real winning is the individual
meeting or maintaining your weight goal," Milton said.

Personal health and team camaraderie are not the only reasons to take the crew challenge.
Every participant receives a certificate of completion, and top scoring teams receive T-
shirts from the Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center, the event sponsor.

"We will provide additional recognition and small prizes to the teams on the ship," Milton
said. "We are working with the Morale, Welfare and Recreation office about what we are
able to provide as prizes. They are going to be determined by how many participants we
have." http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=35211

Harry S. Truman underway in the Persian Gulf on 22 February to 12 March 2008.

Harry S. Truman visited Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates from 13 to 16 March 2008 and
must have picked up an an owl.

When the words foreign object debris (FOD) come to mind the last thing someone thinks
about is an owl. On the morning of March 17 on board Harry S. Truman, an owl is
exactly what was found. What might have been a mishap, ended on a happier note thanks
to a few Sailors' attention to detail.

"I was the safety behind the 300 jet. That's why I probably ended up there first," said
Aviation Structural Mechanic (Equipment) 3rd class Jeremy Smith, a Sailor attached to the
"Ragin' Bulls" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 37.

He was called over by Aviation Electronics Technician Airman Apprentice Tony
McJohnston, also part of VFA 37. What they found was a screech owl.

Aviation Structural Mechanic 2nd class Zachary Gorman who is attached to Helicopter
Antisubmarine Squadron (HS) 7, the "Dusty Dogs," is a licensed falconer in the U.S. He
was called to the scene to check the status of the bird.

"When I got there, I checked him over to make sure he didn't have any broken wings and if
he was dehydrated or malnourished," said Gorman.

Gorman and the flight deck medical team nursed the owl, or "Fod" as Flight Deck Control
liked to call him, back to health by giving him a shot of sugar water to help rehydrate him.

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Gorman said after treating the bird they found no life-threatening problems.

"For the most part the bird was healthy, just a little tired," said Gorman. He also made sure
"Fod" was okay in a box the crew dubbed his makeshift "stateroom." Gorman has been
working with birds of prey since the age of 12 and said he was more than happy to help the
animal.

"I've worked with a lot of owls throughout the years, but I never thought I'd have to deal
with one on a carrier in the middle of the Gulf" said Gorman.
The owl could not reside on board indefinitely so they came up with another plan.

"Since he was in a weak condition, flying to land would decrease his chances of survival so
we thought we would give him a hand," said Gorman.

Preparations were made to fly the owl off the ship on a Carrier Onboard Delivery to land,
where he was released safely and out of harms way.

"It was a free ride. They were going there anyway so we made it a little bit easier on him,"
said Gorman. http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=35896

Harry S. Truman underway in the Persian Gulf (5th Fleet Theater of Operation) from 17
March to 30 April 2008.

Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron (VAQ) 130 held a change of command ceremony
aboard Harry S. Truman, March 22.

Cmdr. John MacTavish handed over the reins to Cmdr. Scott Moran as commanding
officer.

The 'Zappers,' an EA-6B squadron assigned to Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3, are embarked
aboard Harry S. Truman and bid farewell to MacTavish, who had been commanding
officer since December of 2006.

He will head next to United States Africa Command in Stuttgart, Germany.

"I am truly impressed with your skill, style, humor and work ethic," said MacTavish, while
addressing the squardon during the change of command ceremony.

"In this business, one does not get the luxury of choosing one's staff. In my case, I have
been truly lucky to be surrounded with such an outstanding group and I am equally proud
and honored to have had the chance to be your commanding officer," he said.

Moran, who has been with the squadron as executive officer for several months, reminded
everyone of the positive changes the 'Zappers' have undergone during MacTavish's time as
commanding officer.

"Cmdr. MacTavish challenged everyone in the squadron to understand their piece of the
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puzzle and to carry out those responsibilities with pride and professionalism," he said.

Moran said he is excited to lead the squadron and continue the outstanding
accomplishments of the squadron's present deployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of
operations (AOO).

"The 'Zappers' will continue to focus on the development of young leaders so as we turn
the reins over to the next generation, we're sending forward a professional culture that
possesses superior competence and skill," he said.

VAQ-130 is currently deployed with Harry S. Truman and is on a routine deployment to
the 5th Fleet AOO, where it is focused on reassuring regional partners of the coalition's
commitment to help set conditions for security which promotes stability. U.S. forces
maintain a naval and air presence in the region that deters destabilizing activities while
safeguarding the region's vital links to the global economy.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=36046

Sailors aboard Harry S. Truman answered the question: "Who is the strongest Sailor?" by
competing in the second Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) sponsored Bench Press
Competition, March 26.

The contest was based on how much a Sailor could bench press within their weight class.
A bench press consists of lifting the barbell up, lowering it to the chest and then lifting it
back up fully extending the arms.

Truman's New Fitness Boss Maurice Gentry, who arrived on board the Truman March 1,
cohosted the event alongside Truman's former Command Fitness Leader, Chief Mass
Communication Specialist (AW/SW) Gil Dobison.
Dobison is former a body builder and power-lifter.

The competition consisted of four weight classes - 150-169 pounds, 170-179 pounds, 180-
199 pounds and 200 pounds and over.

The mezzanine was packed with Truman Sailors who came out to support their shipmates.

One of the contestants, Aviation Ordnancman 3rd Class Alfred Jones, Weapons
Department, impressed the crowd by winning first place in the 170 to 179 pound weight
class. Jones benched pressed more than 295 pounds.

"As far weight training goes, I do mostly push-ups and sit-ups. I also work on doing bench
press pyramids, and I try to work out every day after work," said Jones.

Aviation Electronics Technician 3rd Class Henry Nelson, assigned to Fleet Readiness
Center (FRC), a sea operational detachment on Naval Operations Base (NOB) in Norfolk,
was runner-up in the 170 to 179 pound weight class. Nelson benched pressed an
impressive 275 pounds.

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"I feel good about my performance. When I first arrived to the Truman I was not putting
up nearly as much weight as I am now. I work out at least six times a week for two hours
each session," said Nelson.

Gas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical) 3rd Class Brandon Cloyne was flown over
from the USS Hue City (CG 66) just to participate in the bench press competition.
Unfortunately, Cloyne fell short of winning first place in the 200 pound and over weight
class. Cloyne maxed out by lifting an astounding 405 pounds.

"It's a little disappointing knowing that I'm capable of lifting more than that. I will keep
hitting the gym and working out so I can improve my max," said Cloyne.

Aviation Electrician's Mate 3rd Class (AW) Leo Mobley, from Truman's Aircraft
Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD), proved to be the strongest Sailor of the
contest. Mobley bench pressed a remarkable 450 pounds walking away with first place in
the 200 pound and over weight class.

Aviation Electronics Technician 2nd Class Joshua Lackey from AIMD won first place in
the 150 to 169 pound weight class. Aviation Ordnancman 2nd Class Eugene Hodge,
Weapons Department won first place in the 180 to 199 pound weight class.

"I was impressed with the bench press contest as a whole. From seeing some of the little
guys throw up more weight than some of the bigger guys," said Gentry. "It was very
entertaining and a very exciting contest. We will definitely have more bench press
competitions in the near future for the Sailors."

All the winners of the contest received a T-shirt from MWR.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=36093

Harry S. Truman qualified her first enlisted tactical action officer (TAO) March 18.

The new TAO, Senior Chief Operations Specialist (SW) Greg Renick, said he hopes to be
a positive influence to his subordinates and lead by example.

"This is really the ultimate milestone for the OS (operations specialist) rate," Renick said.
"There is no higher qualification. I wanted to challenge myself, and I wanted to show the
young Sailors in this rating that if you stick around and study and put forth work there is a
lot of opportunity. There are no barriers."

The TAO is responsible in every condition and situation to defend the ship.

Senior Chief Operations Specialist (SW/AW) Donnie Novak, Operations Department
leading chief petty officer noted he was honored to witness Renick's achievement.

"It takes extraordinary intellect and confidence to be a TAO, but most importantly it takes
dedication, not only to get fully qualified, but to do it well," Novak said. "Countless hours
and months of training are required just to be considered for an opportunity to sit in that
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chair."

Renick said several things had to come together in order to complete his qualification.
Renick explained he had a background in tactical operations so upon arrival to the ship, he
completed a personnel qualification standard and stood several months worth of watches
under instruction. He said the biggest test was passing a qualification board with the
commanding officer, executive officer, operations officer, combat direction center officer
and the ordnance handling officer.

"I am really fortunate to have a chain of command that has the faith and confidence in me
to not only qualify me but consider me for the process," Renick said. "This is really a
culmination of many years of training because you have to be in the position to do it."

Novak said Sailors should use Renick's achievement as motivation to attain their own
goals. Now that he will stand a watch normally reserved for officers, Renick will be an
inspiration to others.

"The junior Sailors in CDC can now see that anything is possible in their career. They may
have known that before, but they see it now," Novak said. "They see him sitting in that
seat, and it surely builds their self confidence. Out of reach goals are merely fabrications of
doubt. With senior chief attaining this qualification, the junior Sailors now have substantial
evidence to look at when doubt exists."

Renick attributed his achievement to his dedication.

"The ability to succeed in the Navy is really unlimited if you work hard and prepare
yourself and dedicate yourself to a goal no matter what it is," Renick said. "You can
achieve anything you set your mind to."
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=36715

Harry S. Truman held a Women's History Month celebration in Hanger Bay 2, March 28,
to recognize the contributions of women in the Navy.

The ceremony showed an appreciation for the accomplishments of military women, who
have continually fought to expand their role in the Navy and the armed forces.

The ceremony featured two accomplished Navy women as guest speakers, Capt. Katherine
Donovan, the assistant chief of staff for Carrier Strike Group 10, and Cmdr. Sara Joyner,
commanding officer of the "Gunslingers" of Attack Fighter Squadron 105, the first woman
to command a strike-fighter squadron.

Donovan provided a detailed account of women's accomplishments in the Navy discussing
everything from the establishment of the Women's Reserve in 1943 to the first females to
fly jet aircraft.

"In 100 years, women have entered, endured and embraced all aspects of military life,"
Donovan said. "The Navy continues to embrace the diversity women bring to the fleet and
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is proud to be part of attracting top women to the military and compelling them to make it
their career."

Donovan related a few of her personal experiences and finished off with a challenge.

"Most of you represent what our future will look like. You will impact how the military
looks and acts in the future. 'Will you stand up and make a difference?'" she asked.

After her speech, a special event was held in which female Sailors E-1 to O-6 passed the
ensign and exchanged salutes.

During the passing of the ensign, Lt. Cmdr. Regina Cox, Truman's combat systems
information officer, read a speech called "Old Glory," which explained the meaning of the
Ensign and its long history, she added excerpts about women's sacrifices over the years.

After the flag-passing ceremony, Donovan presented the ensign to Culinary Specialist
Seaman Recruit Latoya Carter, the most junior female on Truman. Carter said it meant a
lot to receive the ensign considering she was so new to the ship.

"I'm inspired by receiving such an honor because I'm new to Harry S. Truman and never
thought I would be recognized so soon," Carter said.

Joyner explained it is important to recognize Women's History Month because of the
strides women have made over the past century to achieve equality with men.

"The road to the equality we enjoy today was paved by the blood, sweat and tears of
women in uniform over the last 100 years, and their hard work and sacrifice bears
remembering," Joyner remarked.

The Navy began allowing women to serve in combat roles in 1993, and the adjustment was
particularly difficult for the first women who participated in the transition, noted Joyner.

"Recognition and respect grew each year as we proved that women could be valuable
members of the Navy ... we didn't attempt to lessen the Navy's demands, but instead
worked as part of the team to excel as equals," she said.

The ceremony concluded with a benediction by Lt. Cmdr. Sharell Miner followed by a
cake cutting ceremony on the mess decks.

The Truman Heritage Committee sponsored and planned the event.

"[The ceremony] was a little different in the way we educated the crew as far as women
and the role that we play in the Navy and in the military in general," said Chief
Cryptologic Technician (Collection) (SW/AW) Nzinga Henderson, the team leader of the
Heritage Committee. "We definitely had a good turnout – a good support network."
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=36090

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An army sergeant from the Canadian frigate HMCS Charlottetown (FFG 339) completed
his Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist (ESWS) qualification March 31, aboard Harry S.
Truman.

Earning the ESWS pin is certainly hard work, but that did not deter Canadian Army Sgt.
Colin Whyatt.
Whyatt, who has been serving in the Canadian Army for 20 years, joined the ship as a
liaison officer during composite unit training in July 2007.

Whyatt explained his job deals with intelligence communications between the various
coalition ships in Harry S. Truman's Strike Group.

"By the time he came back to cruise in November, he said, 'Hey I want to be able to pursue
this [qualification]. What do I do?'" said Chief Cryptologic Technician [Collection]
(SW/AW) Nzinga Henderson, who works in the Ship's Signals Exploitation Space with
Whyatt.

One of the main reasons Whyatt decided to get his ESWS pin was to improve his
understanding of the ship.
"I started getting tired of things coming on the 1MC and not knowing what was going on,"
he said.

Working toward an ESWS pin is no easy task. It takes a lot of hard work and dedication,
and Whyatt definitely put in the hours.

Henderson noted Whyatt studied extremely hard every day and showed quite a bit of
initiative by calling and setting up individual walk-throughs to get the information and
signatures he needed.

The hard work paid off when he went before his ESWS board.

"He did fantastic," said Fire Controlman Chief (SW/AW) Dustin Armstrong, one of the
chiefs on Whyatt's ESWS board. "He understood what he was talking about and he
expressed that at the board."

Armstrong (SW/AW) said he has participated in more than 20 ESWS boards and this is the
first time he has ever seen a foreign national earn or even attempt to earn his pin.

The Canadian sergeant was proud to have qualified for his ESWS. "It's a good
accomplishment, being a foreigner," said Whyatt. "I only know one guy who got it. There
are maybe two of us who have it in our entire military."

Whyatt enjoyed learning about the ship.

"The best thing for me was getting to drive the ship, just to get up there and have the helm
in your hand," he said. "That was pretty exciting. It was one of the best memories of the
whole thing for me."
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Whyatt's accomplishment impressed Harry S. Truman's Sailors.

"When you see someone from the outside take so much interest and pride in your ship and
what it represents, it motivates you too," said Henderson.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=36382

Harry S. Truman's "Chefs at Sea" program is in full swing as Sailors will complete their
classroom study April 4, and begin the practical application phase.

Jon Anderson, the teacher and coordinator for Truman's "Chefs at Sea" program and an
instructor from First Coast Technical College in St. Augustine, Fla., said he has been
working with Sailors on board the ship to improve their culinary skills. He said once
Sailors are finished with the program, they will have a better understanding of basic and
advanced cooking techniques and be one step closer to certification.

"I work with a bunch of dedicated culinary specialists (CSs) right now," said Anderson.
"Right now we are doing book work and finishing finals. I'm hoping that [on] April 4 we
can have the final, then move into some practical stuff, and more hands on training in the
galleys."

The course is completely voluntary and all of the culinary specialists who are involved
chose to take their cooking to the next level.

"The course consists of 120 hours of classroom study during the cruise, then practical
application," Anderson said. "The course really takes some dedication because of its
difficulty. I have about 20 CSs participating."

The course doesn't just give the Sailors training that will help them on Truman, but gives
them practical skills to take into the civilian world after their service in the Navy.

"We were able to get everyone involved a membership into the American Culinary
Federation (ACF)," Anderson said. "As long as they pass the final, they get a certificate
saying they are a certified culinarian, which is the first step on the ACF ladder."

Anderson said the certification proves their skills are at a higher level because they have
received rigorous training. The academic side of the program consisted of three classes -
human resources, nutrition and sanitation.

"The safety and sanitation portion covered proper food handling and how to use equipment
properly," Anderson said. "We are doing the nutrition class right now and the Sailors just
took the test for the human resource management course where they learned a lot about
mandatory benefits, how to run shifts and restaurant scheduling."

Culinary Specialist Seaman Jamie Snyder, a class participant and one of Truman's galley
chefs said the program has given her a better understanding of food and everything that
goes into preparing it.
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"Out of all three courses, the nutrition course has been the most difficult," Snyder said.
"We had to memorize a lot of facts, like how many calories a day you should have, the
scientific name for the vitamin B-12 and what vitamins are fat soluble. You have to really
know a lot about the vitamins and minerals and where they come from."

The "Chefs At Sea" program is not as far as culinary Sailors can go with their career while
in the Navy.
Anderson said this is only one program available out of many in the Navy.

"Participants can also apply for different certificate levels later on as they go through and
they document their training and work hours," Anderson said.

Whether enlistment time is up or the time to advance is close, extra classes and training
that the Navy offers can help with both bettering yourself as a Sailor and as a person.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=36094.

Harry S. Truman welcomed aboard comedian "Rip" Michaels April 12, for a tour and to
perform his act for the 'Comics on Duty Tour.'

Michaels spent almost an hour telling jokes and entertaining the crowd.

"I thought it was pretty funny," said Aviation Boatswain's Mate [Fuel] 3rd Class (AW)
Marchello Roberts. "He put on a good show. It was a lot of fun and a good break from the
daily routine and hard work."

Michaels said the show was a blast and it was his goal to make the Sailors laugh and have
a good time.

"I just wanted to put on a good show because these guys work so hard. I actually lost my
voice trying to scream out to everybody. We made it through and it was a great show. I had
a lot of fun. There was a lot of energy," he said.

This was not Michaels first visit with service members.

"I have been to Ramstein Air Force base in Germany to perform a few shows for those
guys before," Michaels said. "I was also in Norfolk, Virginia for the big Halloween Bash
they had last year on base. I got into this because of a woman named Karen Fritz with
Navy Entertainment. She sent me a tape called 'Comics On Duty' and included a list of
some of the people that have done it before like Robin Williams, Dennis Leary and Dennis
Miller. She said that they go out to Afghanistan and on carriers."

Michaels said it was an honor to go on tour for the military members who are deployed
overseas.

"I was actually supposed to tape Last Comic Standing at the same time as this tour," said
Michaels. "But I thought, Last Comic Standing happens every year and this is a once in a
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lifetime opportunity. Normally, to see what I saw today, I would have had to sign up for
four years, but this is cool."

Michaels thanked the Sailors before he left.

"I really appreciate what you guys do, all of the hard work you put in," said Michaels.
"You are all out here working 18 and 19 hours a day. I really appreciate it and thank you. If
you are ever at any of my shows make sure you tell the ticket counter you are military and
I will make sure you are taken care of."
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=36422

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Gary Roughead visited the crew of the nuclear-
powered aircraft carrier Harry S. Truman April 15 to address Sailors deployed to the U.S.
5th Fleet area of operations (AOO).

Roughead is visiting the U.S. Naval Forces Central Command (NAVCENT) AOO to
strengthen international maritime partnerships as part of the Navy's Cooperative Strategy
for 21st Century Seapower and meet with regional leaders in an effort to increase dialogue
and cooperation.

During his visit to Harry S. Truman, Roughead took time to award three commendation
medals as well as reenlist 38 Sailors. He also held an all-hands call for the crew. During his
address, the CNO said it was an honor to visit the ship because the crew has done a
phenomenal job of representing the dedication and commitment of the U.S. Navy.

"The work of this particular strike group has been extraordinary," he said. "You all are
setting the bar, and you should be very proud of that."

Roughead said Sailors should also realize they are making a contribution to the big picture
by flawlessly performing daily operations.

"You should be very proud of the operations you are conducting," he said. "The work that
you're doing, whether its flying strikes into Iraq, supporting coalition efforts in the Arabian
Gulf or the work you're doing with other coalition partners … all makes a huge difference.
It's consistent with the strategy that we outline in our program as to where we're taking our
Navy."

The Arabian Gulf is a body of water more commonly known as the Persian Gulf.

During his address to the crew, Roughead discussed a ground-breaking change-of-
command for Combined Task Force (CTF) 152 between Rear Adm. Bill Gortney,
Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CCSG)10, and the Royal Bahraini Navy.

"This is the first time that an Arab nation has stepped up to the leadership role," Roughead
said. "I believe when we look back at this, it will resound as a significant event in history
and you all have been part of that."

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CTF 152 is responsible for Maritime Security Operations in the Central and Southern
Persian Gulf. Roughead also discussed his top three priorities while aboard Truman.

"Number one, we have to maintain the readiness we have today to ensure you are able to
go out and do the job and be ready to do the things that the nation asks of us," he said.
"Another aspect is building tomorrow's Navy. And the other part that, to me is the most
important, is about people. If we stand on the ship today and look at the airplanes or fly
around in helicopters, all of that has no value … until you make [it all] come alive. What
you give to our Navy is absolutely irreplaceable."

Truman is underway in the Persian Gulf on a regularly scheduled deployment to the U.S.
5th Fleet. Operations in the U.S. 5th Fleet AOO are focused on reassuring regional partners
of the coalition's commitment to help set conditions for security and stability. U.S. forces
maintain a naval and air presence in the region that deters destabilizing activities while
safeguarding the region's vital links to the global economy.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=36452

Rear Adm. Mark I. Fox relieved Rear Adm. Bill Gortney as Commander, Carrier Strike
Group 10 during a change of command ceremony held at sea in the Persian Gulf April 19.

Gortney, who will report to the U.S. 2nd Fleet for temporary duty while awaiting orders
from the Chief of Naval Operations, said this command has been one of his most
rewarding.

"This change of command ceremony is not about me, but about all of the Sailors, ships and
squadrons of Carrier Strike Group 10," he said. "Your tireless efforts transformed our
strike group into a combat-proven warfighting team that executed our nation's tasking from
the dusty shores of East Africa to the skies over Mosul."

Since arriving in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations (AOO), Gortney said the strike group
has flown over 10,000 hours and provided more than 70,000 pounds of ordnance in
support of forces operating on the ground in Iraq. The strike group has also conducted
more than 330 interaction patrols visiting local mariners operating in the Persian Gulf.

Gortney has served as Commander of Carrier Strike Group 10 since June 2006 and said he
witnessed the strike group grow together as a team during the past two years.

"Throughout this deployment, each command became a part of a bigger team," said
Gortney. "Each combined their unique capabilities with one another to become an integral
part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group. Your success is due to the efforts of
your Sailors, chief petty officers, officers and the many sacrifices of your families.
Ultimately, you succeeded because you operated as a team, achieving accomplishments
where mere individuals would fail. Teamwork is your trademark."

Guest speaker, Vice Adm. Kevin J. Cosgriff, Commander, U.S. Naval Central Command,
praised the accomplishments of Gortney and lauded him as a leader who will help move
the Navy into the future.
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"The namesake of this ship lived by the axiom, 'the buck stops here,'" said Cosgriff.
"Within the context of this ceremony, the buck stops with the strike group commander.
Rear Adm. Bill Gortney is an excellent example of the kind of leadership we have today
and the kind we will need as we continue to operate during these unpredictable early years
of the 21st century."

Cosgriff said the Truman Strike Group has been in the Persian Gulf supporting operations
that are focused on reassuring regional partners of the United States' commitment to
security, which promotes stability and global prosperity. He also praised the
accomplishments and dedication of the Harry S. Truman Strike Group team.

"This strike group has proven its spirit, its professionalism, and has upheld the standards of
the United States Navy," he said. "I have had a number of strike groups come through this
area under my command, and I could not be more pleased with this one. You have raised
the bar."

Fox, who recently left the White House where he served as Deputy Assistant to the
President and Director of the White House Military Office, expressed his appreciation to
the Sailors of the strike group for their work during this deployment.

"Although Harry S. Truman rose to the nation's highest office, he was never torn by
ambition," said Fox. "He never had a doubt about who he was, and he was a perfect
example of our nation's remarkable ability to yield from the most ordinary origins a most
remarkable and extraordinary man. He was a man of courage, character and integrity. The
direct connection between where we are today and Harry S. Truman is this crew. The men
and women of the Harry S. Truman Strike Group exemplify extraordinary accomplishment
from ordinary origins."

Fox said he hoped to continue to build upon the exceptional work of the strike group.

"My challenge is to sustain and, if possible, improve on the excellence created by Rear
Adm. Gortney," he said. "We are going to create a team that builds on the greatness of
those who came before us."

The Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group is currently on a deployment to the U.S. 5th
Fleet AOO, where it has been operating for the past five months.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=36503

Rear Adm. William E. Gortney reported to his past position as Commander, Carrier Strike
Group TEN in July 2006. Rear Adm. Gortney has flown more than 5300 flight hours. His
command consists of USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), Carrier Air Wing Three (CVW 3)
and various assigned cruisers and destroyers commanded by Destroyer Squadron TWO
SIX (CDS 26). http://www.truman.navy.mil/sg10_admiral.html

A Canadian army sergeant from HMCS Charlottetown (FFG 339) received his enlisted air
warfare specialist (EAWS) qualification pin April 27, making him the first dual-qualified
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Canadian aboard Harry S. Truman.

Canadian Army Sgt. Colin Whyatt, who received his ESWS qualification late last month,
said he decided to go for his EAWS because he wanted to learn more about Truman's flight
operations.

"Once I got into ESWS and started learning about the ship itself, mainly, it was from the
flight deck down," Whyatt said. "Most of my interest was in the flight deck. In order to get
to know more about that, I decided to get involved in the EAWS program."

Whyatt worked through his EAWS personnel qualification standards (PQS) at a rapid pace,
passing his final board only 11 days after receiving his first PQS signature.

Even though he will not be able to wear his pins once he returns to his frigate, he said he is
proud of the accomplishment.

"It was pretty awesome," Whyatt said. "The aircraft carrier has always been an interest of
mine and now I know it from the bottom up."

Chief Storekeeper (AW/SW) Yasmira Leffakis, the leading chief petty officer of the
Component Control Section of Aviation Supply who sat on Whyatt's EAWS board, said
Whyatt performed phenomenally on his final board and really knew his stuff.

"When you go through your air board, you get asked between 25 to 44 questions per panel
member, so it's really difficult," she said. "He didn't seem to have any problems in any of
the six areas he was boarding on."

Whyatt was extremely motivated to learn about Truman's air operations, and he worked
diligently to complete his PQS, said Leffakis.

"He obviously knew his information because he did walk-through after walk-through after
walk-through," Leffakis said. "He actually learned about us and maybe, he'll be able to
take back some of this information implement into his own military."

The knowledge Whyatt has gained by completing his qualifications is certainly unique in
the Canadian military.

"I don't know any other person in the Canadian Forces that has the EAWS qualification
and I don't know anybody that has both of them," Whyatt said.

Whyatt said he especially enjoyed seeing air operations first hand.

"My favorite part was going up on the flight deck during flight operations," he said. "It was
pretty awesome. The personnel have a lot of responsibility and they sure know their
business."

Whyatt noted that working on his warfare pins gave him the opportunity to interact with
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Truman's Sailors.

"Part of my job is to show the [Canadian] flag and represent my country," he said. "I'm
here to get out, be amongst you guys and see what you do."

It is good for Sailors to be exposed to members of foreign militaries and their cultures,
Leffakis explained.

"We learned a lot from him, we really did," Leffakis said. "I think it's awesome that he has
had the opportunity to be able to participate in the military exchange program and be on an
aircraft carrier." http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=36738

During the past several weeks, prior to April 29, 2008, Mine Countermeasure forces from
Coalition navies have conducted operations to survey and clear Mine Danger Areas
(MDAs) of the Northern Arabian Gulf.

During the past several weeks, Mine Countermeasure forces from Coalition navies have
conducted operations to survey and clear Mine Danger Areas (MDAs) of the Northern
Arabian Gulf.

At the invitation of the Iraqi and Kuwaiti Governments, the Royal Navy and U.S. Navy
have been working together with the Kuwaiti and Iraq navies to ensure sea lanes are clear
for mariners operating in the northern Gulf.

“Our work is directly supporting the future success of both Iraq and Kuwait by improving
access to their ports and sea-lanes,” said Cmdr. David Hunkin, Commander of the Royal
Navy’s Mine Warfare Battle-staff. “The navies of Kuwait, Iraq, the United States and the
United Kingdom have worked hard together over the past few months and we have built
very close working relationships. Each nation has brought their own expertise and
equipment, and we have melded them together into an effective coalition Mine
Countermeasures Task Group.”

The ultimate aim of the operation is to re-designate the MDAs as Former Mined Areas,
making them safer for the maritime community. By offering an increased level of
confidence to the region’s mariners using the Khawr Abd Allah (KAA) to ports in both
Iraq and Kuwait.

Under the command of Hunkin, the operation used mine-hunters from both the Royal Navy
and U.S. Navy; Mine Clearance Diving Teams from the Royal Navy, U.S. Navy and
Kuwaiti Navy; and a specialist Royal Navy unit operating REMUS Unmanned Underwater
Vehicles (UUV).

In addition, the Iraqi and Kuwaiti navies contributed patrol boats, and elements of the Iraqi
Department for Border Enforcement helped monitor areas and provide force protection.

“This has been a terrific operation and a great example of Coalition effort, of nations

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working together for a common cause,” said Deputy Task Group Commander, Cmdr. Scott
Evertson. “This operation is leading to a greater sense of security in the region, for
merchant seaman and fisherman alike. Ultimately this work forms part of the
comprehensive economic regeneration for Iraq in particular and the Northern Arabian Gulf
in general.”

The areas searched during this operation were the remnants of the MDAs created in 1991
and 2003 where Iraq laid, or was suspected of laying, anti-invasion minefields. A
considerable mine clearance effort was previously conducted where 1,300 mines were
previously destroyed. However, very shallow areas remained inaccessible for the past 17
years. Using the very latest in mine warfare technology, the Coalition has searched these
remaining areas in an effort to declare them Former Mined Areas.

“It has been great to see some new equipment being used for the first time, a clear
demonstration of the significant investment that nations have made in Mine
Countermeasures technology over recent years,” said Hunkin. “When the Mine Danger
Areas are re-designated, every sailor on this mission can be proud that they have made an
enduring and positive contribution to the security of the region.”

The operation required more than 200 dives and over 100 remotely operated submersible
vehicle runs; all areas have been subjected to an extensive search. This operation took 3
months to plan and execute and at its conclusion will ultimately ensure the area is safe for
surface navigation.

Such operations are testament to the high degree of international cooperation and the
modern equipment that each nation now possesses. It also demonstrates the willingness of
Coalition partners to conduct combined operations in support of the economic regeneration
and stabilization of the region, illustrating the commitment to maintaining the freedom of
navigation on the seas.

Coalition forces in the North Arabian Gulf conduct Maritime Security Operations (MSO),
which help develop security in the maritime environment. From security arises stability
that results in global economic prosperity.
http://www.cusnc.navy.mil/articles/2008/053.html

Harry S. Truman underway in the Persian Gulf (5th Fleet Theater of Operation) from 17
March to 30 April 2008.

Harry S. Truman underway in the Arabian Sea (5th Fleet Theater of Operation) from 1
to 3 May 2008.

Harry S. Truman held its first steel beach picnic of the deployment May 1, after spending
more than 45 consecutive days at sea.

Sailors were invited to enjoy a much needed break from the rigors of deployment in one


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fun-filled afternoon.

The First Class Petty Officers Association cooked for all of Truman's Sailors by grilling
hotdogs, ribs and chicken. http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=36828

Harry S. Truman underway in the Red Sea (5th Fleet Theater of Operation) from 4 to 5
May 2008.

Harry S. Truman transited the Suez Canal and entered the Mediterranean Sea on 6 May
2008.

Harry S. Truman arrived in Rhodes on May 7, for a goodwill port visit as part of the
ship's routine deployment in the region.

Harry S. Truman visited Rhodes, Greece from May 7 to 10 May 2008.

While in port, approximately 5,000 Sailors have a chance to sightsee, shop and enjoy
recreational activities and participate in cultural exchanges with the citizens of Rhodes.

Truman entered the Mediterranean Sea May 6 to support the U.S. 6th Fleet's strategic
priority of improving maritime security and safety in the region following five months in
the Persian Gulf supporting Maritime Security Operations and Operation Iraqi Freedom.

"The Sailors have spent the last several months dedicated to our maritime security mission
and are looking forward to visiting Rhodes to explore the historical significance and beauty
of Greece," said Capt. Herm Shelanski, Harry S. Truman's commanding officer. "I am
confident in our Sailors' ability to represent the United States and be goodwill
ambassadors."

While in port, Truman is scheduled to host a variety of activities for Sailors to show their
appreciation by giving back to the local community.

"Our visit to Rhodes reinforces the strategic relationship between our two countries and
highlights our shared commitment to promoting peace and stability in the region," said
Rear Adm. Mark Fox, Commander, Carrier Strike Group 10 (CCSG-10). "The people of
Rhodes have provided a warm welcome and we look forward to returning the hospitality
by hosting local dignitaries during our sunset reception as well as participating in a local
community relations project in Rodini Park."
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=36967

More than 100 Sailors from Harry S. Truman participated in a community relations
(COMREL) project, May 8, in Rhodes to help beautify the historic Rodini park here.

Rear Adm. Mark Fox, Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CCSG) 10, said participating in
events such as this allows Sailors to create bonds with the local community that will last
for years to come.

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"We are pleased to be able to take part in this project and represent the U.S.," Fox said.
"The Sailors are very excited and bring a lot of young energy here. These types of
interactions are very important because we are able to show the [Greek] people that what is
important to them is also important to us."

Before Sailors began their work on the park, Daniel Speckhard, U.S. Ambassador to
Greece, and the Mayor of Rhodes, Chatzis Chatziefthimiou, presented Truman with a
memento of thanks. Speckhard said he appreciated Sailors taking time from their liberty to
help with the park beautification because it shows our Greek allies that America shares
their same values.

"For us to pay respect to their history as you're doing here by coming to this park and
helping to clean up and, [you are] showing how important it is to us too. As citizens from
the same world, to protect our culture and heritage in common to them means a lot and it
shows them that Americans, care about them, care about their community, care about their
history and care about the beauty of the island."

Fire Controlman 2nd Class Crystal Ditro, one of the participants, said she enjoys
volunteering for COMRELs because it gives her a chance to see the local community in a
different light.

"We worked and interacted with a few of the locals, and while we were out there, they
were showing us pictures of their wives and children, and we got to do the same thing for
them. We were able to ask each other questions and communicate. If you were out in town
you couldn't just go up to someone and start asking questions," she said.

Another volunteer noted COMREL events help develop international relations.

"This is one of the oldest parks in this area and it's certainly a place the community spends
a lot of its time," said volunteer Lt. Cmdr. Casey Baker. "You get to work with a lot of the
local workers and some of the people that are here and it gives you a different perspective.
Like us, they want a nice park where they can take their families and hang out and have a
good time. So, we can help make it a nice place for people to bring their families. It shows
them that we are their friends and we hope to keep it that way."

Lt. Cmdr. Steve Smith, a chaplain and event organizer, explained Sailor participation
increases morale and self esteem.

"It's good for the Sailors," Smith said. "The Sailors love giving, it really encourages them.
If we are mind, body and soul it's one way they can spiritually give back; caring for
others." http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=37101

Harry S. Truman welcomed aboard a group of distinguished Israeli guests May 10, to see
the ship and interact with Sailors in honor of the May 2, Holocaust Remembrance Day.

The visitors spent the day touring the ship whose namesake was an ardent supporter of
creating a Jewish state in Palestine and one of the first to recognize the new nation of Israel
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in 1948.

During the evening, Truman held a ceremony featuring speaker Eliezer Shahaf, a retired
Israeli navy captain and Holocaust survivor, and professor Dina Porat, the head of the
Stephen Roth Institute for the Study of Contemporary Anti-Semitism and Racism at Tel-
Aviv University.

In a moving speech, Shahaf told the story of the hardships he and his mother faced in Nazi
Germany.

"It's very emotional for me to be here today on this ship," Shahaf said. "This is the first
time I've actually told my story. I never did it before."

Born in 1941 in the midst of the Nazi terrors, Shahaf was delivered at home to avoid being
killed in a German or Polish hospital where infanticide of Jewish babies was common
practice. His tale includes life in the ghetto, the execution of his father at Auschwitz and a
harrowing flight through Europe to escape Israel.

"This story proves again not only the love of the mother, the will for the survivor, the
strength of human spirit, but also the existence of small acts of kindness… [which] are
points of light in this story," said Shahaf.

After Shahaf told his story, Porat spoke about the importance of remembering the
Holocaust, and how the Jewish people put back together their shattered lives. During the
war, she said there was a great migration of refugees to Palestine.

"These 360,000 people came, and they came destitute. They came with no shirt on. They
came with terrible experiences," Porat said. "They started afresh and became part and
parcel of Israeli life and of life in Jewish communities elsewhere in the world. The way
they recovered, the way they started afresh, the way they integrated into society is
amazing."

She said after their great suffering, the Jewish people did not seek revenge. They only tried
to rebuild and live as they had before.

"The best revenge that the people thought of as individuals and as public was to have a
new family, to have a new profession, to study what you couldn't when they deprived you
of your studies, to build a new Jewish community wherever in the world, to build the state
of Israel," Porat said.

Porat discussed how the Holocaust is not just an integral part of Jewish cultural heritage,
but a lesson for the rest of the world to follow because it shows how hate can lead to
injustice and human suffering.

"The Holocaust is not just the past and not just a part of Jewish or Israeli memories...It
came because of racism and bigotry...When you think about it this way, you realize
democracy is the only way," Porat said. "If it is studied broadly, universally, it is a way to
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keep the next generations, to keep it away from mischief to have it live with a bright and
free and fine future." http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=37100

Harry S. Truman Sailors participated in a "New Fathers Class" May 14, held in the ship's
chiefs' mess.

The class is designed to teach male Sailors who have a newborn child at home important
aspects of being a new father.

"The main priority of this class is to educate fathers on what to expect in each stage of
development of their baby and how to take care of the child," said class instructor Faith
Walker, of the Parent's Support Program, Fleet and Family Services, Naples, Italy. "It
gives them the education they need to feel more like a part of the family, and it helps in
cutting down the readjustment time greatly."
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=37156

The Sailors from Harry S. Truman and the fleet replenishment oiler USNS Patuxent (T-
AO 201) worked together to complete a successful replenishment at sea (RAS) on May 12.

Approximately 350 palettes were brought aboard, explained Lt. Steve Osborne, the ship's
RAS coordinator. About 200 of those palettes were fresh fruit, vegetables and frozen food.

"We sent off 20 palettes of mail and received about the same amount. The post office was
filled with boxes and letters," said Storekeeper 2nd Class Jefferson Whitehead, S-8
Mezzanine's leading petty officer.

Because Truman is close to the end of deployment, most of the items coming aboard are
for morale and everyday consumables, not just the mission-essential items, Whitehead
noted.

The replenishing ship is chosen by the needs of the Truman and its location in the world.
While in the Persian Gulf, Truman often came alongside the fast combat support ship
USNS Arctic (T-AOE 8).

"Normally, we conduct replenishments at sea with the Arctic, but this time we conducted
the RAS with the Patuxent," Osborne said. "The main difference between the two ships is
that Patuxent doesn't have its own helo deck, so HS-7 performed the vertical replenishment
(VERTREP) portion of the RAS."

"Deployments would be very hard, almost impossible, without constant RAS," said
Whitehead. "We would have to pull into port a lot more often, which costs a considerable
amount of money.

"Every RAS is important because we have to replenish the supplies like food, fuel, oil,
replacement parts for the aircraft and repair parts," Whitehead continued. "We have to
have those items to function properly."

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Whether performing alongside for a connected replenishment or VERTREP, Sailors on the
Truman work as a single, efficient unit to complete the task at hand.

"The whole ship makes the RAS happen," said Osborne. "I thank everyone for their
support." http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=37154

Harry S. Truman underway in the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 6th Fleet from
May 11 to 16 May 2008.

Harry S. Truman arrived in Marseille, May 16, for a goodwill port visit as part of the
ship's routine deployment in the region.

While in port, more than 5,000 Sailors will have the opportunity to sightsee, shop and
relax, and participate in cultural exchanges with the citizens of Marseille.

"We appreciate our French allies opening their country to us for exploration and
enjoyment," Shelanski said. "We look forward to experiencing the culture, interacting with
the local people and representing the U.S. as friends and allies," said Capt. Herman
Shelanski, Truman's commanding officer.

Truman is scheduled to host a variety of events, including a sunset reception aboard the
ship for French dignitaries and local residents.

The crew will also take part in a community relations project with the Little Sister's of the
Poor Nursing Home for the Elderly to show their appreciation for the hospitality of the
Marseille citizens. Sailors will help paint and wallpaper the nursing home.

Rear Adm. Mark Fox, commander, Carrier Strike Group 10, noted that the Sailors have
remained dedicated to the maritime security mission over the last several months.

"France is our oldest ally, and remains a valuable partner in the world scene," Fox said.
"This visit highlights both countries' commitment to promoting peace and stability in the
region as well as both countries' desire to create even deeper bonds of friendship."
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=37336

Harry S. Truman Sailors participated in a community relations (COMREL) project in
Marseille, with the Little Sister's of the Poor Nursing Home for the Elderly to show their
appreciation for the hospitality of the Marseille citizens, May 21.

Lt. Cmdr. Daniel Mode, said participating in events such as COMRELs allows Sailors to
create ties and bonds with the local community that will last for years to come. He noted
the France COMREL was the crew's 13th of the deployment and that more than 500
Sailors have donated more than 2,000 hours of their off-time to help nations of the world.

"Sailors are motivated on all of the COMRELS that we have because they want to help,"
Mode said. "They have skills we need, and it gets them to the local area instead of the
tourist spots."
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"I volunteered so I could meet the hosting community at a personal level," said Aviation
Maintenance Administrationman 2nd Class Randy Thorp. "It's a good way to give back to
the local community and say 'thank you for letting us come in.'"

"The COMREL again exceeded our expectations," Mode said. "As always our Sailors did
an amazing job, went right to work and made it a priority to act as good ambassadors of the
U.S." http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=37335

Harry S. Truman visited, Marseille, France 16 to 21 May 2008 for a goodwill port visit
as part of the ship's routine deployment in the region. Sailors participated in a community
relations (COMREL) project in Marseille, with the Little Sister's of the Poor Nursing
Home for the Elderly to show their appreciation for the hospitality of the Marseille
citizens, May 21; while in port or departing in the afternoon of the 21st, cooperated with
the French Navy May 21, as French pilots landed on the flight deck to work on their carrier
qualifications.

"It's a wonderful opportunity for us because it's a refresher for the pilot and also proved the
compatibility of the French planes and the U.S. carriers," said French Navy Capt. Patrick
Zimmermann, the commander of the French air group attached to the nuclear-powered
aircraft carrier FS Charles de Gaulle (R 91).

France's navy has worked with the U.S. to practice the coordination of joint maritime
security operations during the last six years, and this is the first time a French plane has
landed on Truman.

"In 2002 during the beginning of the Afghanistan conflict when we were with the war
group of the Stennis [USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74)], we did some cross decks with E-
2s," Zimmermann said. "Last year was the first time we experienced some traps on the
Enterprise [USS Enterprise (CVN 65)] in July 2007 with the Rafale. The Rafale is a swing
barrel airplane like the F-18… [performing the functions of] fighter, attack and air
defense."

During the exercise, French pilots accumulated six traps with two Rafales and one E-2C
making two traps each. A third Rafale made 13 touch-and-go landings to test how well
French planes could handle the stresses of landing on Truman's flight deck, explained
Zimmermann.

"What they were doing was trying to test the impact of our carrier on their type of aircraft
such as the landing gear and different stresses on the aircraft," said Lt. Cmdr. Andrew
Shulman, one of the ship's carrier air group landing signal operators. "That way, they can
take a look at when they operate with us this summer, how it's going to affect their
aircraft."

With the Charles de Gaulle currently in the ship yards in Toulon, France, Zimmermann
noted this is the first time his pilots have conducted carrier landings in almost a year.

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Shulman and Lt. Cmdr. Greg Provencher, also a carrier air group landing signal operator,
traveled to Landivisiau, a French naval air base, in Brittany, France. There, they observed
the capabilities of the French E-2Cs and Rafales to ensure they would be able to
successfully land on Truman.

"We went up there primarily to watch their planes land," Sulman said. "One of the
prerequisites of them coming out here, was that we'd get a chance to go out there and see
what the performance of their aircraft was.

"They brought their guys aboard, and everyone met their counterpart. The French shooters
were talking to the American shooters and everyone worked together," said Shulman. "If
you looked at this evolution a couple weeks or a month ago, you'd have thought it would
be more difficult than it actually was; but, it wasn't difficult because there was a lot of
planning."

In July, the French air group is scheduled to conduct flight operations during a joint task
force exercise with USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) and Carrier Strike Group 8,
explained Zimmermann. http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=37366

Harry S. Truman underway in the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 2nd Fleet on 22
May 2008.

Harry S. Truman transited the Strait of Gibraltar and entered the Atlantic operating with
the 2nd Fleet on 23 May 2008.

Harry S. Truman underway in the Atlantic operating with the 2nd Fleet from 23 to 31
May 2008.

USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81) provided assistance to a British sailboat and her crew
in the Atlantic Ocean, May 28.

The sailing vessel Toutamazi and her crew were sailing from Antigua en route to the
Azores. Prior to making a final voyage east to Portugal she began having difficulty with
her generator, which caused her to become dangerously low on fuel. Another sailing
vessel, the Per Mare, met up with the Toutamazi and stayed with her to lend assistance.

The two vessels contacted the Falmouth Coast Guard in the United Kingdom. The Coast
Guard then contacted the USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Carrier Strike Group
(HSTCSG), who were transiting the area at the time of the incident. HSTCSG contacted
Churchill and informed them of the situation.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=37543

Harry S. Truman pulled into Mayport to off-load a small portion of CVW-3 and pick
tiger cruise riders up on 1 June 2008.

Harry S. Truman underway in the Western Atlantic operating with the 2nd Fleet from 2
to 3 June 2008.
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USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) with CVW-3 embarked arrived Norfolk, Virginia,
with Captain Herman A. Shelanski in command, on 4 June 2008, with CCSG10
commanded by Rear Adm. Mark Fox who relieved Rear Admiral William E. Gortney
during a change-of-command ceremony held at sea in the Arabian Gulf April 19, 2008,
ending her fifth Mediterranean Sea deployment (8th & 9th voyage) operating with the
6th Fleet, her third Arabian Sea/Gulf (Persian Gulf) deployment in support of her 1st
Maritime Security Operations and her 3rd Operation Iraqi Freedom on the U. S. Navy’s
86th Arabian Sea and Persian Gulf deployment since September 1945 operating with the
5th Fleet and Central Command while no mention of Operation Enduring Freedom
operations were conducted, during which time Carrier Airwing Three (CVW 3) executed
13,869 flight hours, which made up 2,459 combat sorties. CVW-3 successfully expended
77,536 pounds of live ordnance, Capt. Pawlowski said. “We also did 97 shows of force and
21 shows of presence. Those things didn’t result in kinetic effects, but they resulted in
saving countless lives,” Capt. Pawlowski added. “I couldn’t be more proud of the crew, the
Truman and Carrier Airwing Three Team, working together to accomplish a great seven-
month cruise,” said Capt. Herm Shelanski, Truman’s Commanding Officer. “We have had
some great success here.” Commander Carrier Airwing Three Capt. Rick Pawlowski
echoed Capt. Shelanski’s sentiments and agreed that this cruise was especially productive
and successful. “It has been an extreme pleasure to work with this ship the last 20 months,”
Capt. Pawlowski said. “The entire ship’s team is supreme professionalism everywhere you
look.” MSO and OIF missions were under operational control of the US Naval Forces
Central Command and 5th Fleet., while U.S. Naval Forces Central Command
operational control extends to the Indian Ocean following the war with Iraq (Operation
Desert Storm), with the Commander, 7th Fleet, serving as naval component commander
for Central Command. Underway in the Atlantic from 5 to 15 November 2007; Truman
transited through the straits of Gibraltar 16 November 2007; underway in the
Mediterranean from 16 to 19 November 2007; Truman visited Naples, Italy from 20 to 25
November 2007; underway in the Mediterranean from 26 to 29 November 2007; Truman
entered the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations on 30 November 2007, transiting the Suez
Canal, making her 5th Suez Canal transit and the U. S. Navy’s 127th Suez Canal carrier
transit; underway in the Red Sea from 30 November to 1 December 2007; underway in the
Arabian Sea from 2 to 11 December 2007, relieving USS Enterprise (CVN-65);
underway in the Persian Gulf on 14 to 24 December 2007; Truman visited Jebel Ali,
United Arab Emirates from 25 to 28 December 2007; underway in the Persian Gulf from
29 December 2007 to 24 January 2008, during which time the commander of Carrier
Airwing 3 logged his 6,000th hour of flight Jan. 14 after a successful 3-wire trap aboard
Truman in an E2-C Hawkeye assigned to Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron
(VAW) 126, the "Seahawks". Capt. Rick Pawlowski has spent 360,000 minutes, 250 days,
6,000 hours flying through the air in E2-C Hawkeyes, A-6 Intruders, Helicopters, F/A 18
Super Hornets and a conglomerate of other aircraft. Truman visited Jebel Ali, United
Arab Emirates from 25 to 28 January 2008, during which time Jimmy Buffett visited the
crew aboard the ship and performed a concert, Jan. 28. Truman underway in the Persian
Gulf from 29 January to 16 February 2008, during which time more than 400 football fans
aboard Harry S. Truman, including the Miami Dolphins cheerleaders and two
professional football players attended the ship's Super Bowl XLII party and watched the
game, Feb. 4. Truman volunteered their liberty to three community relations projects
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during a four-day port visit to a Middle Eastern port Feb. 17-21. Underway in the Persian
Gulf on 22 February to 12 March 2008, Sailors on board Truman conducted a
replenishment-at-sea (RAS) with the fast combat support ship USNS Arctic (T-AOE8) and
had the unique opportunity to hone their golf skills on the flight deck March 1. “GO
Navy” reports Truman visited Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates from 13 to 16 March 2008
during which time the ship must have picked up an owl? Truman underway in the Persian
Gulf (5th Fleet Theater of Operation) from 17 March to 30 April 2008, during which time
the crew welcomed aboard comedian "Rip" Michaels April 12, for a tour and to perform
his act for the 'Comics on Duty Tour,' and Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Gary
Roughead visited the crew of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier Harry S. Truman April
15 to address Sailors deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations (AOO). U.S. Naval
Forces Central Command (NAVCENT)/U.S. 5th Fleet/Combined Maritime Forces (CMF)
demonstrated its commitment to building partnerships and enhancing regional cooperation
though operations, exercises and regional engagements during the month of April. During
several weeks in April, and at the invitation of the Iraqi and Kuwaiti Governments, the
Royal Navy and U.S. Navy worked together with the Kuwaiti and Iraq navies conducting
Mine Countermeasures surveys and cleared Mine Danger Areas (MDAs) of the Northern
Arabian Gulf to ensure sea lanes are clear for mariners operating in the northern Gulf.
Canadian Army Sgt. Colin Whyatt from HMCS Charlottetown (FFG 339) received his
enlisted air warfare specialist (EAWS) qualification pin April 27, making him the first
dual-qualified Canadian aboard. Truman underway in the Arabian Sea (5th Fleet Theater
of Operation) from 1 to 3 May 2008, during which time the crew held its first steel beach
picnic of the deployment May 1, after spending more than 45 consecutive days at sea.
Sailors were invited to enjoy a much needed break from the rigors of deployment in one
fun-filled afternoon. The First Class Petty Officers Association cooked for all of Truman's
Sailors by grilling hotdogs, ribs and chicken. Truman underway in the Red Sea (5th Fleet
Theater of Operation) from 4 to 5 May 2008; transiting the Suez Canal on her 6th Suez
Canal transit and the U. S. Navy’s 128th carrier Suez Canal transit; entering the
Mediterranean Sea on 6 May 2008; arriving in Rhodes, Greece on May 7, for a goodwill
port visit from May 7 to 10 May 2008. Underway in the Mediterranean Sea operating with
the 6th Fleet from May 11 to 16 May 2008, during which time Sailors from Truman and
the fleet replenishment oiler USNS Patuxent (T-AO 201) worked together to complete a
successful replenishment at sea (RAS) on May 12. Truman visited, Marseille, France 16
to 21 May 2008 for a goodwill port visit, during which time Sailors participated in a
community relations (COMREL) project in Marseille, with the Little Sister's of the Poor
Nursing Home for the Elderly to show their appreciation for the hospitality of the Marseille
citizens, May 21 and while in port or departing in the afternoon of the 21st, cooperated
with the French Navy May 21, as French pilots landed on the flight deck to work on their
carrier qualifications. Underway in the Mediterranean Sea operating with the 2nd Fleet
from the 21st in the afternoon or on 22 May 2008. Truman transited the Strait of Gibraltar
and entered the Atlantic operating with the 2nd Fleet on 23 May 2008; underway in the
Atlantic operating with the 2nd Fleet from 23 to 31 May 2008; pulling into Mayport to off-
load a small portion of CVW-3 and pick tiger cruise riders up on 1 June 2008. Underway
in the Western Atlantic operating with the 2nd Fleet from 2 to 3 June 2008. HSTCSG
supported maritime security operations in the Mediterranean Sea and Persian Gulf as well
as provided close air support for ground forces serving in Operation Iraqi Freedom.
HSTCSG and coalition maritime forces operated together to help enhance security in the
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maritime environment, complementing the counter-terrorism and security efforts of
regional nations and disrupting violent extremists' use of the maritime environment.
Throughout the deployment, Carrier Air Wing Three (CVW-3) aircraft flew more than
26,500 hours during 9,500 sorties. Of these, 2,459 were combat sorties directly supporting
coalition forces operating on the ground in Iraq. The air wing flew almost 14,000 combat
hours and expended 77,500 pounds of ordnance during 228 troops-in-contact events as
well as providing defense to the Iraqi oil platforms. Additionally, they provided logistical
support to the American Embassy in Lebanon. CVW-3 aircraft also conducted a variety of
theater security cooperation exercises with 5 countries in the 6th Fleet and 5th Fleet
theaters to enhance interoperability and tactical proficiency. These exercises fostered
stronger ties with regional navies, strengthened relationships with allied nations and
improved collaboration among Coalition Task Forces. Her sixth deployment ended (5
November 2007 to 4 June 2008) since her commission and approximately the U. S. Navy’s
787th FWFD. http://www.truman.navy.mil/herald/news/12-119/12-119.html

HSTCSG - Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group is made up CCSG-10, Harry S. Truman,
Carrier Air Wing Three (CVW-3), Destroyer Squadron 26 staff, guided missile cruisers
USS San Jacinto (CG 56) and USS Hue City (CG 66); guided missile destroyers USS
Carney (DDG 64), USS Oscar Austin (DDG 79) and USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81);
USS Montpelier (SSN 765); the Canadian frigate HMCS Charlottetown (FFG 339); and
the British destroyer HMS Manchester (D 95). Carrier Air Wing Three (CVW-3) consists
of Strike Fighter Squadrons VFA-11, VFA-32, VFA-37 and VFA-105; Tactical
Electronics Warfare Squadron VAQ-130; Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron
VAW-126; and Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron HS-7.
http://www.cusnc.navy.mil/articles/2008/047.html
Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group Deploys
Story Number: NNS071105-11
Release Date: 11/5/2007 3:40:00 PM

From USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs

NORFOLK (NNS) -- More than 7,300 Sailors from 17 commands and three staffs left their
homeports Nov. 5 as Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group (HSTCSG) deployed to the
Central Command Area of Operations as part of the ongoing rotation to support Maritime
Security Operations in the region.

According to Rear Adm. Bill Gortney, commander, Carrier Strike Group (CCSG) 10, the
mission of the HSTCSG is to be ready, when called upon, to support theater commanders.
He emphasized that throughout all operations, safety will remain a primary focus.
http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=33089

Harry S. Truman's CMC Shares Deployment Lessons
Story Number: NNS071109-21
Release Date: 11/9/2007 2:19:00 PM

From Mass Communication Specialist Seaman James Fallon, USS USS Harry S. Truman

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Public Affairs

USS Harry S Truman, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) began its seven-
month deployment Nov. 5.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=33183

Truman Celebrates Marine Corps Birthday
Story Number: NNS071113-08
Release Date: 11/13/2007 4:26:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kenneth Hendrix, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- As USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) began
sailing across the Atlantic, beginning her deployment to the 5th Fleet, crew members took
the time out to celebrate the Marine Corps' 232nd birthday, Nov. 10.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=33236

Truman Kicks Off United Through Reading Program
Story Number: NNS071116-13
Release Date: 11/16/2007 2:53:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class, Harry S. Truman Public Affairs

USS HARRY S TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Sailors held
a kick-off ceremony, Nov. 14, to commemorate the beginning of the United Through
Reading (UTR) program.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=33321

Harry S. Truman Sailor Discovers Uncommon FOD
Story Number: NNS071224-02
Release Date: 12/24/2007 5:01:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kenneth R. Hendrix, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affars

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- A Sailor aboard USS Harry S. Truman
(CVN 75) discovered a piece of foreign object debris (FOD) inside one of the ships
catapults Dec. 16.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=34110

Harry S. Truman Hosts VTC
Story Number: NNS080102-03
Release Date: 1/2/2008 2:30:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Heather Weaver, USS Harry S. Truman

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Public Affairs

USS Harry S. Truman, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) leadership
offered a unique chance for Sailors to connect with their families this holiday season via
Video Teleconference (VTC).

The first round of VTCs took place Dec. 24, 26 and 27 and allowed more than 192 Sailors
to participate.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=34154

Harry S. Truman Holds Man Overboard Drill
Story Number: NNS080116-08
Release Date: 1/16/2008 1:17:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Patrick Grieco, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS
Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) (HST) conducted a man overboard drill Jan. 9 to help sustain
the ship's state of readiness.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=34365

Pilot Logs 6000 Flight Hours
Story Number: NNS080117-03
Release Date: 1/17/2008 7:07:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Heather Weaver, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- The commander of Carrier Airwing 3 logged
his 6,000th hour of flight Jan. 14 after a successful 3-wire trap aboard USS Harry S.
Truman (CVN 75) in an E2-C Hawkeye assigned to Carrier Airborne Early Warning
Squadron (VAW) 126, the "Seahawks".

Capt. Rick Pawlowski has spent 360,000 minutes, 250 days, 6,000 hours flying through the
air in E2-C Hawkeyes, A-6 Intruders, Helicopters, F/A 18 Super Hornets and a
conglomerate of other aircraft.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=34364

Jimmy Buffett Visits USS Harry S. Truman
Story Number: NNS080204-04
Release Date: 2/4/2008 8:55:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Heather Weaver, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs


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USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- Whether they were wasting away again in
margaritaville or enjoying a cheeseburger in paradise, Sailors aboard USS Harry S.
Truman (CVN 75) had something to cheer about as Jimmy Buffett visited the crew aboard
the ship and performed a concert, Jan. 28.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=34756

USS Harry S. Truman Celebrates Super Bowl
Story Number: NNS080206-15
Release Date: 2/6/2008 2:52:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kenneth Hendrix, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- More than 400 football fans aboard USS
Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), including the Miami Dolphins cheerleaders and two
professional football players attended the ship's Super Bowl XLII party and watched the
game, Feb. 4.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=34824

USS Harry S. Truman Sailors Honors Fallen Shipmate
Story Number: NNS080208-16
Release Date: 2/8/2008 7:59:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Patrick Grieco, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- Nuclear powered aircraft carrier USS Harry
S. Truman's (CVN 75) weapons department, held a special memorial for one of their
shipmates, Gunner's Mate 2nd Class (AW) Christopher Bissett, Feb. 6.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=34868

Truman Hosts Madden Tournament
Story Number: NNS080213-02
Release Date: 2/13/2008 7:35:00 AM

By Mass Communications Specialist 3rd Class Kenneth Hendrix, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- Gruff voices screamed touchdown with the
sounds of tackles in the background as 16 video game enthusiasts turned out Feb. 8 for
USS Harry S. Truman's (CVN 75) Morale, Welfare and Recreation's (MWR) Madden
National Football League (NFL) 08 tournament.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=34916

USS Harry S. Truman Conducts RAS with USNS Arctic
Story Number: NNS080211-17

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Release Date: 2/11/2008 2:52:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman James Fallon, USS Harry S. Truman Public
Affairs

USS HARRY S TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) received
fresh fruits and vegetables and a million-and-a-half gallons of fuel from fast combat
support ship USNS Arctic (T-AOE 8), Feb. 8, while conducting a replenishment at sea
(RAS). http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=34915

Truman Conducts RHIB Drills
Story Number: NNS080226-01
Release Date: 2/26/2008 7:47:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman James Fallon, USS Harry S. Truman Public
Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) conducted
rigid hull inflatable boat (RHIB) operations from Feb. 11 to 15 at the starboard and port
RHIB decks.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=35213

Harry S. Truman's EOD Team Offers Lessons to the Crew
Story Number: NNS080226-05
Release Date: 2/26/2008 9:01:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Matthew Bookwalter, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman's (CVN 75) Explosive
Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Detachment 22, of Mobile Unit 6, offered rappel lessons for
personnel Feb. 11-12.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=35212

Harry S. Truman Gives Back to the Community
Story Number: NNS080227-11
Release Date: 2/27/2008 4:30:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman James Fallon, USS Harry S. Truman Public
Affairs

USS Harry S. Truman, At Sea (NNS) -- Sailors from USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75)
volunteered their liberty to three community relations projects during a four-day port visit
to a Middle Eastern port Feb. 17-21.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=35249


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Harry S. Truman's Supply Corps Celebrates Birthday
Story Number: NNS080226-19
Release Date: 2/26/2008 2:04:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Matthew Bookwalter, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- One of the Navy's oldest officer corps just
got one year older, on Feb. 23, the Supply Corps celebrated their 213th birthday on board
the USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75).
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=35214

Harry S. Truman MWR Hosts Spades Tournament
Story Number: NNS080318-12
Release Date: 3/18/2008 1:40:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Recruit Jared Hall, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman's (CVN 75)'s Morale,
Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department hosted its first official spades tournament
Feb. 27 to boost the spirit of the crew.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=35820

Harry S. Truman Conducts RAS with USNS Arctic
Story Number: NNS080318-13
Release Date: 3/18/2008 1:51:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Recruit Jared Hall, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- Sailors on board USS Harry S. Truman
(CVN 75) conducted a replenishment-at-sea (RAS) with the fast combat support ship
USNS Arctic (T-AOE8) March 1.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=35822

Sailors Play Golf on USS Harry S. Truman Flight Deck
Story Number: NNS080318-14
Release Date: 3/18/2008 1:54:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Matthew Bookwalter, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- "Fore" was the word of the day as Sailors on
board USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) had the unique opportunity to hone their golf skills
on the flight deck March 1.

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http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=35823

Harry S. Truman Pushes to "Crews Into Shape"
Story Number: NNS080226-26
Release Date: 2/26/2008 2:52:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Matthew Bookwalter, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman's (CVN 75) crew will
begin its "Crews Into Shape" program March 3.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=35211

USS Harry S. Truman Sailor Finds an Unusual Piece of FOD
Story Number: NNS080321-01
Release Date: 3/21/2008 9:58:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Damian Martinez, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- When the words foreign object debris (FOD)
come to mind the last thing someone thinks about is an owl. On the morning of March 17
on board USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), an owl is exactly what was found. What might
have been a mishap, ended on a happier note thanks to a few Sailors' attention to detail.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=35896

"Zappers" Change Command
Story Number: NNS080328-16
Release Date: 3/28/2008 3:15:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Damian Martinez, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS Harry S. Truman At Sea (NNS) -- Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron (VAQ) 130
held a change of command ceremony aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), March 22.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=36046

Truman Holds Weight Lifting Contest
Story Number: NNS080331-15
Release Date: 3/31/2008 1:28:00 PM

From Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Justan Williams, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- Sailors aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN
75) answered the question: "Who is the strongest Sailor?" by competing in the second

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Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) sponsored Bench Press Competition, March 26.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=36093

Truman Qualifies First Enlisted Tactical Action Officer
Story Number: NNS080429-20
Release Date: 4/29/2008 4:07:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Heather Weaver, USS Harry S.
Truman Public Affairs

USS HARRY S TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) qualified
her first enlisted tactical action officer (TAO) March 18.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=36715

USS Harry S. Truman Celebrates Women's History Month
Story Number: NNS080331-20
Release Date: 3/31/2008 4:17:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Recruit Jared Hall, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) held a
Women's History Month celebration in Hanger Bay 2, March 28, to recognize the
contributions of women in the Navy.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=36090

Canadian Sailor Receives Warfare Pin
Story Number: NNS080413-02
Release Date: 4/13/2008 7:10:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Recruit Jared Hall, USS Harry S. Trumam
Public Affairs

USS Harry S. Truman, At Sea (NNS) -- An army sergeant from the Canadian frigate
HMCS Charlottetown (FFG 339) completed his Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist
(ESWS) qualification March 31, aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75).
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=36382

"Chefs at Sea" Program in Full Swing
Story Number: NNS080401-06
Release Date: 4/1/2008 1:38:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Matthew Bookwalter, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman's (CVN 75) "Chefs at

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Sea" program is in full swing as Sailors will complete their classroom study April 4, and
begin the practical application phase.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=36094

"Rip" Michaels Visits Harry S. Truman
Story Number: NNS080415-10
Release Date: 4/15/2008 1:28:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Matthew Bookwalter, USS Harry S. Truman
Pubic Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) welcomed
aboard comedian "Rip" Michaels April 12, for a tour and to perform his act for the 'Comics
on Duty Tour.'
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=36422

CNO Visits USS Harry S. Truman
Story Number: NNS080416-04
Release Date: 4/16/2008 12:13:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Heather Weaver, USS Harry S.
Truman Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm.
Gary Roughead visited the crew of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Harry S.
Truman (CVN 75) April 15 to address Sailors deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of
operations (AOO).
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=36452

CNO Visits USS Harry S. Truman

By Mass Communications Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Heather Weaver

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea - Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Gary
Roughead visited the crew of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman
(CVN 75) April 15 to address Sailors deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations
(AOO).

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Gary Roughead visited the crew of the nuclear-
powered aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) April 15 to address Sailors
deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations (AOO).
http://www.cusnc.navy.mil/articles/2008/046.html

US 5th Fleet/Coalition Forces Build Unity During April




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From Commander, U.S. Naval Central Command Public Affairs

MANAMA, Bahrain -- U.S. Naval Forces Central Command (NAVCENT)/U.S. 5th
Fleet/Combined Maritime Forces (CMF) demonstrated its commitment to building
partnerships and enhancing regional cooperation though operations, exercises and regional
engagements during the month of April. http://www.cusnc.navy.mil/articles/2008/056.html
and http://www.cusnc.navy.mil/articles/2008/050.html

Carrier Strike Group 10 Changes Hands

From Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Central Command/5th Fleet Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At sea -- Rear Adm. Mark I. Fox relieved Rear Adm. Bill
Gortney as Commander, Carrier Strike Group 10 (CSG 10) during a change-of-command
ceremony held at sea in the Arabian Gulf April 19.
http://www.cusnc.navy.mil/articles/2008/047.html

Rear Adm. William E. Gortney reported to his past position as Commander, Carrier Strike
Group TEN in July 2006. Rear Adm. Gortney has flown more than 5300 flight hours. His
command consists of USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), Carrier Air Wing Three (CVW 3)
and various assigned cruisers and destroyers commanded by Destroyer Squadron TWO
SIX (CDS 26). http://www.truman.navy.mil/sg10_admiral.html

Coalition Nations Clear Mine Danger Areas in Arabian Gulf - April 29, 2008

From Combined Maritime Forces Public Affairs

MANAMA, Bahrain – During the past several weeks, Mine Countermeasure forces from
Coalition navies have conducted operations to survey and clear Mine Danger Areas
(MDAs) of the Northern Arabian Gulf.

During the past several weeks, Mine Countermeasure forces from Coalition navies have
conducted operations to survey and clear Mine Danger Areas (MDAs) of the Northern
Arabian Gulf.

At the invitation of the Iraqi and Kuwaiti Governments, the Royal Navy and U.S. Navy
have been working together with the Kuwaiti and Iraq navies to ensure sea lanes are clear
for mariners operating in the northern Gulf.
http://www.cusnc.navy.mil/articles/2008/053.html

Carrier Strike Group 10 Changes Hands
Story Number: NNS080421-02
Release Date: 4/21/2008 7:34:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Heather Weaver, USS Harry S.


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Truman Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- Rear Adm. Mark I. Fox relieved Rear Adm.
Bill Gortney as Commander, Carrier Strike Group 10 during a change of command
ceremony held at sea in the Persian Gulf April 19.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=36503

Canadian Army Sgt. Earns Dual Qualification
Story Number: NNS080502-02
Release Date: 5/2/2008 11:24:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Recruit Jared Hall, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN At Sea (NNS) -- A Canadian army sergeant from HMCS
Charlottetown (FFG 339) received his enlisted air warfare specialist (EAWS) qualification
pin April 27, making him the first dual-qualified Canadian aboard USS Harry S. Truman
(CVN 75).
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=36738

USS Harry S. Truman Holds Steel Beach Picnic
Story Number: NNS080505-02
Release Date: 5/5/2008 1:01:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Recruit Jared Hall, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS Harry S. Truman, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) held its first steel
beach picnic of the deployment May 1, after spending more than 45 consecutive days at
sea. http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=36828

USS Harry S. Truman Arrives in Rhodes, Greece
Story Number: NNS080508-24
Release Date: 5/8/2008 3:48:00 PM

From USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs

RHODES, Greece (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) arrived in Rhodes on May 7,
for a goodwill port visit as part of the ship's routine deployment in the region.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=36967

Truman Strengthens Friendships, Gives Back to Local Greek Community
Story Number: NNS080514-15
Release Date: 5/14/2008 3:00:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Heather Weaver, USS Harry S.

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Truman Public Affairs

RHODES, Greece (NNS) -- More than 100 Sailors from USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75)
participated in a community relations (COMREL) project, May 8, in Rhodes to help
beautify the historic Rodini park here.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=37101

USS Harry S. Truman Celebrates Holocaust Remembrance
Story Number: NNS080514-11
Release Date: 5/14/2008 1:43:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Recruit Jared Hall, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) welcomed
aboard a group of distinguished Israeli guests May 10, to see the ship and interact with
Sailors in honor of the May 2, Holocaust Remembrance Day.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=37100

USS Harry S. Truman Holds New Father Class
Story Number: NNS080515-24
Release Date: 5/15/2008 4:48:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Joshua Moore, USS Harry S. Truman Public
Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Sailors
participated in a "New Fathers Class" May 14, held in the ship's chiefs' mess.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=37156

USS Harry S. Truman Conducts RAS with USNS Patuxent
Story Number: NNS080515-27
Release Date: 5/15/2008 5:20:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist Joshua Moore, USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- The Sailors from USS Harry S. Truman
(CVN 75) and the fleet replenishment oiler USNS Patuxent (T-AO 201) worked together
to complete a successful replenishment at sea (RAS) on May 12.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=37154

Truman Pulls into Marseille, France
Story Number: NNS080522-07
Release Date: 5/22/2008 11:45:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Heather Weaver, USS Harry S. Truman

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Public Affairs

MARSEILLE, France (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) arrived in Marseille, May
16, for a goodwill port visit as part of the ship's routine deployment in the region.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=37336

Truman Sailors Reach Out in France
Story Number: NNS080522-12
Release Date: 5/22/2008 5:33:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Heather Weaver, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

MARSEILLE, France (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Sailors participated in a
community relations (COMREL) project in Marseille, with the Little Sister's of the Poor
Nursing Home for the Elderly to show their appreciation for the hospitality of the Marseille
citizens, May 21.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=37335

French Pilots Land Aboard Truman
Story Number: NNS080523-02
Release Date: 5/23/2008 11:44:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jared Hall, USS Harry S. Truman Public
Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) cooperated
with the French Navy May 21, as French pilots landed on the flight deck to work on their
carrier qualifications.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=37366

Truman Prepares Sailors For Return To Homeport
Story Number: NNS080529-08
Release Date: 5/29/2008 3:07:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Joshua Moore, USS Truman Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- Sailors of USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75)
are participating in several new classes, May 22-31, designed to help those returning from
deployment.

The classes offered are: returning to children, thrift savings plan, traffic safety, Naval
Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS), car buying, motorcycle safety, singles class,
returning to intimacy, money management, and returning to a a spouse.

Classes help individual Sailors as well as families, by informing the Sailor about what to

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expect once the ship returns to homeport. The education provided could be the deciding
factor in many difficult situations.

"Anybody who wants to be successful financially, should attend the money management
class," said Mary Spear, financial educator and credit counselor for the fleet and family
support center, also the instructor for the money management class.

The "returning to children" and "returning to intimacy" classes are family-oriented and
stress the importance of working together to ease the transition of the Sailor back into the
family environment.

"If a Sailor knows what to anticipate, it makes the transition a lot easier," said Spear.
"Everyone should realize that it takes time to reintegrate, whether it be a week or a month.
Every Sailor is different."

Spear also teaches the car buying class, in which she informs Sailors about various
resources that they may use to get the best possible deal when choosing a vehicle.

"Of the 5,000 Sailors on this ship, 40 percent, or roughly 2,100 Sailors, will buy a new or
used car within 60 days of the return to homeport. Out of that 2,100, 95 percent will spend
too much for a car, too much for financing and end up with a poor deal."

The classes serve to fully prepare Sailors for a seamless transition back to life ashore.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=37472

Sailors Participate in Rider Course At Sea
Story Number: NNS080528-15
Release Date: 5/28/2008 5:40:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jared Hall, USS Harry S. Truman Public
Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) conducted
motorcycle safety courses, May 23-24, to prepare Sailors for the ship's return to homeport.

The Basic Rider's Course (BRC) is mandatory for any Truman Sailors who currently own
or ride a motorcycle or who are planning on riding soon.

"It's just a basic training to give the new guys insight and is kind of a refresher for the old
guys," said Boatswain's Mate 1st Class (SW/AW) Eric Wiggins, the BRC instructor and an
experienced biker.

"You can see the interest of the new guys. Some were actually sitting up in their seats and
had questions. Even some of the guys who had been riding for three or four years had
questions and that's exactly what we were looking for."

The class offered a number of tips so Sailors could be better advised about riding safely.
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One of Wiggins' main points was that a rider needs to be observant and drive defensively.

"What you have to watch out for is the other motor vehicles because they don't really see
motorcycle riders," Wiggins said. "The farther back you are, the more chance you have to
react if something happens. We have the two, four and twelve second rule; two being the
minimum and twelve the best."

Wiggins explained that the state troopers who helped teach the class offered a unique
perspective and showed a slide show that made an obvious impact on the Sailors.

"It showed a guy, he wasn't even speeding, and he got hit on the back rear tire and hit the
guard rail," said Wiggins. "They showed the guard rail which had no damage to it
whatever, and showed the guy. He was ripped up and beheaded."

Senior Trooper Connie Maddox of the Virginia State Police, shared her own personal
experience with injury on a motorcycle. She said if she had more education about riding
before she got on the bike her accident would have never happened. She was sideswiped
by another rider and when her bike fell her leg was caught underneath.

"When my foot hit the ground, it damaged my leg severely to where they thought it might
not recover. Hopefully someone will see the experience that I went through, and they won't
make that same mistake. Had I taken the BMR class, I would have never been in that
situation."

The class instructor presented a wealth of information on how to break bad riding habits.

"It showed me a lot of stuff that I was doing wrong," said Wiggins "It breaks you out of
those bad habits that everyone has like using only your back brake, or just your front brake,
turning without using your turning signal or weaving in and out of traffic."

Riders will be happy to be back on the road, but, they need to ensure their riding skills are
as sharp as possible.

Visit www.safetycenter.navy.mil/seasonal/criticaldays to download the keys to a
successful summer season. http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=37473

Harry S. Truman Conducts DUI Prevention Fair
Story Number: NNS080529-15
Release Date: 5/29/2008 3:25:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Damian Martinez, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) is
promoting alcohol awareness and responsible drinking during a Driving Under the
Influence (DUI) Prevention Fair May 26-31.

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Senior Trooper Joseph Ferland, a member of the Virginia State Police who is aboard
Truman to assist with the fair, explained the primary purpose of the fair is to show the
Sailors how their actions affect others around them including the consequences.

"One of the challenges is to show Sailors the importance of not drinking and driving. I
would like to know that out of 5,000 people on this ship, that more than just one or two
Sailors listen and adhere to what we had to say and take to heart that we're not here to just
shove information at them," said Ferland.

"We want them to realize the consequences behind their actions and to use common sense
and understand the repercussions that if it does happen, they may lose their life as well."

The Safety department, along with almost every other department aboard, is pitching in.
They have set up very elaborate scenes for each station with the primary goal of keeping
Sailors involved and engaged. The scenarios give Sailors a small sample of what it will be
like if they choose to drink and drive.

"The DUI Prevention Fair starts with a safety center brief followed by drug and alcohol
training from [the]Drug and Alcohol Program Advisor," said Boatswain's Mate 1st Class
(SW/AW) Eric Wiggins, one of Safety department's personnel in charge of coordinating
the event.

"The scenario itself begins with Sailors leaving a club while intoxicated. You get into an
accident and state troopers are on the scene. The state trooper gives you a field sobriety
test. From there, you go to the hospital to see the family who was involved in the accident.
After that, you go to captain's mast where you get 30 days of restriction. Then you go in
front of the judge who will sentence you to time in the jail that we made. The next step
after that, you'll go to jail."

In the final stage of the fair, Sailors attend the funeral of the person who was 'killed' in the
accident. The participants stand in front of a small casket and listen to the chaplain's
eulogy.

"The biggest thing about the funeral is that it is not an adult who was killed In this
scenario, the fatality is an infant. It is really going to open Sailors' eyes when they see that
it was an infant that they 'killed,'" said Wiggins.

Sailors don't usually think about the fatalities. They only think about the risk of captain's
mast or jail, not the family who lost their child.

"Once they get into it, Sailors start to think 'Well, I knew that. I didn't know that.' It's
basically about keeping them interested," said Wiggins. "A lot of Sailors think 'we're out to
sea, I'm not going to go out and drinking and driving,' but they are going to realize the
importance of it when we pull into port and are again faced with the choice of whether or
not to drink and drive."

According to Ferland, Sailors need to see the big picture when it comes to drinking and
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driving. Twenty seven percent of the fatalities of Sailors and Marines who have died while
stationed in Virginia have been alcohol-related, Ferland noted.

"Walking away from this, Sailors need to realize that if you drink and drive you're taking a
chance with your life and everyone else on the road. What if you get hit by a drunk driver?
You could get killed just as easily getting hit by someone else that was drinking and
driving. Just put yourself in the other person's shoes if you were to lose your daughter,
your wife or your husband," said Wiggins.

With the end of deployment only days away, the DUI Prevention Fair will help Sailors
make sound decisions and remain safe in homeport by giving them the tools and
knowledge they need to make the right choices throughout their career and life.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=37459

Truman Prepares New 3rd Class Petty Officers
Story Number: NNS080529-16
Release Date: 5/29/2008 3:27:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Damian Martinez, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), is offering
a petty offcer indoctrination class for those who have advanced to third class, prior to their
frocking ceremony, to better help them assimilate successfully to their new rank.

"We want them to feel comfortable moving into the new roles and to use their authority
responsibly," said Gunner's Mate 1st Class (SW) Andre Smith, a facilitator of the class.

The most important concept that new petty officers need to take away from the class are
the Navy Core Values of Honor, Courage and Commitment as new leaders explained
Smith.

"Petty officer indoctrination is important because it teaches us the responsibilities and
leadership qualities we need to successfully integrate ourselves into the world of being a
petty officer and all the things that entails for as long as we are in the Navy," said Mass
Communication Specialist Seaman Mathew Williams, one of the many Sailors aboard who
advanced to third class.

"I hope that with petty officer indoctrination, I will learn responsibility, good leadership
skills and how to be accountable for my junior guys."

New petty officers will need to know specific leadership skills for a solid foundation for
becoming a successful leader.

"This is basically a tool to get them ready to step into the role they have been frocked to,"
said Storekeeper 1st Class (SW/AW) Demetra Rogers, president of the First Class Petty
Officer's Association (FCPOA), which is in charge of running the indoctrination class.
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"The purpose of the class is to instill the Navy's core values of Honor, Courage and
Commitment."

The FCPOA-sponsored class is an example of the deckplate leadership they want to instill
into those in the class, noted Rogers.

"It's another avenue, another way for us to mentor our junior Sailors to becoming good
supervisors and leaders," said Rogers.

Now that Sailors aboard Truman have advanced to third class, petty officer indoctrination
will ensure they are prepared to effectively take on their new position as leaders in the
Navy. http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=37489

Winston Churchill Assists Stranded Vessel
Story Number: NNS080601-02
Release Date: 6/1/2008 7:18:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Michael Wilken, USS Harry S.
Truman Public Affairs

USS WINSTON S. CHURCHILL, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81)
provided assistance to a British sailboat and her crew in the Atlantic Ocean, May 28.

The sailing vessel Toutamazi and her crew were sailing from Antigua en route to the
Azores. Prior to making a final voyage east to Portugal she began having difficulty with
her generator, which caused her to become dangerously low on fuel. Another sailing
vessel, the Per Mare, met up with the Toutamazi and stayed with her to lend assistance.

The two vessels contacted the Falmouth Coast Guard in the United Kingdom. The Coast
Guard then contacted the USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Carrier Strike Group
(HSTCSG), who were transiting the area at the time of the incident. HSTCSG contacted
Churchill and informed them of the situation.

"Being the closest vessel in the Harry S. Truman Strike Group formation, we received the
tasking and quickly briefed our plan to conduct a fueling at sea evolution," said Lt. Cmdr.
Kevin Borden, Churchill's Executive Officer.

On board Churchill, the Engineering department quickly set up a refueling hose to pass
over to the Toutamazi. Churchill launched a rigid hull inflatable boat (RHIB) to assist with
the refueling efforts. Churchill provided the sailing vessel more than 500 gallons of marine
diesel fuel to assist her on her voyage.

"As a military officer and naval mariner, there is no greater honor than to be able to render
assistance to a fellow seaman in distress. Not only are we required by the law of the sea, it
is just proper seamanship and would be expected in return if we were ever faced with a
similar situation while far offshore," said Borden.

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The grateful crew of the Toutamazi was in good spirits and gave a thankful wave good bye
after receiving the fuel they needed to complete their voyage.

"The captain and mates on board the Toutamazi will no doubt share their story with family,
friends and fellow sailors and regale their local yacht club with how USS Winston S.
Churchill (DDG 81), a U.S. Navy destroyer, came to their aid in the Atlantic," Borden said.
"A simple gesture of providing a relatively small quantity of diesel fuel to a fellow mariner
will surely go a long way in reinforcing our great relationship with the United Kingdom
and other sea-going nations."

Truman and Churchill are currently en route to Norfolk, Va. after a successful combat
deployment is support of Maritime Security Operations.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=37543

Sailors Fire For Training
Story Number: NNS080602-11
Release Date: 6/2/2008 2:48:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Joshua Moore, USS Harry S. Truman Public
Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- Sailors participated in a machine gun shoot
on the fantail of USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) May 30.

G-2 division stood a careful watch to ensure the safest possible evolution was carried out.

Gun shoots are scheduled approximately every two months. They are held on board when
underway and at surrounding bases when in port.

The main purpose of the shoot was to train the newest members of the security force. New
Sailors assigned to security had the chance to learn how to operate the .50 caliber machine
gun as well as the M-240 machine gun. It also allowed many of them to receive their gun
qualifications.

"The two prevalent reasons that we are out there is safety and training," said Gunner's Mate
2nd Class Christopher Rommel, G-2 line coach for the gun shoot. "We know these guns
inside and out, so if there are any questions or concerns, we can step in and help them out."

Shooting the weapons is important for getting the feel of them, said Aviation Boatswain's
Mate [Fuel] 3rd Class Michael Dunbar, currently TAD to Security division as a security
patrolman. It also helps Sailors to learn about the weapon and to be confident enough to
actually fire it.

"Gun shoots are important for the force protection of the ship, it's important for us to be
able to protect the ship when overseas and even in homeport," said Rommel. "It's important
that we are always ready for anything."

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http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=37572

Harry S. Truman Gives Away Nearly 50K In Prizes
Story Number: NNS080603-03
Release Date: 6/3/2008 11:02:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Damian Martinez, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- On the way back to homeport after seven
months on deployment, the Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) office on board USS
Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) held a Big Bucks Bingo show May 30.

There were many prizes in store for the winners and with almost $50,000 in prizes, more
than a handful of people walked away as winners.

"It was amazing because we had to come up with $46,650 in bingo sales in order to cover
the prizes," said Omar Sunér, the Fun Boss for Truman's MWR office. "We ended up
selling 4,646 bingo tickets."

The money covers the top prize which was a 2007 steel blue metallic Jeep Wrangler
Unlimited with a black hard top. Other prizes included a 2008 Road King Model Sea Doo
water craft with all the accessories, a Sony home entertainment center which consists of a
46 inch XBR High Definition Liquid Crystal TV with a Bravia theatre system with five-
disc DVD/CD disc changer and an IPOD docking station along with the $10,000 in cash
prizes.

"It took until the very last 10 minutes of the last day of selling the bingo cards before we
broke even on the amount needed," said Sunér. "It goes to show that all the hard work that
the crew does is appreciated."

With so many people buying tickets, MWR wanted to have a lot of winners on top of the
13 big winners of $1,000 and above.

"I don't know of any carriers that have given away almost $50,000 in prizes. All the prizes
that I bought and saved up throughout cruise we gave out in this last big bash," said Sunér.

According to Sunér, the winners get to enjoy the opportunity to be one of the first groups
off the ship when Truman pulls pier-side in Norfolk to claim their prizes. "We managed to
get the Jeep on a flat bed tow truck and bring it on the pier along with the Sea Doo and the
entertainment center," said Sunér.

The top prize was the new 2007 Jeep Wrangler, and every Sailor on board was hoping that
they had the winning ticket. The anticipation was high as Truman and Carrier Air Wing
Three command master chiefs pulled numbers from the bingo machine over the ship's site
TV system, but in the end there could be only one big winner.

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"I can not believe that my bingo card was filling up so quickly," said Aviation Boatswain's
Mate (Fuels) 3rd Class Brandon Standlee, from Air department's V-4 division. "The next
thing I know, my bingo card was completely blacked out."

Sailors can appreciate MWR and all the other departments that assisted in making an event
like big bucks bingo where Sailors can have the opportunity to win great gifts.

"I was driving a 1998 Chevrolet Malibu and it's a mid-size car," said Standlee. "I am very
thankful that I won the Jeep because I have four kids and I know the Jeep is big enough for
my family to fit comfortably."

Every Sailor on board is anticipating the moment that Truman pulls pier-side in Norfolk
and the big bucks bingo helped make some lucky Sailors just that much more happy to be
home from deployment. http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=37571

Mama, I’m Coming Home!
MC2(SW) Michael Wilken
Volume 12 Issue 119

Many USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Sailors have been counting the months, days, hours
and even the minutes until the ship returns home to Norfolk, Va.

Well, the time is finally here. Truman returns home June 4, 2008 after a successful seven-
month combat deployment in support of maritime security operations, and Operation Iraqi
Freedom (OIF).

“I couldn’t be more proud of the crew, the Truman and Carrier Airwing Three Team,
working together to accomplish a great seven-month cruise,” said Capt. Herm Shelanski,
Truman’s Commanding Officer. “We have had some great success here.”

Commander Carrier Airwing Three Capt. Rick Pawlowski echoed Capt. Shelanski’s
sentiments and agreed that this cruise was especially productive and successful.

“It has been an extreme pleasure to work with this ship the last 20 months,” Capt.
Pawlowski said. “The entire ship’s team is supreme professionalism everywhere you
look.”

Truman spent nearly five months actively engaged in OIF. During this time Truman and
embarked Carrier Airwing Three (CVW 3) executed 13,869 flight hours, which made up
2,459 combat sorties. CVW-3 successfully expended 77,536 pounds of live ordnance,
Capt. Pawlowski said.

“We also did 97 shows of force and 21 shows of presence. Those things didn’t result in
kinetic effects, but they resulted in saving countless lives,” Capt. Pawlowski added.

Although Truman’s mission was mainly to support Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Marines
on the ground in Iraq, Sailors were able to relax and enjoy some well-deserved time off
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during the ship’s seven port visits.

Commander Carrier Strike Group Ten (CCSG-10) Rear Adm. Mark Fox said this was a
very successful deployment for the ship and airwing team as well. He said Truman and
CVW-3 Sailors should be proud of their accomplishments.

“You are successful warriors,” Rear Adm. Fox said. “We have gone into an operational
environment and we thrived, which is an enormous statement. We risk our lives routinely
and we don’t blink an eye at it.”

As the deployment comes to an end, Rear Adm. Fox leaves the ship’s crew with a few
parting words to ensure they stay safe and ready for the next mission.

“It’s going to be a great homecoming,” Rear Adm. Fox said. “Be smart about it, and I look
forward to seeing all of you into the next turnaround cycle.

” As the clock winds down, Truman prepares to pull into port today. The port many of the
ship’s crew calls home, and every Truman and CVW-3 Sailor should stand tall and be
proud of all their accomplishments from the past seven months.
http://www.truman.navy.mil/herald/news/12-119/12-119.html

USS Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group Returns Home
Story Number: NNS080609-23
Release Date: 6/9/2008 2:18:00 PM

By USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Public Affairs

NORFOLK (NNS) -- More than 7,300 Sailors from 17 commands and three staffs from the
USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Carrier Strike Group (HSTCSG) returned to their
homeports today after spending seven months on a routinely scheduled combat
deployment.

While on deployment, HSTCSG supported maritime security operations in the
Mediterranean Sea and Persian Gulf as well as provided close air support for ground forces
serving in Operation Iraqi Freedom.

HSTCSG and coalition maritime forces operated together to help enhance security in the
maritime environment, complementing the counter-terrorism and security efforts of
regional nations and disrupting violent extremists' use of the maritime environment.

Throughout the deployment, Carrier Air Wing Three (CVW-3) aircraft flew more than
26,500 hours during 9,500 sorties. Of these, 2,459 were combat sorties directly supporting
coalition forces operating on the ground in Iraq. The air wing flew almost 14,000 combat
hours and expended 77,500 pounds of ordnance during 228 troops-in-contact events as
well as providing defense to the Iraqi oil platforms. Additionally, they provided logistical
support to the American Embassy in Lebanon.

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CVW-3 aircraft also conducted a variety of theater security cooperation exercises with 5
countries in the 6th Fleet and 5th Fleet theaters to enhance interoperability and tactical
proficiency. These exercises fostered stronger ties with regional navies, strengthened
relationships with allied nations and improved collaboration among Coalition Task Forces.

Destroyer Squadron (CDS) 26 ships operated with over 50 coalition warships from 11
countries supporting combat operations in Iraq, providing Maritime Security in the Persian
Gulf, and conducting seven exercises throughout the Middle East.

They conducted 1,021 approach and assist visits, which promoted relations with local
fishermen and merchants and encouraged them to contact coalition warships as first
responders against Persian Gulf piracy and smuggling.

CDS 26 units also conducted visit, board, search, and seizures operations, searching for
vessels that could support international terrorist organizations by transferring personnel,
drugs, and weapons.

Additionally, they provided security for the Khor Al-Amaya Oil Terminal and Al-Basra
Oil Terminal in the Northern Persian Gulf against possible terrorist attacks. These
platforms provide more than 85 percent of Iraq's revenue, and are vital in the country's
effort to rebuild.

Rear Adm. Mark I. Fox, Commander Carrier Strike Group 10, said in order to accomplish
such diverse and important missions, the strike group had to form bonds and work as a
team. He said over the course of work-ups and the deployment, they did so and rose to
extraordinary heights.

"Each of the separate entities came together to forge a greater and more unified team,"
Rear Adm. Fox said. "We did this by building upon what was created by those who came
before us and helped to forge a path for those who will take over the mission in the future."

Truman's commanding officer, Capt. Herman Shelanski, said the operational readiness of
the crew, commitment of the mission and support from the families is what made the
deployment so successful. Shelanski said he is proud to have served with each Sailor and
that the Truman team and HSTCSG exceeded his expectations.

"Our Sailors trained hard, sacrificed much and finished this deployment after achieving
extraordinary accomplishments and readiness," Shelanski said. "Our Sailors represented
the U.S. proudly by protecting our country and staying committed no matter what situation
they encountered."

To ensure the success of the deployment extended beyond the return to home port, Truman
conducted a variety of training classes promoting sound decisions to help keep Sailors safe
in port. The information provided in the classes help not only individual Sailors but whole
families by telling the Sailor what to expect once the ship returns to home port. Topics
covered included drinking and driving, returning to children, traffic safety, motorcycle
safety, car buying, and money management.
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http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=37725

Rear Adm. Groothousen Retires Aboard Truman
Story Number: NNS080623-12
Release Date: 6/23/2008 2:51:00 PM

By USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs

NORFOLK (NNS) -- Rear Adm. Michael Groothousen, commander, Navy Region
Europe/commander, Maritime Air Naples said his final Navy farewell to shipmates, friends
and family June 20, aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) at Naval Station Norfolk.

Groothousen served as commanding officer of Truman March 2002 to July 2004. During
this time, Truman and the Carrier Air Wing 3 team participated in Operation Iraqi Freedom
and won the Jig Dog Ramage Award for best ship or air wing team of the Navy. Truman's
crew also swept the Commander Naval Air Force Atlantic Battle "E" competition and
earned the Battenburg Cup as the best ship in the Atlantic Fleet during Groothousen's
tenure.

Several people attended the ceremony in Truman's hangar bay to honor Groothousen's
more than 30 years of honorable naval service.

Capt. (ret.) Charles Nash, one of the event's guest speakers, said Groothousen served the
United States and the Navy with dedication and steadfast commitment. He said by doing
so, Groothousen made a lasting impression on many people's lives - military and civilian.

"You talk with anyone who's ever served with Mike Groothousen and they'll tell you how
awesome it was," said Nash.

During his speech, Nash read a letter to Groothousen from Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman
of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

"Your leadership and your efforts on behalf of our Navy and our people have really made a
difference," Mullen's letter said. "People trusted you because you led them honestly in war
and in peace, because you care too much about the mission and our people and our Navy
not to speak the truth always and not to find the right way."

In his closing remarks, Groothousen thanked his shipmates. He said had it not been for
help from people who had gone before him and the people worked with him, he would not
have had the career he had.

"I will miss the people who make this great Navy perform and their families," Groothousen
said.
"Whenever asked why I continued to serve, my answer was the people – smart, dedicated,
patriotic, hard working and caring for others and their fellow countrymen like no others."

Groothousen ended his career with a final assignment as joint commander of Navy Region
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Europe and commander of Maritime Air Naples. He deployed on board three rotational
flagships -- USS Ross, USS Monterey, and USS Roosevelt -- September 2006 to August
2007 as commander of Standing NATO Maritime Group(SNMG) 2.

He began his naval career in 1975 after graduating from the U.S. Naval Academy with a
degree in Ocean Engineering. He was designated a naval aviator in August of 1976.

Following fleet replacement pilot training in VA-174, in the A-7E Corsair, he made cruises
on board USS America (CV 66) and USS Independence (CV 62) with VA-15 before
reporting to Commander Training Air Wing Three as a landing signal officer (LSO).

In January 1982, Groothousen reported to Commander, Carrier Air Wing 8 embarked on
USS Nimitz (CVN 68) as the air wing's LSO. He then transitioned to flying the F/A-18
Hornet and reported to VFA-106 as one of the initial cadre of Hornet instructor pilots on
the east coast. With VFA-132, he deployed to Iwakuni, Japan. During his tour, the
squadron earned the "Estocin Award" and became the first Hornet squadron to capture the
prestigious "Fox One" Award.

After graduating from the Armed Forces Staff College, he served at the North American
Aerospace Defense Command and at U.S. Space Command. He reported as executive
officer of VFA-137 during Operation Provide Comfort on board USS Forrestal (CV 59).
On September 18, 1992, he assumed command of VFA-137 and carried out the "Kestrels"
homeport reassignment from NAS Cecil Field, Fla., to NAS Lemoore, Calif.

Following nuclear power training, he served as executive officer of USS George
Washington (CVN 73) from May 1996 to September 1997. During Groothousen's tour,
Washington won the coveted Battle "E" Award, each departmental "E" and earned the
Golden Anchor Award.

In December 1997, he assumed command of USS Shreveport (LPD 12) in Constanta,
Romania. During his tour, Shreveport deployed to the Black Sea, Mediterranean Sea,
Persian Gulf, and St. George's Bay followed by a complex drydock availability. Shreveport
subsequently completed all readiness assessments and Engineering Certification (ECERT)
in record time preceding her award of the 1998 Battle "E" Award.

After his flag promotion, Groothousen served as assistant deputy commandant for Marine
Aviation, Headquarters, U.S. Marine Corps.

His personal awards include the Legion of Merit (five awards), Bronze Star, Defense
Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal (two awards), Joint Service
Commendation Medal and Navy Commendation Medal.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=37998

Truman Aims to Wipe out DUI-Related Incidents
Story Number: NNS080711-18
Release Date: 7/11/2008 10:41:00 PM

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By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Joshua Moore

(USS Harry S. Truman, At Sea) (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) briefed its
Sailors extensively about the importance of being responsible and warned against drinking
and driving, just prior to the ship's planned operational manning leave period June 4-30.

Leaders believe the training helped result in no driving under the influence (DUI) incidents
during that period.

"After returning from the last deployment [in 2005], within the first six weeks we had five
DUIs," said Cmdr. Patrick Lacore, Truman's safety officer. "Over the course of the next
eight months we had a total of 35. In response to this, the previous safety officer came up
with the DUI fair concept.

"In just the first year alone the DUI rate was cut by 30 percent. Since then it has dropped
an additional 15 percent."

Lacore attributes the DUI-free POM period to the concentrated training that everyone on
board received the last two weeks prior to pulling back in to homeport. He also believes
that the "Homecoming with a purpose" slogan used during captain's call aided in the
"Team Truman" spirit.

Lacore named two other important methods that could be used to train and educate Sailors
- khaki leadership that filters down through the ranks and repetition of all issues that need
to be addressed.

"Drive it down to the first classes, from there to the second classes and so on," Lacore said.
"And keep the information flowing. Touch on the subject often."

Truman's crew comprises roughly one percent of the Navy, yet last year the Truman made
up approximately four percent of the Navy's fatalities.

According to information from Truman's Safety department Intranet link, the monetary
consequences of a DUI in Virginia start with $900 bail and includes $75 dollars to get a car
out of the impound, along with a $135 impound fee. After lawyer, arrest and restricted
license fees, a first offender class individuals have to pay for and the court fines, the total
runs up to around nearly $5,000 or more.

After returning to homeport, USS Harry S. Truman Sailors completed 27 DUI-free days.
With a little planning and effort from all hands, leaders hope to completely wipe out the
number of DUIs. http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=38395

Sailor Represents HST On All-Navy Team
Story Number: NNS080712-04
Release Date: 7/12/2008 12:12:00 AM



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By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jared Hall

(USS Harry S. Truman, At Sea) (NNS) -- A Sailor aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75)
returned from a month-long trip to compete with the 2008 all-Navy women's volleyball
team, who won the gold medal at the Armed Forces Volleyball Tournament in Cherry
Point, N.C., in June.

Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Ollie Vance, who works with G-1 in the hangar bay, is a
newer member of the Truman team. However, she has already given her command a
reason to be proud by being a part of a championship Navy sports team.

Vance participated in two tournaments with the volleyball team and said she greatly
enjoyed the opportunity.

"It was an awesome experience," she said. "The people that you meet and the experience in
itself are unbelievable."

Naturally, weapons department is proud of having one of their own participate in a gold-
medal-winning team.

"To have someone from G-1 weapons department actually represent the Truman and play
in the all-Navy team was very exciting," said Aviation Ordanceman 1st Class (AW)
William Stanton, the leading petty officer of G-1.

"After she came back, I found out that they had won the gold, and I'm sure she was a big
part of that."

Vance disembarked Truman May 7 and traveled to Annapolis, Md., for a chance to try out
for the team. Though she said the tryouts were difficult, she successfully secured the
position of libero, a defensive specialist on the 6-member team.

"If you want a spot and you want to play, then you have to put a lot into it," Vance said.
"You have to make sacrifices and maybe play a different position that you've never played
before and just have a positive attitude."

For about a month, the team practiced and learned to play together in Annapolis. On May
28 they were ready to compete in an Atlanta tournament that included a variety of AA and
AAA teams. This tournament would serve as a launching point to give the team experience
playing against real teams before the armed forces tournament in June.

"We lost in the semi-finals there, but it was funny because we weren't even going to
compete for a medal, and we almost won," Vance said.

The next competition was the main event. The team traveled to Cherry Point to participate
in the annual Armed Forces Volleyball Tournament where, after going nearly undefeated,
they beat Army in the final round and took home the gold medal.

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Vance said one of the most important lessons she learned while playing on the team was
how to use teamwork to overcome challenges.

"Being a first-year player I didn't expect to play a lot, and I actually got a lot of play time,"
said Vance. "I definitely learned how to be a team player. I'm used to being a starter, and
when I went there I was back-up to somebody else, so you have to learn to be ready at any
time."

Vance said she is looking forward to playing on the team again, and she will work hard to
stay in shape for next year. With her talent and perseverance, some believe she can
certainly help the all-Navy women's volleyball team win another championship in 2009.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=38396

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- Sailors from USS Harry S. Truman's (CVN
75) Damage Control division have been working around-the-clock to sort, store and make
ready to off-load all chemical, biological and radiological (CBR) defense equipment since
July 11.

"We're off-loading the gas masks along with all the CBR gear," said Damage Controlman
1st Class (SW/AW) Chris Haas. "We do it every time after cruise. What we're doing right
now is we're boxing it all up and sending it off."

The gear will be off-loaded from the ship and sent to Ft. Worth, Texas, where it will be
inspected and perhaps sent to other ships to use on their deployments, explained Haas.

"All the gear is still pretty good, so they just do a quick run-through," Haas said. "There
are other ships that could use it when they go out for six months. It's their way of
maintaining it and keeping it ready."

The Sailors in the Damage Control division are working vigorously to care for the 50,000
to 55,000 individual pieces of gear before they are off-loaded. Haas noted his Sailors are
working an average of 14 to 16 hours a day.

"The DCs are having a tough time," said Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) Airman
Jeremy Gerson, who works in the V-3 Damage Control division and has been helping to
get his division's gas mask turnover in order. "They've been separating their stuff, and all
the divisions have been getting their CBR masks together."

Gerson noted he has been working hard to get all of the 80 to 100 gas masks in order.

"We're a big division, so we're responsible for a lot of CBR gas masks and their
maintenance. We're just going down the roster, checking serial numbers, and making sure
everybody gets their gas masks in," Gerson said. "In my division, I've been responsible for
making sure everyone turns in their CBR mask with their canister. When we bring them up
to the hangar bay, we separate them by size."

CBR training will continue despite the absence of the gas masks.
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"We're still going to be doing CBR training. We'll always do CBR training," Haas said.
"We still have all our CBR training gear on board; we just won't be using the gas masks."
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=38458
Truman Aims to Wipe out DUI-Related Incidents
Story Number: NNS080711-18
Release Date: 7/11/2008 10:41:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Joshua Moore

(USS Harry S. Truman, At Sea) (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) briefed its
Sailors extensively about the importance of being responsible and warned against drinking
and driving, just prior to the ship's planned operational manning leave period June 4-30.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=38395

Sailor Represents HST On All-Navy Team
Story Number: NNS080712-04
Release Date: 7/12/2008 12:12:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jared Hall

(USS Harry S. Truman, At Sea) (NNS) -- A Sailor aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75)
returned from a month-long trip to compete with the 2008 all-Navy women's volleyball
team, who won the gold medal at the Armed Forces Volleyball Tournament in Cherry
Point, N.C., in June.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=38396

Truman Sailors Unmasked In Hangar Bay
Story Number: NNS080716-04
Release Date: 7/16/2008 4:17:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jared Hall, USS Harry S. Truman Public
Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- Sailors from USS Harry S. Truman's (CVN
75) Damage Control division have been working around-the-clock to sort, store and make
ready to off-load all chemical, biological and radiological (CBR) defense equipment since
July 11.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=38458
Harry S. Truman departed Norfolk, Va. 11 July 2008 with 19 midshipmen from the
Naval Academy and Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) programs who have been
serving aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) as part of their required, month-long
summer cruise.

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- Sailors aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN
75) paid their final respects to a fallen service member by committing his body to the deep

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in a somber and traditional ceremony known as a burial at sea July 12.

Overlooking the ocean in what was some believed was a truly beautiful scene, a crowd of
Sailors said their final goodbyes to Chief Boiler Technician Joseph Lucas who retired after
30 years of service. He was a veteran of both World War II and the Korean War.

Lucas worked as a boiler technician aboard five different ships, and because his last two
ships were aircraft carriers, his widow requested that the burial take place aboard a carrier.
Lucas retired in 1961 after a career of faithful service. During his life, he saw two of his
grandsons enter the Navy as well, one a chief and the other a seaman apprentice.

The burial at sea is a long-standing naval tradition which is used to render honors to
deceased Sailors as they reach their final resting places.

"This tradition of honoring the dead goes back long before the United States Navy," said
Lt. Cmdr. Daniel Mode, one of the ship's chaplains who presided over the ceremony.
"Seafarers have buried the dead in the deep for many centuries."

Mode said burial at sea is an honor the military extends to many of service member.

"Any veteran who has an honorable discharge can be buried at sea," said Mode. "It's a
beautiful honor to be able to give to a person."

For many Sailors, an at-sea burial is a fitting way to commemorate one's life journey, and
Mode said Lucas desired to be put to rest in the same waters where he had served.

"For a Sailor, especially a Sailor who has been out to sea and served on many ships, I
would say that attachment to the sea extends beyond," said Mode. "In his last days, that's
what he wanted to do; he wanted to be buried at sea."

Perhaps one of the most moving parts of a burial at sea is the 21-gun salute, when seven
Sailors line up in formation and fire three shots each over the open water.

"It's three volleys of fire, and that's probably the most traditional aspect," Mode said. "It
acts as a final salute to our fellow Sailors."

Gunner's Mate 2nd Class Chris Rommel, who works in G-2 weapons department and leads
Truman's rifle squad, coordinated the 21-gun salute.

"The rifle squad provides the 21-gun salute for the fallen and his family members. It
represents showing respect for the fallen," Rommel said. "We only do it out to sea to help
lay that person's spirit or soul to rest."

At the conclusion of the ceremony, the Sailors walked away with a solemn sense of
reverence. One of the Navy's own was laid down with the dignity and respect deserving of
a Sailor who has given so much in the service of his country.

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http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=38422

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- For the past few weeks, 19 midshipmen
from the Naval Academy and Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) programs have
been serving aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) as part of their required, month-long
summer cruise.

Since June 21, they have spent their time working with the ship's various departments and
observing how Sailors keep a 98,000-ton, nuclear-powered aircraft carrier afloat and
mission ready.

"They've done a pretty good job of getting us around. We've seen almost every
department," said Midshipman 2nd Class Ryan Burke. "They set us up with running-mates
from different departments. I have a yeoman, and I sit in his office, observe his job and
watch how the ship operates on a daily basis."

THe visit allows midshipmen to become accustomed to shipboard life and gives them an
opportunity to observe different jobs aboard.

"The main purpose of our summer cruise is not to work. It's to see what we want to do,"
said Midshipman 1st Class Ben Peter. "They don't want us to be in a job position that we
hate and not perform."

Peter will start his senior year this fall and has been working with Truman's Combat
Direction Center (CDC) during his time aboard Truman.

"It was pretty interesting how everyone works together, and they have to plot all these
different things and know which is what," Peter said. "I thought that was cool because it's a
lot of stress, but they handle it well."

Midshipmen generally complete two different summer cruises. Their first cruise comes
before their junior year and is designed to show them the life of an enlisted Sailor.

"The guys that are on their second-class cruise, they're with the enlisted guys, so they will
know what the enlisted lifestyle is like," Peter said.

The second midshipman cruise comes before their senior or first-class year and is designed
to help them understand an officer's role aboard a ship.

"Before their senior year, they'll set them up with a chief or an officer," said Burke.
"They're living in the state room, and they're eating in the ward room, and they're
experiencing more of what they'll be doing out in the fleet."

Both Burke and Peter agreed that watching flight operations is one of the most exciting
aspects of their underway with the Truman.

"I really enjoyed going up in the tower and watching flight operations," said Burke. "The
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shooters and the pilots aboard have been great about helping us out and talking to us."

After a one-month stay, the midshipmen will depart Truman upon her return to homeport.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=38479

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) completed
a towed drone unit (TDU) shoot required for carrier qualifications July 14.

The TDU shoot tests the overall effectiveness of the close-in weapon system (CIWS)
performed once a year, explained Fire Controlman 2nd Class (SW) Clifford Anderson,
safety observer for the TDU exercise.

"We have other tests that test the tracking system and firing system, but this is the only one
that tests both the tracking and firing systems together.".

The shoot is designed to prove the capabilities of the ship with the CIWS system.

"We did a pre-action aim calibration fire which involves the CIWS technicians going out
and completing the pre-fire of the gun and CS-7 division loading the weapons systems to
fire," said Fire Controlman 1st Class (SW) Harold Vernon, CIWS and rolling air-frame
missile system group supervisor for combat systems department's CS-7 division.

"Once they are shot we ensure the guns are calibrated to zero to guarantee that we can hit
the target accurately. It does a self calibration to reach zero to make sure everything is on
point."

The purpose is to ensure the readiness of the carrier.

"The evolution really starts two days prior when we do a detect-to-engage drill with our
own aircraft to ensure all our systems are operational and are able to track on target
without firing rounds," said Vernon.

The CS-7 division checked each piece of gear and put it all together into one evolution
with the entire division involved.

"The tactical action officer (TAO) talks directly to the commanding officer to get the go
ahead to release the batteries. The TAO gives directions to the radio control panel operator
who passes the final word down to the local control panel operator to release the safeties
and let the gun do its job."

One hour prior to the evolution, a brief was held to review safety precautions.

"A civilian company is contracted to tow the drone behind them on a 1,500 yard cable for
the evolution. Once the plane is here, we do a tracking run to make sure we track the drone
and not the Lear jet for the pilot's safety. Once we clear that, we test fire the weapons
themselves when the pilot brings the drone around again for the live run. Once we see the
jet above us we set the system to fire," explained Anderson.
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A lot preparation and planning yielded a successful finish to the TDU shoot for Truman
due to the hard work of the combat systems team.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=38481

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman's (CVN 75) Weapons
Department, G-2 division conducted a gun shoot on aircraft elevator four July 16.

The shoot featured the firing of two different machine guns and a pistol qualification
course. The exercise trained Truman's security force on proper weapons handling and
aimed to keep the Sailors' skills sharp.

"We have a gun shoot for people in security to give them experience on how to shoot the
weapons," said Gunner's Mate 2nd Class Mervin Pile, one of the weapon's technicians
overseeing the gun shoot.

"That way, they can be more proficient when the situation calls for it and they need to fire
the weapon."

Approximately 50 Sailors had the opportunity to fire a number of weapons. Two machine
guns, the .50-caliber machine gun and M-240 machine gun, were set up on the fantail, and
a 9mm pistol qualification course took place on aircraft elevator four.

The 9mm pistol is the Navy's primary sidearm. It is worn in a holster on the hip and carried
by the ship's security personnel.

"It is one of the safest weapons the Navy has," said Pile.

To train the security personnel, G-2 set up a complete 9mm qualifying course on elevator
four. Sailors fired at targets and had the opportunity to be scored on their performance. Pile
said participants needed to score at least a 190, or they would have to repeat the course
until they qualified.

Safety is of considerable importance when dealing with live weapons, and G-2 made sure
to keep plenty of personnel on hand to ensure participants of the gun shoot were not in
danger at any time.

"The most important thing is safety -- making sure at the end of the day that everybody's
safe, nobody's hurt and everybody's trained," said Gunner's Mate 2nd Class (SW) Jason
Harden, a range safety instructor. "We make sure everybody went to the training the day
before. We make sure they went to the safety brief, so they know what to do and what not
to do and what to expect and how to react in certain situations."

Harden holds a special Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC), which qualifies him as a small
arms marksman instructor. He said all of the gunner's mates at the evolution were trained
to step in and stop any unsafe practices.

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"My role as the range safety officer is to make sure the whole evolution is being run safely.
Even though I'm the main safety person, everybody's [responsible for] safety. If something
is not safe, they can stop the evolution at anytime."
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=38526

Harry S. Truman underway in the Atlantic from 11 to 22 July 2008.
Retired Sailor Buried At Sea Aboard Truman
Story Number: NNS080713-03
Release Date: 7/13/2008 10:23:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jared Hall

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- Sailors aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN
75) paid their final respects to a fallen service member by committing his body to the deep
in a somber and traditional ceremony known as a burial at sea July 12.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=38422

Midshipmen Try Their Sea Legs Aboard HST
Story Number: NNS080717-06
Release Date: 7/17/2008 4:04:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jared Hall, USS Harry S. Truman Public
Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- For the past few weeks, 19 midshipmen
from the Naval Academy and Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) programs have
been serving aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) as part of their required, month-long
summer cruise. http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=38479

Truman Conducts CIWS PAC Fire
Story Number: NNS080719-04
Release Date: 7/19/2008 8:07:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Damian Martinez, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) completed
a towed drone unit (TDU) shoot required for carrier qualifications July 14.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=38481

Truman Sailors Fire Their Guns
Story Number: NNS080717-08
Release Date: 7/17/2008 10:06:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jared Hall


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USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman's (CVN 75) Weapons
Department, G-2 division conducted a gun shoot on aircraft elevator four July 16.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=38526
USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) entered Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth for a
Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) in July 2008, scheduled to complete February
2009.
Truman Sailors Bring Down the House
Story Number: NNS080905-20
Release Date: 9/5/2008 3:04:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Felicito Rustique, USS Harry S.
Truman Public Affairs

SUFFOLK, Va. (NNS) -- Sounds of demolition echoed through the air as USS Harry S.
Truman (CVN 75) Sailors helped tear down two homes during a community relations
(COMREL) project Aug. 27 in Suffolk, Va.

Last April, disaster struck hard when a tornado touched down, damaging homes and
causing some to be condemned. Four months later, neighborhoods are still trying to clean
up and move on.

Ens. Maximiliano Pino of combat systems department, a Truman COMREL coordinator,
lives in Suffolk. Through his local church, he learned of some neighbors who needed help.
Pino said the approximate 60 Sailors who volunteered were exactly what he needed.

"I think it's going well," Pino said. "We're looking through the building which we weren't
doing when we got here, and there's a big pile of stuff on the side of the road that needs to
be picked up."

Pino emphasized the importance of Sailors participating in community relations events
because they help the cause as well as the Sailors themselves.

"We are gone quite a bit, but it's very good for us to come home to our own people and
take care of our own folks and to show them that we're people too and we care," Pino said.
"We're out here doing good things."

Sailors took apart and removed everything they could within reasonable safety. The
physical labor of demolishing walls and ripping apart floors gave Sailors a chance to do
something different for a day.

"Us taking time out from our regular job and coming out and helping in the community
shows what we're really capable of, that we can give a helping hand," said Airman Terence
Emmanuel, one of Truman's volunteers. "I had fun. We had fun. Everybody enjoyed
themselves, and it was a plus at the end of the day."

As Sailors literally brought down the roof at the event, Barbara Chappell, one of the

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homeowners who had her home demolished, welcomed the destruction.

"Oh, it's a blessing. I'm actually crying happy tears," Chappell said. "You just can't go day
to day and take it lightly. People need to think about what they have and think of it as a
blessing."

Pino said participating in community relations events provides nothing but positive effects
for everybody involved.

"If you guys get the opportunity to do a COMREL, join on and make sure that you do your
part and good things will come," Pino said.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=39534

USS Harry S. Truman Mustangs Make a Difference
Story Number: NNS080906-32
Release Date: 9/6/2008 9:32:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class James Fallon, USS Harry S. Truman Public
Affairs

NORFOLK, Va. (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman's (CVN 75) Mustang Association pitched
in and helped out the Ronald McDonald House Charities as part of a community relations
project (COMREL) Aug. 22 in Norfolk.

Chief Warrant Officer 2 Carl Smith, radio officer and mustang secretary, noted that the
Ronald McDonald House Charities of Norfolk provide a home away from home for
families of seriously ill children. Truman's Mustang Association cooked breakfast for the
families staying at the Ronald McDonald House.

"We got together and made breakfast for them, so they could have a hot meal before they
see their loved ones at the hospital," Smith said. "That will hopefully help them get
through the day. We served pancakes, sausages, fruits, but our special was the hot eggs and
bacon."

Ensign Tracy Culbert, the communications officer and an active member of Truman's
Mustang Association, talked to a woman who had a child at the hospital and said she was
amazed to see Truman's Mustang Association cooking breakfast and serving them coffee.

"We were actually a surprise to them," Culbert said. "The way they do it at the McDonald
House is that the families have to provide their own food and prepare it themselves. So for
them to have a hot meal was extremely appreciative from their point of view."

The families were extremely thankful for the breakfast because it saved them time that
normally would have been taken away from their sick child at the hospital.

"Now that we are back from deployment, we are trying to get a COMREL with them every
month," said Smith. "We will cook breakfast for the families, clean up the Ronald
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McDonald House or whatever they need. We will help out.

"We have got the time to help other people out," Smith said. "Not only do we help our
country by serving in the military, but also we help take care of other folks in the
community, and that is what we do."

Some participants say COMRELs are important because they show officers getting
together with junior enlisted Sailors and working together to give back to the community.

"When we are working together at a COMREL, it's not about rank; it is about team
building, giving back to the community and showing everyone that we do it for the
pleasure and enjoyment of helping people out," said Culbert.

"The COMREL was a great experience, and I enjoyed the camaraderie of the mustang
association, and just to see what we do to help support the community as far as the families
are concerned is phenomenal."

Some of the mustangs say they take great pride in lending a helping hand to the
community.

"We are there to pitch in and help them out, whether it is cooking them a nice meal or
whatever we can do to help support them," said Smith. "You could see the smiles, the
enjoyment, the laughter of the families because they were very grateful for what we were
doing. We are looking forward to do more COMRELS and supporting the community."
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=39535

Truman Sailors Gain Insight on Personal Health, Safety, Financial Matters
Story Number: NNS081102-13
Release Date: 11/2/2008 7:34:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Daron Street

USS HARRY S TRUMAN (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman's (CVN 75) safety department
hosted a health and safety fair Sept. 29 at the Callahan Fitness Center on Norfolk Naval
Shipyard base.

The event provided an opportunity for Sailors to receive information about programs
available to them through the Navy and the surrounding community to provide both
physical and professional help.

Cmdr. Pat LaCore, Truman's safety officer, explained this fair was one way to give Sailors
insight about their options for everything from Morale, Welfare and Recreation to the
commissary and more.

"We're just trying to give the Sailors a means of acquiring this information all in one
place," LaCore said. "If the Sailors are interested in something but they don't really have
the time to go and research a particular business or program, then we're bringing these
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things to them so they can gather a lot of safety and health information at once."

"Today is a day that we set aside so everyone from the ship can come by and receive
information on everything from motorcycle safety to personal hygiene," Damage
Controlman 2nd Class Alex Daniels said. "Sometimes people get so caught up with
everything that's going on in their everyday lives that they may become complacent.

"These are things that if you don't take time out to know about them you may miss out on
programs available that would be beneficial to them."

Sailors were offered information from various organizations such as the Red Cross, Navy
Federal Credit Union, Fleet and Family Support Center and other Navy and community
groups.

A representative from www.turbotap.org, which helps Sailors with retirement benefits and
the transition to the civilian world after the Navy, offered Sailors information about the
defense department program.
The Virginia Department of Transportation provided Sailors information on hurricanes,
hurricane evacuation routes and procedures to evacuate Hampton Roads.

"We hope the Sailors absorb some of this information for their benefit," LaCore said. "A
lot of these Navy-based and community programs aren't being used to their full capacity,
and we just hope that the Sailors take advantage of the things that are there to help them."
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=40625

USS Harry S. Truman's Family Readiness Group Holds Meeting
Story Number: NNS081102-14
Release Date: 11/2/2008 7:37:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matthew Williams, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

NORFOLK (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman's (CVN 75) Family Readiness Group (FRG)
held their fall welcome social Oct. 2 at the Pennsylvania House on Norfolk Naval Base.

Melissa Arnold, the FRG's president, said the fall social was meant to inform the Sailors
and family members of upcoming FRG events and give the spouses a chance to meet new
people.

"The fall social helps the FRG meet spouses who may be new to the area or may have just
not been to the other FRG meetings prior to our event tonight," Arnold said. "The meeting
allows us to get volunteers for upcoming events and functions."

Capt. Herm Shelanski, the commanding officer of the Truman, said the FRG events during
the yard period are important. It gives the spouses and family members a chance to meet
new people without the immediate stress of being away from their Sailors.

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"These events give family members a chance to learn the ship's schedule and prepare them
for the upcoming sea trials and eventually, the next deployment," Shelanski said. "These
meetings give them the preparation and necessary resources they will need to have when
their Sailor deploys."

There will be quite a few upcoming events to go with the holidays around the corner.

"We have Halloween coming up, the fall season and Christmas. The FRG normally has
events for the kids during these holidays," Shelanski. "It's important for kids to meet other
children who they will be able to talk with and relate to during times of deployment, and
these events help to build those friendships now."

Arnold said all these events help to gather volunteers and raise money for the biggest event
they put on -- the ship's homecoming after each deployment.

"There is so much work that goes into the homecoming," Arnold said. "We need as many
volunteers as we can get for it."

Arnold said the FRG meets every fourth Thursday of the month, with the exception of
November, which will be the third Thursday to accommodate Thanksgiving.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=40627

USS Harry S. Truman Sends Sailors to All-Navy Boxing Camp
Story Number: NNS081103-01
Release Date: 11/3/2008 5:52:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) Heather Weaver, USS Harry S.
Truman Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN (NNS) -- Sailors from USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) will
attend the All-Navy Boxing Training Camp in December after fighting their way to the top
18 of more than 50 competitors at Naval Amphibious Base Little Creek's boxing mini-
camp.

Those selected include: Aviation Ordnanceman 3rd Class Robert Flournoy, Yeoman
Seaman Brandon Tucker and Store Keeper Seaman (SW) Anthony Aguilar.

Once they arrive at the camp in December, the Sailors will compete for one of eight
potential spots on the All-Navy team. Those who make the team will then compete in the
Armed Forces Championships at Fort Huachuca, Ariz., in February.

Flournoy, who is part of Truman's weapons department, said he went to the camp with a
goal of performing to his best ability. He said now his goal is to continue progressing
toward a professional career.

"I went in there and learned right away that I had to relax and use everything I knew I
had," Flournoy said. "I did everything I could, and they just kept asking me to come back."
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Tucker said he went to the camp with few expectations but knew he was meant to be there
the moment he stepped into the ring.

"I kept myself cool, stayed in the middle of the ring and controlled the pace of the fights,"
Tucker said. "We all performed in rare form for the entire camp. Flournoy almost knocked
someone out the first day."

If they are chosen as All-Navy team representatives, the Sailors will go on to compete in
nationals after the Armed Forces Championships.

All-Navy Boxing coach Kevin Ludwig said in a previous interview that the camp is just
the first step in bringing Navy boxing back to the forefront.

"Navy boxing has been struggling for a while," Ludwig said, "and that's why we're here, to
get the word out."
He said boxing is a Navy tradition, and although it has recently faltered, it is on a rise back
to the top.

"Boxing and the Navy go hand-in-hand; they always have," Ludwig said. "Even though,
we've kind of gotten away from that tradition over the years, I think we're on our way back.
This camp proves that."

Flournoy said Truman's Sailors will have an advantage in the climb to the top because they
will have each other for support and encouragement.

"It makes it so much better to have people from the ship in this with me," Flournoy said.
"Tucker and Aguilar and I all trained together before, and I can be comfortable and be
myself around them. We will push each other and be honest with each other. We always
do, and we always are. We all train together, and we will go that extra mile together."

As the Sailors head to the first leg of the All-Navy Camp in December, their one request is
that Sailors aboard Truman continue to support them.

"Anyone who was here with us on cruise knows how hard we worked to get to this point,"
Tucker said. "They watched us, rooted for us, cheered for us – we need everyone to
continue that trend and we will go out there and represent [Truman] the best way we can."
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=40632

Truman Sailors Put Fitness to Test During Wilderness Challenge
Story Number: NNS081104-08
Release Date: 11/4/2008 6:32:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Damian Martinez, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

NORFOLK NAVAL SHIPYRD, PORTSMOUTH, Va. (NNS) -- Sailors on board USS
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Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) participated in the Navy's Wilderness Challenge Oct. 4-6.

The Wilderness Challenge, which is held annually, is sponsored by the Navy Mid-Atlantic
region Morale, Welfare and Recreation. The event is held in West Virginia in the heart of
the Appalachian Mountains and on the New and Gauley Rivers.

Each military branch has a presence at the event and competes against each other.
Participants have to be active duty or retired military. The competition is intense,
according to participants.

"There are usually about eight teams that are really crazy into it, training all year for it,"
said Legalman 3rd Class (AW/NAC) Rosemary Cronin, a participant from Truman's Legal
department.

She said training for such events gives people who enjoy fitness a visible goal to achieve.

"When you find something to do, it can motivate you, and when you do complete
something like [this challenge] it makes you want to push yourself harder. Personally that's
why I race," said Cronin. "You feel a sense of completion or satisfaction that you could
challenge yourself and complete it."

The event presents stumbling blocks along the way and sometimes pulling together to help
someone out can be just as frustrating as a working environment. Team camaraderie is
important to receiving ranking in the Wilderness Challenge. Competitors still have to pull
through by setting differences aside and keeping their eyes on the prize.

"It was definitely challenging. We had to get through a lot of obstacles between the teams
and the individual people we competed with," said Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Romeo
Caballero from Weapons department's G-3 division. "For me it was more of a lifestyle. I
like doing that sort of stuff, plus being around all the competitiveness ramps you up."

The competition itself consists of a number of events stretched out over the course of three
days, starting out with briefs held for all the participants prior to being bussed over to the
actual site of the event.

Day one started with an 8K run and white water rafting.

Day two started with a 14-mile mountain bike ride, followed by a seven-mile kayak race.
The kayaking takes about two hours and then participants get a 30 to 40-minute break and
end it all with a half-marathon.

"It's challenging to say the least," said Cronin.

Some say events such as the Wilderness Challenge are a good way Sailors can stay fit,
challenge themselves and meet other people with the same interests.

"As a team we all bonded, even though we had our differences. It made us that much
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stronger," said Caballero.

It is never too early to think about the future and set goals that will help achieve a sense of
accomplishment.

"The advice I'd give for people trying to get ready for next year would be to stick to it.
Don't just show up there," said Caballero. "You definitely need to get physically and
mentally ready for the Wilderness Challenge. Build up your stamina, be confident and just
have fun." http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=40630

Truman Hosts Blood Drive To Support Deployed Sailors
Story Number: NNS081104-09
Release Date: 11/4/2008 6:39:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Louis Batchelor, Harry S. Truman Public
Affairs

NORFOLK, (NNS) -- Service members in Afghanistan and Iraq are always in need of
support, supplies and services. Thanks to the Sailors of USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75),
service members can rest assured they will have a sufficient amount of blood for medical
support.

Truman's Sailors hosted a blood drive Oct. 21, in support of The Armed Services Blood
Program (ASBP), a program established to support the medical needs of American military
personnel abroad.

Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class (SW) Robert Dobbs of Truman's health services department,
organized the event and said it was a very important cause. He said the mission of the
ASBP is to provide quality blood and blood products to service members and their families
worldwide.

"What most people may not know is that the military has its own blood bank program
completely separate from any civilian organization," Dobbs said. "When you give to those
organizations, your blood could go anywhere, but when you give to the Armed Services
Blood Program, you know your donation is used for military members and their families."

Dobbs said the ASBP provides quality blood products for service members and their
families in both peace and war. The blood Sailors donate can be used in several different
ways, depending on the situation.

"From one unit of blood, we can get a couple of different products. For example, we can
separate the whole blood from the plasma and have two separate units for transfusion."

Dobbs believes it is imperative for people to donate to this cause. According to the ASBP
Web site, 40 or more units of blood could be required for a single trauma victim.

"When we give blood, that donation will be used to save lives. It's a great way to help out.
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It only takes a little time out of your day, and you usually get juice and cookies afterward,
so it's a win-win situation for everybody," Dobbs said.

"Right now, a lot of blood is needed to support the ongoing war effort, so any blood that is
given has a real good chance of saving the life of one of our own, maybe even someone
you know."

Many first-time donors, especially younger Sailors, may not realize they could be the
difference in a life or death situation. Dobbs encourages all Sailors to participate, saying it
is a worthy cause.

"I've been in Navy medicine for over fourteen years now, and I've seen first hand the
difference a unit of blood can make," Dobbs said. "I've seen lives saved because of
someone's donation. I've also seen lives lost because we didn't have enough blood to give
them.

"You may not think that one small unit of blood can make that much difference, but
believe me, it can and often does."

Aviation Electronics Technician Airman Scott Rudacille agrees. Rudacille, a first-time
donor, encourages all other Sailors to donate blood whenever they can.

"Someone who is deployed could really use the help," Rudacille said. "You can never have
too much blood."

He said someone always benefits from blood drives and if Sailors are apprehensive about
donating, they should try to put themselves in the shoes of someone in need.

"I volunteered because I figured this would be a good way to help someone," Rudacille
said. "It's easy and a great way to help out a shipmate."

Dobbs believes giving blood could help save the lives of service members and their
families. He also said there are alternate sites for Sailors to give year-round.

"Yes, it does hurt a little at first, but it's a very small price to pay to save the life of
someone's parent or even a child," Dobbs said. "I give blood as often as possible. If for
some reason you can't give during the blood drive, you can always go to the lab at the
Naval Medical Center in Portsmouth and schedule a time to give. Their donation center is
almost always open and ready to go."
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=40631

Truman Helps Four-Legged Friends
Story Number: NNS081108-05
Release Date: 11/8/2008 6:13:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Matthew Williams, USS Harry S. Truman

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Public Affairs

NORFOLK NAVAL SHIPYARD PORTSMOUTH, Va. (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman
(CVN 75) Sailors spent Oct. 7 making a difference for some less fortunate four-legged
friends in Portsmouth.

Truman Sailors volunteered at the Portsmouth Humane Society during the community
relations (COMREL) project. Sara Shellman, the shelter manager, noted the importance in
having volunteers assist at the shelter. It makes a difference not only for the animals but
those volunteering as well.

"It was great to have so many people show up; it gave the dogs a chance to get more
socialization," Shellman said. "They get more exercise, and we can get more done around
the shelter."

Sailors accomplished a lot at the shelter, including exercising the dogs, cleaning all of the
kennels, installing a new door, yard work around the building and general upkeep of the
facility.

"It was really nice to have the Sailors here; it allowed us to accomplish so much more than
we normally could in a single day," Shellman said. "The dogs seemed so much happier
today too because of it. It's normally so loud in here (the kennel area) because of all the
barking, but the dogs were quieter when all was said and done because they had cleaner
kennels and got more attention than usual."

Aviation Boatswain's Mate [Handler] 1st Class Michael Panaccione, who spent most of the
day walking the dogs, came out because he loves animals and wanted to do something to
make life for the ones at the shelter a little better.

"These dogs come in and are abused or not taken care of like they should be, it is really
sad," Panaccione said. "It's awesome being able to make life for them a little better, getting
them out of the kennels for a little exercise and love."

The reaction from most of the other volunteers was the same, they just wanted to come
work and play with the dogs.

According to Shellman the shelter has come a long way, and they are still working to
improve it every day.

"We need volunteers to come out and help us, even if it's just walking a dog," Shellman
said. "The more socialization the dogs can get the better because it ultimately benefits them
and helps us accomplish a lot while they are occupied. It also helps prepare them for
adoption when they have human interaction."

The Portsmouth Humane Society is currently entered in a contest to win $1 million for a
complete makeover of the facility. An online poll will determine the winner of the contest.

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"The facility could really use the makeover," Panaccione said.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=40628

USS Harry S. Truman Completes Sea Trials, Returns to Homport
Story Number: NNS090218-03
Release Date: 2/18/2009 7:30:00 AM

From USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs

NORFOLK (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) returned Feb. 14 after completing
two days of sea trials following a nearly seven-month Planned Incremental Availability
(PIA) at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Va.

Truman completed her shipyard stay on schedule and on budget, returning to Norfolk with
numerous repairs, improvements and upgrades to ship's systems and the shipboard
environment.

"For the shipyard work, there was approximately a five percent savings on what was
budgeted," said Matt Durkin, the shipyard's project superintendent for Truman. "We set
goals for ourselves during the planning concerning quality, safety, cost and schedule. We
actually met or exceeded all those goals."

Completing PIA on schedule is necessary to ensure the ship meets her operational
commitments, said Capt. Herman Shelanski, Truman's commanding officer.

"The fact that we were able to finish a bit ahead of schedule is really nice," Shelanski said.
"Every at sea period has to be accomplished on schedule, and you can't take time out of
that schedule to do major maintenance."

Truman underwent a host of repairs, but the largest project was a Dual Media Discharge
(DMD). This is a time-consuming maintenance on the propulsion plant that occurs once
every ten years and is vital to the ship's readiness.

"We were able to accomplish it in about four months, which was really record setting,"
Shelanski said. "The last ship to do it took about nine months."

Truman also completed the reactor training modification, making Truman the third nuclear
powered aircraft carrier to do so. Contractors prepared a new training space for Reactor
department personnel and completely revamped Media department spaces.

Besides operational maintenance and upgrades, Sailors completed many projects that
enhanced the ship cosmetically. Sailors replaced decking, paint, lagging, doors and hatches
throughout the ship, and completely rehabilitated many berthing spaces. These projects
will improve the quality of life for the crew and help boost morale, said Durkin.

One of Truman's major focuses throughout the PIA was keeping Sailors trained and ready
for an underway. The importance of keeping up with training is learned from the last yard
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period, and it proved to be this PIA's greatest accomplishment.

"The biggest victory was that when we went into the shipyard, we decided we were not
going to lose our focus on training and being Sailors, and we were very successful at that,"
Shelanski said. "After completing this underway period, I can see that there's a little more
we have to do to get up to fighting speed, but on the whole, the crew has great spirit and
great morale and is ready to get the ship ready for deployment."

The culmination of the shipyard period was a two-day sea trial, which the ship performed
while transiting back to Norfolk. Sea trials allow the command to assess the ship's state of
readiness, get Sailors back into an underway mindset and ensure maintenance was properly
completed in the yards. The sea trial was special because it marked the last underway for
Capt. Shelanski as commanding officer of Truman. Shelanski will relinquish command of
Truman Feb. 18. http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=42640

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) commenced sea trials in the Western Atlantic on 12
February 2009, entering Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth for a Planned Incremental
Availability (PIA) in July 2008.

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) returned Feb. 14 after completing two days of sea trials
following a nearly seven-month Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) at the Norfolk
Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Va.

Truman completed her shipyard stay on schedule and on budget, returning to Norfolk with
numerous repairs, improvements and upgrades to ship's systems and the shipboard
environment. http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=42640

Truman Celebrates Supply Corps Birthday
Story Number: NNS090226-19
Release Date: 2/26/2009 8:03:00 PM

By Mass Communication 2nd Class (SW) Heather Bolestridge, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) celebrated
the 214th birthday of the Supply Corps Feb. 24, with a cake-cutting ceremony.

The Supply Corps was created 1795 when President George Washington appointed Tench
Francis as the country's first Purveyor of Public Supplies. At its inception, the Supply
Corps was responsible for supporting the outfitting and operations of the Navy's six
frigates. Throughout the years, the Supply Corps has played a key role in supporting fleet
operations, providing expertise in logistics, acquisition and financial management. The
Supply Corps currently has more than 3,500 naval officers.

"By acknowledging the anniversary of the start of the Supply Corps, we bring visibility of
the contributions of the Supply Corps to the Navy, promote esprit de corps among the

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Supply Corps members and show pride in the long-standing traditions and history of the
Supply Corps and what it has contributed to the United States Navy and our country over
the past 214 years," said Lt. Cmdr. Mark Garrigus, Truman's principal assistant for
services.

Truman's Supply Department is recognized as being amongst the best in the fleet. They
were awarded numerous accolades last year, including: The Blue "E" for Supply
Management Excellence, the Ship's Store Retail Sales and Services Excellence Award
where they went on to win the "best of the best" in the category, Atlantic Fleet Ship's Store
Best of Class Award, the Dorrie Miller Award for Wardroom Service Excellence, and the
2008 Capt. Edward F. Ney Memorial Food Service Excellence award large afloat category
runner-up. In addition to their awards, Truman's Supply Department set new benchmarks
and standards for logistics support and were always well above standards for the CNAF
Supply readiness goals during the entire deployment.

"Our goal is always to give the crew a home away from home while ensuring the ship and
her air wing are always materially ready and fully capable of launching and recovering
fully mission capable aircraft for every mission assigned," said Lt. Cmdr. Steve Osborne,
the ship's principal assistant for logistics. "We want to provide the best living conditions
and comforts we can to make the crew and air wing's lives enjoyable every day they are
aboard." http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=42948
USS Harry S. Truman Changes Command
Story Number: NNS090220-08
Release Date: 2/20/2009 1:29:00 PM

From USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs

NORFOLK (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) held a change of command
ceremony at Norfolk Naval Station Feb. 18.

Capt. Herman A. Shelanski relinquished command to Capt. Joseph M. Clarkson.

The ceremony, which took place in the ship's hangar bay, marked the sixth time the ship
has changed hands since its commissioning in 1998. Shelanksi has been in command since
July 2006.

Shelanksi thanked Truman Sailors for a successful tour of duty.

"I couldn't have asked for a more fitting two and half years and a beautiful underway
finale," he said to a large audience of family, friends and Sailors. "It has been an honor and
privilege to serve as the captain of the USS Harry S. Truman. I have truly been blessed."

During Shelanski's tenure, Truman underwent two successful shipyard periods, a rigorous
work-up cycle and a seven-month deployment to the Arabian Gulf in support of Operation
Iraqi Freedom and Maritime Security Operations. The ship completed 75,000 miles of safe
steaming, 40 incident free replenishments at sea and 52 restricted water transits, while

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simultaneously completing shipyard maintenance in record-breaking time. Despite these
accomplishments, Shelanski tempered his speech with humility by stating that the Sailors
are the biggest factor for the ship's success.

"As big and as beautiful as it is, the heart and the soul of the ship is its phenomenal crew,"
said Shelanski. "Nineteen-year-olds from all states in the Union, representing every color
and race, who are away from home for months during workups and deployment are the
true patriots of this ship and our country."

For his dedication and service as Truman's commanding officer, Rear Adm. Mark I. Fox,
commander, Carrier Strike Group 10, presented Capt. Shelanski the Legion of Merit.

Fox praised the two as seasoned professionals and experienced leaders.

"With me today are the incoming and outgoing officers of USS Harry S. Truman, two
remarkable men; they are national treasures," said Fox. "They both answered the call to
serve. They both have taken different paths to get here. I'm honored to serve with them."

Capt. Clarkson, who served as commanding officer of USS Denver (LPD 9) before
assuming command of Truman, took a few minutes to thank the crew for an enthusiastic
welcome aboard.

"To say that I am thrilled, honored and humbled to be here is an understatement. Harry S.
Truman has a tradition of team work and excellence that is second to none," Clarkson said.
"Truman stands ready to execute our mission in defense of our nation and continues to be
an integral part of the Strike Group 10 team."

Truman recently completed a seven-month Planned Incremental Availability at Norfolk
Naval Shipyard and is beginning an arduous work-up cycle in preparation for her next
deployment. http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=42714

Harry S. Truman Awarded Battle "E"
Story Number: NNS090225-11
Release Date: 2/25/2009 9:35:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class (SW) Tristan Miller, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) was
awarded the East Coast Battle Efficiency (Battle "E") Award for 2008 Feb 18. The Battle
Efficiency Award signifies the overall readiness of a command to carry out its assigned
wartime tasks over a year-long evaluation.

"This award is given to the best carrier on the east coast," said Command Master Chief
Allen R. Walker. "We displayed efficiency and a high level of professionalism, ultimately
proving the Truman Battle Axe Team."

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The Battle "E" award recognizes sustained superior performance in an operational
environment within a command. A ship must win a minimum of three out of four
command excellence awards (maritime warfare, engineering/survivability, command and
control, logistics management), and be nominated by their immediate superior.

"In deciding who wins the Battle "E", all aspects of the ship's performance are evaluated,"
Walker said.
"They look at all facets of the command and if even one division or department fails - the
ship fails."

Ships winning a Battle Efficiency competition are authorized to paint a white "E" with
black shadowing on their stacks or elsewhere to give evidence that they won the award.
The ships are evaluated during training exercises, weapons inspections and evaluations of
the ship's tactical readiness that are among the 16 different areas of which they are
critiqued and inspected.

According to Personnel Specialist Seaman Sergey Soukhenko, all personnel aboard during
fiscal year 2008 are authorized to wear the Battle "E" ribbon. Now that Truman is
underway again preparing for a 2009 deployment, the ship begins a new cycle in the Battle
"E" competition.

"We can't get complacent," said Walker. "We have to maintain the same professional and
forward thinking we had to receive the award, it's a whole new year and the mission starts
all over again and we have to be ready."
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=42886
USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) departed Norfolk, Va. on 20 February 2009 to conduct
Carrier Qualifications in the Western Atlantic.

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Sailors prepared for underway emergencies 21
February 2009, by conducting the first major general quarters (GQ) in more than eight
months after a scheduled shipyard period and held flight operations for the first time on her
deck in more than eight months.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=42882
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=42884

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) conducting Carrier Qualifications in the Western
Atlantic on 20 February 2009.

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Sailors prepared for underway emergencies Feb. 21, by
conducting the first major general quarters (GQ) in more than eight months after a
scheduled shipyard period.

"GQ is GQ, whether it's training or an actual casualty. We have to be prepared for
everything," said Information Technician 1st Class (SW/AW) Jamesha Henderson, a
member of Truman's Damage Control Training Team (DCTT).


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"Everyone needs to be qualified, so in case of an actual casualty, we can still fight and
defend the ship."

The ship underwent a five-hit scenario, where the crew had to battle fires, flooding and an
actual casualty.
"Training makes us smarter, it increases our ability to fight the ship," said Chief Warrant
Officer 3 Danny L. Royse, Truman's fire marshal. "Constant training will help instill in
everyone that it's up to us when we're out to sea, we are the firefighters and the damage
controlmen."

With dozens of new Sailors constantly reporting aboard, the DCTT's ongoing effort to
prepare Sailors and make them aware of shipboard situations is vital for the crew and the
safety of the ship.

"Yesterday was a real-world drill, things that can really happen when we deploy, so we
have to be ready," said Royse. "It's a lot of work but everyone has to pull their own weight
to make the ship a safe environment and combat actual scenarios if needed."
Truman's DCTT implores all Sailors to take their training seriously, from knowing where
to muster to wearing the proper battle dress.

"If everyone is motivated to train and learn, knowing what to do in an actual casualty
becomes second nature. We all have to do our part to survive the ship," said Royse.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=42882

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) held flight operations for the first time on her deck in
more than eight months Feb. 21.

With Truman's departure from the shipyards, the ship is slowly working her way toward
fully operational status. Launching and recovering aircraft is the ship's primary mission,
and the flight-deck crew is working around the clock to ensure that Truman's flight
operations are up to speed. The first task for personnel on the flight deck is to complete
flight-deck certifications over the course of the next few months, explained Lt. Cmdr.
Jeffery Sandin, Truman's handler.

"We're actually now into phase II, which is the certification of the flight deck: launching
aircraft, recovering aircraft, refueling aircraft and all the things we do during flight
operations," Sandin said.
"We've got to have Naval Air Forces' approval or blessing to continue on and advance
further into the work-up cycle and the deployment."

Sailors will perform flight operations on a regular basis to get ready for the certification
process. Sandin said a handling team from Commander, Naval Air Forces will come
aboard the ship to evaluate Truman's flight operations.

"They look at the Air department and how they perform as a team, how we conduct flight
operations, how we work with the air wing as a team, how we launch and recover aircraft,
refuel aircraft and maintain our equipment," said Sandin.
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For many Sailors, the flight operations were their first opportunity to see aircraft launched
and recovered. Numerous Sailors new to Truman and the flight deck watched while the
experienced Sailors trapped jets.

"I like the adrenaline rush it gives you when you're standing there, knowing that you're
right next to the planes taking off," said Aviation Boatswain's Mate [Equipment] (ABE)
Airman Brittany Vogt, a Sailor who is completing her flight-deck qualification and will
soon be working on the bow catapults. "I'm excited just about seeing the planes take off
and land today. I loved it. It was awesome."

For new Sailors on the flight deck, like Vogt, the Handler said to put safety first. He noted
the flight deck is a dangerous place to work and accidents do occasionally happen,
therefore, it is necessary to pay attention and use Operational Risk Management.

"It's been a very busy and compact schedule, and I need everyone to have their head on
their shoulders," said Sandin. "When something doesn't appear right, don't be afraid to say,
'hey petty officer' or 'hey chief, this just doesn't seem right,' and bring it to someone's
attention."

For Vogt, a competitive attitude and enthusiasm to learn will contribute to success on the
flight deck.
"I want to learn everything as quick as I can and be good at it," Vogt said. "I like to be
better than the guys most of the time. I'll be an ABE master chief."
Other considerations for flight deck work include foreign object debris (FOD) and safety
gear. Sandin said Sailors are still finding shipyard FOD throughout the ship.

It is important to thoroughly clean the ship to ensure FOD does not end up on the flight
deck or hangar bays where it could hurt personnel or damage equipment. Flight deck
uniforms must be worn properly. This means removing buttons from trousers and sewing
the pockets shut. Sandin said Sailors should make especially sure their float coat works
properly as it is a life-saving piece of equipment.

During the course of flight operations Saturday, Truman successfully completed more than
40 recoveries, launched jets from the bow catapults and completed precision approach and
landing.

Sailors will continue a rigorous flight operations schedule as they prepare to pass flight-
deck certifications and get ready for Truman's next deployment.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=42884

Physical readiness is essential to the Navy's mission, USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75)
Sailors understand this and are in high gear, preparing for Truman's upcoming Physical
Fitness Assessment (PFA).

Senior Chief Information Systems Technician (SW/AW) Henry Searcy serves as Truman's
command fitness leader (CFL). He said he and his team of assistant command fitness
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leaders are here to create a culture of fitness for Truman Sailors. He added they are here to
enhance Sailors' abilities to complete tasks in support of the command's mission.

"Our mission is to keep people off the Fitness Enhancement Program (FEP) and in control
of their careers," Searcy said. "People look at fitness as a part of work. Fitness is a personal
life choice, and we are here to help keep people healthy to do what they need to do at
work."

Searcy's primary duties as Truman's CFL have him coordinating the command's FEP
sessions on board and conducting individual counseling with Sailors on diet, nutrition and
exercise as well as referring them to resources that can tend to their physical fitness needs.
He is also responsible for ensuring the safe and correct administration of Truman's semi-
annual PFA cycles.

Searcy would like to remind everyone in their preparation for the PFA to remember the
administrative side as well as the physical. He said it is imperative that all hands complete
their Physical Activity Risk Factor Questionnaire (PARFQ) screenings in the Physical
Readiness Information Management System, and answer those questions honestly.

"The main thing is to expedite the completion of your PARFQ so if the Medical
Department finds an issue, we can have time to work with you," Searcy said. "It does not
take long."

Searcy implores Truman Sailors to take heart with the issue of physical readiness. He
believes that it is a loss to allow a Sailor's future to be jeopardized because they are not in
good physical condition.

"You can't procrastinate," said Searcy. "You have to sit down and come up with a plan. It
takes work and you have to stay focused. Fitness is a culture and a part of life. It helps
people stay competitive and progressing in their careers."
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=42889

As reported on 26 February 2009, USS Harry S. Truman's (CVN 75) "Crews into Shape"
program is back, the 2009 challenge is ready to get underway.

"Crews into Shape" is a Department of Defense (DoD) wide program for Soldiers, Sailors,
Airmen, Marines, Coast Guardsmen, and civilians designed to use teamwork and
camaraderie to help with weight loss and improving physical health.

"Sixty-one percent of active duty service members are at least 20 pounds overweight and
that is why a program like this is needed to add that extra motivation to get out and
exercise," said Lt. Chad Thoemke, Truman's
"Crews into Shape" program coordinator.

"Crews into Shape" begins the first week of March, in support of National Nutrition
Month. The program is a four-week challenge to eat five servings of fruit, exercise 30
minutes a day and drink healthy fluids, explained Thoemke. "I signed up to help motivate
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myself and my shipmates to get in shape and promote a healthier lifestyle," said Chief
Aviation Maintenance Administrationman (AW/SW) Joseph Souza, a participant in the
program.

"I signed up early to encourage the rest of the crew to join and be a part of improving their
personal health through friendly competition," he added.

Support and teamwork are the foundation of what makes this program work aboard
Truman.

Last year Truman had the highest participation throughout DoD, with 248 crew members
combining into 40 teams, losing a total of 446 pounds with a 6.8 percent weight loss
average.

"It's going to be a fun experience participating in the program and my team is definitely
going to win," exclaimed Souza.

Teams will be awarded points for participation and achieving weekly goals. The points will
be totaled to award the top teams.

After four weeks of dedication and hard work, everyone will receive a certificate for
participating; the winning teams will receive T-shirts and medals. "Truman did such an
outstanding job last year with crew participation, staying motivated and reaching their
goals," Thoemke said.

"I hope this year we can double the success we achieved last year."

For more information on "Crews into Shape," visit
www.nmcphc.med.navy.mil/hp/crew_into_shape/imdex.htm.

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) conducting Carrier Qualifications in the Western
Atlantic from 20 to 27 February 2009.
Release Date: 2/25/2009 9:25:00 AM

By Mass Communication Speciliast 3rd Class (SW) Tristan Miller

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Sailors
prepared for underway emergencies Feb. 21, by conducting the first major general quarters
(GQ) in more than eight months after a scheduled shipyard period.

"GQ is GQ, whether it's training or an actual casualty. We have to be prepared for
everything," said Information Technician 1st Class (SW/AW) Jamesha Henderson, a
member of Truman's Damage Control Training Team (DCTT).
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=42882

USS Harry S. Truman Holds Flight Ops

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Story Number: NNS090225-10
Release Date: 2/25/2009 9:32:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jared Hall

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) held flight
operations for the first time on her deck in more than eight months Feb. 21.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=42884

USS Harry S. Truman Prepares for the PRT
Story Number: NNS090225-27
Release Date: 2/25/2009 11:58:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Louis Batchelor, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, at sea (NNS) -- Physical readiness is essential to the Navy's
mission, USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Sailors understand this and are in high gear,
preparing for Truman's upcoming Physical Fitness Assessment (PFA).
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=42889

USS Harry S. Truman Kicks Off "Crews into Shape" 2009
Story Number: NNS090226-11
Release Date: 2/26/2009 4:36:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class (SW) Tristan Miller, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman's (CVN 75) "Crews
into Shape" program is back, the 2009 challenge is ready to get underway.
www.nmcphc.med.navy.mil/hp/crew_into_shape/imdex.htm
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=42947
USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) conducting Carrier Qualifications in the Western
Atlantic from 10 to 22 March 2009.

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) completed the onload of more than 1,800 tons of
ammunition March 21, preparing the ship for upcoming work-up cycles and eventual
deployment.

Cmdr. Steven Anderjack, the weapons officer on board, said Truman is now fully
operational, capable of carrying out both training and combat operations.

"We are about 90 percent fully loaded in our ability to conduct a mission," said Anderjack.
"In support of the upcoming training-events, we have all of our non-combat expenditure-
allowance. We are ready for any taskings that may be provided by the command."


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Transferring ordnance from the USNS Robert E. Peary (T-AKE 5) to Truman was a large
evolution that involved moving more than 1,200 pallets of ammunition by both vertical
and connected replenishment.

"The ammo onload went as perfectly as it possibly could have gone," Anderjack said. "We
had trained a number of folks in ordnance-handling, including all our forklift drivers and
flight-deck personnel to handle both vertical replenishment and connected replenishment,
so [ultimately] we could bring on ammo from three, different points on the ship."

First, helicopters dropped ammunition off on the flight deck, then Sailors moved it to the
hangar bay and from there, into the magazines. Other pallets of ammunition were received
directly into the hangar bays, via lines connecting Truman to Peary, before being
transferred to the magazines.

The evolution required the cooperation of virtually every department on the ship; requiring
all hands to complete the nearly two-day event.

"It can't be done by just one department or one team. Everybody has to be involved," said
Aviation Ordnanceman 2nd Class (AW/SW) Marilyn Williams, the ammo accountant
aboard Truman. "On top of our weapon's department, we also have help from deck
department, air department, supply and of course you have to give credit to security as
well."

The types of ordnance received encompassed a wide range of explosives and parts for
bombs, missiles and small arms. Williams said Truman's weapons department carries 500,
1,000 and 2,000-pound bombs, Sidewinder missiles, Sparrow missiles and a variety of
rounds for ship's defense-systems and small arms.

"Just about every piece of ordnance known to man was received," Anderjack said.

As part of any evolution, especially one dealing with the transfer of dangerous munitions,
the safety of the Sailors involved was of primary concern. Williams said the onload was
planned from the beginning to end long before the actual event, to ensure that it was
carried out safely and efficiently.

With the completion of ammo onload and fully stocked weapons magazines, Truman is
now ready to take the fight wherever the country calls.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=43652

As reported on 23 March 2009, USS Harry S. Truman's (CNV 75) INSURV Assessment
Team is gearing up efforts to prepare the ship for the Board of Inspection and Survey
(INSURV).

INSURV is a major inspection mandated by Congress to test a crew's damage control
ability, the ship's material conditions and the overall readiness of the ship.

Adm. David Farragut established INSURV in 1868 to show the American people that the
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ships of the U.S. Navy are being properly maintained and are capable of performing their
duties while deployed.

The crew will be thoroughly inspected on its ability to perform preventive maintenance,
locate and resolve discrepancies, and set material conditions, said Lt. j.g. James Barkley, a
member of the INSURV assessment team.

The INSURV assessment team is selected by the executive officer to prepare Truman and
her crew for the actual INSURV inspection, which starts in June.

"We are here to help the crew focus on the assessment process, to help guide them in
preparation for INSURV," Barkley said. "Small things get overlooked sometimes, and we
are the outside eyes to help catch them."

Truman is scheduled to begin the five-day inspection starting June 1. More than 140
inspectors will be on board assessing every space on the ship, with three to six personnel
inspecting each space at once.

Each inspector will focus on one specific aspect of the space from proper electrical wiring
and equipment maintenance to overall cleanliness. Each department is responsible for its
spaces during the inspection, making it an all hands effort.

"All Sailors should recognize these are their spaces and they should reflect the pride and
respect of each department," said Lt. Cmdr. James Winfrey, Truman's INSURV
coordinator. "We are practicing for INSURV everyday, if we continue to demonstrate our
ability to fight the ship, and that we can properly maintain the ship, INSURV should run
smoothly."

INSURV is usually conducted every five years. The inspection is conducted in port as well
as out to sea. The information obtained during the inspection is sent to the chief of naval
operations, and his assessment determines whether or not the ship will be able to deploy on
schedule. http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=43621

As reported on 23 March 2009, Sailors and Marines of USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75)
will not have to go without, thanks to the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS).

Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society is a nonprofit organization designed to provide
financial, educational and other assistance to military service members and their families.

Chief Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Fuels) (AW) Hawa Jenkins, of Truman's V-4 division, is
Truman's NMCRS representative.

"NMCRS is an organization geared toward assisting the Navy, Marine Corps and their
families in their time of need with student loans, grants, baby sea bags, emergency
transportation, funerals, disaster relief and personal needs when pay is delayed," Jenkins
said.

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According to Jenkins, Truman Sailors received $117,000 in interest free loans and another
$5,000 in free grants from NMCRS last year. She also said NMCRS has slightly changed
their services in a move to make attaining financial assistance easier for Sailors.

"NMCRS is so ready to help us during our time of need, to the point where they have
expanded their services by minimizing the number of Sailors that use credit or payday loan
programs," Jenkins said. "The 15-minute loan program is good for $300 interest free with
no questions asked."

Jenkins wants to stress the importance of donating to the society. She said NMCRS exists
solely to help Sailors and Marines in need of assistance, but it cannot help without the
financial contributions provided by fellow charitable service members.

NMCRS assists service members in nearly 300 locations afloat and ashore with cases such
as medical needs, vehicle repairs, family emergencies, disaster relief and food and utility
services.

For more information on the benefits NMCRS has to offer service members, contact your
departmental representative. http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=43623

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) conducting Carrier Qualifications in the Western
Atlantic from 10 to 22 March 2009.
USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) completed the onload of more than 1,800 tons of
ammunition March 21, preparing the ship for upcoming work-up cycles and eventual
deployment. http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=43652

USS Harry S. Truman's (CNV 75) INSURV Assessment Team is gearing up efforts to
prepare the ship for the Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV).
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=43621

As reported on 23 March 2009, Sailors and Marines of USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75)
will not have to go without, thanks to the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS).
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=43623
USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) underway in the Western Atlantic conducting
Tailored Ships Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Phase (FEP) from 20 to
24 April 2009.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=44530




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USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) departed Norfolk, Virginia on or before 20 April 2009.

CSG 10 is made up of the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), with its
embarked air wing, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3 and embarked Destroyer Squadron 26 staff,
guided-missile cruisers USS San Jacinto (CG 56) and USS Hue City (CG 66); guided-
missile destroyers USS Carney (DDG 64), USS Oscar Austin (DDG 79) and USS Winston
S. Churchill (DDG 81).

CVW 3 consists of Strike Fighter Squadrons (VFA) 32, VFA-37, VFA-105 and Strike
Marine Fighter Squadron 312; Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron 130; Carrier
Airborne Early Warning Squadron 126; and Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron 7.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=45168

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) underway in the Western Atlantic conducting
Tailored Ships Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Phase (FEP)
commencing 20 April 2009.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=44530

As reported on 21 April 2009, USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) is out to sea again,
which means Sailors from V-1 Air Department will finally be able to work with aircraft
again as the various squadrons attached to Truman bring their aircraft on board this
underway period.

Chief Aviation Boatswain's Mate [Handling] (AW/SW) Jeff Brownlee, flight deck leading
chief petty officer aboard Truman, said 49 squadron aircraft will be joining the ship to
participate in the Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA). Truman must coordinate
with the air wing to prove that she is capable of carrying out flight operations during the
TSTA evolutions.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=44530

As reported on 21 April 2009, Sailors aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) brought
thousands of pieces of protective equipment on board Tuesday, in an effort to prepare the
crew for the possibility of dealing with a chemical, biological or radiological (CBR) attack.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=44534

As reported on 21 April 2009, The crew of USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) has a new
series of challenges to embrace during the ship's current underway period. The Tailored
Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) is a mandatory evolution designed to focus on
developing the ship's self-training capability through its integrated training teams.

Truman will spend three weeks at sea engaging in the TSTA evolution as it prepares for its
upcoming 2009 deployment.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=44532

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) underway in the Western Atlantic conducting
Tailored Ships Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Phase (FEP) from 20 to

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24 April 2009. http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=44530

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) pinned six new master chiefs April 27, 2009 while
underway during the ship's work-up cycle.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=44984

Sailors from Naval Air Facility (NAF) Washington departed USS Harry S. Truman
(CVN-75) April 30, 2009 after spending nearly two weeks underway, concluding the first
iteration of a NAF Washington pilot program, Sailors to Sea.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=44988




http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=71350

090502-N-2858S-123 ATLANTIC OCEAN (May 2, 2009) The aircraft carrier USS Harry
S. Truman (CVN 75) transits the Atlantic Ocean during a Tailored Ships Training
Availability and Final Evaluation Phase. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication
Specialist 3rd Class Justin M. Smelley/Released)
http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=71350

As reported on 5 May 2009, USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) Sailors are tirelessly
honing their skills in mass casualty drills during the ship's current Tailored Ship's Training
Availability (TSTA) period and Final Evaluation Phase (FEP).
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=44990


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As reported on 5 May 2009, A Sailor aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75)) recently
introduced what may prove to be a unique and effective concept in alcohol awareness
training, simply by wearing a T-shirt.

Aviation Boatswain's Mate [Fuel] Airman Brandon Barnes, who works in the paint locker,
recently lost his cousin to an alcohol-related incident.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=44986

Commander Carrier Strike Group (CCSG) 10 received a new commander during a change-
of-command ceremony held in the hangar bay aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75)
May 8, 2009

Rear. Adm. Patrick Driscoll relieved Rear Adm. Mark Fox as CCSG 10 commanding
officer.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=45168

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) underway in the Western Atlantic conducting
Tailored Ships Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Phase (FEP) from 20
April to 8 May 2009. http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=44530

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) returned to Norfolk, Virginia on 9 May 2009.
Truman Welcomes Return of Squadron Aircraft
Story Number: NNS090421-07
Release Date: 4/21/2009 12:44:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Jonnie Hobby, USS Harry
S.Truman Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) is out to
sea again, which means Sailors from V-1 Air Department will finally be able to work with
aircraft again as the various squadrons attached to Truman bring their aircraft on board this
underway period.

Chief Aviation Boatswain's Mate [Handling] (AW/SW) Jeff Brownlee, flight deck leading
chief petty officer aboard Truman, said 49 squadron aircraft will be joining the ship to
participate in the Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA). Truman must coordinate
with the air wing to prove that she is capable of carrying out flight operations during the
TSTA evolutions.

"We are trying to show the admiral that we're ready," Brownlee said. "Our entire ship
operates very well. Everybody who has come to the ship has said we operate like a ship
that's been out of the shipyards and has been running flight [operations] for a long time.
We take a lot of pride in that. We just have to show the people who have come out here to
look at that very thing -- to show them we're ready for the next step."


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Truman began taking aircraft aboard April 18, and the hangar bays are now full of
Prowlers, Super Hornets and Hawkeyes.

"We'll be working with seven squadrons," said Aviation Boatswain's Mate [Handling] 1st
Class (AW) Doll Pope, an elevator operator for V-1. "We have two F/A-18 squadrons
consisting of the legacy models, two F/A-18 squadrons consisting of Super Hornets, one
EA-6B squadron consisting of Prowlers, one E2-C squadron and the [helicopter]
squadron."

Pope said the Sailors in her department do not normally get to work within their rates until
Truman goes out to sea. However, during the last in-port period, air department worked
tirelessly to prepare for the oncoming air wing.

"That's our house," said Pope. "We have to make sure our house is clean before we get
company. During the last in-port period, we had over 80,000 feet of non-skid to resurface
the deck, so we would be prepared to take on these jets."

Teamwork is one of the keys to passing the upcoming TSTA evolution, said Pope.

"As long as we take care of what we're supposed to do on our side, the air wing will take
care of what they do," she said. "Once we work together, it shows that, if we are called to
do a mission, we will be able to fight. We're doing everything in our power to make sure
the ship is qualified and up to par, so when these jets touchdown, we can catch them and
do what we're supposed to do up there."

Brownlee takes a lot of pride in the effectiveness in which the Sailors on board Truman
operate, and he said he feels Truman is ready for deployment.

"We have a great crew on board Truman," he said. "The flight deck operates extremely
well and everybody else on the ship hits it on the spot every time. I couldn't imagine
working with a better team."

Pope said she is excited to be out to sea because it allows her to practice her rate and work
on aircraft.

"We're all excited to be working on jets again," she said. "When there are no aircraft on
board we have a lot of general maintenance around the ship, but, for the most part,
[aviation boatswain's mates] do most of their work out to sea. We always do the [foreign
object damage] walk downs and blow downs, but when it boils down to it, we don't start
pounding skid and showing our skills until we pull out to sea."

Brownlee said he is also excited to be working with aircraft during this underway because
flight deck work is fast paced and challenging.

"It's always exciting and fast-paced. Things change in the blink of an eye. You have to
think on the go every time. I've had 14 years of sea duty, and I love working on the flight
deck. The best part of my job is watching everybody work as a team to make everything
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come together. The world's greatest air department is ready to run the ship out there."
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=44530

Truman Sailors Engage In Demanding TSTA Drills
Story Number: NNS090421-08
Release Date: 4/21/2009 12:46:00 PM

By Mass Communications Specialist 3rd Class Jeff Troutman, Truman Public Affairs

USS Harry S. Truman (at sea) (NNS) -- The crew of USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75)
has a new series of challenges to embrace during the ship's current underway period. The
Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) is a mandatory evolution designed to focus
on developing the ship's self-training capability through its integrated training teams.

Truman will spend three weeks at sea engaging in the TSTA evolution as it prepares for its
upcoming 2009 deployment.

"Overall, TSTA is a measure of how well the crew integrates and fights the ship together,"
said Lt. Cmdr. Cheryl D'Andrea, Truman's Training Officer.

During the course of Truman's current underway, the ship's crew will conduct 14 General
Quarters drills, said Lt. Cmdr. Matthew Lyle, Truman's damage control assistant. An
estimated 900 Sailors will man the ship's repair lockers, and the drills will be integrated
with every training team having a role.

"General Quarters will be the big evolution that affects everybody," Lyle said. "It's an all-
hands evolution, from the damage control petty officers signing yoke every day to the
tactical actions officer countering inbound missiles."

Each department on board Truman will have their own training agendas out of the Carrier
Training and Readiness Manual (CNAFINST 3500.20A).

Upon completing TSTA, the ship will be certified to move on to the next phase of training
to ensure deployment readiness.

The Afloat Training Group (ATG), a team of 17 personnel, is aboard Truman this
underway period to evaluate the training teams and, in turn, help them learn how to better
train their repair locker personnel.

"ATG is here to train the trainers during a training evolution," D'Andrea said. "They're on
board to help us, to train and to provide constructive criticism. They're also looking for our
documentation to ensure we're documenting our training performance properly."

With a significant amount of Truman's Sailors new to both the ship and its at-sea training
evolutions, D'Andrea stressed the importance of the ship's crew working as one team and
maintaining a positive focus throughout the duration of the TSTA evolution.

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"Basically, we're trying to get everyone into the mindset that we are in foreign waters,
mimicking a real-life scenario where we are fighting the ship," she said. "If we don't have
proper damage control, the ship won't stay afloat for any length of time, but when you have
personnel who are motivated and participating, that's half the battle right there."

Master Chief Fire Controlman (SW/AW) Joseph O'Brien, Training Department's leading
chief petty officer, said he's confident the ship's crew will know exactly what to do should
an actual casualty situation arise.

"In the event a real-life scenario occurs, you'll see the training come together," O'Brien
said. "We're being trained this way so in the reality of a casualty, we'll know exactly what
we need to do. If we train like we fight, when an actual situation comes up, it will be like
second nature to us."

O'Brien said that despite the long hours being put in at sea, there's a purpose to the arduous
training environments Truman's Sailors will endure in the weeks ahead.

"The end result is, with this training, we will be better able to self-sustain any damage we
incur during deployment, ensuring everybody comes back home safe," said O'Brien.

Coming home safely is, of course, the most important part of any underway period, and by
putting forth all their effort in the upcoming TSTA evolutions, Truman Sailors can ensure
their safety for future underways, as well.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=44532

Truman Takes Steps To Protect Sailors From CBR Attack
Story Number: NNS090421-10
Release Date: 4/21/2009 1:13:00 PM

By Mass Communications Specialist Seaman Apprentice Jared Hall, Truman Public
Affairs

USS Harry S. Truman (at sea) (NNS) -- Sailors aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75)
brought thousands of pieces of protective equipment on board Tuesday, in an effort to
prepare the crew for the possibility of dealing with a chemical, biological or radiological
(CBR) attack.

Personnel from the ship's Damage Control (DC) division directed a 100-man working
party for three days to transfer more than 5,000 CBR kits from the hangar bay to various
spaces throughout the ship.


The ship now commands enough CBR equipment to issue each Sailor a full CBR kit
containing the Advanced Chemical Protective Garment (ACPG) and the MU-2P gas mask.

Damage Controlman (DCman) 1st Class (SW) Leethaniel Edwards, who led one of the

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working parties Tuesday, said having individual kit bags is a new initiative for Truman.

For the last deployment, Sailors were issued individual gas masks, but not ACPGs. The
ACPGs were stored in the repair lockers.

"The kit bag is about the best idea I've seen. It's a Navy-wide thing," Edwards said. "For
each of the 5,000-plus Sailors on board, we have a kit bag. They'll keep it the whole time
they're on the ship."

The gas masks and ACPGs protect Sailors from a variety of chemical and biological
agents, which enemy combatants could use against the ship's crew. Certain agents have far-
reaching and damaging effects on the human body, and are so horrifying that their use has
been banned by international law. Protecting Sailors from these attacks remains a primary
concern for damage control efforts aboard Truman.

"Maybe for the life of the ship we will never have that kind of attack," said Damage
Controlman Fireman Dominic Green, who helped Tuesday by binding together empty
palates. "But, you don't know for sure and you don't want to take that chance."

Completing the on-load was the first step in protecting Sailors from CBR attack, but
Edwards said the crew still needs to undergo training before the ship reaches CBR
readiness.

One aspect of the training is having Sailors complete the 309 Personal Qualifications
Standards, which deals with CBR defense, said Edwards.

"We need to train first. We have a brand new crew, and they haven't been through the
drills. A lot of them don't know what to do," Edwards said. "I want at least to get the crew
75-percent qualified in 309. The more people we get qualified to help us out the better
because, God forbid that one of our Sailors go down or one of our DCmen go down, who's
going to take his spot? It's the Sailor standing next to him. Everybody should be qualified
the same amount. It doesn't matter if you're a DCman or not."

On-loading enough CBR kits for the entire crew was a large undertaking, which required
the cooperation of crew members from throughout the ship.

Edwards said DC division greatly appreciated help from the 100-man working party during
the three-day on-load, and as one of the leaders in the evolution, did his best to try and
make it fun for everyone.

He said without the help of the working party, it would have taken DC division much
longer to complete the work.

"When DC does working parties, we make it fun. We'll talk, crack jokes, sing and I'll
always go out and buy them drinks," Edwards said. "It's 5,000 bags I got. It would just be
my division doing it. We only have about 33 people. It would take us about two weeks."

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With the working party, it only took Truman Sailors three days.

Now, the ship has a full complement of CBR gear; enough to protect each Sailor in the
event of a CBR attack. http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=44534

Truman Pins Six New Master Chiefs
Story Number: NNS090505-28
Release Date: 5/5/2009 10:12:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class (SW) David Giorda, Truman Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) pinned
six new master chiefs April 27 while underway during the ship's work-up cycle.

For most, reaching master chief is the ultimate goal in an enlisted Sailor's Navy career.
Sailors who advance through the ranks to E-9 often have unique opportunities to make a
difference and give back to the junior Sailors who helped them reach this goal.

"Making master chief means a lot of hard work and dedication to reach a specific goal,"
said Master Chief Operations Specialist (SW/AW) Gregory Renick, Operations
department's leading chief petty officer.

Naval ceremonies, such as pinnings and frockings, include putting on the crow for the first
time as a third class petty officer and being pinned with fouled anchors as a chief petty
officer. Pinning ceremonies are a time-honored tradition in the Navy.

"The master chief pinning is a reminder of your chief petty officer pinning," Renick said.
"A friend or shipmate pins your anchors on. It's a special feeling."

Becoming a master chief takes a lot help from many different people along one's career
path. It takes a good chain of command with good leadership, but maybe more importantly,
it's doing the hands-on work every day.

"I will never forget the junior Sailors who I trained and who helped me reach my ultimate
milestone," said Master Chief Aviation Ordnanceman (AW/SW) Anthony Fobbs, weapons
department's G-5 division leading chief petty officer.

"It's the greatest accomplishment and milestone that any enlisted Sailor could envision in
their military career," said Fobbs.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=44984

Truman Takes Sailors to Sea During Pilot Program
Story Number: NNS090505-27
Release Date: 5/5/2009 10:09:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Jared Hall, USS Harry S. Truman

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Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- Sailors from Naval Air Facility (NAF)
Washington departed USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) April 30, after spending nearly
two weeks underway, concluding the first iteration of a NAF Washington pilot program,
Sailors to Sea.

As a shore command, many NAF Washington Sailors are first-termers who have never had
the opportunity to go to sea. The Sailors to Sea Program aims to provide these Sailors and
others who may not have been underway, the chance to set sail and experience life on the
water. For 12 days, four Sailors in the NAF group had this opportunity.

"I think every Sailor needs to go out to sea once," said Chief Aviation Electronics
Technician (AW) Dale Hicks, the ranking member of the group. "Depending on where
they wind up at the end of their career, they should be out to sea even if it's just for a
couple of weeks because that's part of what it means to be a Sailor."

NAF Washington is a full-time support command at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland.
The command's primary duty is to provide support for Reservists in the Washington D.C.,
area.

"I was talking with my chief one day, and she asked me if I would be interested in coming
on to a carrier," said Storekeeper 2nd Class Sherry Freeman, who worked with Truman's
supply department during her two-week stay. "I said, 'Sure, I'll go and see what ship life is
like.'"

Freeman, along with the rest of the NAF group, immediately took note of how different
shipboard life can be compared to life working at a shore command.

"On shore, when it's time to get off, I can put the work off and come back to it the next
morning," said Freeman. "On the ship, I've noticed that I can't leave until everything is
completed. I work from 0700 to 2100 maybe 2200. That's a big difference."

Some Sailors had never experienced flight operations and the wide expanse of the ocean.

"I liked seeing all the flight ops and everything," said Yeoman Seaman Apprentice Craig
Daleske, who worked closely with some of Truman's yeomen during his visit. "Me being a
little kid and wanting to be a pilot, it's nice to be this close to the jets. It's better than seeing
a sea of corn back in Iowa."

The pilot program may have provided at least one NAF Washington Sailor with an
additional opportunity.

"My corpsman is thinking about going air crew. He's really interested in being a rescue
swimmer," said Hicks. "He might actually find another avenue to pursue his rate.

"Everybody seems to be really enjoying the community out here," Hicks added. "Truman
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has been a great host to us and I'm glad we could come."
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=44988

HST Medical Team Hones Skills during Mass Casualty Training
Story Number: NNS090505-05
Release Date: 5/5/2009 5:23:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Louis Batchelor, Truman Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) Sailors
are tirelessly honing their skills in mass casualty drills during the ship's current Tailored
Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) period and Final Evaluation Phase (FEP).

The premise behind training for mass casualties is to better prepare ship's company,
particularly security and medical personnel, to respond to potential emergency situations. It
helps Sailors to better understand the roles they will play if disaster strikes the ship.

Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Dana Bingham of Truman's medical department said all
Sailors can either be potential victims or assistants during an actual emergency. Bingham,
whose normal mass casualty assignment is to escort victims from the scene of the accident
to medical facilities, said this stresses the point that all Sailors should educate themselves
about what could happen during a real mass casualty.

"If an actual casualty happens, there may not be enough medical and dental personnel to
take care of the entire ship's company," Bingham said. "In the event that something
happens to us, the crew needs to know how to handle the situation."

Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class (AW) Tim Hand from the "Seahawks" of Airborne Early
Warning Squadron (VAW) 126 feels that the crew benefits from the drills, but believes this
training is equally beneficial to squadron personnel and urges them to participate.

"Mass casualties are the preparation of our combined medical department to utilize all
crew members and effectively provide assistance and appropriate care as fast as possible,"
Hand said. "When the embarked air wing is forward deployed, it gives us [as a strike
group] the chance to work as a unit. TSTA allows us to work as a team during drills and
allows the air wing's maintenance personnel in the hangar bay and flight deck to integrate
with the ship's staff as stretcher bearers and various other roles."

During mass casualty drills, personnel are sorted by the condition of their injuries and are
brought to a temporary medical facility for urgent treatment and holding until better
medical arrangements can be made.
"Usually, when we get word of a casualty, the corpsman currently on medical readiness
team duty assesses the situation, then contacts Damage Control Central to make an official
announcement to the ship," Bingham said.

"By that time, the rest of us are in medical, standing by at our stations or in place on the
hangar bay or the aft mess decks."
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During mass casualty drills, Sailors play different roles. "Victims" lay lifeless, scream for
help or exhibit signs of injuries, while their shipmates organize temporary medical
treatments. Stretcher bearers, medical personnel and security staff are tested, assisting
personnel in shock, setting boundaries and safely transporting personnel to medical
facilities for further immediate treatment.

Afloat Training Group (ATG) Atlantic evaluated the ship's casualty drills during
TSTA/FEP on how well Truman's Sailors adjusted to dealing with situations and how well
the ship's medical department facilitated the drill. According to ATG, the entire crew must
be prepared for actual casualties because everyone on board has a potential role. Whether it
includes containing the situation, providing casualty assistance or acting as a stretcher
bearer, every member of Truman's crew must exhibit credible knowledge in the case of an
emergency.

During TSTA/FEP, Truman's Medical department has at least three mass casualty drills
with at least one graded by ATG, as well as several other shipboard evolutions, such as
General Quarters drills. These drills improve the crew's ability to respond during real or
potential threats and improve the overall performance of the ship.

"ATG remains a valuable service as we are a carrier strike group preparing for a
deployment," said Hand. "They remind us of all the little things that we should remember
and could make a difference during an actual casualty."
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=44990

Truman Sailor's Alcohol Awareness Innovation Goes Shipwide
Story Number: NNS090505-15
Release Date: 5/5/2009 3:18:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Jonnie Hobby, Truman Public
Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- A Sailor aboard USS Harry S. Truman
(CVN-75) recently introduced what may prove to be a unique and effective concept in
alcohol awareness training, simply by wearing a T-shirt.

Aviation Boatswain's Mate [Fuel] Airman Brandon Barnes, who works in the paint locker,
recently lost his cousin to an alcohol-related incident.

"She was on her way home from work when she was hit by a drunk driver," he said. "My
family made memorial T-shirts with her picture on the front. The XO (executive officer)
saw me wearing it in the gym and asked me about it. I told him about my cousin, and he
asked me if I'd be interested in helping with DUI [driving under the influence] awareness
T-shirts with the command DAPA and I said I would love to do it."

The executive officer spoke with Chief Aviation Boatswain's Mate [Fuel] (AW/SW)
Thomas Lucas, command Drug and Alcohol Program advisor, and together they started to
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plan a special T-shirt made for Truman Sailors.

"The shirt would have the names of somebody dear to them who was killed by drunk
drivers," said Lucas. "On the front of the shirt will probably be a logo or an emblem about
DUIs, and on the back there will be a list of names."

Lucas said the shirt will affect Sailors aboard Truman by making them think about DUI
deaths on a more personal level.

"A lot of people know Airman Barnes, and they can see how this affected his life," said
Lucas. "I think it would help if people could match names with faces, so instead of having
a picture of somebody you don't know, you'd see the face or the name of somebody you
know personally."

"Every little bit can help," said Barnes. "If they can familiarize with a person wearing that
shirt, they might see drunk driving in an entirely new light."

Barnes said he hopes the shirts help Sailors make the right decision to not sit behind the
wheel after drinking alcohol.

"Almost everybody likes to drink, but not everybody is responsible," said Barnes. "They
should have a plan. If plan A doesn't work out, then use plan B, maybe even plan C. Spend
the night at a friend's house or use the Safe Ride program. Just don't do something you're
going to regret once you're sober."

Barnes said alcohol consumption should not be taken lightly because there have been so
many fatal alcohol-related incidents.

"Alcohol isn't something you just play around with anymore," said Barnes. "Too many
people are losing lives, and too many lives are ruined because one person decided to make
a stupid decision."

One often-cited statistic from the DUI awareness campaign is that the financial
repercussions of catching a DUI charge can run in the tens of thousands. While this is true,
Lucas said the price one pays runs much deeper than money.

"Be smart," he said. "If you take a life, that's going to be there forever. Money comes and
goes, but if you take a life, you're going to have to live with that for the rest of your life."
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=44986

Truman Hosts CCSG 10 Change of Command
Story Number: NNS090511-19
Release Date: 5/11/2009 10:04:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Jared Hall, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

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USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- Commander Carrier Strike Group (CCSG)
10 received a new commander during a change-of-command ceremony held in the hangar
bay aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) May 8.

Rear. Adm. Patrick Driscoll relieved Rear Adm. Mark Fox as CCSG 10 commanding
officer.

Fox will soon travel to Nevada to assume command at Naval Strike and Air Warfare
Center.

"This level of team play, this level of excellence, this just doesn't happen without some
level of effort, and it's built on trust; it's built on communication and people talking to
people," said Fox.

Guest speaker Vice Adm. Melvin Williams Jr., commander of the U.S. 2nd Fleet,
commended Fox and the CCSG 10 team for their achievements and excellence of service.

"As I think about Rear Admiral Mark Fox, my classmate, it has been a privilege to serve
with him. He has, with the Harry S. Truman Strike Group, achieved excellence," Williams
said. "As I think about the 90,000 Sailors and Marines who serve within the 2nd Fleet area
of responsibility, the 103 ships, the 1,500 aircraft, the Marines who serve with us, the
things that we do to serve the homeland, the things that we do for future force development
as we serve with our allies and partners and NATO support, I have not had to worry about
the Harry S. Truman Strike Group because of the leadership of Admiral Mark Fox."

Williams presented Fox with the Legion of Merit, gold star in lieu of a second award, for
his outstanding service April 2008-May 2009.

Driscoll, who assumes command of CCSG 10 after returning from his last tour of duty as
the supporting commander of Multi-National Force Iraq, commended the strike group for
the exceptional accomplishments achieved under Fox's leadership.

"When we deploy later this year, we must be ready to conduct maritime combat operations
across the full spectrum of warfare," Driscoll said. "Fortunately, teamed with our coalition
partners, we will sortie a superior maritime force backed by the world's most powerful
democracy. But, this alone will not assure our success. We will succeed in meeting the
demands of our diverse mission set if each individual in the Harry S. Truman Strike Group
works hard during the next six months."

Williams expressed his confidence in Driscoll's ability to carry on the reputation of
excellence enjoyed by his predecessor.

"Rear Admiral Pat Driscoll I know from my personal experience, watching him operating
out on the Kitty Hawk Strike Group," said Williams. "You are adequately prepared to
assume the command of the Harry S. Truman Strike Group. You are a leader. You take
care of your people, and I have full confidence in your ability to lead this strike group into
combat and to lead it into places where you prevent combat."
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CSG 10 is made up of the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75), with its
embarked air wing, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3 and embarked Destroyer Squadron 26 staff,
guided-missile cruisers USS San Jacinto (CG-56) and USS Hue City (CG-66); guided-
missile destroyers USS Carney (DDG 64), USS Oscar Austin (DDG-79) and USS Winston
S. Churchill (DDG-81).

CVW 3 consists of Strike Fighter Squadrons (VFA) 32, VFA-37, VFA-105 and Strike
Marine Fighter Squadron 312; Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron 130; Carrier
Airborne Early Warning Squadron 126; and Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron 7.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=45168

USS Harry S. Truman Hosts Holocaust Remembrance
Story Number: NNS090703-01
Release Date: 7/3/2009 5:05:00 AM

From Truman Public Affairs Office

NORFOLK (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) hosted a Holocaust memorial
observance ceremony in the ship's hangar bay to promote awareness of the tragic events
during World War II and educate Sailors May 13.

Sailors gathered together to listen to a speech delivered by India Meisel, a local educator,
and hear the inspiring story of Hanns Loewenbach, a Holocaust survivor.

Loewenbach, a German-born Jew who escaped Germany during the late 1930s, recounted
in detail his experiences living under the persecution of the Nazi government.

Loewenbach stressed that Germany at the time was a democracy, and even democracies
can allow great injustices. He described how Germans turned from boycotts to murder in
less than a decade. Among other points, he noted that it would be tragic for the world to
forget what happened during the Holocaust and miss this valuable lesson, a sentiment that
was echoed in Meisel's address.

"The Holocaust is a subject that we cannot let just slip by," said Meisel. "We are losing our
survivors, and we are losing the ideas that we need to carry on to future generations to
prevent future genocides."

"[The speakers] summed it up very well for me," said Aviation Boatswain's Mate
(Handling) Airman Johnathan Karg. "The Holocaust is something that I've really liked
learning about and hearing about the struggles of the people and all the survivors that they
were brave enough to come out and tell their stories."

At the conclusion of the ceremony, each Sailor in attendance lit a candle to symbolize
those who passed away during the Holocaust.

"The Holocaust may have happened seven decades ago, but we still have genocides
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occurring in our world today," Meisel said. "We need to act. We cannot just let this
become a memory. We cannot let what happened become a page in a history book."
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=45325
USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) departed Norfolk, Virginia on 1 June 2009.

Carrier Strike Group 10 (CSG-10) is made up of the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman
(CVN-75), with its embarked air wing, Carrier Air Wing Three (CVW-3) and embarked
Destroyer Squadron 26 (CDS-26), guided missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG-66); guided-
missile destroyers USS Carney (DDG-64), USS Oscar Austin (DDG-79) and USS Winston
S. Churchill (DDG-81); attack submarine USS Norfolk (SSN-714); and independently
participating frigates USS Stephen S. Groves (FFG-29) and USS McInerney (FFG-8).

CVW-3 consists of Strike Fighter Squadrons (VFA) 32, 37 and 105; Marine Fighter Attack
Squadron 312; Electronic Attack Squadron 130; Airborne Early Warning Squadron 126;
Carrier Logistics Support Squadron 40; and Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron 7.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=46877

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) underway in the Western Atlantic from 1 to 8 June
2009.

Photo
http://www.news.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=72463

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) commenced Composite Training Unit Exercise
(COMPTUEX) in the Western Atlantic on 9 June 2009.

Command individual augmentee (IA) coordinators aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-
75) provided training on the IA and Global War on Terror (GWOT) Support Assignment
(GSA) experience for Sailors on June 2009.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=46459

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) security force personnel trained on the proper use of
flares on the ship's fantail on 21 June 2009 during the composite training unit exercise
(COMPTUEX).
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=46692




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http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=72966

090622-N-2880M-065 ATLANTIC OCEAN (June 22, 2009) Visitors watch as an F/A-18
Hornet from the Checkerboards of Marine Strike Fighter Squadron (VMFA) 312
completes an arrested landing aboard the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75).
Harry S. Truman is underway in the Atlantic Ocean conducting a Composite Training Unit
Exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Second Class Joshua A.
Moore/Released) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=72966

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) underwent replenishment at sea (RAS) with USNS
Laramie (T-AO-203) during her current underway for composite training unit exercise
(COMPTUEX) on 27 June 2009.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=46688

Capt. John Meier, Truman's executive officer, said the integration of the strike group is
vital to the training necessary for Truman's success during COMPTUEX.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=46467

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) and Carrier Strike Group 10 conducted an air defense
exercise (ADEX), one part of their composite training unit exercise 29 June 2009.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=46687

In addition to protecting and accompanying USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75), the other
ships in Truman Strike Group have the duty of inspecting suspicious vessels with highly
trained Visit, Board, Search and Seizure (VBSS) teams.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=46694

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) conducted Composite Training Unit Exercise
(COMPTUEX) in the Western Atlantic from 9 June to 3 July 2009.

Sailors from Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group (HST CSG) used active sonar to hunt
submarines during the strike group's composite training unit exercise (COMPTUEX) from
9 June to 3 July 2009. http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=46877


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USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) returned to Norfolk, Virginia on 4 July 2009,
conducting Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) in the Western Atlantic
from 9 June to 3 July 2009’ preceded by training operations in the Western Atlantic from
1 to 8 June 2009.
Truman Shares Insight on the IA Experience
Story Number: NNS090709-15
Release Date: 7/9/2009 4:45:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) David Wyscaver, USS Harry S.
Truman Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- Command individual augmentee (IA)
coordinators aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) provided training on the IA and
Global War on Terror (GWOT) Support Assignment (GSA) experience for Sailors June
20.

Sailors who fill IA and GSA assignments have different requirements than the average sea-
duty assignment. Truman's command IA coordinators educate Sailors on how these
assignments can be professionally and personally beneficial.

"You see more Sailors going and wanting to make a difference. I get questions asking how
they can go," said Aviation Electronics Technician 1st Class (AW/SW) Todd Rose,
assistant command IA coordinator.

"It is very encouraging when you are going through the training and seeing Sailors that
have been in for a while having a whole new working attitude and mentality for other
things going on around them, and then they bring that back with them. So, I would say that
the integrated training between the services and the feeling of accomplishment when the
Sailors get back are helping the diversity of the Navy."

In contrast to a Sailor who deploys with a ship, squadron or unit, an IA or GSA Sailor
leaves his or her home unit or command to deploy as an individual. Most of these Sailors
deploy to a joint operational environment, allowing them to work directly with other
branches of the military.

"Iraq, Afghanistan, Guantanamo Bay and the Horn of Africa are the main locations for IA
assignments," said Chief Storekeeper (SW/AW) Henry Milton, Truman's command IA
coordinator. "There are also IAs in the Philippines, Germany and other North Atlantic
Treaty Organization countries. A Sailor can also do an IA in the continental United States."

The IA coordinators also explained the difference between an IA and GSA assignment.
While IA billets are considered temporary duty assignments; GSAs are permanent change
of duty orders. IAs can last anywhere from six months to 425 days, including all training
and in-theater time.

"Right now we have approximately 50 Sailors deployed through IAs. It's a good sized

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number. Some carriers have as many as eighty personnel on IA," said Milton.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=46459

Sonar Operators Test Their Skills During COMPTUEX
Story Number: NNS090714-01
Release Date: 7/14/2009 7:16:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Coleman Thompson

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN At Sea (NNS) -- Sailors from Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike
Group (HST CSG) used active sonar to hunt submarines during the strike group's
composite training unit exercise (COMPTUEX) June 9-July 3.

COMPTUEX is an intermediate-level exercise required of each carrier strike group before
it deploys. The exercise brings ships and aircraft together to prepare to project force as a
strike group in the interest of global maritime security and to protect the nation's homeland
security.

Although sonar operators receive various types of synthetic antisubmarine warfare (ASW)
training, nothing compares to using active sonar at-sea to hunt actual submarines.

"The ability to run silently on battery power makes modern diesel submarines a significant
threat against U.S. forces patrolling the oceans. An undetected submarine can quickly
cripple a high value target such as an aircraft carrier before the ships accompanying it can
effectively respond," said Capt. Robert C. Barwis, commander, Destroyer Squadron
(DESRON) 26,

According to Lt. Christopher W. Clevenger, DESRON 26 submarine operations officer,
detecting these threats is the duty of all Sailors within the ASW community, requiring
simultaneous training at-sea by ships, submarines, planes and helicopters. Through the use
of helicopters and towed sonar arrays, ASW teams can detect most sub-surface threats, but
the only way to detect an ultra-quiet threat before it comes within striking range is with of
active sonar.

"ASW training, including the use of active sonar in at-sea training scenarios during
COMPTUEX, is vital to training sonar operators and ensuring the Navy stays competent in
its ability to combat sub-surface threats," Clevenger said.

Because ASW skills are perishable and deteriorate rapidly, repeated training is required.

"The proficiency goes away if you don't maintain and keep up with it," said Sonar
Technician (Surface) 2nd Class Alex Szlamas, a sonar operator with DESRON 26's ASW
team. "That goes for the ability of an operator working on a destroyer platform to evaluate
accurate types of contacts on their sensors, all the way to the command and control staffs,
like the DESRON."

Sailors have opportunities to hone their ASW skills during COMPTUEX.
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"There are a lot of elements that make background noise when using sonar - whales,
background shipping freighters, even shrimp. All these create a situation that can easily
mask a diesel submarine, which can sound like a shipping freighter," said Clevenger. "It's
very hard to mimic all those sounds in a simulation, which is why we need real-time
training in a real environment.

"Unfortunately these diesel submarines don't have a lot of tonal frequencies that we can
pick up when they're running on battery. They can be very difficult to locate if we're just
using passive sonar until, unfortunately, they get too close. Worse, they become even
harder to locate in littoral waters where background noise is both higher and more diverse,
providing a larger protective sound shield for the subs."

Although some concern has been raised lately over the adverse effect of active sonar and
marine wildlife, the Navy is one of the leading sponsors of marine mammal research,
spending $26 million in fiscal year 2008, including efforts to understand the relationship
between sound and marine mammals.

"We follow a lot of precautions to ensure the safety of marine mammals," said Clevenger.
"One of the common practices we use is to have sonar operators trained specifically to
identify and locate marine mammals and we'll limit, or cut off, the power of our active
sonar as they get within a certain range."

With more countries fielding more submarines, it is very important for strike groups to
continue to practice ASW so they are better prepared for sub-surface threats and able to
maintain safe and effective fleet operations. The Navy recently completed a comprehensive
Environmental Impact Statement for Atlantic Fleet Active Sonar Training (AFAST), which
evaluated the environmental effects of the Navy's training activities on all of its training
areas. As a result of this study, the Navy will continue with the present level of training
along the East Coast of the United States and within the Gulf of Mexico as authorized by
federal regulators. As part of this authorization, Navy continues to implement protective
measures set forth by the National Marine Fisheries Service.

Carrier Strike Group 10 (CSG-10) is made up of the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman
(CVN-75), with its embarked air wing, Carrier Air Wing Three (CVW-3) and embarked
Destroyer Squadron 26 (CDS-26), guided missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG-66); guided-
missile destroyers USS Carney (DDG-64), USS Oscar Austin (DDG-79) and USS Winston
S. Churchill (DDG-81); attack submarine USS Norfolk (SSN-714); and independently
participating frigates USS Stephen S. Groves (FFG-29) and USS McInerney (FFG-8).

CVW-3 consists of Strike Fighter Squadrons (VFA) 32, 37 and 105; Marine Fighter Attack
Squadron 312; Electronic Attack Squadron 130; Airborne Early Warning Squadron 126;
Carrier Logistics Support Squadron 40; and Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron 7.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=46877

Truman's Security Force Practices With Flares
Story Number: NNS090705-01
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Release Date: 7/5/2009 10:13:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class (SW) David Giorda, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) security
force personnel trained on the proper use of flares on the ship's fantail June 21, during the
composite training unit exercise (COMPTUEX).

Flares assist in search and rescue (SAR) missions, man overboards, and in deterring
potential small-boat threats. Sailors conducted this exercise as part of COMPTUEX in
preparation for conducting maritime security operations during the upcoming deployment.

"We are out here training the security force on the proper execution of the flare," said
Master-at-Arms 1st Class (SW/AW) Melvin Dickson. "Search and rescue missions are
vital in saving a Sailor's life or a boat that is in need of help."

Flares are used to help aircraft identify rescue boats by locating a vessel that is in need of
help. Flares make it easy to spot Sailors in need of immediate assistance because they emit
a bright red light, which allows rescue units to easily identify the distress signal.

"The Lima 118 Flare is utilized during SAR missions to help locate Sailors that may have
gone overboard," said Dickson.

The flare can also be used in defense of the ship. In hostile areas of the world, Truman
sometimes sets defense postures when .50-caliber machine gun mounts are manned by
Weapons Department personnel. These defense postures protect the ship against possible
threats such as small boat attacks. The flares can be used during these times as non-lethal
warning shots.

"The flare could be used anytime that the .50-cal. mounts are manned up," said Cmdr.
Steve Anderjack, the ship's gun boss.

Flares, which are also used during man overboard drills, are a critical capability of the ship.
Flares aid in saving personnel who have falling overboard and pilots that eject from their
aircraft during night operations. Without these flares, locating Sailors in low-visibility
conditions would be virtually impossible. By using these flares properly and effectively,
lives can and will be saved, according to Anderjack.

Truman's security force is made up of Sailors from air, deck, weapons, operations and
other departments. These Sailors are assigned to security operations as a temporary
assigned duty.

The Security department conducts regular drills to keep Sailors trained and familiar with
the weapons they are required to use.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=46692

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Truman Conducts Final RAS of COMPTUEX
Story Number: NNS090703-10
Release Date: 7/3/2009 5:58:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) David Wyscaver, USS Harry S.
Truman Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75)
underwent replenishment at sea (RAS) with USNS Laramie (T-AO 203) during her current
underway for composite training unit exercise (COMPTUEX) June 27.

The evolution gave Truman and her crew a chance to stock up on necessities such as fuel,
food and other essentials to continue its mission underway.

"We had approximately 150 pallets come on board from the RAS including food and
beverages," said Culinary Specialist 1st Class (SW/AW) Kathy Gomez, S-2 (food supply)
leading petty officer. "It's important because it provides a variety of supplies for the crew
and boosts morale with the items we bring on board."

RAS is a crucial part of a ship's mission. Without the essentials provided through these
evolutions, Sailors and Marines wouldn't be able to complete daily tasks that are critical in
preparing Truman for her upcoming deployment.

A lot of different aspects go into preparing for a RAS to ensure those involved are ready to
successfully complete the evolution.

"Safety training, making sure we have the working parties setup, inventory checks and
ensuring we use the items from the previous RAS first are just a few things we need to do
in order to prepare," said Gomez.

A RAS is beneficial to the whole crew and allows individuals from different departments
to interact with one another to successfully complete the task at hand. These underway
replenishments involve a high number of supplies and a large amount of time to complete.

Many different aspects occur during a RAS, and it is extremely important Sailors take the
time out to complete their tasks both safely and effectively.

This will be the last RAS for Truman during COMPTUEX, although, there are still many
critical evolutions ahead for the crew in the coming days. These critical mission readiness
evolutions will continue to play a part in the Truman's future.

COMPTUEX is one of the major underway periods for the Truman Strike Group which is
preparing for its upcoming deployment later this year. The group is concentrating on
enhancing interoperability in support of maritime security operations around the world.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=46688

Truman's Strongest Compete for Weightlifting Title
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Story Number: NNS090703-25
Release Date: 7/3/2009 12:51:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman David Finley, USS Harry S. Truman Public
Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- Sailors and Marines aboard USS Harry S.
Truman (CVN-75) competed in a weightlifting competition in the ship's mezzanine gym
June 28.

The contest was the first of its kind sponsored by the ship's morale, welfare and recreation
(MWR) office since Truman's gyms was refurbished.

"A lot people spend time in the gym," said Electrician's Mate 3rd Class Robert Vera, an
MWR representative aboard Truman. "That's their hobby. Some people have video games,
so we have video competitions. Some people have weightlifting, so to accommodate for
everyone, we have weightlifting competitions. We have competitions just like out in
town."

The competition featured four events: bench press, squat, dead lift and viper. Plaques were
awarded to the overall strongman, top bench press and best male and female viper
performance. The females competed only in the viper event.

"I attended today's event to boost participation aboard the ship as far as the MWR," said
Aviation Support Equipment Technician 1st Class (AW/SW) Jeremiah J. Jones. "They do a
great job of putting out different events for us Sailors on board the ship. I thought it was a
good time for me to come out and show my stuff for the competition."

The overall strongman award and title of strongest man on the ship went to Lance Cpl.
Joshua Cole with a bench press of 275 lbs., squat of 405 lbs. and deadlift of 365 lbs.

The contest was scored based on dividing the weight of the contestant by the weight lifted,
and the highest score from that equation won the contest.

The bench press award went to Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Tristan Lee with a weight
of 275 lbs., while the viper awards went to Aviation Boatswain's Mate [Handling] 2nd
Class Stephen Miller and Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Apprentice Mellisa Maiden.

"It's a good morale booster what MWR does for us on the ship," said Jones. "It definitely
brings the crew together and it keeps us as one unit."

The competition offered Sailors and Marines a chance to take their minds off of work with
a healthy competition.

"It's a definite stress reliever from the day being [leading petty officer] of a division of 45
people," said Jones. "It gives me stress relief and promotes a healthy lifestyle."

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MWR offers a variety of events for Sailors and Marines during underway periods.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=46693

Truman Strike Group Preps for any Contingency during Exercise
Story Number: NNS090701-08
Release Date: 7/1/2009 3:39:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeff Troutman, USS Harry S. Truman Public
Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- The Harry S. Truman Strike (HST) Group,
comprised of approximately 7,500 Sailors and Marines, is engaged in a composite training
unit exercise (COMPTUEX), a three-week evolution, designed to enhance the training and
skills of crew members in preparation for an upcoming fall deployment.

COMPTUEX is a multi-week, intermediate-level exercise required of each carrier battle
group before departing for a seven-month deployment. The exercise brings ships and
aircraft together to prepare to project force as a battle group in the interest of global
maritime security and protecting the nation's homeland security.

"COMPTUEX is a key fundamental training block that allows Sailors to improve their
readiness," said Rear Adm. Patrick Driscoll, commander, Carrier Strike Group 10. "That
enhances our overall effectiveness. When we successfully complete COMPTUEX, we will
be surge capable and ready to deploy in the event of an emerging contingency."

In the event of a contingency or threat, COMPTUEX will enable the strike group to
respond in an effective manner and help set the conditions necessary for proper security
and prosperity, thereby directly contributing to the defense of our homeland.

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) has completed numerous at-sea evolutions since the
beginning of the year in preparation for a 2009-2010 deployment. In addition to being the
ship's lengthiest sea trial before deployment, COMPTUEX will be the first evolution
during which Truman and other strike group ships train together as a cohesive battle unit.

Capt. John Meier, Truman's executive officer, said the integration of the strike group is
vital to the training necessary for Truman's success during COMPTUEX.

"The basic overall goal of the COMPTUEX exercise is really for us to demonstrate our
ability to operate as an integrated strike group," said Meier. "This is how we will fight,
how we will go into combat and how we will go into harm's way. We will be going into
these scenarios with all of our strike group's assets, so it's important we train with all our
assets."

Driscoll said COMPTUEX is different from prior sea exercises by its heightened degree of
training and level of focus.

"This will be the most intense training we get as a strike group before we deploy," said
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Driscoll.

"Commander, Second Fleet Vice Admiral Mel Williams and Commander Fleet Forces
Training Atlantic Rear Admiral Garry White and their staffs are very focused on training
the HST carrier strike group and are providing numerous aircraft, ships and fast boats to
act as opposition."

"The ability to protect the carrier, which is the great power projection unit for the Navy, is
the key role of practicing our air defense," said Meier. "We work with all the units of the
strike group to ensure the protection of this high-value target. It's all about how we
interoperate, how we communicate and how we fight as a strike group."

Successful completion of COMPTUEX will certify Truman and Carrier Air Wing (CVW)
3 as qualified for open ocean operations. It's not only a critical step in the pre-deployment
training cycle but a prerequisite for the battle group's joint task force exercise (JTFX),
Meier added.

To achieve that success, the battle group will need to rely on the key to success in any
military strategy -- its people.

"COMPTUEX and CSG operations are a team sport," said Driscoll. "The Sailors are top-
notch and highly-skilled, and I know they're going to be combat ready. My hope is we will
leave COMPTUEX with a strong team and we will understand each warfare command's
strengths and their efforts to the overall fight."

CSG-10 is made up of the aircraft carrier Harry S. Truman; its embarked air wing, CVW 3;
embarked Destroyer Squadron (CDS) 26; the guided missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG-
66) the guided missile destroyers USS Carney (DDG-64), USS Oscar Austin (DDG-79)
and USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG-81); and the attack submarine USS Norfolk (SSN-
714). Also participating in the exercise are frigates USS Stephen S. Groves (FFG-29) and
USS McInerney (FFG-8).

CVW-3 consists of Strike Fighter Squadrons 32, 37 and 105; Marine Fighter Attack
Squadron 312; Electronic Attack Squadron 130; Airborne Early Warning Squadron 126;
Carrier Logistics Support Squadron 40; and Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron 7.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=46467

Air Defense Exercise Ensures Skies Above Truman Strike Group Remain Safe
Story Number: NNS090702-19
Release Date: 7/2/2009 7:26:00 PM

By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class (SW) Rebekah Adler, Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) and
Carrier Strike Group 10 conducted an air defense exercise (ADEX), one part of their

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composite training unit exercise June 29.

"ADEX is basically how well the battle group defends itself against air threats," said Chief
Operations Specialist (SW/AW) Robert Regan, leading chief petty officer of the ship's
combat direction center.

"We need to maintain our airspace without any conflicts."

ADEX also helps teach Sailors how to communicate effectively in any environment
through various systems.

ADEX is comprised of many situations the battle group may face. The scenarios can range
from a two-hour, low, slow flyer drill to full-on battle situations that can last up to 24
hours.

"This stage of training fine-tunes our systems and crew before we go on deployment," said
Electronics Technician 2nd Class (SW) Jason Cranford. "If and when we engage in combat
operations, it won't be the first time we've done it as a strike group. We're making sure our
equipment is fully operational and that we can endure anything during sustained combat."

Once ADEX is completed, the lessons Sailors learned during this event will carry them
through to the strike group's next major exercise, a joint task force exercise. Both exercises
bring ships and aircraft together to practice projecting force as a battle group in the interest
of global maritime security and protecting homeland security.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=46687

VBSS Teams Train to Board Vessels of Interest on High Seas
Story Number: NNS090704-13
Release Date: 7/4/2009 10:47:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Coleman Thompson, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS Harry S. Truman, (NNS) -- In addition to protecting and accompanying USS Harry
S. Truman (CVN-75), the other ships in Truman Strike Group have the duty of inspecting
suspicious vessels with highly trained Visit, Board, Search and Seizure (VBSS) teams.

The purpose of a VBSS team is to conduct inspections on vessels of interest and to combat
terrorism and piracy. During the Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX), the
teams worked with several Navy ships in the area conducting boarding operations,
detaining and processing prisoners, and taking control of ships that posed a threat.

"These training operations are key," said Ensign Shawn Toth, the boarding officer for the
VBSS team on board guided-missile destroyer USS Carney (DDG 64). "The more training
we can get the better. We've already had a few dry runs. We ran across some problems
along the way, but we addressed them and are better prepared for the real thing."

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The VBSS exercises offered the Sailors involved a chance to practice something that is not
usually prevalent on larger decks.

"I think it's unique," said Engineman 2nd Class (SW) Chad Zandi, a member of Carney's
VBSS team. "You don't really get to do things like this in most parts of the fleet."

Repeated training is essential to maintaining mission readiness for the group, and the team
must be ready for any situation since the need and opportunity to board another vessel may
present itself at any time.
Once a vessel of interest comes into range of the strike group, queries are made to various
agencies about the vessel's purpose and cargo. If anything is suspicious, the team will
launch a small craft and move to board the ship. From there, the team will gather more
information on the crew and inspect the ship's cargo. If any crew member's information
comes in as a threat or the cargo is found to be contraband, the team will assess the
situation and move forward accordingly.

With the recent rash of pirate attacks, it's more important than ever that these teams remain
ready in the event that they encounter a pirate threat. They train to be ready for any
possible situation by mastering weapons and non-lethal tactics in order to easily subdue
hostile threats.

"We've done a lot of good training out here," said Toth. "We did a few dry runs, all
involving different players and scenarios. It's always different when you're against
somebody that's unpredictable, and the guys out here posing as the opposition have been
doing just that."

The team trained with former Navy SEALs who worked as evaluators and simulated crew
members on the ships participating in the exercise.

"I've been getting a lot of great mentorship out here," said Zandi. "I'm learning new things
each day from the people above and below me."

The teams will continue to train after COMPTUEX in preparation for the strike group's
upcoming deployment. http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=46694

Truman Locksmiths Maintain Mission Readiness
Story Number: NNS090703-11
Release Date: 7/3/2009 6:03:00 AM

By Mass Communications Specialist 3rd Class Jeff Troutman, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) Sailors
can rest easy knowing the ship's locksmith team has a handle on anything on board with a
lock or combination.

Machinery Repairman 2nd Class (SW) Jerome Hill and fellow locksmith Machinery
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Repairman 3rd Class Matthew Till have the distinctive honor of composing Truman's
official locksmith team. Whether it is a safe that needs cracking or a cipher lock on a
doorknob in need of replacement, Till said the locksmith team is ready to answer the call.

"We're on call pretty much all the time," said Till. "We'll have two to three pages of trouble
calls to attend to on average. We're always pretty busy."

Truman Sailors can request the locksmiths for a job by submitting a trouble call form,
located on the ship's intranet home page, to the machine shop below the aft galley.

According to Till, not just anybody can become a locksmith. There is a four-week civilian
locksmith school he and Hill had to complete in Kentucky before they became certified
locksmiths. Their fingerprints were taken and filed by the FBI, and background checks for
all of the school's attendees were mandatory, Till said.

"The civilian locksmith school in Kentucky is one of the best locksmith schools in the
United States," said Hill. "They taught me how to pick locks, drill into safes and how to
transfer my skills over into a civilian environment. They teach you a lot at the school, but
there's a lot you find out in the field, too."

Despite having no prior locksmith experience before the Navy, Hill said the work
interested him when the opportunity to attend the school presented itself. Though Till has
only been a member of Team Truman for approximately three months, Hill said he's
learned a lot from his shipmate. Together, they strive to help those in need of entry to vital
work spaces or classified material.

"We have locksmiths on board Truman due to people forgetting combinations or
combinations not being turned over properly when changes within departmental personnel
occur," said Hill. "Each division is supposed to have a security manager who logs all codes
and combinations for that division. That's the best way to prevent a trip to the locksmiths."

However, not every division uses their security manager, thereby keeping Truman's
locksmith team gainfully employed with trouble calls. The locksmiths can often finds
themselves keeping combination records for many different divisions.

Till said each door code or safe combination is supposed to be written down on a special
form and sealed in an envelope by a division's security manager. The envelope is then
supposed to be filed away in a safe of its own for future division personnel to reference
when needed. If the combinations to locks are not properly catalogued, the responsibility
often falls on the locksmiths.

"If a division doesn't have access to the combination, there's no other way to get into the
safe unless they come to us," said Till. "For us, there's always a way to get into locks, but
there's always some that prove more difficult than others."

The locksmiths rely on a variety of tools to assist them when they head out to a job. Hill
said screwdrivers, drills, diamond drill bits and lock-picking kits are the norm when the
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numbers to a lock or safe are lost. Sometimes they will improvise and make their own
tools, depending on the situation, he added.

Hill said any time a lock is drilled with a hole larger than three-eighths inch in diameter,
the drawer of the safe, or in some instances the entire container itself, will need to be
replaced.

"If the lock is drilled, the whole thing will have to be replaced. The door frame has to be
welded and then repainted," said Hill. "It takes a lot of patience to get into some of these
safes because it takes awhile to drill."

Till said a job can range from a five-minute combination-resetting to an entire work day
drilling into a safe. Because of the classified material contained in many of the safes they
crack, the locksmiths can certify different safes to legally contain classified information, he
said.

As the Truman locksmith team continues to provide an invaluable service to the ship's
crew, Sailors are advised to call the locksmith as soon as a lock or number combination
discrepancy is noticed.

"There is a locksmith on board Truman," said Hill. "Call us any time. If you wait to call, it
could make our job hours longer than necessary."

http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=46690




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http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=71664

090513-N-8726C-007 MILLINGTON, Tenn. (May 13, 2009) All Navy guard Hull
Technician Fireman, Morgan Petite, assigned to USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75), leaps
into the air for a two-point shot during a basketball game against the Army in the ongoing
Armed Forces Basketball Tournament held May 12-17, 2009 at the National Security
Agency North 82 gym. Petite scored 10 points in Navy's 68-51 victory over the Army in
the second round of games. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class
John Collins/Released) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=71664

Truman Fireman Soars Above the Competition
Story Number: NNS090704-01


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Release Date: 7/4/2009 7:38:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class (SW) David Wyscaver, USS Harry S.
Truman Public Affairs

USS Harry S. Truman, At Sea (NNS) -- For one Sailor on board USS Harry S. Truman
(CVN-75), her naval career has not only given her a chance to perform a job she enjoys
and takes pride in, but an opportunity to represent her branch of service and country as a
member of the Women's All-Navy Basketball Team.

When she's not on temporary assigned duty playing basketball for the Navy, Hull
Technician (HT) Fireman Morgan Petite works in the Engineering Department, performing
a variety of tasks to help Truman continue her mission.

"I enjoy being an HT. It's hard work and keeps me motivated," said Petite.

Petite's passion for her job extends into her recreational activities as well. Her love for
basketball wasn't something that just came about overnight. It has been a pastime of hers
since her early childhood days.

"I've been playing basketball since I was a little girl," said Petite. "Before the Navy, I
played basketball in college for a year at Stephen F. Austin University in Texas. It's always
been a passion of mine, and something I've enjoyed doing."

Her journey began a year and a half ago when she joined the Navy. Her recruiter informed
her about the Women's All-Navy Basketball team and offered specifics on how to get
involved.

"Once I came to Truman and got all the information on how to get started, I began
gathering what I needed to attend the team tryout session, which is held every April,"
Petite explained. "I submitted a package and filled out several special request chits while
working with my chain of command."

"My chain of command has supported me 100 percent. I'm glad they gave me the
opportunity, and I really appreciate it," said Petite.

After attending the initial mini-camp session, Petite waited patiently for a phone call letting
her know she was invited to the next step in the process, training camp.

"We conduct four mini-camps around the country -Norfolk, Jacksonville, Seattle and San
Diego. From those mini-camps, I select 25 to 30 athletes to invite into training camp," said
Lt. Samuel Caldwell, Women's All-Navy Basketball head coach. "Those selected 25 to 30
basketball players will then compete for the 12 spots on the team. Training camp is tough
and a very competitive process. Being a member of the All-Navy Basketball team puts
those athletes in a very exclusive class. I still get excited for them when I see the pride of
the selected few who don the Navy uniform for the first time."

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Petite never looked back as she made the team and lead Navy to its second consecutive
championship through her leadership at point guard and by contributing 15 points, 5
assists, 5 rebounds and 5 steals per game while being nominated as the tournaments most
valuable player in June.

"I took the opportunity and ran with it. It's really helped me grow as a person," said Petite.
"I encourage other females to give it a shot and tryout."

"I applaud her for coming into her own to learn a new system and being receptive. There is
a tremendous amount of pressure on the point guard," said Caldwell. "There's no way we
win back-to-back championships without her."

As for the future, Petite will be playing for the All-Armed Forces team in Lake Charles,
La. She also plans to return to the All-Navy Basketball Team next spring and hopes one
day she gets the chance to become a member of the Naval Academy's women's basketball
team.

Although she is quite satisfied with the knowledge and experience she has gained thus far
in the Navy and in the All-Navy Basketball team.

"It's the greatest experience I've ever had, and if I could do it all over again, I would!"
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=46689
USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) departed Norfolk, Virginia on 13 July 2009.

Carrier Strike Group 10 (CSG-10) is made up of the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman
(CVN-75), with its embarked air wing, Carrier Air Wing Three (CVW-3) and embarked
Destroyer Squadron 26 (CDS-26), guided missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG-66); guided-
missile destroyers USS Carney (DDG-64), USS Oscar Austin (DDG-79) and USS Winston
S. Churchill (DDG-81); attack submarine USS Norfolk (SSN-714); and independently
participating frigates USS Stephen S. Groves (FFG-29) and USS McInerney (FFG-8).

CVW-3 consists of Strike Fighter Squadrons (VFA) 32, 37 and 105; Marine Fighter Attack
Squadron 312; Electronic Attack Squadron 130; Airborne Early Warning Squadron 126;
Carrier Logistics Support Squadron 40; and Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron 7.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=46877




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http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=73935

090715-N-2844S-001 ATLANTIC OCEAN (July, 15 2009) A RIM-7P NATO Sea
Sparrow missile is launched from the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75).
Truman is underway in the Atlantic Ocean conducting carrier qualifications. (U.S. Navy
photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Daron Street/Released)
http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=73935

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) successfully completed a NATO Sea Sparrow Missile
exercise at sea July 15 to certify that the ship's missile system is sufficiently capable of
warding off certain types of threats.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=46976

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) underway in the Western Atlantic from 13 to 16 July
2009.

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) returned to Norfolk, Virginia on 17 July 2009.
Truman Fires Missiles, Certifies Air Defenses
Story Number: NNS090715-34
Release Date: 7/15/2009 10:28:00 PM

By Mass Communications Specialist Seaman David Finley, Truman Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, at sea (NNS) -- The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Harry
S. Truman (CVN-75) successfully completed a NATO Sea Sparrow Missile exercise at
sea July 15 to certify that the ship's missile system is sufficiently capable of warding off
certain types of threats.

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Fire Controlman 1st Class (SW) Harold Vernon said the exercise included two parts: the
first being to hit an air target and the other to hit a surface target.

To simulate protecting the ship from an aerial threat, Sailors employed two drones, which
approached the ship in a stream-raid flight pattern. On board Truman a missile was fired to
intercept the drones, hitting both targets.

Another missile was fired to intercept a surface target the size of a sail boat moving at 10
knots. The purpose was to test a new camera sensor installed on the NATO Sea Sparrow
launcher.

The cameras are designed to give improved range and the ability to visually identify any
surface crafts in the area, said Vernon.

Sailors on board Truman endured a lot of hard work and preparation to ensure a successful
evolution.

"It took approximately 70 hours of preparation from four NATO technicians and combat
systems (CS-7) division in support to get this program done," said Vernon. "They have
been preparing for this missile shoot for the last month."

"Teamwork is essential," said Fire Controlman 2nd Class (SW) Clifford Maass. "There are
certain steps in loading the missiles that require at least three people at a time. The whole
evolution takes six people on deck to complete, and each person is vital."

Safety was also an important issue in the missile exercise.

"We all have our ammo handling physical qualification, and we have to get ammo
handling qualified, which gets done with the ordnance handling officer," said Maass.
"Once we are all qualified, we actually go to schools in Dam Neck, Va., to qualify
ourselves on shore before we are allowed to do this on a ship."

USS Harry S. Truman is currently conducting work-up evolutions in preparation for
deployment later this year. With the recent completion of composite training unit exercise,
Truman and its attached battle group are nearing certification as the Navy's ready
deployable carrier strike group.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=46976




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USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) departed Norfolk, Virginia on 18 July 2009 for a
Friends and Family Day Cruise, returning the same day.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=47161




http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=74368

090718-N-2844S-001 ATLANTIC OCEAN (July 18, 2009) An F/A 18E Super Hornet
attached to the Checkerboards of Marine Strike Fighter Squadron (VFMA) 312, performs a
touch and go for the crowd of Sailors, family and friends. The aircraft carrier USS Harry S.
Truman (CVN-75) is on a Friend's and Family Day Cruise, approximately 3,700 friends
and family of Truman Sailors joined the crew for a 14-hour underway to see a day in the
life aboard an aircraft carrier. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd
Class Daron Street/Released) http://www.navy.mil/list_single.asp?id=74368

Friends, Family of USS Harry S. Truman's Crew See Ocean From Sailors' Point of
View
Story Number: NNS090724-13
Release Date: 7/24/2009 5:49:00 AM

By Mass Communications Specialist Seaman David Finley, Truman Public Affairs

NORFOLK (NNS) -- Sailors on board the USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) hosted a
friends and family day cruise (FFDC) July 18 to give their loved ones a firsthand look at
the daily operations aboard Truman.

The 14-hour cruise was an excellent opportunity for guests to tour the ship, learn how
various departments support the mission and enjoy entertainment sponsored by the Morale,
Welfare and Recreation (MWR) department.

The purpose of friends and family day cruise is to give friends and family a snap shot of
what Sailors do on board, said Lt. Cmdr. Robert Palmore, Aviation Intermediate

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Maintenance Department maintenance material control officer and FFDC coordinator.

"I brought my family on board today so they could experience what it is like to be on a
Navy carrier and to see how I live every day," said Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Kaitlin
Schommer.

"The idea is to develop a feel-good relationship with our friends and family so they have
an idea of what our Sailors and Marines do on a daily basis," said Palmore. "Whether you
are working on the mess decks, working on the bridge or standing watch in engineering
department, nobody really gets the idea of what that may encompass until they come out
here and see it for themselves."

It took a lot of planning to prepare for FFDC and the more than 3,700 registered guests.

"I am just the coordinator," said Palmore. "Of course it took everyone on the ship's help,
whether you were prepping your spaces or you worked in supply, which took on a brunt of
the work. MWR also did a fantastic job getting the entertainment setup, and I think
everyone did a great job."

"MWR's role is basically to maintain the morale of the ship and to show the friends and
families a good time," said Fire Controlman Jason Edwards, MWR representative.

The event featured live concerts, a magic show and even a performance by the Washington
Redskin cheerleaders.

"Friends and family day cruise definitely boosts morale for friends and family but even for
the crew," said Palmore. "I have seen guys who normally view their jobs as tedious and
[now] have a little more pep in their step."

"I think it is good to do fun things like this once in a while instead of work, work, work,"
said Schommer.

A highlight of the event was an air-power demonstration, which featured F/A-18s
performing aerial maneuvers and two supersonic fly-bys. Truman's air department also
launched and recovered several aircraft with guests closely watching from behind the foul
line.

The event also included an autograph signing by Madison Pettis, actress, from the Disney
show "Cory in the House."

"I was really happy to come out," said Pettis. "I have an older brother in the Army so for
me to do anything that involves the military is really special for me."

Friends and family day was not only about showing the guests a good time but also how
Truman operates and defends the country during war time.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=47161

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Pre-Deployment Seminar Prepares Truman Families for Sea
Story Number: NNS090729-23
Release Date: 7/29/2009 5:03:00 PM

By Mass Communications Specialist 3rd Class Danna Morris, Harry S. Truman Public
Affairs

NORFOLK, Va. (NNS) -- Married Sailors stationed aboard USS Harry S. Truman
(CVN-75) attended a pre-deployment seminar July 23 at First Baptist Church in Norfolk.

The seminar included several presenters whose mission was to ensure Truman Sailors and
their families are prepared for the ship's upcoming deployment.

Truman Command Master Chief (SW/AW) Allen R. Walker began by stressing the
importance of maintaining balance between the mission and those back home while
deployed.

"If you love your spouse," said Walker, "Please pay particular attention to what is going on
today. Make sure your spouse has the information they need to take care of business while
you are underway."

Brad Sargent, a financial specialist from United Services Automobile Association,
presented valuable information on financial management and gave every Sailor a
deployment kit to store important papers. Sailors should make sure their family is aware of
their financial activity and has access to available funds, said Sargent.

One of Truman's ombudsman explained how the ombudsmen team can reach a Sailor if the
need arises. Truman ombudsmen act as a point of contact or advocate for family members
and provide access to the chain of command.

Another important resource for families of Truman Sailors is the Family Readiness Group
(FRG), which raises money to support events such as bowling nights and holiday parties
for the families.

Melissa Arnold, president of the FRG, spoke to families about the events available to them.

"This last year, some of the things we did were a fall festival, a breakfast with Santa and an
Easter egg hunt at the Norfolk Botanical Gardens," said Arnold. "All of these activities are
free of charge for our Sailors and our families."

Ship's Serviceman 2nd Class (SW/AW) Frank H. Joyner and his wife of two years,
Kenyetta, attended the brief.

"Just knowing that you can't get evicted from your apartment while deployed was good to
know," said Kenyetta. "All the financial information and free stuff they talked about was
great."

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Volunteers from First Baptist Church kicked off the evening by serving a meal to Truman
Sailors and their families before the seminar. In exchange for the church members'
hospitality, Sailors brought canned goods and non-perishable food items for a food drive
coordinated by the church.

The pre-deployment seminar showed Truman Sailors and their families the importance of
preparing for deployment. http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=47244

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) underway in the Western Atlantic on 4 August 2009.

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) welcomed aboard six first-year medical students from
the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences Aug. 4 for a weeklong underway
visit.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=47508

As reported on 8 August 2009, Midshipmen from various universities across the country
participated in a 24-day visit on board the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-
75) to give them a firsthand look at daily life on a Navy carrier.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=47517

USS Harry S. Truman's (CVN-75) First Class Petty Officers' Association is hosting an
advancement exam prep workshop every Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 9 a.m. in the
first class petty officer's mess for all eligible E-4 through E-6 candidates.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=47519

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) carrier qualifications for the FRS and the CNATRA off
the Virginia coast from 4 to 14 August 2009.

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) returned to Norfolk, Va. on 15 August 2009.

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) underway in the Western Atlantic from 20 to 27
August 2009.

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) underway in the Western Atlantic from 13 to 15
September 2009.

Future Navy Docs Experience Life at Sea
Story Number: NNS090810-02
Release Date: 8/10/2009 4:29:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jymyaka Braden, USS Harry S. Truman
Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- The aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman
(CVN-75) welcomed aboard six first-year medical students from the Uniformed Services
University of the Health Sciences Aug. 4 for a weeklong underway visit.


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The ensigns have the opportunity to experience daily operations on a ship, interact with the
crew and learn more about fleet medical operations.

Lt. Dave Dolan, Truman's radiation health officer, said the students were onboard to learn
what the Navy does, how a carrier works and the relationship between enlisted and officers
in the fleet.

"We have had them rotating from air department, safety and medical. They spend some
time in medical and dental learning how sick call runs and what the corpsmen and docs
do," said Dolan. "They have no hands-on experience as students in a classroom, but here
they get to see how some of the concepts they learn about are applied firsthand. I hope they
get a deeper appreciation for the everyday Sailor."

Dolan said it was also important for them to see how the enlisted people work and the time
restraints the junior enlisted face to understand how to better serve them.

Ensign Gregory Czaja, a visiting medical student, said he has a greater appreciation for all
the work that goes into making the ship run.

"You think you know how it works until you actually see it. I didn't really know anything
before," Czaja said. "From walking around the ship, I can see potential injuries we may
have to treat or prevent. As a medical professional, you have to be aware of heat conditions
people work in, noise levels they're exposed to, trip hazards and taller people bumping
their heads."

Another student, Ensign Michael Dore, said he was amazed at how much energy there was
on board and how everyone was constantly moving.

"It's amazing how well the ship is run, how much pride the Sailors have and how friendly
they were to us. We participated in the ship's cleaning 'happy hour' and were just glad to be
able to contribute something," Dore said.

Dore said he also observed the different ways officers and enlisted Sailors interact within
departments.

"That was a big thing for me because we don't interact with many enlisted people in
school, but I see a medical officer on a ship is different than a medical officer in a
hospital," Dore said. "It made me think about the kind of leader I want to be. In our job we
want people to be comfortable, open up and tell us what's going on with them. You can't be
welcoming if you're barking orders; it's a delicate balance."

The groups said the hospitality of Truman Sailors made a lasting impression on the group
of future medical officers and leaders. The future medical officers learned the difference
between in-port and underway procedures, the importance of safety, situational awareness,
leadership styles and at-sea medical operations.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=47508

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Midshipmen Sample Life On Board Truman
Story Number: NNS090810-07
Release Date: 8/10/2009 4:51:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman David Finley,
USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- Midshipmen from various universities across
the country participated in a 24-day visit on board the aircraft carrier USS Harry S.
Truman (CVN-75) to give them a firsthand look at daily life on a Navy carrier.

The visit serves as part of their Summer Service Orientation Program during which
midshipmen visit a variety of commands, including aviation, surface and Marine Corps
units in an effort to help them decide their future career path.

"The purpose of the visit is for the midshipmen to experience daily life on an aircraft
carrier and see what the crew does on both the enlisted and officer side of the house," said
Lt. Cmdr. Eduardo Salazar, Truman's midshipmen training coordinator.

Salazar said that he volunteered to be the midshipmen training coordinator because as a
Naval Academy graduate, he knows what the midshipmen training program has to offer.

"It gives the second and third classes, or juniors and sophomores, a chance to interact with
the enlisted personnel, said Salazar. "It offers the first classes, or seniors, a chance to see
what the junior officers' roles are and serves as their last chance to interact with people in
the fleet before they graduate."

"It is really good to get this experience," said Midshipmen 3rd Class Harry Merickel. "At
the Naval Academy, even though we are with Navy and Marine Corps officers all the time,
this cruise is really the first time I get to experience any part of the fleet."

"Not only does this program help the midshipmen develop their officer skills it also helps
them determine what they want to do when they get out into the fleet," said Salazar.
"Truman has people on board from just about every warfare community for them to
interact with to make a more informed decision."

"I want to go into aviation," said Merickel. "So the highlight for me was watching the F-18
launches and recoveries."

Salazar said the program benefits the Navy because it ultimately helps future leaders gain
valuable fleet experience while still in school, insight they can take with them long after
they graduate.

"Having an enlisted running mate, I hope to take from this experience a better
understanding of daily operations on board a carrier," said Merickel. "When I get
commissioned and become an officer, I know that part of my job is to help enlisted

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personnel do their jobs." http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=47517

Sailors Prepare to Advance, Attend Workshop
Story Number: NNS090810-08
Release Date: 8/10/2009 4:55:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jymyaka Braden,
USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs

USS Harry S. Truman At Sea (NNS) -- USS Harry S. Truman's (CVN-75) First Class
Petty Officers' Association is hosting an advancement exam prep workshop every Monday,
Wednesday and Friday at 9 a.m. in the first class petty officer's mess for all eligible E-4
through E-6 candidates.

The first class petty officers association (FCPOA) has also solicited help from members of
the second class petty officers association (SCPOA) to lead training.

"We wanted to include SCPOA in this as well so that we have the most subject matter
experts to help teach these topics," said Air Traffic Controller 1st Class (AW) Nick
Braunshaun, workshop coordinator. "We're going to go over all the professional military
knowledge topics and basic military requirements that will be on the bibliographies."

Braunshaun said the ultimate goal of the workshop is improve and encourage command
advancement.

"Realistically, we know that everyone won't advance, but everyone can benefit from the
knowledge," Braunshaun said. "We all want the best for our Sailors because as we
transition, they are our reliefs."

"As the Navy continues to transition ahead, it's critical we focus on the junior Sailors of
today and instill the knowledge in them they need in order to be successful."

Braunshaun said it was essential to him that the leaders today made an effort to improve
the next generation of the Navy.

SCPOA President Machinist Mate 2nd Class (SW) Kelvin Hugley said helping his
shipmates advance is important to him.

"Truman Sailors are the best the fleet has to offer. We're above the standard. What better
way to reward superior Sailors than to advance them?" Hugley said.

He added that studying as a group can be more effective and motivating than studying
alone.

"Group-studying offers encouragement and makes it easier to identify your weaknesses,"
Hugley said. "Other people can challenge you more and offer some perspective."

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http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=47519

CVN-75 CO - Captain Joe Clarkson, former Captain Herman A. Shelanski
CCSG 10 - Rear. Adm. Patrick Driscoll, former Commander Rear Adm. Mark I. Fox,
former Rear Admiral William E. Gortney
CDS 26 - Commodore Captain Michael A. Strano, former Captain Richard L. Williams
CVW-3 CO - Captain Fredrick Pawlowski, former Captain James Cook
Squadrons – VFA-11; VFA-32; VFA-37; VFA-105; VAQ-130; VAW-126; VRC-40; HS-7

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75), Naval Station Norfolk, Va. – 63rd - Present –Up
Dated 10 May 2009
http://www.truman.navy.mil

Commanding Officer
Captain Joe Clarkson, former Captain Herman A. Shelanski

Executive Officer
Commander John F. Meier, former Commander Ronald Reis

Command Master Chief
CMDCM (SW/AW)
Master Chief Allen Walker, former

Master Chief Clarence M. Frye (SW/AW)

Chain Of Command
http://www.truman.navy.mil/chain.html

Commander, Carrier Strike Group 10 (CCSG 10)
COMCARSTRKGRU TEN

Commander
Rear. Adm. Patrick Driscoll, former Commander Rear Adm. Mark I. Fox, former Rear
Admiral William E. Gortney

Commander Carrier Strike Group (CCSG) 10 received a new commander during a change-
of-command ceremony held in the hangar bay aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75)
May 8.

Rear. Adm. Patrick Driscoll relieved Rear Adm. Mark Fox as CCSG 10 commanding
officer.

Fox will soon travel to Nevada to assume command at Naval Strike and Air Warfare
Center.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=45168

USS HARRY S. TRUMAN, At Sea (NNS) -- Rear Adm. Mark I. Fox relieved Rear Adm.
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Bill Gortney as Commander, Carrier Strike Group 10 during a change of command
ceremony held at sea in the Persian Gulf April 19., 2008
http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/news/2008/04/mil-080421-nns01.htm

NORFOLK, Va. (NNS) -- Rear Adm. William E. Gortney assumed command as
commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 10, relieving Rear Adm. Joseph F. Kilkenny July
10, 2006 during a ceremony aboard USS George Washington (CVN 73).
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=24610

Rear Adm. William E. Gortney reported to his past position as Commander, Carrier Strike
Group TEN in July 2006. Rear Adm. Gortney has flown more than 5300 flight hours. His
command consists of USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), Carrier Air Wing Three (CVW 3)
and various assigned cruisers and destroyers commanded by Destroyer Squadron TWO
SIX (CDS 26).

Chief of Staff
Captain Leo Falardeau, former Captain Michael W. Ullrich

Master Chief 0f Command
Master Chief Marry L. Donlevy

Chain of Command

COMDESRON TWO SIX (CDS 26)
Commander Destroyer Squadron Two Six
DESRON TWO SIX
http://www.cds26.surfor.navy.mil/default.aspx

Commodore
Captain Michael A. Strano, former Captain Richard L. Williams
http://www.cds26.surfor.navy.mil/Site%20Documents/0-6Bio.aspx?PageView=Shared

DESRON 26 Changes Command
Story Number: NNS080205-16
Release Date: 2/5/2008 3:46:00 PM

From USS Harry S. Truman Public Affairs

JEBEL ALI, United Arab Emirates (NNS) -- Commander, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON)
26 held a change of command ceremony while in port Jebel Ali, Jan. 29.

Capt. Michael A. Strano relieved Capt. Richard L. Williams as commander, DESRON 26
in a change of command ceremony.

During Williams' time as DESRON 26, he had success after success and a list of "firsts."
As sea combat commander for the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group, DESRON 26

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planned, coordinated, and executed a major Sink-Exercise of the Ex-USS LaSalle,
employing long-range tactics to counter emerging, fifth-generation threats in support of
major combat operations.

As commander, Task Group 152.0, Williams breathed new life into Maritime Security
Operations through innovative strategic development of a Coalition Task Force campaign,
optimizing Expeditionary Strike Force capabilities and an afloat forward staging base with
the addition of Central/South Arabian Gulf Navies.

In Norfolk, DESRON 26 earned its reputation as the "go-to" squadron for readiness in
support of the Fleet Response Plan. In the course of one year, DESRON 26 ships
completed five Board of Inspection and Survey Material Inspections, scoring well above
the fleet average.

Williams will report in February to 5th Fleet Headquarters in Manama, Bahrain, as deputy
commander for 5th Fleet.

Strano comes to the squadron from Washington, where he was the senior military assistant
to the under secretary of defense (comptroller and chief financial officer). Prior to this, he
was the executive assistant and naval aide to the assistant secretary of the navy (financial
management and comptroller).

At sea, Strano has commanded USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49) and USS Oriole (MHC
55). He now assumes command of DESRON 26 and commander, Task Group 152.0 in
charge of Maritime Security Operations in the Persian Gulf.

The Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group is on deployment in the 5th Fleet area of
operations, which will include five months in the Persian Gulf supporting Operation Iraqi
Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom and Maritime Security Operations in support of the
war on terrorism.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=34767

Chief of Staff
LCDR Craig A. Hill, former Commander Christopher P. DeGregory
http://www.cds26.surfor.navy.mil/Site%20Documents/0-5Bio.aspx?PageView=Shared

Master Chief of Command
Master Chief Aardahl
http://www.cds26.surfor.navy.mil/Site%20Documents/E9SEL.aspx?PageView=Shared

Chain of Command
http://www.truman.navy.mil/chain-csg10.html#

DESRON TWO SIX SHIP'S
http://www.cds26.surfor.navy.mil/default.aspx

USS Bulkeley (DDG-84)
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“Freedom Torch”
http://www.bulkeley.navy.mil/default.aspx
USS Bulkeley (DDG-84) History
http://navysite.de/dd/ddg84.htm
USS Bulkeley (DDG-84) Photos
http://www.navsource.org/archives/05/01084.htm

USS BULKELEY is the 34th ARLEIGH BURKE - class guided missile destroyer and the
first ship in the Navy named after Vice Adm. John Duncan Bulkeley.

USS Carney (DDG-64)
http://www.carney.navy.mil/default.aspx
USS Carney (DDG-64) History
http://www.navysite.de/dd/ddg64.htm
USS Carney (DDG-64) Photos
http://www.navsource.org/archives/05/01064.htm

The USS CARNEY is the Navy’s 14th ARLEIGH BURKE Class Destroyer. Built at the
Bath Iron Works in Bath, ME, the ship was named after Admiral Robert B. Carney, an
influential leader during World War II and the years following. The CARNEY was
commissioned in Mayport, Fla, where she is now homeported.

USS Hawes (FFG-53)
http://www.hawes.navy.mil/default.aspx
USS Hawes (FFG-53) History
http://navysite.de/ffg/FFG53.HTM
USS Hawes (FFG-53) Photos
http://www.navsource.org/archives/07/0753.htm

USS HAWES is the 47th frigate in the OLIVER HAZARD PERRY class and the first ship
in the Navy named after Rear Admiral Richard E. Hawes.

USS James E. Williams (DDG-95)
“LEAD FROM THE FRONT,”
http://www.williams.navy.mil/default.aspx
USS James E. Williams (DDG-95) History
http://www.navysite.de/dd/ddg95.htm
USS James E. Williams (DDG-95) Photos
http://www.navsource.org/archives/05/01095.htm

Named after the most-decorated enlisted man in Navy history, the USS JAMES E.
WILLIAMS is the 17th Flight IIA ARLEIGH BURKE - class guided missile destroyer and
the first ship in the Navy to bear the name.

USS Kauffman (FFG-59)
“Toujours Vedette”
http://www.kauffman.navy.mil/default.aspx
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USS Kauffman (FFG-59) History
http://navysite.de/ffg/FFG59.HTM
USS Kauffman (FFG-59) Photos
http://www.navsource.org/archives/07/0759.htm

USS KAUFFMAN is the 28th "long hull" - version in the OLIVER HAZARD PERRY
class and she is one of the last frigates of the Navy built in the 20th century.

USS McFaul (DDG-74)
http://www.mcfaul.navy.mil/default.aspx
USS Oscar Austin (DDG-79)
“Honor and Sacrifice”
http://www.oscar-austin.navy.mil/default.aspx
USS Oscar Austin (DDG-79) History
http://navysite.de/dd/ddg79.htm
USS Oscar Austin (DDG-79) Photos
http://www.navsource.org/archives/05/01079.htm

USS OSCAR AUSTIN is the lead ship of the OSCAR AUSTIN - class, a sub-class of the
ARLEIGH BURKE - class, making her the Navy's first FLIGHT IIA ARLEIGH BURKE -
class guided missile destroyer. The OSCAR AUSTIN is the first ship in the Navy to bear
the name.

USS Ross (DDG 71)
“Fortune Favors Valor”
http://www.ross.navy.mil/default.aspx
Focus on USS Ross (DDG 71)
http://www.navy.mil/local/ddg71
USS Ross (DDG 71) History
http://www.navysite.de/dd/ddg71.htm
USS Ross (DDG 71) Photos
http://www.navsource.org/archives/05/01071.htm

USS ROSS is the 21st ship in the ARLEIGH BURKE - class of AEGIS guided missile
destroyers and the first ship in the Navy named after Capt. Donald K. Ross.

USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG-81)
"The most noble Order of the Garter"
http://www.churchill.navy.mil/default.aspx
Focus on USS Winston Churchill (DDG 81)
http://www.navy.mil/local/ddg81
USS Winston Churchill (DDG 81) Story Archive
http://www.navy.mil/local/story_archive.asp?id=203
USS Winston Churchill (DDG 81)History
http://navysite.de/dd/ddg81.htm
USS Winston Churchill (DDG 81)Photos

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http://www.navsource.org/archives/05/01081.htm

USS WINSTON S. CHURCHILL is the third ship in the OSCAR AUSTIN - class but also
the 31st ARLEIGH BURKE class guided missile destroyer.

The ship is the fourth US warship named after an Englishman. As a courtesy to the ship's
namesake country, a member of the Royal Navy is assigned to the ship's crew at all times.

FORMER TASK FORCE SHIP'S/SUBS

USS Arleigh Burke (DDG-51)
“Fast and Feared”
http://www.arleighburke.navy.mil/default.aspx
Focus on USS Arleigh Burke (DDG 51)
http://www.navy.mil/local/ddg51
USS Arleigh Burke (DDG 51) Story Archive
http://www.navy.mil/local/story_archive.asp?id=450
USS Arleigh Burke (DDG-51) History
http://navysite.de/dd/ddg51.htm
USS Arleigh Burke (DDG-51) Photos
http://www.navsource.org/archives/05/01051.htm

USS ARLEIGH BURKE is the lead ship of the ARLEIGH BURKE class of guided missile
destroyers. These ships are the first destroyers in the world equipped with the AEGIS
Weapons Systems.

USS ARLEIGH BURKE was the first U.S. Navy ship designed to incorporate shaping
techniques to reduce radar cross-section to reduce their detectability and likelihood of
being targeted by enemy weapons and sensors. Originally designed to defend against
Soviet aircraft, cruise missiles, and nuclear attack submarines, this higher capability ship is
to be used in high-threat areas to conduct antiair, antisubmarine, antisurface, and strike
operations.

USS Barry (DDG-52)
“Strength and Diversty”
http://www.barry.navy.mil/default.aspx
Focus on USS Barry (DDG 52)
http://www.navy.mil/local/ddg52
USS Barry (DDG-52) History
http://navysite.de/dd/ddg52.htm
USS Barry (DDG-52) Photos
http://www.navsource.org/archives/05/01052.htm

Propelled by powerful, quick response gas turbine (jet) engines to speeds in excess of 30
knots, USS BARRY is a diverse and extremely capable ARLEIGH BURKE - class AEGIS
Guided Missile Destroyer. USS BARRY is the fourth ship in the Navy to bear the name.

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USS Mahan (DDG-72)
“Built to Fight”
http://www.mahan.navy.mil/default.aspx
USS Mahan (DDG-72) History
http://www.navysite.de/dd/ddg72.htm
USS Mahan (DDG-72) Photos
http://www.navsource.org/archives/05/01072.htm

USS MAHAN is the 22nd guided missile destroyer in the ARLEIGH BURKE class and the
twelfth ship in that class built by Bath Iron Works in Maine.

USS Nitze (DDG-94)
“Valor – Courage – Determination”
http://www.nitze.navy.mil/default.aspx
USS Nitze (DDG-94) History
http://www.navysite.de/dd/ddg94.htm
USS Nitze (DDG-94) Photos
http://www.navsource.org/archives/05/01094.htm

USS NITZE is the 16th Flight IIA ARLEIGH BURKE - class guided missile destroyer and
the fist ship in the Navy named after Paul H. Nitze.

COMCARAIRWING THREE (CVW-3)
http://www.cvw3.navy.mil
http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/cvw3.htm

Commander
Captain Fredrick Pawlowski, former Captain James Cook

Chief of Staff
Captain Lewis

Chain of Command
http://www.truman.navy.mil/chain-cvw3.html

Carrier Air Wing 3 Gets New Commander
Story Number: NNS070319-01
Release Date: 3/19/2007 8:30:00 AM

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Jymyaka Braden, USS Harry S.
Truman Public Affairs

NORFOLK (NNS) -- Capt. Fredrick Pawlowski relieved Capt. James Cook as the
Commander of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3 during a change of command ceremony aboard
USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) on March 1.

After serving as commander since September 2005, Cook accepted an instructor position at
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the Naval War College, Newport, R.I.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=28269

Deputy Commander
Captain Andrew Lewis
http://www.truman.navy.mil/cvw3_dcag.html


STRKFITRON 11 (VFA-11)
"Red Rippers"
FA-18E Hornet
Strike Fighter Squadron ELLEVEN

Red Rippers CAG 17 Nov 2005 Certified for Flight
http://www.vfa11.navy.mil
http://www.alert5.com/gallery/VFA-11

STRKFITRON 32 (VFA-32)
"Swordsmen"
FA-18 F Super Hornet

Strike Fighter Squadron THREE TWO
http://www.vfa32.navy.mil

STRKFITRON 37 (VFA-37)
"Ragin' Bulls AGIN' BULLS
FA-18C(N) Hornet

Strike Fighter Squadron THREE SEVEN
http://www.vfa37.navy.mil

STRKFITRON 105 (VFA-105)
"Gunslingers"
FA-18E Hornet

Strike Fighter Squadron ONE ZERO FIVE
http://www.highgallery.com/VFA-105Gunslingers.html
http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/vfa-105.htm

VAQRON 130 (VAQ-130)
"Zappers"
EA-6B Prowler

Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron ONE THREE ZERO
http://vaq-130.ahf.nmci.navy.mil

CARAEWRON 126 (VAW-126)
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"Seahawks"
E-2C Hawkeye

Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron ONE TWO SIX
http://www.vaw126.navy.mil
http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/vaw-126.htm

HELANTISUBRON 7 (HS-7)
"Dusty Dogs"
SH-60F / HH-60H Seahawk

Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron SEVEN
http://www.hs7.navy.mil
http://www.highgallery.com/HS-7DustyDog.html
http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/hs-7.htm

FLELOGSUPPRON 40 (VRC-40)
"Rawhides"
C-2A Greyhound

Fleet Logistics Support Squadron FOUR ZERO
http://www.vrc40.navy.mil
http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/vrc-40.htm

New Commander Pilots VRC-40 “Rawhides”

NORFOLK, Va. (NNS) -- Cmdr. Mark F. Light relieved Cmdr. Bradford L. Brown of his
duties as commanding officer (CO) of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 40, at
Naval Station Norfolk, Oct. 26.
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=26349
http://www.cvw3.navy.mil/squadrons.htm

As of 4 June 2008:

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) with CVW-3 embarked arrived Norfolk, Virginia,
with Captain Herman A. Shelanski in command, on 4 June 2008, with CCSG10
commanded by Rear Adm. Mark Fox who relieved Rear Admiral William E. Gortney
during a change-of-command ceremony held at sea in the Arabian Gulf April 19, 2008,
ending her fifth Mediterranean Sea deployment (8th & 9th voyage) operating with the
6th Fleet, her third Arabian Sea/Gulf (Persian Gulf) deployment in support of her 1st
Maritime Security Operations and her 3rd Operation Iraqi Freedom on the U. S. Navy’s
86th Arabian Sea and Persian Gulf deployment since September 1945 operating with the
5th Fleet and Central Command while no mention of Operation Enduring Freedom
operations were conducted. MSO and OIF missions were under operational control of the
US Naval Forces Central Command and 5th Fleet., Her sixth deployment ended (5
November 2007 to 4 June 2008) since her commission and approximately the U. S. Navy’s

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787th FWFD. http://www.truman.navy.mil/herald/news/12-119/12-119.html

HSTCSG - Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group is made up CCSG-10, Harry S. Truman,
Carrier Air Wing Three (CVW-3), Destroyer Squadron 26 staff, guided missile cruisers
USS San Jacinto (CG 56) and USS Hue City (CG 66); guided missile destroyers USS
Carney (DDG 64), USS Oscar Austin (DDG 79) and USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81);
USS Montpelier (SSN 765); the Canadian frigate HMCS Charlottetown (FFG 339); and
the British destroyer HMS Manchester (D 95). Carrier Air Wing Three (CVW-3) consists
of Strike Fighter Squadrons VFA-11, VFA-32, VFA-37 and VFA-105; Tactical
Electronics Warfare Squadron VAQ-130; Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron
VAW-126; and Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron HS-7.
http://www.cusnc.navy.mil/articles/2008/047.html

As of 18 April 2005:

On 18 April 2005, Harry S. Truman with CVW-3 embarked arrived Norfolk, Virginia,
with Captain James P. Gigliotti, USN in command, ending her fourth Mediterranean Sea
deployment (7th voyage) operating with the 6th Fleet, her second Arabian Sea/Gulf
(Persian Gulf) deployment in support of Exercise Arabian Gauntlet 2005 and her 2nd
Operation Iraqi Freedom on the US Navy’s 76th Arabian Sea and Persian Gulf
deployment since September 1945 operating under operational control of the US Naval
Forces Central Command and 5th Fleet. Her fifth deployment since her commission.

HST strike group comprises Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3, Commander, Rear Admiral
Joeseph Kilkenny, Carrier Strike Group TEN Commander, Cruiser Destroyer Group
(CCDG) 2 and Commander, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 26 staffs, guided-missile
cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61), guided-missile destroyers USS Mason (DDG 87) and USS
Barry (DDG 52), and attack submarine USS Albuquerque (SSN 706); USNS Arctic (T-
AOE 8).

As of 23 May 2003:

On 23 May 2003, Harry S. Truman with CVW-3 embarked arrived Norfolk, Virginia,
with Capt. Michael R. Groothousen, USN in command, with more than 20,000 loved ones
waiting on the pier to welcome the crew home, ending her second Mediterranean Sea
deployment (3rd voyage) operating with the 6th Fleet in support of Operation Southern
Watch, enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq, Operation Enduring
Freedom and what turned out to be the end of Afghan combat and the beginning of
Operation Iraqi Freedom operating under operational control of the US Naval Forces
Central Command and 5th Fleet. Her third deployment since her commission.

USS San Jacinto (CG 56); USS Oscar Austin (DDG 79); USS Mitscher (DDG 57); USS
Donald Cook (DDG 75); USS Briscoe (DD 977); USS Deyo (DD 989); USS Hawes (FFG
53); USS Pittsburgh (SSN 720); USS Montpelier (SSN 765); USNS Mount Baker (T-AE
34) and USNS Kanawha (T-AO 196) joined Harry S. Truman task group.
USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) Norfolk, Va. Official U. S. Navy Web Site – 382
http://www.truman.navy.mil
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USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) News http://www.news.navy.mil/local/cvn75
USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) Story Archive - 382A
http://www.news.navy.mil/local/story_archive.asp?id=9
USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) Photo Gallery
http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/75.htm
Commander, U.S. 2nd Fleet Story Archive
http://www.navy.mil/local/story_archive.asp?id=18
5th Fleet NEWS http://www.cusnc.navy.mil/articles/index.html
Current Aircraft Carrier Location - Current Aircraft Carrier Location -
http://www.gonavy.jp/CVLocation.html
References: 1, 72, 76, 84A, 382, 531, 533, 552 & U.S. Navy Deployment History
Resources


AIRCRAFT         DEP          AIR         TAIL      DEPART       RETURN         FLEET
CARRIER                       WING        CODE                                  D. NO.

USS Harry S.     5h Med       CVW-3       AC        5 Nov        5 June         787
Truman           Suez Canal                         2007         2008
(CVN-75)         x2
(3rd Arabian
Sea and
Persian Gulf)

        Maritime Security Operations and 3rd Operation Iraqi Freedom
SQUADRON SQUADRON NICK AIRCRAFT DESIGN TAIL                       AIRCRAFT
          NAME & PRIMARY            NICK NAME &          CODE
                ROLE              PRIMARY ROLE           Modex DESIGNATION
                                McDonnell-Douglas -
          Red Rippers -
VFA-11                          Hornet                  AC100 FA-18F
          Fighter Squadron
                                Jet Strike Fighter
                                McDonnell-Douglas -
          Swordsmen -
VF-32                           Hornet                  AC200 FA-18A
          Fighter Squadron
                                Jet Strike Fighter
                                McDonnell-Douglas -              FA-18C (N)
          Bulls – Strike
VFA-37                          Hornet                  AC300
          Fighter Squadron
                                Jet Strike Fighter
                                McDonnell-Douglas -              FA-18C (N)
          Gunslingers - Strike
VFA-105                         Hornet                  AC400
          Fighter Squadron
                                Jet Strike Fighter
                                Grumman - Prowler
          Zappers - Tactical
                                Jet Attack Bomber -
VAQ-130   Electronics Warfare                           AC500 EA-6B
                                Special electronic
          Squadron
                                installation
VAW-126   Seahawks - Carrier    Grumman - Hawkeye - 600          E-2C

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               Airborne Early        Electronics
               Warning Squadron
               Dusty Dogs -          Sikorsky – Seahawk
                                                                    SH-60F / HH-
HS-7           Helicopter Anti-      Anti-submarine -       610
                                                                    60H
               Submarine Squadron Search and Rescue
               Rawhides - Fleet      Grumman – Greyhound
VRC-40 DET.5 Logistics Support                              42xx    C-2A
               Squadron
F/A-18 Hornet, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking, E-2C Hawkeye, SH-60 Seahawk and C-2A
Greyhound




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