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Conceptual designs for a hand vacuum cleaner

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					                     A teaching and learning resource
                               for developing student’s abilities to
                                 develop conceptual designs
                                                                  at level 1 NCEA




      May provide opportunities for students to develop
           understandings that support assessment of:

      Demonstrate the use of design ideas to produce a
                                     conceptual design
                                        for an outcome
                                      Internal 6 credits




Lesley Pearce. Team Solutions Auckland University. October 2010                 1
Students need to understand the following terms:

A Brief
       a guiding document
It has:
       a conceptual statement, that explains what is to be done and why
        it should be done
       specifications that describe the physical and functional needs of an
        outcome that addresses the issue (and the practices that need to be
        followed when developing it)

This can be a student developed brief or a teacher given one. Both must have
a conceptual statement and attributes.

If developed by a student:

The brief should be based on findings from the exploration of the issue,
analysis of the context and the need/opportunity driving the project
       The brief takes into account physical and social environment where
         the technological outcome will be placed
       The brief must state what or whom the outcome is for
       The issue/context presented to the students by the teacher, from
         which the brief is developed must hold the interests of the student

Functional modelling: the on-going exploration, testing and evaluation of a
design idea. It is undertaken to gather evidence on all aspects of a potential
outcome – technical feasibility and social acceptability.

Conceptual design – a design that clearly communicates a proposed
technological outcome that has the potential to address the brief. Conceptual
designs can be presented as sketches, diagrams, technical illustrations, scale
model, computer simulations, written descriptions, material details, a toile etc

Fitness for purpose – refers to the likelihood that the outcome to address the
brief /specifications

Stakeholder feedback – asking for feedback from the key and wider
community stakeholders (people who have some stake in the outcome and/or
the technological practice undertaken to develop the outcome).




Lesley Pearce. Team Solutions Auckland University. October 2010                    2
   4 steps


                                  Technological Practice
                                                      Conceptual design          Fitness for purpose
              Functional modelling
           Researching and generating
                  design ideas



Researching:                Testing, refining and     Sketches, diagrams,        Demonstrate how
Analyse aspects such as     evaluating research       technical drawings,        the conceptual
ergonomics, sizes, shape,   findings and design       scale models,              design outcome can
aesthetics, colour,         ideas. Use of             computer simulations,      be judged as having
materials, ingredients.     stakeholder feedback      and/or written             the potential to be
Research industry case      to test ideas and         descriptions, which        “fit for purpose” as
studies with similar        inform decision-          describes the              measured against
contexts and/or             making.                   functional and             the brief. This can
technological practice.     Refinement of             aesthetic qualities of a   include evidence
Researching design ideas    attributes into           proposed                   from testing, data
can be ongoing              specifications.           technological              acquired from
                            Techniques: sketching,    outcome. Details of        simulating the
                            testing whole or parts    the materials likely to    product in use
                            of design.                be used to make the        (physical and/or
                            Testing, functional and   outcome and/or             virtual) stakeholder
                            aesthetic properties of   assembly instructions      feedback etc.
                            a proposed design         may also be used to
                                                      communicate the
                                                      features included a
                                                      conceptual design
                            What techniques and
                            strategies will be
                            used to collect data?

                               Possible Student Evidence:
Screening, analysing    A range of design ideas.         A detailed              Detailing
Research is ongoing     Creative thinking,               description of          refinements.
                        experimentation Show             how the outcome         Notes justify how
                        how ideas have                   would look like         the design was
                        changed/been refined.            and function. By        judged as “fit for
                        Photographs of functional        using above             purpose”. If any
                        modelling to test design         techniques              refinements to the
                        ideas..                                                  brief – attributes
                        Show data that has been
                        collected either from
                        research and/or testing)
                        and show how this has
                        been interpreted/acted
                        upon.
                        Interpreting stakeholder
                        feedback.
                        Evidence from above is
                        shown to have informed
                        design ideas.
                                  Planned progress reports


   Lesley Pearce. Team Solutions Auckland University. October 2010                                     3
 Read the following case study of a conceptual design for a hand held
  vacuum cleaner. Discuss the following questions individually or in
                            small groups.




   1. What type of research was carried out?




   2.What functional modelling techniques and strategies were used?




   3. What evidence is there that the designer reviewed and refined their
      ideas?




   4, What evidence is there that the testing informed the
   development of the conceptual design?




   5. How does the designer justify the conceptual design as being
   fit for purpose?




Lesley Pearce. Team Solutions Auckland University. October 2010             4
   4. Conceptual designs for a hand vacuum cleaner

file://localhost/Users/lpearce/Technology/1.3 conceptual design/Raptor.html




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This project was quick one-week design activity, taking an ordinary product
form for a very ordinary product to an exciting form. Developing a hand
vacuum device with a very subtle yet futuristic look that excites users to
interact with the product and also serves as a product of beauty in the
surrounding environment combining it with ergonomic research analysis and
working principles.




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Lesley Pearce. Team Solutions Auckland University. October 2010               5
Looking at the various problems hand appliances have on people, their users,
and also the problem of tangled wires. The affected areas are the lumbar or
back support, wrists, shoulder muscles and neck muscles. These mainly are
strained because of bad weight distribution, irrelevant handle angles and also
placement of the inner suction apparatus.




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The first task I had to do was to understand the various postures and divided
these into two categories, lower muscles and upper muscles. The lower
muscles mainly are the back and the lumbar support.




Lesley Pearce. Team Solutions Auckland University. October 2010                  6
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The second task was to understand the upper extremity muscle postures and
also at the same time various grips to design the handle. These studies
provided a great insight into the various forms I could come up with and I
based all my ideation on the studies conducted.




Lesley Pearce. Team Solutions Auckland University. October 2010              7
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The first concept was a simple hand held with an ergonomic grip and a wide
mouth for cleaning. I also thought of adding a soft hand grip as a material
change. I also designed the profile so it would be a gradual curve so as to
distribute weight right at the centre and hence would be easier to use, but with
further studies I realized that with lower functions and when reaching into
small spaces it could easily slip of the hand.

With the second iteration, i went with the same form language but with a more
streamlined approach and this was initially a great step with the gradual
curvature i achieved and hence i did a quick 3D model and rendered it to
visualize the various details i needed to add.




Lesley Pearce. Team Solutions Auckland University. October 2010                8
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I realised that a handle would be very necessary to maintain a good power grip
and also to take the stress of the wrist muscles. Maintaining the same initial
profile curvature, I came up with various sketches to add form and volume to
the profile sketch and ended up with the final design sketch at the bottom.




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With a lot more sketching I concluded how the concept would work and what
technology should be used and the placement of the buttons, materials,
manufacturing process to be used etc




Lesley Pearce. Team Solutions Auckland University. October 2010              9
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Also to validate my findings I did a number of physical models to test them in
actual use and also at the ergo lab with EMG and find out the stress on the
muscles. Model C was the most comfortable and also the most ergonomic of
the three and I took it to 3D and worked with Alias to create the sweeping
outer surfaces. The transitions were very hard to model because of the subtle
changes between the handle and the main body.




                                       QuickTime™ and a
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These were the various postures that were tested to find out the most
comfortable and ergonomic handle positions. I finally settled with the gradual
angular neutral posture




Lesley Pearce. Team Solutions Auckland University. October 2010                  10
                                       QuickTime™ and a
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                                are neede d to see this picture.




                                            QuickTime™ an d a
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I continued to sketch some more to finalize the details and some last minute
ideas still popped up. The final 3D model was modelled with Alias® and
Solidworks® and was rendered with Hypershot®. It contains a unique static
dust holder that can be reused. The inner motor is a small one as most of the
dust adheres to the dust holder where the holder is charged with negative ions
to attract dust particles. It also has a wide mouth for cleaning and a dust
indicator to alert users that the dust holder is full. Its charged via a DC output
and the batteries are rechargeable.



Lesley Pearce. Team Solutions Auckland University. October 2010                 11
Sentence starters when evaluating own design ideas and testing:


I found from testing …(materials, joining techniques, stretching etc), that ….

I wanted to test the (strength, durability, waste etc) and by doing this I
discovered ….

I selected to use … because…

Testing the … allowed me to prove ….

By doing this I found out that ….

My sketches allowed me to investigate ….

When I made a scaled model I discovered ……


I asked three people who experience the same problem what they thought of
this design idea and they suggested …. so I decided to adjust


I have proved this is” fit for purpose” as it ….

The materials selected after testing, will be suitable for manufacturing the
product because …

The materials selected after testing, are environmentally friendly (non harmful
and sustainable) because ….

The models allowed me to … gain feedback about … and then I selected one to
refine further as it…

By experimenting with a variety of construction processes I found ….

I found that I could enhance the … without compromising any specifications …




Lesley Pearce. Team Solutions Auckland University. October 2010                  12
                                                             Draft Achievement Standard

Subject Reference                  Technology 1.3
Title                              Demonstrate the use of design ideas to produce a
                                   conceptual design for an outcome
Level          1                   Credits       6             Assessment       Internal
This achievement standard involves generating and testing design ideas to develop a
conceptual design to address a brief.

Achievement Criteria

Achievement                       Achievement with Merit           Achievement with
                                                                   Excellence

 Demonstrate the use of           Demonstrate the use of          Demonstrate the use of
  design ideas to produce a         informed design ideas to         refined design ideas to
  conceptual design for an          produce a conceptual             produce a conceptual
  outcome.                          design for an outcome.           design for an outcome.

Explanatory Notes

1       This achievement standard is derived from Level 6 of the Technology learning area in
        The New Zealand Curriculum, Learning Media, Ministry of Education, 2007, and is
        related to the material in the Teaching and Learning Guide for Technology, Ministry
        of Education, 2010 at http://seniorsecondary.tki.org.nz.

        Appropriate reference information is available in Safety and Technology Education: A
        Guidance Manual for New Zealand Schools, Learning Media, Ministry of Education,
        1998; and The Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992, and in the Technology
        Curriculum Support, October 2007 that can be found at
        http://www.techlink.org.nz/curriculum-support/papers/practice/outcome-
        dev/page2.htm and http://www.techlink.org.nz/curriculum-
        support/papers/knowledge/tech-model/index.htm.

        Further information can be found at http://www.techlink.org.nz.

2       Definitions:
        Demonstrate the use of design ideas to produce a conceptual design for an outcome
        involves:
         generating design ideas
         testing design ideas through functional modelling
         using stakeholder feedback to inform decision making
         using findings from functional modelling to select design ideas
         producing a conceptual design for an outcome
         determining the outcome’s potential fitness for purpose.




Lesley Pearce. Team Solutions Auckland University. October 2010                            13
     Demonstrate the use of informed design ideas to produce a conceptual design for an
     outcome involves:
      creating design ideas informed by research and analysis of existing outcomes
      testing and evaluating design ideas through functional modelling
      using findings from functional modelling to review design ideas.

     Demonstrate the use of refined design ideas to produce a conceptual design for an
     outcome involves:
      testing, refining and evaluating design ideas through functional modelling and
        ongoing research
      interpreting stakeholder feedback to inform decision making
      justifying the potential fitness for purpose of the outcome.

3    A conceptual design clearly communicates a proposed technological outcome that
     has the potential to address the brief. It is a detailed description of how the outcome
     would look and function. Conceptual designs can be presented using a variety of
     techniques which may include but are not limited to: free hand sketches, diagrams,
     technical drawings, scale models, computer simulations, written descriptions, details
     of materials, components and/or assembly instructions.

4    Potential fitness for purpose refers to the likelihood of the outcome to address a brief.
     The brief used for this standard must allow for a range of outcomes and include the
     purpose and probable attributes of the outcome. The brief may be provided by the
     teacher or developed by the student.

5    Functional modelling is used to explore and evaluate developing design ideas. It is
     undertaken to gather evidence on all aspects of the outcome including its likely
     technical feasibility and social acceptability.

6    Conditions of Assessment related to this achievement standard can be found at
     www.tki.org.nz/e/community/ncea/conditions-assessment.php.




Lesley Pearce. Team Solutions Auckland University. October 2010                             14
Lesley Pearce. Team Solutions Auckland University. October 2010   15

				
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