Ravensbourne SED

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					Ravensbourne
QAA Institutional Review:
Self-Evaluation Document
February 2012
Introduction

This Self Evaluation Document (SED) was prepared for Ravensbourne’s Institutional
Review by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA) in May 2012.

The commentary in the various SED sections was arrived at in discussions and meetings
with the Academic Development Managers (ADMs), academic staff and key support staff
in which Ravensbourne’s position was considered against sections of the QAA Academic
Infrastructure. Sections have been widely circulated for comment within the Institution.
Fuller drafts have been considered by Management Committee and circulated to members
of Academic Board.

Student representatives and the Ravensbourne Student Union (RSU) have been given
access to the document and their views canvassed via their representatives on sub-
committees of the Academic Board. The Student Written Submission (SWS) was not
available at the time this document was finalised. The final version of this SED is available
to all staff and students on Ravensbourne’s Intranet.

The SED follows the suggested structure set out in the Guidelines for producing the self-
evaluation document (SED) for Institutional review which includes collaborative provision
published on the QAA website. We have chosen to include more narrative than the
guidance suggests. This is because Ravensbourne has seen significant change since its
last Institutional Audit and it is believed that it will enable the Reviewers to more fully
understand our contexts.

The SED describes Ravensbourne’s procedures for assuring the academic standards of
its awards; the processes for ensuring and enhancing the quality of student learning
opportunities; and the means by which it ensures the accuracy and completeness of
information it provides for applicants and the public. It reflects the effectiveness of these
processes and procedures and their likely future development, and identifies the evidence
that the institution is using to substantiate the claims made in the text.

Wherever possible, references to existing policies and procedures are provided in the form
of hyperlinks to Ravensbourne’s Intranet, which are available to staff and students. If the
Review Team would prefer, all the evidence is available as a file that can be uploaded to
the QAA site. Our Intranet has recently been re-designed and re-launched and where that
transition is not complete or the document would not be commonly available, it is provided
as a file for the Review Team. Links to the main committee papers for the last three years
are also provided. References to QAA guidance are to both the UK Quality Code for
Higher Education and the former Academic Infrastructure.




                                              2
Contents

SECTION 1: Brief description of Ravensbourne .............................................................7

   1.1     Introduction ...................................................................................................................... 7

   1.2     Mission.............................................................................................................................. 8

   1.3     Major changes since last review ..................................................................................... 8
              Relocation..................................................................................................................... 9
              Laptop Project ............................................................................................................ 10
              Skillset Academy status .............................................................................................. 10
              New validating partner ................................................................................................ 10
              Postgraduate redevelopment ...................................................................................... 11
              Undergraduate redevelopment ................................................................................... 11
              New modes of delivery (validation 2010-11) ............................................................... 12
              Enterprise and Entrepreneurship ................................................................................ 13
              Academic restructuring ............................................................................................... 13
              New internal validation system.................................................................................... 14
              Quality Enhancement Strategy ................................................................................... 14

   1.4     Key challenges Ravensbourne faces............................................................................ 15
             Consolidation .............................................................................................................. 15
             New ways of working .................................................................................................. 15
             Student engagement .................................................................................................. 16
             Student experience ..................................................................................................... 16
             Learning and teaching strategy 2012-13 to 2015-16 ................................................... 17
             Applied research ......................................................................................................... 17
             Changes and development in the HE landscape......................................................... 18
             Taught Degree Awarding Powers (TDAP)................................................................... 19

   1.5     Implications of changes and challenges for safeguarding academic standards and
            quality of student’s learning opportunities ................................................................. 19



SECTION 2: How Ravensbourne has addressed the recommendations of the last
audit ..................................................................................................................................20

   2.1     Advisable recommendations ......................................................................................... 20

   2.2     Desirable recommendations ......................................................................................... 21

   2.3     Features of good practice.............................................................................................. 21



SECTION 3: Ravensbourne’s threshold academic standards .....................................23

   3.1     Each qualification is allocated to the appropriate level of the Framework for Higher
           Education Qualification (FHEQ) ................................................................................... 23

   3.2     Use of External Examiners is strong and scrupulous ................................................. 23

   3.3     Design, approval, monitoring and review of assessment strategies are effective in
           ensuring that students have opportunity to demonstrate learning outcomes of the
           award.............................................................................................................................. 24

                                                                       3
                Approval of Assessment processes ............................................................................ 24
                Project briefs ............................................................................................................... 25
                Assessment Regulations ............................................................................................ 25
                Plagiarism and academic misconduct ......................................................................... 26
                Assessment Boards .................................................................................................... 26

   3.4     Design, approval, monitoring and review of programmes enables standards to be
           set and maintained and allows students to demonstrate learning outcomes of the
           award.............................................................................................................................. 26
             Portfolio Development Group ...................................................................................... 27
             Internal validation........................................................................................................ 27
             Programme specifications ........................................................................................... 27
             Unit specifications ....................................................................................................... 27
             Programme amendments ........................................................................................... 28
             Annual Course Monitoring .......................................................................................... 28
             Revalidation ................................................................................................................ 29
             Strategic Review ......................................................................................................... 29

   3.5     Subject benchmark statements are used effectively in programme design, approval,
           delivery and review to inform standards of awards .................................................... 29



SECTION 4: The quality of students’ learning opportunities (teaching and academic
support) ............................................................................................................................30

   4.1     Professional standards for teaching and support of learning are supported ............ 30
              Staff Recruitment ........................................................................................................ 31
              HEA Accreditation....................................................................................................... 31
              Induction and Probation .............................................................................................. 31
              Annual Appraisal......................................................................................................... 31
              Staff Development ...................................................................................................... 32
              Teaching hours and budgeting.................................................................................... 32
              Staff loading................................................................................................................ 33
              Peer Observation ........................................................................................................ 33
              Student Feedback on Teaching .................................................................................. 33
              External engagement .................................................................................................. 33
              Research and Scholarship .......................................................................................... 34

   4.2     Learning resources are appropriate to allow students to achieve the learning
           outcomes of their programmes .................................................................................... 34
              Learning Environment ................................................................................................. 34
              Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) ............................................................................ 35
              Library resources ........................................................................................................ 35
              Central Loan Resource ............................................................................................... 36
              Timetabled Space ....................................................................................................... 36
              Laptops ....................................................................................................................... 37
              Software ..................................................................................................................... 37
              Resource specification ................................................................................................ 37
              Student Feedback on Resources ................................................................................ 38

   4.3     There is an effective contribution of students to quality assurance .......................... 38
              Student Union ............................................................................................................. 38
              Student Representatives............................................................................................. 38
              Student Parliament ..................................................................................................... 39
              Student Liaison Committees ....................................................................................... 39
              Student Feedback....................................................................................................... 39

                                                                       4
               Student Involvement in Committees and Processes ................................................... 40

   4.4    There is effective use of management information to safeguard quality and
          standards and to promote enhancement of student learning opportunities ............ 40

   4.5    Policies and procedures used to admit students are clear, fair, explicit and
          consistently applied ...................................................................................................... 41

   4.6    There are effective complaints and appeals procedures ............................................ 42
             Academic Appeals ...................................................................................................... 42
             Complaints.................................................................................................................. 42
             University level review of complaints and academic appeals ...................................... 42

   4.7    There is an approach to career education, information, advice and guidance (CEIAG)
          that is adequately quality assured ............................................................................... 43

   4.8    The quality of learning opportunities is managed to enable the entitlements of
          disabled students to be met ......................................................................................... 44

   4.9    The quality of learning opportunities for international students is appropriate ........ 44
             Recruitment and Admissions ...................................................................................... 44
             Highly Trusted Sponsor Status ................................................................................... 45
             Support and information for international students ...................................................... 45

   4.10 Appropriate support and guidance is provided to enable postgraduate research
        students to complete their programmes and to enable staff involved in research
        programmes to fulfil their responsibilities .................................................................. 45

   4.11 The quality of learning opportunities delivered as part of collaborative
        arrangements is managed effectively to enable students to achieve their awards .. 46

   4.12 The quality of learning opportunities delivered through flexible and distributed
        arrangements, including e-learning, is managed effectively ..................................... 47

   4.13 The quality of learning opportunities delivered through work-based and placement
        learning is effective ....................................................................................................... 47

   4.14 A student charter, or equivalent document, setting out the mutual expectations of
        the institution and its students, is available................................................................ 48



SECTION 5: The quality of public information, including that produced for students
and applicants ..................................................................................................................50
               Institutional Information ............................................................................................... 50
               Intranet ....................................................................................................................... 51
               Student Information .................................................................................................... 51
               UCAS ......................................................................................................................... 51
               Unistats ...................................................................................................................... 51
               Key Information Set (KIS) ........................................................................................... 51



SECTION 6: The institution’s enhancement of students’ learning opportunities ......52
   6.1    Quality Enhancement Strategy...................................................................................... 52
            Planning and target setting for improvement ............................................................... 52
            Identification and dissemination of good practice internally and externally .................. 52

                                                                      5
               Continuous improvement and innovation in the curriculum and its delivery ................. 53
               Technology for learning .............................................................................................. 53
               Deepening the interaction and inter relationship between Ravensbourne’s academic
               provision and the world of work ................................................................................... 54
               Responding positively to the evolving needs of a diverse student body ...................... 55
               Involvement of students in the academic life of the Institution ..................................... 55
               Review of quality and regulatory frameworks .............................................................. 55



SECTION 7: Thematic element of review .......................................................................56


Acronyms .........................................................................................................................57


Referencing ......................................................................................................................59




Appendix 1 – Student numbers by programme and level of study

Appendix 2 – Ravensbourne Committee Diagram

Appendix 3 – Confidential note




                                                                  6
SECTION 1: Brief description of Ravensbourne
1.1     Introduction

1.1.1   Ravensbourne is a nationally regarded, small specialist higher education
        institution. The Institution was previously known as Ravensbourne College of
        Design and Communication but shortened its name to Ravensbourne in April
        2010, following a review of its branding and to reposition itself strategically in
        advance of its move to Greenwich. Its students and other stakeholders had long
        used the name ‘Ravensbourne’.

1.1.2   Ravensbourne has offered undergraduate higher education since the 1960s and
        postgraduate education since 1999. It is well known in the creative industries and
        amongst peer institutions for the employability of its graduates and their
        disproportionately high level of success in national competitions.

1.1.3   Currently, 1871 students are enrolled at Ravensbourne, the majority of which
        [1541 (82%)] are enrolled on higher education programmes. 1479 students are on
        undergraduate programmes and 62 on postgraduate (see Appendix 1: Statistics).

1.1.4   Ravensbourne has a strong commitment to increasing the diversity of entrants to
        the creative industries and the continuum of education in the creative disciplines.
        As part of that commitment, Ravensbourne also offers a small number of specialist
        Further Education courses and 330 students are enrolled on these programmes.

1.1.5   Ravensbourne has over two decades developed and evolved a distinctiveness
        [Strategic Plan 2010-16 1] based on:

             championing the creative use of digital technology in its discipline areas;
             maintaining strong links with the creative industries it serves;
             delivering a curriculum shaped by current industry practice and an informed
              view of where the creative industries are going;
             an approach to learning and teaching which seeks to embed the
              professionalism, generic employment skills and increasingly the enterprise
              skills which give our graduates an edge when they leave;
             placing a strong emphasis on collaboration and interdisciplinary working.

1.1.6   Over the summer of 2010, Ravensbourne fulfilled a long-term strategic goal to
        relocate and moved from its former Chislehurst campus to a new purpose built
        facility in North Greenwich. It ceased operations at its former Chislehurst Campus
        in May 2010 and opened its new purpose built facility on the Greenwich Peninsula
        to students in October 2010.

1.1.7   The relocation project emerged in response to Ravensbourne’s concern to ensure
        its long-term sustainability. Like many smaller institutions, it had concerns related
        to its size and the renewal of its estate. It also had a concern about its
        geographical isolation in terms of transport infrastructure. The costs of
        refurbishment of its former site were not affordable and estates development could
        only be achieved through releasing capital from the sale of the site as it had a high
        value for housing. Ravensbourne conducted an options appraisal during 2003 and
        concluded that its longer term academic and financial interests were best served
        by relocating. Accordingly, Ravensbourne took the decision to sell its site and use
                                             7
        the funds released to finance the development of a new purpose built education
        facility on the Greenwich Peninsula.

1.1.8   The location is well served with a range of public transport connections and it is
        within easy reach of central London. It is ideally placed to allow Ravensbourne to
        fulfil the enterprise and innovation aspects of its mission, to deepen the interaction
        between its academic activity and the capital’s creative sectors, and to be an
        active participant in the economic regeneration of Greenwich, East London and
        the Thames Corridor. The new site is close to areas identified as a higher
        education ‘cold spot’ in that historically they have had very low participation rates.

1.1.9   The RIBA award winning 21st century campus, designed by Foreign Office
        Architects, simulates the environment and emergent working practices of creative
        professionals. It is equipped with a large, six-channel HD TV studio, a four-channel
        studio, two four-channel linked large atria, HD Virtual studio and Dolby Surround
        Sound Studio. All are supported by high-end editing and colour grading suites
        (including Mystika for 3D), Dolby Mastering studio, Final Cut and Avid
        workstations, ingest and record systems, FORK based digital asset management
        system, automated playout system supporting IPTV channels, mobile delivery and
        Digital Terrestrial Television (DTT). The latest technologies for 2D and 3D printing
        and rapid fabrication, enable students and professionals to go from virtual
        prototype to physical product or innovation within 24 hours.

1.1.10 The new learning environment and its location enhances our ability to innovate in
       our approaches to learning and teaching and to fulfill our aspiration to be a higher
       education institution for the 21st century. It allows us to intensify our innovation,
       incubation and business engagement activity. We now support nearly 100 small
       businesses through our Incubation Centre and through our links with Greenwich
       Council’s incubator. Ravensbourne was one of the founding partners of the David
       Cameron supported Cisco initiative, the National Virtual Incubator (NVI).

1.2     Mission

1.2.1   The Strategic Plan 2010-16 [1] reaffirms Ravensbourne’s mission “to provide
        innovative and dynamic educational opportunities through high quality teaching,
        learning and student support. We are a national institution with international
        perspectives but we attach particular importance to contributing to London’s social
        and cultural vibrancy and its economic prosperity. We encourage creativity and
        enterprise in our students and staff and champion the creative exploitation of
        digital technologies in design and communication.” [Strategic Plan 2010-16 1]

1.3     Major changes since last review

1.3.1   Ravensbourne has evolved and matured substantially since the 2007 Institutional
        Audit. The most significant changes include:

             Relocation
             Laptop Project
             Skillset Academy status
             New validating partner
             Postgraduate redevelopment
             Undergraduate redevelopment

                                              8
             New modes of delivery (validation 2010-11)
             Enterprise and Entrepreneurship
             Academic restructuring
             New internal validation system
             Enhancement Strategy

        Relocation

1.3.2   The most significant change since the last review is that the institutional relocation
        project was successfully completed. As noted above, the move to the new campus
        took place over the summer of 2010. Planning for the transition and preparation for
        post-relocation operation dominated the period leading up to relocation. Pre-
        relocation planning included a move to paperlite working, and the development of
        plans for supporting students during the summer transition. Staff and students
        worked remotely over the summer vacation with a drop-in centre at the adjacent
        Mitre Passage building hired over the summer for face-to-face meetings. All
        administrative support was maintained without interruption, including Registry and
        Student Services. Ravensbourne had purposefully maintained a light staff
        development calendar in 2009-10 in order to allow staff space and time to prepare
        for relocation. The tail-end of the 2009-10 academic year was marked by
        workshops and faculty based staff development related to supporting students
        during transition (e.g. increased use of our Moodle-based VLE) and to prepare
        staff for teaching in the new spaces in the new learning environment post
        relocation. During the transition period, a series of faculty meetings (June and
        September 2010) took place focusing on contingency planning, preparing for new
        ways of working, and setting up first term course delivery.

1.3.3   Initial occupation required us to orientate staff and induct them to the equipment
        and learning spaces in September 2010. There was a robust programme of
        induction activities for all staff related to the new building to ensure that they were
        fully orientated in their work space, familiarised with the learning environments,
        and trained in the operation of visual and audio equipment in those spaces.
        Additionally, there were workshops related to the new prototyping and media
        spaces. A thorough re-induction took place for all continuing students as well as
        an induction for the new annual intake. The period since relocation has been
        devoted to bedding into the new building, dealing with inevitable snagging issues
        and adapting our learning approaches to the new opportunities it provides.

1.3.4   Leaving the challenges aside, the new location and campus have brought us many
        opportunities and allowed us to enhance the student experience in ways that
        would have been unimaginable on our previous site. It has proved a magnet for
        industry and the professions to which we relate. The traditionally strong
        interactions that we have with these stakeholders have intensified. Students have
        been able to attend and get involved with industry and professional conferences
        related to 3D stereoscopy, HD, Mozilla and YouTube, among others. For instance,
        the student experience on the MA/MSc 3D Stereoscopic Media and other
        pathways are considerably enhanced by its access to an annual conference on the
        3D aesthetic; this year the event is likely to attract over 500 delegates. Industry
        Days for students have continued since relocation and have been particularly
        strong and well attended (and attractive not only to enrolled students but also
        graduates) [Annual Monitoring Report 2010-11 paragraph 21k 2a].


                                               9
        Laptop Project

1.3.5   In preparation for relocation, Ravensbourne reviewed its approach to general
        information and communication technology provision. It began to promote a
        personalised learning approach through the use of laptops and away from fixed
        computing towards provision of high end equipment. Fixed computing was
        therefore withdrawn in stages and a laptop bursary was introduced in 2008-09 and
        gradually rolled out across all undergraduate programmes. This was not without its
        difficulties and received mixed feedback from students, particularly from those not
        covered by the scheme as it rolled out. As desktop computer lab provision was
        reduced on the old site, loan laptops were made available to students outside the
        bursary to address negative feedback [Annual Monitoring Report 2008-09
        paragraph 26i 3].

1.3.6   The scheme is now fully implemented. All new entrants are required to own a
        laptop. Ravensbourne publishes a suitable specification and it operates a bursary
        scheme available automatically to all entrants to subsidise the purchase as well as
        passing on the significant discount it gains from the large-scale purchase. A
        supplementary bursary is available for students from disadvantaged backgrounds.
        Many free and subsidised software packages are also available to students.
        Through a strategic partnership with Adobe, Ravensbourne is able (at significant
        discount) to provide Adobe Creative Professional Suite licenses to all students and
        staff at no cost to the user.

        Skillset Academy status

1.3.7   Ravensbourne achieved accreditation as a Skillset Media Academy in December
        2007. Following this, Skillset also accredited the animation Foundation Degree
        and associated top-up programme in summer 2008. Involvement in the Skillset
        Academy network and the support of Skillset has enabled Ravensbourne to
        develop its higher education offer (see New Modes paragraph 1.3.14 below) and
        to accelerate its engagement with media and creative industries and its offer in
        terms of conferences and training. Ravensbourne submitted for re-accreditation as
        a Skillset Academy in January 2012 and in line with the revised procedure for the
        accreditation of 10 individual programmes [full application is available on request].
        This is being scrutinised currently and we are awaiting the arrangement of dates
        for review visits.

        New validating partner

1.3.8   Ravensbourne entered into a validation agreement with City University, London in
        Autumn 2007 [City Recognition Report, 2007 4]. Prior to this, Ravensbourne had
        been an affiliated college of the University of Sussex since 1995 (re-recognised on
        a cyclical basis, most recently in 2006). The period between 2007 and now has
        been one of transition as programmes validated by the University of Sussex were
        run out, while entering cohorts enrolled on programmes validated by City
        University. It has also been a period in which Ravensbourne adapted its
        regulations and procedures to align more closely with those of the new validator.
        This was not without its challenges. There remain a very small number of students
        ‘writing up’ under the University of Sussex during the current 2011-12 academic
        year (see Appendix 1: Statistics).



                                             10
        Postgraduate redevelopment

1.3.9   In 2007-08, Ravensbourne undertook a validation of the postgraduate area of
        study. The outcome of this validation was a new suite of programmes that enables
        cross-disciplinary collaboration within a common framework that more fully
        reflected Ravensbourne’s established strengths. Initially, seven pathways and
        named exit awards were encompassed within the framework [City External
        Validation Report, February 2008 5].

1.3.10 An additional six pathways were developed in 2008-09, which were internally
       validated in April 2009 [6] and externally validated in May 2009 [7] with City
       University. As part of the latter development, Ravensbourne also developed an
       extended two-year Masters mode, Master of Innovation/Master of Fine Arts (M
       Innov/MFA), which provides students with the opportunity to extend their study for
       a further academic year in order to achieve a more rounded and professional
       realisation of their project and/or the practical incubation of its enterprise potential
       or the commercialisation of its intellectual property. A new pathway in 3D
       Stereoscopic Media was added during 2010-11 [8].

1.3.11 The contrast with the postgraduate provision in existence at the time of our last
       institutional audit is tangible. At that time, the provision consisted of two
       programmes and had only 7 students enrolled. Overall, Ravensbourne’s
       postgraduate community remains relatively small but the MA/MSc structure allows
       the delivery of the specialisms with relatively low numbers. Working as they often
       do, at the forefront of their creative areas, these students form a vibrant creative
       subgroup within our student body and contribute to the intellectual ambitions of the
       institution as a whole.

        Undergraduate redevelopment

1.3.12 In anticipation of validation and relocation, and the transfer of undergraduate
       provision to City University validation, Ravensbourne’s Academic Board undertook
       a review of its undergraduate framework [9a-c] during 2008. Consideration was
       given to whether a fully modular structure should be adopted but it was concluded
       that the issues associated with this would outweigh the benefits. Nevertheless, a
       single programme structure was adopted to enable Ravensbourne to gain most of
       the benefits of modularisation while maintaining a strong emphasis on single
       honours specialism. Ravensbourne’s entire undergraduate provision was internally
       validated over two events (one per Faculty) between January and February 2009
       [10a-b]
               and externally validated with City University across three events between
       April and May 2009 [7]. This validation process also involved the development and
       validation of some new awards.

1.3.13 From autumn 2009, all new entering students were enrolled on courses validated
       by City University. All continuing second level cohorts were offered the opportunity
       to transfer their registration to the City validated programmes, and eight cohorts
       elected to take this option. One third level course also chose to transfer to the
       newly validated City University validated programme. Student meetings were held
       across each course and ballots held. Only where a clear majority of students were
       in favour of the transfer were the City validated programmes rolled in early.
       Although some cohorts chose to transfer, a number of cohorts continued on
       programmes validated by the University of Sussex. This required a period of joint

                                              11
        examination boards.

        New modes of delivery (validation 2010-11)

1.3.14 Although the undergraduate provision had only been validated with City University
       in 2008-09, Ravensbourne decided to return its entire undergraduate programme
       to validation in 2010-11.

1.3.15 In autumn 2010, it became clear that the higher education funding landscape was
       about to change radically. The full ramifications of the Browne Review were not yet
       fully apparent but it could be seen that public funding would diminish and that the
       costs of higher education would transfer to the student. Like many institutions,
       Ravensbourne moved quickly to consider how its programmes might adapt to the
       new landscape. Internally, another driver was the early experience of occupying
       the new building. It became apparent early on that significant changes were
       necessary to ensure that the opportunities of the new building were fully exploited.

1.3.16 The validation in 2008-09 of the entire undergraduate programme had enabled the
       introduction of a new core curriculum element across the undergraduate portfolio
       related to Enterprise and Entrepreneurship (see 1.3.19 below) alongside existent
       core units, providing students with contextual and theoretical perspectives on their
       practical work and underpinning their employability skills. The launch of the new
       core units was not entirely successful and there was considerable negative
       feedback from students as to their fit and relevance. There were additional issues
       in relation to elements of overlap between the Enterprise and Entrepreneurship
       (E&E) units and the then Personal and Professional Development (PPD) units. It
       had been envisaged that these units would be delivered collaboratively between
       the individual subject clusters/courses and the Institution’s Enterprise and
       Innovation Unit but there were problems in delivery from a staffing point of view
       and in practice students perceived them as ‘bolted-on’. Adjustments were made to
       delivery during 2009-10 but it became apparent that this alone would not address
       the issues and it was decided to revisit the content and structure of the core units
       during validation in 2010-11. However, primarily, the aim of the 2010-11 validation
       was to add an accelerated two year fast-track mode to all honours degrees.

1.3.17 Ravensbourne has been known for innovation in learning and teaching and has
       offered a fast-track two year accelerated delivery in one or two subject areas since
       the mid 1990s. Ravensbourne’s previous location in Chislehurst was poorly served
       by public transport and as such was a barrier to the development of a part time
       mode, which has only been available on the postgraduate courses. All
       Ravensbourne’s undergraduate (UG) courses were internally validated during
       2010-11 [11a-c] and externally validated in May 2011 with City University [8] to allow
       a fast-track mode. Originally, it was intended that a part-time mode would also be
       developed for all its honours programmes. The validation of this mode, however,
       has been deferred pending further development work. Although all programmes
       are validated for fast-track delivery, only one programme is on offer for a
       September 2012 start.

1.3.18 Some new programmes were also developed as part of this validation. For
       instance, many of Ravensbourne’s foundation degrees and associated ‘top-up’
       degrees were converted into BAs in response to changes in funding and student
       demand in 2010, an FdA Editing and Post Production: Industry Practice was
       validated in 2010-11 [11a-c and 8] to cater for those students who would prefer to gain
                                              12
        a higher education qualification through work-based learning. In 2010-11,
        Ravensbourne responded to the launch of Skillset’s national “Build Your Own MA”
        Media Practice Short Course Framework, validating the MA/MSc Professional
        Media Practice [11a-c and 8]. This flexible, modular, postgraduate programme is
        designed to be attractive to, and meet the needs of, professionals working in the
        media and creative industries, allowing them to undertake CPD while gaining
        credit towards a postgraduate qualification.

        Enterprise and Entrepreneurship

1.3.19 It is part of Ravensbourne’s mission to develop enterprising graduates and it is
       committed to the agendas set out in the Cox Review of Creativity in Business
       (2005) and the Leitch Review of Skills (2006). Complimenting its traditional
       strengths in developing technically strong graduates with good employability skills
       and experience in collaborative working, Ravensbourne has sought increasingly to
       develop a more ‘T-shaped’ curriculum where depth of specialist knowledge and
       understanding is balanced by cross-disciplinary perspectives and a broader
       business awareness [12]. The aims are twofold: equip our graduates to deal with
       the challenges and opportunities afforded by the convergence of the creative
       professions, the emergence of multi-disciplinary practice fostered by affordable
       and accessible technology and the development of new business models; and to
       broaden the opportunities available to our graduates in the future.

1.3.20 Enterprise orientated units had been incorporated within the postgraduate
       structure during the validations of 2007-08. Enterprise and Entrepreneurship
       (E&E) units were introduced in each level of the undergraduate framework in the
       2008-09 validation with City University. These built sequentially on each other and
       aimed to nurture enterprising attitudes, values, skills and behaviours with the
       entrepreneurial ‘heat’ gradually increasing through the undergraduate levels.
       These units were revisited during 2010-11 to address the negative feedback from
       students and issues in delivery referred to above (see paragraph 1.3.16). The
       redevelopment sought to reinforce the purpose of the units but also to tailor the
       content increasingly to the ‘cluster’ (see below) and course, and to address the
       student perception of relevance. The curriculum was revisited through a process of
       ‘co-creation’ workshops with existing students, involving approximately 90
       students from across all levels and courses (including foundation diploma
       students) in late January and early February 2011 [19 and 20]. The outcome of the
       redevelopment and validation was a revised curriculum stream. In Level 1,
       students engage with current events/trends/technology and learn the basics of
       business planning, basic market research, IPR, and budgeting. In Level 2,
       students engage with marketing strategy and in Level 3 with the launch of a ‘real’
       business enterprise. A highlight of delivery is ‘Penrose Market’, a fair at which third
       level students market their enterprise with the aim of real cash transactions and
       expressions of interest.

        Academic restructuring

1.3.21 Prior to Summer 2011, Ravensbourne was organised as two undergraduate
       faculties (Faculty of Design and Faculty of Communication Media) and Further
       Education and Postgraduate areas of study. Having successfully relocated the
       institution to the Greenwich Peninsula in September 2010, Ravensbourne has
       reviewed its course portfolio and academic management structure in the light of
       the move and also in response to the substantial cuts impacting higher education.

                                             13
       Another driver for the undergraduate validation of 2010-11 was ensuring the fit of
       programmes to ‘clusters’ – an appropriate grouping of courses overseen
       managerially by an Academic Development Manager. A decision was made to
       create one faculty organised in three clusters [Organogram 13].

1.3.22 The new management structure was iterated in detail over a three-month period at
       Senior Management level. It is intended that the new structure will help to remove
       artificial barriers between disciplines; refocus faculty management in order to
       strengthen operational management; and prioritise efficient implementation of the
       new corporate strategy covering such issues as the development of applied
       research and the strengthening of subject specialisms; continuously improve the
       student experience through responsive systems and proper staff-student
       collaboration; and ensure that staff receive appropriate support and development
       opportunities. The new structure has a matrix aspect with each of the Academic
       Development Managers (ADMs) responsible, across our provision, for a strategic
       theme [Organogram 13]. In their original conception, these themes were the
       student experience, applied research and development, and commercial
       development. However, following a poor recruitment round for the latter position
       and feedback from the interim postholder and the other ADMs, it has been decided
       to reposition this to focus on learning innovation.

1.3.23 Ravensbourne had already adapted its deliberative Committee structure in 2008-
       09 replacing the former Faculty Committees with a single Curriculum and
       Programmes Board and discipline based Boards of Study meetings [Academic
       Board minutes 21/10/08 item 09.05]. This was a response in part to staff feedback
       about the number of meetings, in part to the requirements of the new validator and
       in part a preparation for a move to a single faculty.

       New internal validation system

1.3.24 Following from the previous QAA Institutional Audit, Ravensbourne recognised
       that the event-based system for programme approval, monitoring and review that it
       then operated was rather burdensome and possibly excessive for a small
       institution [Mid Cycle Follow Up Report June 2010 14]. Given the internal and
       external validation [5] of all the postgraduate provision during the academic year
       2007-08 and the entire undergraduate [7] provision during the academic year 2008-
       09, it was felt that it would have been unwise to trial a new system at that time.
       Ravensbourne therefore decided to move to a committee-based system of internal
       validation in the 2009-10 academic year. Revised procedures for a committee-
       based system of internal validation were developed and implemented during 2010-
       11 and adjusted following implementation [15a-b].

       Quality Enhancement Strategy

1.3.25 Since 2007, Ravensbourne has worked towards its own definition of enhancement
       and being more explicit about adding value to the student experience. The
       emphasis in the quality systems has moved towards the identification and
       dissemination of good practice and the encouragement of innovation. A Quality
       Enhancement Strategy [16] has been developed, with eight aims together with a
       programme of actions to achieve these. This strategy is maintained as a separate
       document, pending its possible incorporation into the Learning and Teaching
       Strategy when the latter is next reviewed. Progress against actions so far was
       discussed recently at Quality Development Committee [QDC 31/01/12 paper 06].

                                           14
        Additional updates are contained in Section 6.1 below.

1.4     Key challenges Ravensbourne faces

1.4.1   The key challenges for Ravensbourne post relocation are to:

            complete its consolidation on its new campus;
            embed the new ways of working particularly around learning space
             management and timetabling;
            proactively engage its students;
            define its student experience;
            develop a post-relocation learning and teaching strategy for 2012-13 to 2015-
             16
            build its applied research agenda;
            adapt to changes and development in the HE landscape;
            build capacity and prepare for a Taught Degree Awarding Powers
             application.

        Consolidation

1.4.2   Consolidating on an entirely new campus with entirely new learning spaces and
        technology is challenging. ‘Snagging’, operational and environmental issues
        impacted on the student experience in the early months in the building and were
        reflected in negative student feedback. The issues ranged from building snags
        such as occasional defective electrical sockets, lighting and noise issues in
        learning spaces, and operational issues such as the student crew card system put
        in place in technical spaces. A Building Group was set up to identify, progress and
        monitor the resolution of these issues. Ravensbourne has operated an online fault-
        reporting system for many years (JIRA) and staff and students were encouraged
        to use this to report defects. A Post Relocation standing item was put on the
        agenda of Academic Board and its sub-committees so that there was regular
        progress reporting and opportunities for staff and students to identify additional
        issues.

1.4.3   Issues related to the visual display units in learning spaces proved particularly
        intractable. Although multiple attempts were made to rectify the VDU issues, these
        persisted throughout 2010-11 and as a result, a new contractor was appointed in
        Autumn 2011 and has been tackling the issues since then. Blackout curtains and
        other lighting control mechanisms have been progressively introduced in learning
        spaces. Background noise was tackled via an acoustics survey and measures
        such as the carpeting of larger learning spaces. Further measures are in train.
        Most of the major issues have been dealt with or work is in progress.
        Nevertheless, Ravensbourne is continuing to monitor and engage with its staff and
        students to ensure that any remaining building issues are addressed.

        New ways of working

1.4.4   Relocation was not simply about transferring activity to a newer campus. It also
        involves a considerable change project. In preparation for relocation,
        Ravensbourne engaged with the Change Academy to build capacity for the
        change management associated with relocation [Engage Magazine, Leadership
        Foundation, Issue 25, Spring 2011]. One of the most significant changes

                                            15
        associated with relocation was that learning space allocation moved from being
        discipline related to being activity related. The design disciplines had, in most
        instances, dedicated studio space at the Chislehurst site. At the Greenwich site,
        however, all learning space is shared and timetabled (with the exception of the
        common postgraduate area). For the design disciplines, this is quite a radical step
        [ADM-HEA ‘Shaping Things to Come’ Keynote address by Professor Maureen
        Wayman]. The transition to the new way of working for these disciplines has been
        challenging. Timetabling, matching activities to spaces and locating adjacent
        sessions appropriately was particularly demanding in the early days in the
        building, and this remains a key aspect of the student experience to be improved
        going forward. Institutional results in the ‘organisation and management’ section of
        the National Student Survey 2011 [17a-b] decreased to an overall score of 3.1 (47%)
        compared to 3.2 (48%) in the 2010 Survey. An analysis of the NSS open student
        comments [17c-e] suggests that some of the dissatisfaction in the ‘management and
        organisation’ section was a reflection of relocation issues and the aspects of
        cultural change which accompanied it, such as the move away from dedicated
        studio working. However, the open comments reflect frustration at course level
        with cancellations and with some tutors changing or not sticking to the published
        timetable. Some comments reveal that the timetable is not consolidated enough (a
        view shared institutionally) and that a lack of regularity impacting on students’ part
        time work is causing dissatisfaction. Course organisation, and in particular
        timetabling, is a key issue for Ravensbourne to address if it is to make the most of
        the innovative learning spaces available to it, and it is clear that this has to be
        approached holistically with input from facilities, timetabling and the course
        clusters.

        Student engagement

1.4.5   Ravensbourne launched a Student Engagement Policy in Spring 2011 [QDC
        25/01/11 paper 08 and QDC 19/04/11 paper 16]. It was clear at this point that
        issues around relocation and the early occupation of the building had caused a
        dislocation in Ravensbourne’s traditionally strong relationship with its students.
        This was apparent from qualitative student feedback and was confirmed in the
        results of the National Student Survey 2011 and our in house Course Experience
        Questionnaire the same year. The purpose of the policy is to shift our traditional
        systems of student feedback from passive receipt of student views to be more
        strategic, comprehensive and responsive. Good progress has already been made
        with this initiative. Termly meetings between senior managers and all course
        student representatives have already become part of the institutional calendar.
        The former Staff-Student Liaison Committee (pre-September 2011) meetings have
        been reformed to be more proactive with student comments collected in advance
        so that managers can consider them and provide responses for the meeting
        [Student Liaison Committees, post September 2011]. Nevertheless, there is still
        much work to be done to ensure students become co-creators of their own
        experience and active agents of improvement within our QA systems.

        Student experience

1.4.6   With the pressures of relocation behind us, Ravensbourne is confident that it has a
        distinctive and desirable higher education experience to offer. However, it needs to
        work harder to ensure that it is expressed and communicated in a manner that is
        accessible and transparent to students, staff and other stakeholders. The former
        Learning and Teaching Review Committee (LTRC) was reformed as Learning,

                                             16
        Teaching and Student Experience Committee (LTSEC) in Autumn 2011, following
        a review of the Academic Board sub-committee structure during the summer [AB
        22/11/11 paper 07]. The new title of the Committee and revised Terms of
        Reference reflect Ravensbourne’s concern to place the student experience at the
        forefront of its thinking. At the same time, Ravensbourne, in collaboration with its
        Student Union (RSU), launched a project to document the Ravensbourne Student
        Experience [LTSEC 11/10/11 paper 05]. The outcome of this may be a ‘charter’
        though we are agnostic as to what the final outcome or device will be as we are
        keen that it be meaningful and ‘live’. The key purpose is to capture and convey a
        shared understanding and expectation of the student journey from application to
        alumni.

        Learning and teaching strategy 2012-13 to 2015-16

1.4.7   Work is currently being carried out on the development of a new Learning and
        Teaching Strategy which, following a planned review of the impact of the new
        building on learning and teaching, will build on the outgoing learning and teaching
        strategy 2006-07 to 2011-12 [18] and the roll-out of the new undergraduate
        curriculum. The Strategy will also support the delivery of the institution’s Strategic
        Plan 2010-16 [1]. The review will also be informed by the student “co-creation”
        workshops carried out in January-February 2011 [LTRC 10/05/11 paper 03 [19] and
        LTSEC 11/10/11 paper 10 [20]].

1.4.8   The 2006-07 to 2011-12 strategy focused especially on relocation themes (e.g.
        having robust processes for timetabling and course costing, working with the
        architects on the space plan, staff development especially in using the VLE and
        developing research skills, and the building of new industry partnerships relevant
        to curriculum changes and relocation). Other key themes included: developing
        staff capability, quality assurance and enhancement, continued innovation in
        delivery, widening participation in a supportive learning environment, enterprise
        and employability, and continued innovation in digital technology. Key
        achievements relating to the 2006-07 to 2011-12 strategy [18] include:

             strengthening of course provision through the introduction of a new suite of
              programmes with shared curriculum in the area of core units which also
              promotes contemporary modes of cross-disciplinary collaborative working;
             establishment of the VLE as the institution’s learning and teaching portal
              which as “plan B” also provided risk mitigation should there have been any
              delays in 2010 in accessing the new building;
             the development of an applied research function which arose partly through
              our postgraduate courses which were enriched through our ERDF project
              (3D stereoscopy and rapid prototyping) and partly through learning and
              teaching (Learning Conversations project).

1.4.9   It is expected that the new Learning and Teaching Strategy will serve to bring
        together strands of activity currently with separate existence e.g. the Quality
        Enhancement Strategy [16].

        Applied research

1.4.10 Ravensbourne is developing an applied research strategy. This will focus
       specifically on the development of applied research or ‘original investigation
       undertaken in order to acquire new knowledge…directed primarily towards a
                                             17
        specific practical aim or objective’ (Frascati Manual, 2002). For Ravensbourne,
        this will encompass the development of new applications, processes or ways of
        working, and practice based or action research where the researcher’s own
        practice is an integral element of the research with the aim to develop new
        knowledge, understanding, applications or practice. It will include pedagogical
        research and does not preclude personal academic research.

1.4.11 This strategic focus is important to Ravensbourne and our commitment to its
       development is already reflected in our establishment of the elements of a
       research infrastructure: two annual research forums for staff, regular visits from
       practicing external researchers, a Research and Ethics Sub-committee, the
       convening of the Professorial Sub-Committee of Academic Board, the
       establishment of a Research Associate programme, the introduction of research
       internship opportunities for postgraduate students and the training and mentoring
       of staff who have research capability, often through registration on higher degrees
       and through bid writing training.

        Changes and development in the HE landscape

1.4.12 The challenges outlined above are primarily associated with our own recent
       history, our next stage of development and the realisation of our mission. Like all
       institutions, we have felt the impact of the dramatic changes and developments in
       the higher education funding and regulatory landscape, and are adjusting our
       systems and practices accordingly. These include:

             The recent cuts in higher education funding, in particular those associated
              with price band C (which have impacted and will impact on our design
              programmes) and the changing relationship between HEFCE and
              institutions;
             The new Home/EU student fee arrangements and their likely impact on
              student recruitment in the short term and student demand in the longer term.
              On other levels, we are adjusting our administrative and financial systems to
              ensure they are robust under the new arrangements as well as considering
              the likely impact on the student - institution relationship;
             Changes to the Student Number Control (SNC), and the uncertainties of the
              core/margin arrangements. Ravensbourne applied for and was exempted
              from the Core/Margin arrangements for 2012-13 as a specialist institution
              where admission is portfolio based. We are currently engaging with the
              HEFCE consultations in respect of the SNC for 2013-14;
             The move to more comprehensive annual access agreements with OFFA
              combined with our continued strategic commitment to widen participation
              particularly in light of our new location, which is in close proximity to areas
              which have traditionally been higher education ‘cold spots’, and has the
              potential for access to a less traditional demographic;
             The increasing stringency of UKBA visa arrangements for Tier 4 (students)
              and the associated monitoring arrangements for the latter. As an institution
              with relatively modest international student numbers, this is a particular
              concern. Ravensbourne had UKBA Tier 4 (students) Highly Trusted Sponsor
              status. Despite robust admissions practices for international students and
              compliant systems for reporting and monitoring migrant activity, we have
              found that UKBA do not evaluate the statistics for small institutions
              holistically and we are therefore vulnerable to the tolerances applied within

                                             18
              their guidance (see International Students, Section 4.9 below);
             Furnishing greater and more transparent information for applicants and the
              implementation of the Key Information Set (KIS) once final technical
              guidance is published in March [see Public Information, Section 5 below];
             The implementation of extended transcript information for graduates through
              the Higher Education Achievement Record (HEAR) (see Assessment,
              Section 3.3 below);
             Likely developments in the work of the Office of the Independent Adjudicator
              (OIA) foregrounded in the OIA Pathfinder Report (see Student Complaints,
              Section 4.6 below);
             Maintaining high levels of graduate employability in a challenging economic
              period, developing our offer and services to alumni in a time when budgets
              are restrictive, and involving graduates more fully in the life of our institution,
              including within our quality systems (see Employability, paragraphs 4.7, 4.13
              and 6.1.15 to 6.1.18 below).

        Taught Degree Awarding Powers (TDAP)

1.4.13 The achievement of TDAP is a strategic objective for Ravensbourne. Work on this
       project has been deferred pending relocation so that Ravensbourne could focus
       on relocation, identify clearly the changes associated with it and embed these. It is
       envisaged that Ravensbourne will recommence preparations for a TDAP
       application within two years. This will provide us with appropriate time to reflect on
       and evaluate the changes we have made post relocation and to take into account
       and act on the findings of the QAA Institutional Review 2012.

1.5     Implications of changes and challenges for safeguarding academic
        standards and quality of student’s learning opportunities

1.5.1   Ravensbourne understood that there were risks associated with relocation and its
        associated changes. Whenever possible Ravensbourne sought to manage and
        mitigate these risks. Particular attention was paid to contingency planning during
        the terms which immediately preceded relocation. As noted above, Ravensbourne
        sought to increase its capacity for change management in that period (paragraphs
        1.3.2 and 1.4.4). Overall, relocation was successful and the impacts on the student
        experience, and academic standards and quality, were less than they potentially
        could have been. It is undoubtedly the case that relocation and the changes
        associated with it have impacted on student satisfaction [NSS 17a-e and CEQ] most
        visibly in the results for those cohorts that commenced study at Chislehurst.
        Analysis of the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) results for 2011 suggest
        that while there was some impact for new entrants, the primary effect was in the
        continuing cohorts (Levels 2 and 3) [32].

1.5.2   Post relocation, our challenge is to focus on the student experience and its
        enhancement.




                                               19
SECTION 2: How Ravensbourne has addressed the recommendations of
the last audit
2.0     Ravensbourne’s last institutional audit of took place in March 2007. Confidence
        was placed on both the management of the academic standards of the awards
        that we deliver and on our management of the quality of the learning opportunities
        offered to students. There were four recommendations, two of which were
        advisable and two of which were desirable. These were acted on as outlined in
        Ravensbourne’s QAA MCFU Report, June 2010 [14]. The following is a brief
        summary with some additional updates.

2.1     Advisable recommendations

2.1.2   The auditors recommended that we review the requirements for quoracy for
        internal progression boards and ensure that they are observed for all meetings of
        the boards. Internal Progression Boards were reviewed through discussion at
        Quality Development Committee during 2007 [QDC 24/04/07 paper 07], and were
        amalgamated with final assessment boards from July 2008. This had the benefit of
        increasing the status of internal progression and the level of scrutiny applied to it
        by ensuring that a validating partner representative, external examiner(s) and all
        permanent members of the course team are present. Ravensbourne continues to
        monitor and evaluate its formal assessment board system to maintain its
        effectiveness. In the current academic year, Progress Review Boards, which
        monitor in-year progress and attendance, are being strengthened to become
        Interim Assessment Boards [QDC 31/01/12 papers 08a-c and AB 15/02/12 papers
        14a-c].

2.1.3   The auditors also recommended that we review and revise the quality assurance,
        reporting and management structures for taught postgraduate provision to secure
        parity with those for the undergraduate course. The Academic Board and its sub
        committee structure as a whole were reviewed during Summer 2008 to reduce
        meeting burden and align the system with the requirement of Ravensbourne’s new
        validation partner. Issues in relation to the reporting lines for this provision were
        addressed through a new structure, which was approved by the Board of
        Governors in September 2008.

2.1.4   All provision is subject to the same level of scrutiny and reporting lines (including
        postgraduate). In summary, there is a specific Student Liaison Committee (SLC)
        for the postgraduate area at which student representatives have an opportunity on
        a termly basis to feed back on their experience and raise issues with their Course
        Director. There is also a Postgraduate Board of Study (BoS) for the postgraduate
        area, which is chaired by the Postgraduate Course Director. The Curriculum and
        Programmes Board (CPB) receives the minutes of the latter. CPB maintains an
        oversight of all the academic provision and ensures that all areas are given equal
        attention and are considered in a holistic manner [Committee Terms of Reference,
        and Committee diagram online and in Appendix 2]. The effectiveness of the
        revised structure is kept under review annually.

2.1.5   Standard quality assurance processes are applied across all provision of the
        Institution (undergraduate and postgraduate programmes), including
        arrangements for external examining, annual course monitoring, student feedback

                                             20
        systems, feedback on assessed work, validation and revalidation, and the peer
        observation scheme, to name a few. Quality assurance policies and procedures
        are all available on the Intranet along with minutes and papers of all meetings of
        the Academic Board and its Sub-Committees.

2.2     Desirable recommendations

2.2.1   The auditors recommended that we review the arrangements for course review,
        periodic review and course revalidation to eliminate duplication and to establish
        clarity of purpose for each process. Quality Development Committee (QDC)
        considered this recommendation in December 2007. Initial discussion centred on
        amalgamating course review and revalidation in order to simplify the process. The
        former process was in practice little used in any case because of the requirement
        to revalidate programmes within a three to five year cycle. The cycles of
        revalidation and validation that have followed the change of validating partner also
        meant that additional reviews would be unnecessarily burdensome. Ravensbourne
        piloted a committee-based system of internal validation during 2010-11, which it
        believed would be more aligned with the external system used by its new validator.
        This was formally approved by QDC in September 2011 [QDC 27/09/11 papers
        10a-b].

2.2.2   Ravensbourne piloted a system of Portfolio Review in autumn 2008 in advance of
        undergraduate validation. Following on from this, consideration was given to
        whether this methodology might be adapted to provide the Institution with an
        appropriate system of periodic review. In its pilot form, Portfolio Review had
        involved no external participation and was weighted in its consideration towards
        quantitative factors. Periodic review mechanisms of the kind found in many
        institutions were poorly suited to Ravensbourne and do not fit well with our size,
        structure and activities. In 2010, Ravensbourne piloted a new review system called
        Strategic Review [QDC minutes of 25/01/11 item 11.30, and 19/04/11 item 11.40,
        and QDC 19/04/11 paper 08], which engages holistically with themes and aspects
        of our provision from both an academic and support point of view.

2.2.3   The auditors recommended that we make explicit and formalise the institutional
        approach to enhancing the quality of learning opportunities. Ravensbourne
        developed a Quality Enhancement Strategy [16] during 2007-08. Progress has been
        made in shifting Ravensbourne quality systems towards the identification and
        dissemination of good practice, and the encouragement of innovation, as well as
        assuring the quality of our provision. Examples include: the identification and
        dissemination of good practice within the action planning process in response to
        external examiner reports, which are discussed at Boards of Studies, and the
        Annual Course Monitoring template was revised to include a new section focussed
        on enhancement and innovation, as well as the introduction of an ACM Plenary [2a
        and 2g]
                system to allow for more detailed discussion across all courses outside of the
        committee system.

2.3     Features of good practice

2.3.1   Ravensbourne has continued to capitalise on the features of good practice
        identified in the last Institutional Audit [Institutional Audit Report 2007 and MCFU
        Report 14]. The comprehensive and accessible Quality intranet pages have
        continued to be maintained. Ravensbourne transferred its intranet to a new

                                             21
        operating platform in autumn 2011, the content of which continues to be
        embedded. As Ravensbourne staff and students operate a paperlite policy, the
        information available online is extensive. Ravensbourne’s involvement of
        undergraduate students in multiple aspects of its academic activities has also
        been built upon, particularly through the development of a Student Engagement
        Policy [QDC 25/01/11 paper 08 and QDC 19/04/11 paper 16], which is applied
        across all of Ravensbourne’s provision (see Section 4.3 below).

2.3.2   Ravensbourne no longer uses the Annual Service Monitoring Process as Business
        Planning superseded it. A more holistic Strategic Review process has also been
        developed (see paragraphs 3.4.13 to 3.4.14 below). Ravensbourne continues to
        integrate employability within the curriculum and prepare students for the world of
        work, particularly through core elements throughout the undergraduate curriculum
        and placement opportunities available to all students. Ravensbourne also
        continues to place a strong emphasis on the staff induction process (see
        paragraph 4.1.18 below).




                                            22
SECTION 3: Ravensbourne’s threshold academic standards
3.0     Ravensbourne has a strong and well understood framework of processes and
        procedures for setting and monitoring the academic standards of the awards which
        it delivers on behalf of its validating partners. These processes and procedures
        meet the expectations of the former QAA Code of Practice (and the published
        chapters of the UK Quality Code). Access to Ravensbourne’s framework for
        quality assurance is online via an A-Z of quality assurance policies and
        procedures, maintained by its Quality Team, which has responsibility for
        supporting these processes.

3.1     Each qualification is allocated to the appropriate level of the Framework for
        Higher Education Qualification (FHEQ)

3.1.1   All higher education awards at Ravensbourne are set at an appropriate level in the
        FHEQ. Reference to the FHEQ is a required field for course development teams to
        complete in Ravensbourne’s Programme Specification template [available on the
        Quality A-Z]. Both internal validation panels [15a-b] and external validation panels
        are charged with evaluating whether a programme has been aligned appropriately
        with the FHEQ. Commonly, this interaction will take the form of a discussion of
        whether the programme’s learning outcomes are appropriate to the level of the
        FHEQ. Course teams find the FHEQ a useful reference point in ensuring that
        programme learning outcomes are set at the right level. Within the Annual Course
        Monitoring process, Subject Leaders are asked to consider whether the content of
        the programme is still comparable in terms of level in relation to the programme’s
        position in the FHEQ. External examiners are also asked to confirm the
        comparability of standards with similar programmes elsewhere and the
        programme’s alignment with the FHEQ.

3.2     Use of External Examiners is strong and scrupulous

3.2.1   Ravensbourne makes strong and scrupulous use of external examiners. It is
        confident that its systems meet the expectations of the former Section 4 of the
        QAA Code of Practice. We have followed closely the UUK/GuildHE review of
        external examining nationally and already reviewed our systems [QDC 31/01/12
        paper 03] against the expectations of Chapter B7 of the Quality Code to ensure
        that our external examiner systems continue to match national expectations.

3.2.2   At least one external examiner is appointed for each higher education award for a
        fixed tenure. Formally, external examiners are employed and paid by our
        validating university and indeed report to them. During the recent transition from
        University of Sussex to City University validation some external examiners have
        reported to both institutions. A list of current external examiners at Ravensbourne
        is available for staff and students on the A-Z of quality assurance policies and
        procedures.

3.2.3   There are clear procedures for nominating external examiners internally [A-Z of
        quality assurance policies and procedures] and Ravensbourne’s Quality Team
        supports academic staff in putting forward nominations. We have recently
        developed a practice of inviting potential examiners to Ravensbourne prior to
        nomination so that they can fully understand the context of our work prior to taking
        on the role. Quality Development Committee (QDC) is responsible for approving

                                            23
        nominations (on behalf of Academic Board) before the nominations are submitted
        to City University. Each examiner is given an appropriate induction to the course
        and Ravensbourne’s assessment processes at an initial visit at which they are
        briefed by the Subject Leader about the course and meet with either the Director
        of Academic Services or Head of Quality to be briefed about the Ravensbourne’s
        assessment policies and the external examiner role in the quality processes.
        External examiners are issued with guidance on their role by City University, and
        inducted by them. Examiners are also issued in advance with course related
        information such as programme specifications, unit specifications, the Regulations
        governing the award, together with guidance on the Conduct of Assessment
        Boards [AB 15/02/12 papers 14a] by the Quality Team in an annual mailout. These
        are updated during their tenure as necessary and material directly related to
        assessment, such as project briefs, are provided by the course team. More
        recently, we have developed an annual external examiner conference to provide
        an opportunity to update external examiners on institutional developments.

3.2.4   Each external examiner provides an annual written report on the appropriateness
        of the standards set, the validity of the processes for assessment and the
        standards of student achievement. Procedurally, this report goes directly to City
        University but commonly examiners copy it to Ravensbourne at the same time.
        Both the Academic Services Office at City University and the Quality Team
        analyse reports and note good practice, strengths and issues to be addressed.

3.2.5   External examiner reports receive a very wide internal circulation. They are copied
        to the Subject Leader responsible for the course and their Academic Development
        Manager. The Director, as Chief Executive and Chair of Academic Board, receives
        copies of all reports as does the Deputy Director and the Director of Academic
        Services.

3.2.6   An External Examiner’s Action Plan is prepared for each report by the Subject
        Leader supported by a Quality Officer, setting out the actions to be taken by the
        course in response to issues raised by the external examiner. External Examiner
        Reports and Action Plans relevant to it have always been shared with our student
        course representatives and are available on our intranet. Reports on progress
        against the Action Plans are received at each Board of Study during the year and
        external examiners are sent a copy of the action plan (in their annual mailout) to
        inform them how the issues they raised are being addressed.

3.3     Design, approval, monitoring and review of assessment strategies are
        effective in ensuring that students have opportunity to demonstrate learning
        outcomes of the award

3.3.1   In line with Section 6 of the QAA Code of Practice on Assessment (and Chapters
        A6 Chapter and B6 of the UK Quality Code), Ravensbourne seeks to encourage
        assessment practice that promotes effective learning. It also seeks to ensure that
        assessment is conducted with rigour, probity and fairness and with due regard for
        security. Appropriate regulations, policies and procedures are in place to support
        this and these are underpinned by administrative resource and IT infrastructure.

        Approval of Assessment processes

3.3.2   The appropriateness of the assessment strategy for a programme and its
        constituent units is considered as part of internal and external (re)validation. The
                                             24
        Programme Specification describes how the learning outcomes will be assessed
        and the specific assessment requirements are described in each validated unit
        specification.

        Project briefs

3.3.3   Much of the assessment at Ravensbourne is project based with learning on the
        unit driven by a Project Brief, which elaborates the assessment for the student in a
        manner that will foster creative, technical and academic skills. This approach is
        student centred, encourages deep approaches to learning, builds problem solving
        ability, and integrates academic with professional learning. Group and
        collaborative projects feature strongly in the diet of assessment to encourage peer
        learning and foster team-working skills, and some projects may be ‘live’ (i.e.
        involve a real client or industry partner or a significant element of industry
        simulation). All units incorporate an opportunity for formative feedback prior to
        summative assessment.

3.3.4   Ravensbourne issues a Project Brief template [available on the Quality A-Z] to
        ensure that there is an appropriate degree of consistency in the assessment
        information that students receive. Draft project briefs are checked by the Quality
        Team to ensure that the information contained in them is correct and accurately
        reflect the validated unit specification. Beyond this, we have explored a number of
        systems for the academic moderation of project briefs with the aim of promoting
        best practice.

        Assessment Regulations

3.3.5   Each of Ravensbourne’s higher education awards is governed by a robust and
        comprehensive set of Assessment Regulations, which are fully and consistently
        implemented. These provide the regulatory framework within which assessment
        on each programme at Ravensbourne is conducted. Specific Assessment
        Regulations are in place for foundation degrees, honours degrees and
        postgraduate degrees. These make clear to staff and students the rules which
        apply to assessment deadlines, referrals, retrievals, mitigating circumstance and
        other formal aspects of assessment practice. A common grading and marking
        scheme is contained within the Assessment Regulations. This scheme is also
        used to calculate an overall unit result, where a number of assessments must be
        aggregated, and also for calculating an overall degree classification.

3.3.6   Academic decision making within the assessment process is circumscribed by the
        regulations. Their consistent application means that students are treated in an
        equal and transparent fashion. Mechanisms are in place for reporting breaches of
        the regulations in the conduct of assessment at Assessment Boards so that these
        can be dealt with, but this is extremely rare. In general, academic staff involved in
        assessment have a thorough understanding of the regulations for their
        programme. The Head of Registry and Student Services and the Senior
        Assessment Officer provide advice to staff on occasions when interpretation is
        needed. Since entering into partnership with City University, Ravensbourne has
        been bringing its regulations into closer alignment with those of the University.
        During 2010-11, changes to the regulations were introduced to remove the
        carrying of academic credit between levels, which had been possible in our
        previous regulations. For the coming academic year changes have been
        introduced to clarify that ‘non-submission’ counts as an attempt, and that students

                                             25
        who subsequently fail the retrieval of a non-submission have no further opportunity
        to retrieve [QDC 31/01/12 paper 08b and AB 15/02/12 paper 14b].

        Plagiarism and academic misconduct

3.3.7   Appendices to the Assessment Regulations stipulate the procedure for formally
        investigating academic misconduct or plagiarism and the penalties that might be
        applied when a student is found to have committed an academic offence.
        Ravensbourne provides students with guidance in relation to referencing their
        work and on how to avoid plagiarism, as part of induction and both within
        contextual and practical unit delivery. The current system is fit for purpose and
        ensures that cases of plagiarism are unlikely to go undetected. Cases of
        plagiarism are relatively low but this may reflect the subject areas in which we
        operate and the degree to which the development of student work is often
        extremely transparent to staff.

        Assessment Boards

3.3.8   No formal assessment results are ratified until they have been considered and
        approved by a Final Assessment Board. All final awards and their classification, all
        failures and all decisions in respect of progression between levels are subject to
        the agreement of the Final Assessment Board. These are chaired by City
        University and an external examiner must be present at the Final Assessment
        Board for it to be quorate.

3.3.9   Unit Verification Boards are held in advance of the Final Assessment Board.
        These provide a formal opportunity to internally collate and moderate marks
        across all units in a programme, beyond the internal moderation which must be
        applied by course teams in arriving at those marks. Termly Progress Review
        Boards provide a regular opportunity to monitor student engagement with
        assessment requirements and attendance. Terms of reference are contained
        within the Guidance for Examination Boards for Postgraduate and Undergraduate
        Courses [21] to ensure that all these boards are clear in their remit. The Registry is
        responsible for supporting the assessment boards, which underpin the formal
        approval of results at Ravensbourne, and specific guidance on how marks are
        moderated, recorded and transmitted to Registry are in place.

3.3.10 Progress Review Boards do not currently have any power to formalise results or to
       set retrieval tasks. These are currently being reformed and strengthened to
       become Interim Boards with the power to issue results and retrieval tasks (but not
       to make decisions in respect of awards, progression or failure) [AB 15/02/12 paper
       14a-c]. It is hoped that this reform from the 2012-13 academic year will allow us to
       feedback more quickly to students on their formal performance. It is unlikely that
       the new Boards will be implemented by the time of the Institutional Review.

3.4     Design, approval, monitoring and review of programmes enables standards
        to be set and maintained and allows students to demonstrate learning
        outcomes of the award

3.4.1   All programmes leading to higher education awards at Ravensbourne are subject
        to rigorous and effective processes of internal [15a-b] and external approval,
        monitoring and review, which are in full accordance with the expectations of
        Section 7 of the QAA Code of Practice and Chapter A4 and Chapter B1 and B8 of

                                              26
        the UK Quality Code. Ravensbourne has no collaborative arrangements with other
        institutions.

3.4.2   Ravensbourne operates its own systems of internal validation and revalidation [15a-
        b]
           . This is to ensure that proposals that are put forward for external validation are
        subject to sufficient internal development, external input and of sufficient quality
        prior to submission for external validation. As Ravensbourne does not have
        Taught Degree Awarding Powers, all programmes leading to a higher education
        award must be subject to external validation.

        Portfolio Development Group

3.4.3   Formal authority to approve the initial development of a new course rests with
        Management Committee, although this is delegated in practice to the Portfolio
        Development Group [Terms of Reference 22]. This ensures that a proposal is in
        line with Ravensbourne’s mission and Strategic Plan [1]; is financially viable and an
        efficient use of Institutional resources; is based on realistic projections of potential
        student numbers; and is based on a sound analysis of competing courses at other
        institutions, industry needs and potential employment opportunities for graduates.

        Internal validation

3.4.4   Internal validation currently involves a rigorous scrutiny of draft course
        documentation by an Internal Validation Committee chaired by a senior manager,
        and composed of internal and external peers [15a-b]. As noted above, it incorporates
        a consideration of the course’s position in relation to the Framework for Higher
        Education Qualifications (FHEQ) and also any relevant QAA Subject Benchmark
        statements. Specific proformas are provided to course teams to support this
        engagement with the Academic Infrastructure [available on the Quality A-Z]. It is
        normally expected that course teams will evidence external input from industry.
        When appropriate, it is expected that course teams will also reference
        Professional, Statutory and Regulatory Bodies (PSRBs) and other relevant
        benchmarks in developing the programme. A proposal may only proceed to
        external validation following approval by an Internal Validation Committee.

        Programme specifications

3.4.5   The key document presented at internal and external validation is a draft
        Programme Specification. A template is produced for staff involved in course
        development, which is available on the Quality A-Z and issued to staff. This
        template was initially designed with reference to the QAA guidelines for preparing
        programme specifications. The template has evolved over the years as
        Ravensbourne has adjusted it to its own needs. It also changed to align more
        closely with the practice of the new validator. Programme specifications are
        designed for multiple audiences. They are used to describe the aims and learning
        outcomes of a programme to a validation panel. They are the core of the definitive
        documentation about the programme, which academics involved in delivery will
        refer to. They are at the heart of the information given to students at enrolment
        about their programme in their Course Handbook.

        Unit specifications

3.4.6   The detail of the curriculum is outlined in Unit Specifications, for which there is

                                              27
        also a standard template on the Quality A-Z. Once programme specifications and
        unit specifications have been successfully validated, they are definitive and cannot
        be changed without following a minor modification or full revalidation process.
        Programme specifications and unit specifications are issued to students at
        enrolment within their Course Handbook.

        Programme amendments

3.4.7   Once validated, minor modifications may be made only through the system of
        programme amendments operated by our validating partner (City University
        Validation and Institutional Partnerships Handbook, paragraph 5.10). This
        procedure allows for minor changes to be approved by Boards of Study (e.g.
        updating of reading list, minor variations in the units pattern of learning delivery or
        the distribution of learning hours). The City University Course Board must approve
        all other changes. All Boards of Study agendas contain a prompt to enable staff to
        propose minor changes to programmes and to ensure that they are aware of the
        processes and timescales for making minor modifications [Ravensbourne policy
        available on the Quality A-Z]. CPB is the final internal sign off point for minor
        modifications to ensure that the wider impact of a change is fully considered.

        Annual Course Monitoring

3.4.8   All programmes are subject to a process of Annual Course Monitoring to ensure
        that they are maintained in good standing and delivered in the manner specified in
        the Programme Specifications and within the Institution’s regulatory framework.

3.4.9   Since 2004, there has been a standard template for Annual Course Monitoring
        Reports was introduced. Since the last Institutional Audit, the process has been
        reviewed to introduce an enhancement focus and to ensure that it integrates
        effectively with City University’s systems. In summary, the Subject Leader
        prepares the Annual Course Monitoring Report (ACMR), in liaison with other
        course team members and supported by a Quality Officer, by drawing together the
        views of Unit Leaders, other staff, external examiners and students. Subject
        Leaders reflect upon the experience of the academic year just ended and identify
        the course’s strengths, areas of good practice and issues, and actions to address
        any shortcomings are specified. Consideration is given in the report to relevant
        statistical datasets such as the student profile, retention, achievement and
        employability. Student feedback and student satisfaction, as measured in the
        annual Course Experience Questionnaire and the National Student Survey [17a-e],
        are also taken into consideration.

3.4.10 ACMRs are considered by the Boards of Study, ideally with direct input from
       student representatives in advance. An annual ACM plenary day [2g] provides a
       forum for the sharing of experience and the identification of good practice. The
       Curriculum and Programmes Board formally considers the notes of the ACM
       Plenary at its Autumn Term meeting. All ACMRs are read and analysed by the
       Head of Quality and an overview for the Institution as a whole is submitted to both
       Academic Board and Ravensbourne’s validating partners [Annual Monitoring
       Report 2010-11 2a-i]. The actions set out by the Subject Leader within their ACM
       Report are extracted by the Quality Team into an Annual Course Monitoring Log.
       These Logs are monitored, and progress reported on, on a termly basis at Boards
       of Study.


                                              28
3.4.11 Overall, the ACM procedure has worked well since its introduction. The template
       has been revised slightly year-on-year based on the experience of running the
       system. It is amongst the best embedded and understood of the Institution’s
       quality systems.

        Revalidation

3.4.12 Ravensbourne is required by its validating partner to revalidate within a cycle
       agreed with them of between three and five years [VIP Handbook, Section 9]. This
       is to ensure that programmes remain current and valid in light of developing
       knowledge and practice in the discipline. This process involves the production of
       an additional Self Evaluation Report reflecting on the experience of the course
       delivery informed by Annual Course Monitoring Reports over the lifetime of the
       programme’s delivery and drawing on evidence from external examiner reports,
       PSRBs where relevant, staff and student feedback, alumni and employer
       feedback, student progression and achievement data. A Ravensbourne
       programme has not as yet been subject to a revalidation by City University.
       Programmes for external revalidation would first be subject to internal revalidation
       [15a-b]
               .

        Strategic Review

3.4.13 Ravensbourne does not operate a system of periodic review of the type commonly
       found in many universities. The absence of natural units of review of viable size
       and the interlinked nature of Ravensbourne’s academic programmes has meant
       that it would be difficult to transpose such a method to our context. In practice,
       many of our validations have functioned like periodic review in having impact
       across a significant body of programmes.

3.4.14 In 2011, Ravensbourne introduced a new review method, titled Strategic Review
       [available on the Quality A-Z]. The purpose of which is to evaluate and drive
       holistic improvement in aspects of Ravensbourne’s provision. The method has the
       advantage of focusing on both the academic and support aspects of the activity.
       The first Strategic Review was held in Summer 2011 [23a-b]. It was envisaged that
       another review around the theme of employability would take place in Autumn
       2011 but this was postponed following a reallocation of line management
       responsibility. This will now take place in the early summer 2012.

3.5     Subject benchmark statements are used effectively in programme design,
        approval, delivery and review to inform standards of awards

3.5.1   Ravensbourne requires staff to reference subject benchmark statements in
        internal and external validation [15a-b]. Proformas are provided by the Quality Team
        to support staff in engaging with the primary benchmarks to which we relate and
        these are available on the Quality A-Z. The primary subject benchmarks to which
        programmes at Ravensbourne relate are Communication, Media, Film and
        Cultural Studies, and Art and Design. There are a small number of other relevant
        benchmarks. Because of the small number of benchmarks to which we relate and
        because our programmes rarely fit neatly within these benchmarks, our academic
        staff have found Subject Benchmark statements less useful in supporting the
        definition of standards than the FHEQ.



                                             29
SECTION 4: The quality of students’ learning opportunities (teaching and
academic support)
4.0.1   Ravensbourne aims to provide its students with distinctive and high quality
        learning opportunities. We seek to optimise our curriculum, its manner of delivery
        and its support, to provide our students with the best chance to succeed on their
        programmes of study and to achieve the necessary academic standards for their
        award.

4.0.2   Ravensbourne’s current Learning and Teaching Strategy 2006-07 to 2011-12 [18]
        dates from before relocation and its aims were informed by that strategic
        imperative:

             Relocation to the new Ravensbourne: To prepare the academic community
              and related support services for the move to the new site at Greenwich in
              2009-10;
             Developing staff capability: To promote professional standards and
              continuing professional development for teaching staff in further and higher
              education;
             Quality assurance and enhancement: To embed a robust framework for
              assuring the quality and enhancement of learning and teaching at faculty and
              course level;
             Continued innovation in delivery: To stimulate and support continued
              innovation in the delivery of learning and teaching;
             Widening participation in a supportive learning environment: To widen
              participation, in particular, through the development of an appropriately
              supportive learning environment;
             Enterprise and employability: To enhance enterprise and employability skills
              development;
             Continued innovation in digital technology: To continue to develop an
              appropriate technical and digital environment for the delivery of learning and
              teaching in the current building and in the new Ravensbourne.

4.0.3   Ravensbourne is now reviewing its Learning and Teaching Strategy 2006-07 to
        2011-12 [18] in light of its consolidation at Greenwich and to ensure that it takes
        best advantage of the opportunities afforded by the new location.

4.1     Professional standards for teaching and support of learning are supported

4.1.1   Ravensbourne is confident that its academic staff are competent to teach, facilitate
        learning and undertake assessment to Level 6 and Level 7 of the FHEQ.
        Currently, Ravensbourne does not deliver programmes at Level 8 of the FHEQ
        although a number of staff have experience of this or have been recently involved
        as joint supervisors or as examiners of doctoral candidates at other institutions.

4.1.2   Ravensbourne maintains and keeps under review a robust framework of human
        resource policies, which support the maintenance and development of our staff
        capability. The strategies, policies and procedures within this framework are
        published on our intranet and are supported by a specialist department.



                                             30
        Staff Recruitment

4.1.3   Robust appointment procedures [HR A-Z of policies and procedures] ensure that
        appointees to teaching posts are appropriate. Normally, academic staff must, as a
        minimum, be academically qualified to at least the level in terms of the FHEQ as
        the programmes(s) to which they will contribute. Ideally candidates will be qualified
        to Level 7 (masters). Normally we expect applicants to have recent or ongoing
        engagement in industry.

4.1.4   Raising the qualification level of our staff is target within our Human Resources
        Strategy Action Plan. A further spur to this has been the development of our
        applied research agenda. This is being achieved through a rigorous approach to
        appointments and by supporting existing staff in the achievement of higher
        qualifications. Our Annual Monitoring Report [2a] notes the improving qualification
        profile of our staff.

4.1.5   The interview panel for an academic post will always include the relevant
        Academic Development Manager and all appointments must be approved by the
        Director (or Deputy Director in his absence). The Deputy Director or Director is
        always involved in the selection and recruitment process for more senior posts.

        HEA Accreditation

4.1.6   Although we are of insufficient size to sustain a Higher Education Academy (HEA)
        accredited course, the HEA Professional Standards Framework guides
        Ravensbourne’s ambitions in terms of the pedagogic qualification of its staff. New
        academic appointees who do not possess a suitable teaching qualification or who
        are not accredited by HEA are required to achieve this within two years and are
        supported in doing so. Ravensbourne has provided ongoing access to an external
        mentor for existing staff to support in gaining HEA accreditation.

4.1.7   Overall, our engagement with the HEA and in particular the Art, Design Media
        subject centre (ADM-HEA) is strong. Currently, 30 staff are accredited by the HEA
        of which 28 are Fellows and 2 Associates according to recent HEA Institutional
        Report (February 2012). In percentage terms, the proportion of our staff accredited
        (29%) is greater than the average for the sector, for institutions of our size and our
        mission group.

        Induction and Probation

4.1.8   Following appointment, staff undergo a comprehensive induction and a
        compulsory probation [Human Resources A-Z]. Induction includes familiarisation
        with their role and orientation in their department and Ravensbourne as a whole.
        In addition to briefings from their line manager and other departments, new
        academic appointees receive a thorough briefing on the regulatory and quality
        frameworks and procedures and their external contexts. Probation involves a
        mandatory teaching observation by a line manager.

        Annual Appraisal

4.1.9   All staff are subject to an annual appraisal (from 2011-12 known as Performance
        Review) which is an opportunity for the staff member to reflect on their
        achievements relative to the goals they set themselves in the previous year and to

                                             31
        set objectives for the next [Human Resources A-Z]. An important area of focus is
        the identification of development and training needs. It is also an opportunity for
        the line manager to monitor performance, ensure that individual objectives are
        aligned with business plans, and consider whether staff are developing and
        fulfilling their potential. This process has been recently reviewed and will become
        Annual Performance Review and Development (APRD) during the course of this
        year.

        Staff Development

4.1.10 The Staff Development Policy provides support for staff attendance at external
       training courses, conferences and for the achievement of other qualifications
       [Human Resources A-Z]. 449 academic staff days were spent on internal and
       external staff development in 2010-11 [Staff Loading Report 24].

4.1.11 Ravensbourne delivers its own comprehensive annual programme of internal staff
       development organised by the Academic Development Managers (ADMs)
       focusing on current organisational priorities [2a Section 7] characterised recently by
       intensive ‘SkillsFest’ workshops which have introduced new ideas in learning and
       teaching, prepared staff for the delivery of the 2010 validated curriculum and the
       rollout of Moodle 2.0, created a ‘Super Moodlers’ workshop, and provided training
       in the use of the Media Asset Management system (MAM). The workshops also
       introduced new developments in the Study Zone (library), new forms of
       assessment, the use of social media for learning and teaching, subverting the
       lecture, Personal Progress Review system (tutorial), producing for podcast and
       maximising audio visual (AV).

4.1.12 Since Autumn 2010, Ravensbourne has begun to attract professional and
       academic conferences associated with our discipline areas and industries. Staff
       (and students) have benefitted both through their involvement as presenters and
       attendees. Recent events have included The Mozilla Foundation, YouTube, and a
       3D Storytelling Conference. Recent educational events have included the Media
       Education Summit in September 2011, and in November, the ADM-HEA fifth
       Annual Learning and Teaching Day.

4.1.13 An annual Learning and Teaching Conference is a regular and important feature of
       the annual programme of staff development [2a paragraph 54]. This event
       combines keynote presentations from external speakers with staff led sessions on
       personal pedagogical development and is intended to motivate staff to innovate in
       their learning and teaching.

4.1.14 Ravensbourne continues to keep its approach to staff development under review.
       In 2011, Ravensbourne conducted a Skills Need Inventory and developed a
       Strategic Skills Development Plan (SSDP). It has also begun to develop a range of
       online training materials for staff. All major HR polices are under review post
       relocation.

        Teaching hours and budgeting

4.1.15 Maximum teaching hours are set in contracts (e.g. 15 hours per week for full time
       Subject Leaders and 18 hours per week for other full time academic staff and pro-
       rata for part-time staff). The distribution of teaching hours and other duties is
       agreed annually with academic staff by their Academic Development Manager

                                             32
        (ADM). The Planning Manager undertakes an annual review of available
        permanent staff contact hours against delivery hours required on individual
        programmes taking into account projected student recruitment targets and
        progression estimates. This enables the identification of the budget costs of
        sessional teaching on any particular programme and that FTE staffing costs are
        allocated correctly across programmes. These figures are reviewed after the 1
        December census date and adjusted accordingly.

        Staff loading

4.1.16 Ravensbourne is developing a staff loading procedure. For two years, it has run a
       Staff-Loading Questionnaire, the report of which is received by Management
       Committee [Staff Loading Report 24]. Work is also in train to formalise an equitable
       approach to the designation of research time in Ravensbourne’s model of staff
       loading.

        Peer Observation

4.1.17 Involvement in the Peer Observation Scheme is a mandatory requirement for
       permanent academic staff, with the aim that all staff are observed within an annual
       cycle [Human Resources A-Z]. An Annual Peer Observation Report is produced,
       taking an overview of the scheme [LTSEC 24/01/12 paper 04] [2a Section 5].

        Student Feedback on Teaching

4.1.18 Ravensbourne has a number of quantitative and qualitative means by which it
       engages students in relation to learning and teaching and elicits feedback (see 4.3
       below). Student feedback reinforces this view with 87% of respondents assenting
       to this statement in the Course Experience Questionnaire 2011 (Question 1: The
       teaching on my course is good). Open comments in the National Student Survey
       2011 [17c-e] and qualitative feedback from students also highlight staff commitment
       and subject expertise.

        External engagement

4.1.19 Ravensbourne is well integrated into the higher education sector and the wider
       disciplines with which it engages. Many staff have experience of delivery of similar
       programmes of study at other universities. Around a quarter are external
       examiners at other higher education institutions or have held external
       examinerships in the last five years. A similar proportion have been involved in
       validation panels or as critical friends at other higher education institutions. Some
       have been involved with PhD supervision or examination within the UK and
       abroad. A number are involved with Professional, Statutory and Regulatory Bodies
       (PSRBs) or discipline associations, either through participation in accreditation
       panels or through membership of senior committees. At a senior level,
       Ravensbourne is a member of GuildHE and CHEAD nationally and CUMULUS
       internationally amongst other sector bodies taking part in their committees and
       networks. 128 academic staff days were reported as spent on external
       conferences, meetings, or involvement in external events in 2010-11 [Staff
       Loading Report 24]




                                            33
        Research and Scholarship

4.1.20 Ravensbourne does not submit for the Research Assessment Exercise (RAE).
       Nevertheless, learning and teaching is underpinned by the research and
       scholarship of its staff. All permanent staff are expected to keep abreast of
       developments in their specialist area and industries. The 2010-11 Staff Loading
       Report [24] shows that 437 staff days were spent on such activities such as
       academic research, consultancy, commercial collaborations, work shadowing,
       technological up-skilling and industry liaison.

4.1.21 Opportunities for staff to engage in professional development that advances their
       understanding of their subject and of the commercial work environment are
       provided through the Staff Development Policy [Human Resources A-Z] and
       underpinned by a staff development budget.

4.1.22 Ravensbourne’s taught postgraduate programmes are sites of experimental
       research in the creative application of new media and technology. The growth of
       this area, the visibility of its work to the wider community and the engagement of
       staff from across most programme areas with postgraduate teaching has served
       as stimulant to the development of research and scholarship more widely in the
       community. The development of Ravensbourne’s Applied Research Strategy (see
       1.4.10 above) will underpin and develop this further. As a teaching focused
       institution, it is unsurprising to note that a number of staff are engaged with
       research of an investigative pedagogical nature, for example into group work, the
       use of laptops in learning and teaching, and into how students can become
       involved into designing their own online learning environments.

4.2     Learning resources are appropriate to allow students to achieve the learning
        outcomes of their programmes

4.2.1   Ravensbourne has always been known for the quality of the learning resources
        and technology, which underpin our learning opportunities. Relocation has
        provided us with the opportunity to renew and reinvigorate that resource base.

        Learning Environment

4.2.2   Our new campus provides us with a range of innovative and extremely well
        equipped learning spaces, which range from innovative large open plan and
        flexible studios through to more traditional enclosed spaces for seminars or small
        group teaching. The building is engineered for openness and to break down
        boundaries between disciplines. However, there are more private or enclosed
        spaces for learning activity that demands this. In addition to the timetabled studio
        spaces, lecture and classrooms in which formal learning events takes place, there
        are open study studios for group and individual study throughout the building as
        well as relaxed and informal meeting places.

4.2.3   Ravensbourne updated its equipment and technology infrastructure substantially
        before, during and after relocation moving more fully from the analogue to the
        digital. In terms of design and making, we have moved in advance of relocation
        from traditional 3D metal engineering, plastic and woodworking workshops to
        modern rapid and desktop prototyping facilities. In the area of fashion and
        photography, we replaced ‘wet’ printing with ‘digital’ printing. Where and when

                                             34
        necessary, we maintain or facilitate student access to traditional making methods
        through external partnership (e.g. our arrangements for fashion at Deptford).

4.2.4   Among the resources available to our students now are:

             A state of the art Audio Recording Studio and live room (funded by Harvey
              goldsmith) hosting the Euphonix System 5 and with 5.1 Genelec surround
              and which is suitable for radio dramas, ADR (automated dialogue
              replacement), foley and sonic arts performances.
             A TV Studio with five Sony HXC-100 studio cameras, lenses, CCUs and
              remotes, Vinten Pedestals and Heads, black, white and green cycs and
              Combination of 2K & 1K spots, Cyc lights and soft boxes on a grid with
              pantographs.
             A production, lighting control room and sound gallery equipped with the latest
              vision and sound production equipment.
             Professional quality editing and post production facilities for offline and online
              editing and creating visual effects, audio post production, colour grading. We
              are amongst the first institutions to offer access to 3D editing.
             Prototyping spaces and equipment which incorporate the latest scanning and
              for 3D printing equipment from CAD which enable the rapid manufacture of
              detailed and highly finished concept models, functional working prototypes
              and facilitate iterative concept development in a way that is forward thinking
              and relevant to modern design practices.
             Wired and wireless access to the Internet via 1Gb/s connection to JANET,
              the UK academic network.
             A large space with 3 sided HD projection and touchscreen control, a fully
              controllable lighting rig, configurable for lecture, conference and other
              settings

        Our ICT Service Helpdesk provides support and advice to students in accessing
        the various ICT services available.

        Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)

4.2.5   A Moodle based virtual learning environment was implemented in 2004 and
        Moodle 2.0 was implemented in summer 2011. The nature and amount of activity
        undertaken on the VLE will also vary from unit to unit but as a minimum, students
        will be able to access course related information and a repository of learning
        materials in electronic format. As students gain confidence and competency, a
        greater emphasis is placed on self-directed study and there may be increasing
        interaction with academics and with other students through online forums. Finally,
        the VLE is also used to link to external learning content, which may be provided
        online by communities of practice (such as networks and email lists) or by
        organisations such as the Tate, Ted Talks, The British Library, MIT, or the Royal
        Society of Arts and Manufacturing. Moodle is also used to point students to
        communities of practice and to useful email lists (for example, for the BA (Hons)
        Web Media students).

        Library resources

4.2.6   Ravensbourne’s Study Zone houses a library of over 18,000 books, as well as
        providing access to e-books, ejournals, DVDs and a rich multimedia collection of

                                              35
        other electronic resources. It also facilitates student access to wider library
        collections through our partnerships.

4.2.7   In response to feedback from students through the NSS [17a-e] and Course
        Experience Questionnaire (CEQ), recent improvements have been made to the
        quality of the information about the resources available through the Study Zone.
        The Library Services Manager has reviewed the alignment of reading and
        resource lists in Course Handbooks with resources, and subject guides have been
        created for the different discipline areas. The space itself has been reconfigured to
        create dedicated group work areas where students can discuss projects together
        and a Silent Study Zone, for individual work.

        Central Loan Resource

4.2.8   Many learning events and a lot of independent group or individual study or practice
        by Ravensbourne students is underpinned by the range of equipment available via
        theCentral Loan Resource (CLR). This provides students with access to in excess
        of 3500 pieces of equipment. This includes media equipment such as cameras,
        specialist lenses, lighting, microphones, and leads, computing equipment such as
        laptops, scanners and hard drives, and design and making equipment such as
        sewing machines. A full catalogue is available to students and staff online through
        which bookings can be made.

4.2.9   Given the centrality of the CLR to so much of the activity at Ravensbourne, it is
        unsurprising that it features strongly in student feedback. Some of this is a natural
        reaction to a gate keeping function and the control of access to resources which
        are necessary. Nevertheless, actions are in train to address student concerns
        about levels of service from the CLR. It is envisaged that student issues in relation
        to enabling the remote booking of equipment will be addressed in the medium
        term by the replacement of the current stock management and booking system (as
        it cannot be facilitated by the current database). The alignment of CLR equipment
        and course resource requirements are kept under continuous review (for instance
        via the Portfolio Development Group for new or revalidating programmes) and
        Management Committee when target numbers are considered together with
        human and physical resource issues.

        Timetabled Space

4.2.10 In order to maximise students’ access to Ravensbourne facilities, we operate a
       flexible space protocol. This responds to HEFCE’s Space Management Group
       recommendations about efficient and effective space utilisation in Higher
       Education; the need to give students an experience of collaborative working as is
       characteristic of industry; and the requirement to address institutional sustainability
       by generating third stream funding through building hire. Learning events and
       activities are timetabled in particular spaces. Spaces are timetabled centrally using
       Celcat software and timetables are published at the beginning of each term and
       available online.

4.2.11 Ravensbourne while committed to its flexible space management policy
       recognises that the transition from dedicated studios and specialist resource to
       activity related timetabling has been challenging for some disciplines. Further it is
       necessary to improve the quality of timetabling particularly in relation to assigning
       learning events to spaces and in ensuring that where sessions are scheduled

                                              36
        adjacent to each other, these activities do not conflict. This has come through
        clearly in both quantitative [NSS [17a-e] and CEQ] and qualitative student feedback
        via SLCs. Particular adjustments which have been made in response to student
        feedback have included the establishment of a UG Level 3 studio for the latter part
        of the academic year and the establishment of an operational timetabling group
        charged with identifying issues and dealing with these on an ongoing basis.

        Laptops

4.2.12 All students entering Ravensbourne are required to own or have ready access to a
       laptop. Laptops are used extensively in learning and teaching. This is publicised to
       students on each individual course page in the digital prospectus in advance and
       students are reminded during enrolment. Advice on laptop specifications is
       provided to students along with details on a range of bursaries and financial
       support available to them. Advice on the support available is also set out on the
       Ravensbourne Intranet.

        Software

4.2.13 Ravensbourne also provides its students with access to an extremely wide range
       of free or heavily discounted software. The Software Tools for Students page on
       the intranet sets out the packages available. An agreement resulting from a
       strategic partnership with Adobe allows us to provide Adobe Professional Creative
       Suite free to all students and staff through a relatively modest investment by the
       institution.

        Resource specification

4.2.14 The initial resource requirements or impacts of a new course or a revalidating
       course are subject to approval by Portfolio Development Group (on behalf of
       Management Committee). Course teams complete a Course Development
       Approval Form (CDAF) outlining the impact that the development will have on
       institutional resources and any requirement to acquire new equipment [available
       on the Quality A-Z].

4.2.15 The relationship of resources to delivery is subject to further scrutiny at internal
       and external (re)validation [15a-b]. When necessary, both types of event incorporate
       a tour for external peers on the panel so that the teaching spaces, and IT and
       specialist resources relevant to the course, can be viewed first hand.

4.2.16 The ACM process requires course teams to comment on whether the learning
       resources for a course remain adequate. Throughout the year, representatives
       from support services with responsibility for resources, such as ICT and facilities,
       attend SLCs, Boards of Study and other committees so that issues relating to
       these resources can be picked up and any new developments in the service can
       be communicated to the Committee. External examiners also often comment on
       resource concerns: these are addressed through External Examiner Action Plans.




                                            37
        Student Feedback on Resources

4.2.17 There are multiple opportunities for students to feedback and comment on learning
       resources quantitatively and qualitatively via Student Liaison Committees, Student
       Parliament, CEQ and NSS [17a-e].

4.2.18 Learning resources have tended to be rated lower than other aspects of our
       student experience in the NSS [17a-e] and CEQ. Satisfaction with learning resources
       across the English HE sector increased by one point to 80% this year from 2010.
       Ravensbourne, however, received particularly low scores on this aspect of
       experience in that year. We believe that learning resource change in advance of
       relocation and the problems associated with the introduction of the laptop project
       impacted on this aspect of student satisfaction.

4.2.19 Satisfaction with learning resources overall improved slightly from 54% in NSS
       2010 to 56% in 2011 (having fallen from 78% in 2008 and 70% in 2009) [2a
       paragraph 22c]. Although still some 32% lower than the national figure,
       satisfaction with access to general IT resources when needed also increased from
       41% in 2010 to 52% in 2011, compared to 69% in 2009 and 78% in 2008.
       Ravensbourne has been heartened by this evidence of improvement, albeit slight.
       We are pessimistic that our results will improve dramatically in the NSS 2012,
       although we are working hard to raise student satisfaction. We believe that there
       will continue to be elements of negativity associated with the transition from
       dedicated studios and specialist resource to activity related timetabling, and ‘just in
       case’ to ‘just in time’ access to resources.

4.3     There is an effective contribution of students to quality assurance

4.3.1   Ravensbourne has robust systems to ensure that the development, monitoring
        and improvement of its higher education programmes is informed by the opinion of
        students. It has operated a robust Student Feedback Policy for many years. This
        was reviewed during 2011 and a new Student Engagement Policy [QDC 25/01/11
        paper 08 and QDC 19/04/11 paper 16] was launched which seeks to reinvigorate
        our relationship with our student body.

        Student Union

4.3.2   All Ravensbourne students are automatically entitled to membership of the
        Ravensbourne Student Union (RSU). RSU is represented on both the Board of
        Governors and Academic Board and its sub committees. The RSU executive is led
        by a democratically elected President (or Co Presidents), which may be a paid
        sabbatical. However, as is common in small specialist institutions, the incumbents
        more often prefer not to take a sabbatical. A proposal to strengthen the RSU
        Executive has been considered by Management Committee (and will in amended
        form go to the Board of Governors).

        Student Representatives

4.3.3   Normally, at least one Student Course Representative is elected for each level of a
        programme. Student Course Representatives attend Student Liaison Committees
        (SLCs) and provide feedback to staff on issues arising on the course and affecting
        the student experience. Ravensbourne provides Student Course Representatives
        with guidance on their role [available on the Quality A-Z].
                                             38
        Student Parliament

4.3.4   Plenary meetings of Student Course Representatives from across the Institution
        organised by RSU and the Quality Team and have been held on an annual or bi-
        annual basis for a number of years [AB 22/11/11 paper 14a-b]. From 2010-11,
        these have been held on a termly basis. These meetings were initially referred to
        as Student Forums but have become colloquially known as the Student
        Parliament. From 2010-11, senior managers have attended the Student
        Parliament including the Director and Deputy Director [AB 15/02/12 papers 10a-b].
        The Parliament also serves to integrate the Student Course Representative
        system with the SU representative system. The meetings often afford an
        opportunity to gather additional feedback from the representatives and to seek
        their views on developments and issues.

        Student Liaison Committees

4.3.5   Each cluster of programmes has a Student Liaison Committee (SLCs), which
        provides an opportunity for Student Course Representatives from each level to
        comment on the student experience on their course and to raise issues with the
        management and the course team [Terms of Reference]. SLCs are chaired by the
        Academic Development Manager (ADM) with responsibility for the cluster.
        Formerly referred to as Staff-Student Liaison Committees, these were reformed in
        2010-11 [QDC 19/04/11 paper 16] in order to be more proactive and responsive to
        issues raised by students. Representatives are asked to forward issues in
        advance so that managers and staff can formulate responses and provide
        immediate answers at the meeting; when necessary support departments are
        invited.

        Student Feedback

4.3.6   Ravensbourne operates student feedback systems at both the central and local
        level to ensure that students have an opportunity to feed back on their experience
        overall and the elements which contribute to it.

4.3.7   An annual Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) is targeted at the total student
        population. Its results are collated and analysed by the Quality Team and an
        annual report provided to Academic Board [AB 22/11/11 paper 13a].
        Ravensbourne finds its own survey more useful in identifying issues than the NSS
        as often student concerns can be related specifically to an aspect of programme
        delivery. Course results (and qualitative comments) from the CEQ are distributed
        to course teams and Academic Development Managers.

4.3.8   Ravensbourne’s results in the National Student Survey (NSS) [17a-e] are also
        analysed by the Quality Team and reported to Academic Board. An institutional
        action plan is prepared. Course results (and qualitative comments) from the NSS
        are distributed to course teams and Academic Development Managers.

4.3.9   Institutional actions from the NSS and CEQ are collated into the Annual Monitoring
        Report [2a and 2i]. When necessary, a particular programme may be required to
        prepare a more detailed Action Plan related to the NSS and CEQ where it is
        apparent that there are specific issues.



                                            39
4.3.10 Students are given the opportunity within the CEQ to rate individual units of study.
       This system is not ideal as the evaluation is out of sync with the delivery. A unit
       questionnaire is currently being developed on Moodle (our VLE). Some
       programmes and units conduct their own questionnaires.

        Student Involvement in Committees and Processes

4.3.11 Ravensbourne has always tried to involve students within its academic processes
       and we are seeking to deepen their engagement:

             There is Student Union representation on the Board of Governors and
              Academic Board.
             There is student representation on the organisational sub committees of
              Academic Board (CPB and BoS).
             There is Student Union representation on the policy sub committees of
              Academic Board (QDC and LTSEC).
             Since March 2011, there has been student union representative on the
              Internal Validation Committee [15a-b]. In March 2011, we also introduced a
              new Strategic Review [23a] mechanism and this involves student
              representation.
             Under University of Sussex regulations, we included a student union
              representative on the Appeals Panels. We regret that this is no longer
              possible under City University regulations.
             Student representatives or student ambassadors are commonly involved in
              interviewing with Admissions Tutors [Admissions Policy 31].
             A meeting with or presentation to students is, when practical and possible, a
              part of the interview and decision process for the recruitment of staff (for
              example for the recent recruitment of the Subject Leader - Sound and Music
              Production).
             We are increasingly involving students in the co-creation of curriculum and in
              the design of other aspects of the student experience.
             We have found paid student helpers very effective in increasing the ICT
              helpdesk support available to students. Capitalising on the ability of student
              helpers to understand the perspectives of fellow students, Student Services
              have recently piloted a student-led session on how to use Moodle as part of
              their programme of study skills support sessions.

4.4     There is effective use of management information to safeguard quality and
        standards and to promote enhancement of student learning opportunities

4.4.1   Appropriate use of quantitative information to monitor that standards set is made
        by Ravensbourne. The data available for use in quality and other management
        processes is comprehensive covering the whole of the student lifecycle. Statistics
        and qualitative data are also deployed at all levels within the organisation to
        monitor performance and to identify areas for improvement. Nevertheless,
        Ravensbourne is seeking to improve the quality of the data available, its
        accessibility and its uses in our systems.

4.4.2   Statistical analysis of national UCAS data is used in course development planning
        and is made available to validation panels [25].



                                             40
4.4.3   Admissions targets are set by Management Committee in consultation with the
        Academic Development Managers (ADMs). During the recruitment cycle,
        Management Committee and the ADMs receive fortnightly data on applications
        and on progress with reviewing these including interviewing and selection. The
        Admissions Officer regularly updates Subject Leaders. A new recruitment
        application is being piloted during this recruitment cycle and it is envisaged that a
        ‘dashboard’ will be added to this enabling managers and Subject Leaders access
        to live data on the recruitment process. Diversity Committee considers equality
        data in relation to applications and admissions. Admissions data is made available
        to Subject Leaders during ACM.

4.4.4   Retention data is monitored on an annual basis. This data forms part of the
        dataset provided to Subject Leaders for the Annual Course Monitoring (ACM)
        process. Analysis of institutional level performance is contained in the Annual
        Monitoring Report [2a]. In year progress is monitored at termly Progress Review
        Boards (see 3.3.9 to 3.3.10 above). A new system of bar code register scanning
        for attendance is being piloted which may provide these boards with live access to
        attendance data.

4.4.5   Assessment Boards have access to the range of results associated with a
        particular candidate. They also have access to results for each unit to enable
        comparison across units within a level. In the case of final assessment,
        Assessment Boards view the spread of classifications and historical comparative
        data (in real number, percentage and pie chart form) for the previous two years
        [Example Examination Board spread sheet, July 2011 26]. Assessment data forms
        part of the dataset provided to Subject Leaders for ACM. An annual Examination
        Board Report [AB 15/02/12 papers 11a-g] collating results data at the institutional
        level as well as external examiner comments is collated for the University of
        Sussex and Board of Governors.

4.4.6   An annual Destination of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) Report [27a-b] is
        undertaken annually and submitted to Academic Board. This contains granular
        information related to programmes of study and is made available to course
        teams.

4.4.7   Ravensbourne’s Annual Monitoring Report [2a] takes an overview of the ACMR
        process, also of statistical monitoring data and performance indicators. Use of
        performance indicators is made by Management Committee for instance in
        considering its approach to widening participation. Academic Board (and
        Governors) receive overview information in relation to academic appeals and
        complaints. Diversity Committee receives regular data reports to support
        maintenance of Ravensbourne equality duty and agenda. The Registry support
        adhoc access to statistical reports on an ongoing basis. Data in respect of student
        satisfaction derived from both the National Student Survey (NSS) [17a-e] and
        Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) is used pervasively through our QA
        system.

4.5     Policies and procedures used to admit students are clear, fair, explicit and
        consistently applied

4.5.1   The recruitment and admissions of students is co-ordinated and supported by the
        Registry. A common Admissions Policy [31] is in place, which fully meets the

                                             41
        expectations of the recently revised Section 10 of the QAA Code of Practice and
        chapter B2 of the UK Quality Code. This is kept under annual review to ensure
        that it continues to be fit for purpose.

4.5.2   The admissions criteria for each programme are set out in programme
        specifications and approved at validation [15a-b]. For most undergraduate courses,
        these criteria are generic but additional criteria are in place where this is
        appropriate. The selection of suitably qualified candidates is based on an
        evaluation of submitted practical work and an interview. Each candidate receives
        equal consideration.

4.5.3   Specific guidance is in place on the conduct of the procedures and training is
        provided for those involved in interviewing potential students. No candidate is
        admitted without an interview and templates are in place to support consistent
        decision-making. An Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL) Policy and Procedure
        for candidates without traditional qualifications or who wish to apply for advance
        standing on the course is also in place [Registry Intranet].

4.6     There are effective complaints and appeals procedures

        Academic Appeals

4.6.1   In line with Section 5 of the QAA Code of Practice (academic appeals and student
        complaints on academic matters), and Chapter B9 of the Quality Code, a Student
        Appeals Policy and Procedure is in place to ensure that students have an avenue
        of recourse when they believe that their results in assessment have been
        adversely affected by an administrative, or by a health or other personal difficulty
        which for good reason was not disclosed at the time of the assessment. This
        procedure is communicated to students in the Assessment Regulations for their
        award.

        Complaints

4.6.2   Ravensbourne also has a separate procedure in place for complaints not related
        to matters of assessment [Annexe 2 of the Student Contract Handbook 28
        available on the Quality A-Z]. This enables students to bring matters of complaint
        to its attention, both informally and formally.

        University level review of complaints and academic appeals

4.6.3   Under the University of Sussex regulations, appeals were both screened and
        considered initially at Ravensbourne. Under City University, appeals are initially
        screened by the University and referred to Ravensbourne for consideration. There
        is no evidence to suggest any confusion on the part of students about this.
        However, it has meant a slightly later appeals cycle than we have been used to
        and we are considering what adjustment might address this.

4.6.4   If an appeal is not upheld internally, the student has a right to appeal to the
        validating university for a review of the conduct and outcome of the Ravensbourne
        stage. Ravensbourne subscribes to the Office of the Independent Adjudicator
        (OIA) and this gives the student an additional avenue of redress.



                                             42
4.6.5   Both procedures allow for a formal review of the process of consideration where a
        complainant or appellant remains dissatisfied with the outcome. The Quality Team
        supports the Complaints Procedure. The volume of formal complaints is relatively
        small; an anonymised report on complaints and appeals is presented to Academic
        Board annually [AB 11/01/11 paper 06].

4.7     There is an approach to career education, information, advice and guidance
        (CEIAG) that is adequately quality assured

4.7.1   As an industry engaged, vocationally focused institution, the employability of our
        students is extremely important to us. We pride ourselves on providing good
        quality career education, information, advice and guidance both through a blend of
        curriculum and extracurricular activity. We are confident that this aspect of our
        activity meets the expectations of Section 8 of the former QAA Code of Practice
        and the relevant sections of Chapter B4 of the UK Quality Code.

4.7.2   Ravensbourne’s Employability Team provides students and graduates with an
        employment and careers advice service, as well as access to jobs listings,
        workshops and advice about employment, entrepreneurship, further study,
        professional practice, placement, intellectual property, as well as organising
        various industry networking events throughout the year. Information, guidance and
        templates for students are provided on our Moodle-based VLE (access upon
        request).

4.7.3   Aspects of professional development and planning (PDP) and career education
        are embedded at each level of the curriculum in undergraduate programmes (e.g.
        within industry and professional practice and enterprise and entrepreneurship),
        though as our approach has matured, we have moved away from an explicit
        stream of curriculum units related to this. The team work very closely with
        academic staff to support those aspects of this provision which are delivered within
        the curriculum and to ensure their extracurricular activity enhances academic
        delivery. The industry background of our permanent academic staff as well as our
        strong use of sessional staff currently active in industry also underpins this
        approach. Personal Tutorials (now known as Personal Progress Reviews) are a
        key mechanism in integrating career plans, extra-curricular activity and on-course
        learning.

4.7.4   The Employability Team work throughout the year to identify, promote and support
        new career, employment, work experience and graduate internship opportunities
        for students. The team are all experienced professionals within design, fashion,
        and broadcast and communication media and include a qualified Careers Advisor.
        Through their networking they maintain a live database of some 1500 companies
        and employers who provide work experience, live projects, internships and jobs
        each year. In addition, the employability team produces extensive online and
        physical resources to help students and graduates research and prepare to
        progress into their future careers. This has ranged from the delivery of
        Ravensbourne’s first industry judged CV competition this year, to a wide range of
        support resources for teaching and the VLE. The team also offer a more tailored
        approach to individual situations: this supports the needs of a variety of audiences
        from international to dyslexic students. The last year has seen 300+ one-to-one
        and 800+ digital/online coaching scenarios.


                                            43
4.7.5   Employability activity is evaluated through the Annual Monitoring Report. The
        academic and support staff involved in supporting this activity keep it under
        continuous review regularly seeking to enhance the offer to students and
        incorporating new ways to engage students (e.g. multi-speaker Pecha Kucha style
        events or Industry speed-networking). Currently, a working group of academic and
        support staff led by the ADM (Applied Research) are reviewing holistically the
        curricular and extra-curricular support of employability to refine and update
        provision further following a recent re-organisation [LTSEC minutes 24/01/12 item
        12.24]. A Strategic Review in this area will follow once that is complete.

4.8     The quality of learning opportunities is managed to enable the entitlements
        of disabled students to be met

4.8.1   Ravensbourne is experienced in supporting students with a full range of
        disabilities, which may range from students with dyslexia or other learning
        difficulties through to students with mobility or mental health issues. It fully meets
        the legal requirements in respect of this aspect of its activity and is proactive in its
        support seeking to identify and support those with disability during the recruitment
        and application stage. Ravensbourne exceeded its HEFCE Performance
        Indicators 2009-10 (published 2011) for Students in receipt Disabled Study
        Allowance [2a paragraph 21j].

4.8.2   The Student Services department provides access to a range of advice, guidance
        and support to students dealing with the demands of a Ravensbourne programme
        of study and the additional challenges which may face them. These services
        include disability support, dyslexia screening and referral, dyslexia support, study
        skills support, financial advice and assistance, a counselling service, and
        mentoring. There were bedding in issues associated with this department in the
        immediate aftermath of relocation related to access and availability but these are
        diminishing and further improvements are envisaged.

4.8.3   Student Support were subject to a recent Strategic Review in 2011 and
        Ravensbourne is progressing the recommendations of that report [23a-b].

4.9     The quality of learning opportunities for international students is appropriate

4.9.1   Around 7% of HE students at Ravensbourne are international students and they
        come from a diverse range of countries, which span all the continents. While
        proportionately, international students form a smaller section of the student body
        than in many other institutions, they are an extremely important part of our
        community enhancing the learning community with global perspectives.

4.9.2   Ravensbourne’s aspiration is to be both global and local. Our Strategic Plan states
        that ‘in 2016, Ravensbourne will be attracting some of the most innovative minds
        from across the globe’. Post-relocation, attention has been given to developing our
        international strategy [LTRC 18/01/11 paper 04 and AB 29/03/11 29a-b]. We believe
        that our distinctive offer will be attractive to overseas students and there is scope
        to increase the recruitment of international students.

        Recruitment and Admissions

4.9.3   Specific information for international applicants on the recruitment process is
        available on the Ravensbourne website. International candidates are subject to the
                                              44
        same Admissions Policy [31] and entry criteria as home/EU students. The Business
        Development Manager in Marketing and Admissions Team in Registry provide
        advice and support during the applications process.

        Highly Trusted Sponsor Status

4.9.4   Ravensbourne has Tier 4 (Students) Highly Trusted Sponsor Status and has
        robust processes in place to comply UKBA requirements related to the issuing of
        CAS, and reporting migrant activity. These have recently been subject to a
        compliance audit by a specialist immigration legal company and were found fully
        compliant [report available on request]. The Registry is currently considering the
        suggested areas for improvement.

        Support and information for international students

4.9.5   Although as a small institution, we do not have dedicated support functions related
        to international students, Student Services have always sought to ensure that its
        services are inclusive of international student needs and when necessary there is
        specific provision to address their need (such as English as a Foreign Language
        sessions). A welcome event for international students is organised annually in
        collaboration with the Student Union. These provide an opportunity to orientate
        international students and ensure that they are aware of the range of services
        available and to introduce key staff. In Autumn 2011, this involved the Director and
        other senior managers.

4.9.6   Student Services have sought increasingly to delineate the information and
        services available to international students and to make them more accessible.
        Our support for international students is kept under review. Following publication
        by QAA of International Students Studying in the UK, Guidance for higher
        education providers, January 2012, a Ravensbourne handbook for international
        students is in preparation. Ravensbourne is member of the British Council’s
        Education UK Partnership and the UK Council for International Student Affairs
        (UKCISA), which provides it and our international students with access to
        additional advice and information.

4.10    Appropriate support and guidance is provided to enable postgraduate
        research students to complete their programmes and to enable staff
        involved in research programmes to fulfil their responsibilities

4.10.1 Ravensbourne does not currently have any provision which falls within the scope
       of Section 1 of the QAA Code of Practice (Postgraduate research programmes)
       and Chapter B11 of the UK Quality Code. The mechanisms by which research and
       scholarship, and professional practice inform teaching at Ravensbourne are
       described in Section 4 above (4.1.20 to 4.1.22).

4.10.2 Ravensbourne does not submit to the Research Excellence Framework and whilst
       it has a developed suite of masters courses they belong to PGT, not PGR.

4.10.3 Nevertheless, Ravensbourne has a number of research active members of staff
       qualified at doctoral level or working towards a doctorate and there is a strong
       emerging applied research agenda [Draft Research and Innovation Strategy 30]
       (see paragraphs 4.120 to 4.1.22 above also). We are beginning to develop a
       research infrastructure. This has been driven in part by the Learning and Teaching

                                             45
        Strategy [18] – where the establishment of an applied research function at
        postgraduate level has been a key objective – and in part by the institution’s ERDF
        “Commercialising Digital Technology” programme.

4.10.4 Ravensbourne staff (and masters students) have accordingly been collaborating
       with external industry and academic partners particularly in the areas of Rapid
       Prototyping and 3D Stereoscopy. The establishment of postgraduate pathways in
       Applied Technologies and 3D Stereoscopy, respectively, has strengthened this
       work and with the recent validation of the Master of Design a research investment
       plan is currently being implemented. Another significant area is online learning and
       Ravensbourne was pleased to be in receipt of funding (£133k) from the Paul
       Hamelyn foundation for a project relating to online learning and sixteen year old
       NEETs entitled “Learning Conversations”.

4.10.5 Sometimes the outcomes of staff research result in consultancy work for external
       commercial organisations e.g. rapid prototyping and 3D television. Although the
       main focus of resource is on industry relevant research, individuals also pursue
       topics of personal interest including aspects of research-informed teaching and
       pedagogical research e.g. group dynamics in an educational context.

4.10.6 At masters level students are encouraged to develop an integrated approach to
       theory and practice facilitated through the shared Research Process unit of study
       which culminates with the final project supported by CARD – the Critically
       Assessed Research Document. This work has resulted in developments within the
       institution’s key research areas.

4.10.7 Ravensbourne is also committed to developing staff research skills and to this end
       research skills and bid writing workshops are run periodically. A current project
       involving all course teams requires staff to carry out pedagogical research focused
       on the delivery of a unit of study and written up as a case study: it is hoped that
       the case studies can be disseminated on the website and afford more detailed
       information to applicants about how students experience their studies at
       Ravensbourne.

4.11    The quality of learning opportunities delivered as part of collaborative
        arrangements is managed effectively to enable students to achieve their
        awards

4.11.1 Ravensbourne does not currently have any collaborative arrangements which fall
       within the scope of Section 2 of the QAA Code of Practice on Collaborative
       provision and flexible and distributed learning (including e-learning) and Chapter
       B10 of the UK Quality Code.

4.11.2 Ravensbourne has been developing a Procedure for Articulation Compacts and
       Managed Progression Agreements, and associated curriculum mapping template
       to support staff in setting up such arrangements but none are in place as yet [QDC
       31/01/12 papers 10a-b].




                                            46
4.12    The quality of learning opportunities delivered through flexible and
        distributed arrangements, including e-learning, is managed effectively

4.12.1 Ravensbourne does not currently have any programmes which fall within the
       scope of Section 2 of the QAA Code of Practice on Collaborative provision and
       flexible and distributed learning (including e-learning).

4.12.2 Nevertheless, e-learning has long formed an important part of the learning blend at
       Ravensbourne. A survey of course use of Moodle conducted before relocation
       found that there was considerable variation across course teams. Further, the
       Moodle-supported element of any particular unit can also vary depending on the
       curriculum content. Ravensbourne has been developing quality procedures related
       to e-learning aspects of its curriculum support and a new procedure is currently
       being piloted [QDC 31/01/12 paper 07]. As Moodle becomes more important within
       our learning experience, we have also sought to involve students in to co-design of
       that experience. For instance, in the development of the navigation on the Moodle
       site.

4.13    The quality of learning opportunities delivered through work-based and
        placement learning is effective

4.13.1 Ravensbourne’s approach to placement learning and work based accords with
       section 9 of the QAA Code of Practice and Section 2 of Chapter B3 of the Quality
       Code.

4.13.2 All Ravensbourne undergraduate students are encouraged to undertake a work
       placement, and in some programmes these placements or longer periods of work-
       based learning are compulsory. The exact role that placement plays in each
       course, and the assessment associated with it are defined in a course’s validated
       definitive document.

4.13.3 In two honours programme areas, placement is mandatory and forms part of the
       delivery within a unit (BA (Hons) Fashion and BA (Hons) Editing and Post
       Production). The assessment of such units requires the student to research and
       critically analyse the business or technical contexts of their placement and to
       reflect on their period of work experience. Last year more than 120 students from
       these programmes went out on placement. We validated a new FdA Editing and
       Post Production: Industry Practice, which enrolled its first cohort in Autumn 2011.
       This programme also requires a significant professional practice placement in its
       second level.

4.13.4 On other courses, placement is voluntary and, although strongly encouraged, does
       not form part of the formal delivery or assessment. Ravensbourne interactions and
       discussions with employers from across a range of areas within the creative
       industries have lead us to believe that our approach is broadly correct and that
       there is not a one-size-fits-all work experience opportunity. By being more flexible
       in the ways in which employers can engage with our placement schemes (busy
       times, available jobs etc.), they can offer a higher quality of experience to trainees
       and new entrants. There are strong mechanisms and networks in place to support
       students applying for and achieving placements and internships [Work Placement
       Intranet pages and further information is available on Moodle]. In addition, an


                                             47
        appropriate range of materials explaining and governing the nature of the
        placement for all stakeholders is in place.

4.13.5 Placement activity at Ravensbourne is supported by the Employability department.
       There is plenty of evidence to suggest that students are well supported in
       engaging with the industries into which they progress. For example, in 2010-2011,
       492 placement opportunities were advertised by the Employability Unit for all the
       design, graphic design, animation and motion graphics courses, with students
       generally contacting the companies direct. A further 245 opportunities were
       advertised for the broadcasting courses alone, which included 138 being managed
       by the Employability Unit (involving the co-ordination of applications and
       interviews). A total of 424 job opportunities were advertised for graduates across
       Ravensbourne’s disciplines [2a].

4.13.6 In addition to formal and informal placement, there is a considerable emphasis
       placed on other forms work related learning at Ravensbourne. A particular
       emphasis is placed on projects that progressively introduce professional contexts
       and constraints. As in industry, project briefings encourage questions, discussion,
       and clarify understanding of the task being set. Students engage in many types of
       industry engagement whilst studying ranging from working on live projects,
       simulations, industry visits and industry guest speakers.

4.13.7 This strong connection between the world of work and academic study results in
       students experiencing the creative industries at first hand, often through activities
       within their course work. The embedding of such activity within the student
       experience results in an industry-informed, learner-centred, approach that
       underpins subsequent smooth transition to the world of work at the end of the
       study programme.

4.13.8 Whenever possible Ravensbourne has identified sources of funding to enable
       employers to take on our graduates mentor, support and pay them at least the
       minimum wage. This was done very successfully for example in 2009-10 when our
       Graduate and Business Incubation Services Advisor, through the Government
       funded Graduate Internship Scheme, placed 300 graduates in six-week
       internships. The Scheme resulted in over a third of interns securing either full-time
       employment with contracted or other companies, or a freelance career following
       their internship. Ravensbourne will actively continue to identify any opportunity that
       supports our graduates and others to gain entry into the creative industries.

4.14    A student charter, or equivalent document, setting out the mutual
        expectations of the institution and its students, is available

4.14.1 The terms of Ravensbourne’s studentship are set out in the Student Contract
       Handbook [28]. Course Handbooks outline the student experience that students can
       expect, including learning hours.

4.14.2 Ravensbourne decided to develop a student charter during 2009 and undertook
       work with its then Student Union Executive to this end [QDC minutes 12/05/09 to
       15/12/09]. The project was problematic as it did not seem to engage the Student
       Union and as relocation was approaching elements of the project seemed
       abstract. Nevertheless, the institution remains committed to the idea of a ‘Charter’
       and the recently launched Student Experience Project Working Group [LTSEC

                                             48
11/10/11 paper 05] is evidence of a commitment to establishing a meaningful
device which sets out mutual expectations in respect of the Ravensbourne
experience.




                                   49
SECTION 5: The quality of public information, including that produced
for students and applicants

        Institutional Information

5.1.1   Ravensbourne operates a paperlite policy; the information available online is
        extensive. The institutional approach is to the make as much of information as
        possible accessible on its website and its intranet.

5.1.2   Ravensbourne’s governance and management structure is outlined on the website
        and greater detail about governance and management is available on the intranet.
        The strategic plan [1] is normally available on its website and a range of supporting
        strategies available on the strategic planning section of the intranet including its
        learning and teaching strategy [18].

5.1.3   Ravensbourne’s quality assurance framework is available to its staff, students and
        other stakeholders via the Quality A to Z on the intranet. The Information Centre
        provides a ‘one stop shop’ for students and other stakeholders on our campus
        through which students can access a range of information and services. Student
        Information centre A to Z collates a range of student facing information, guidance
        and services.

5.1.4   Since the launch of our intranet in 2004, we have sought to be extremely
        transparent not only in making our policies and procedures publically available
        whenever possible but also our deliberative committee minutes and papers.

5.1.5   A range of information in relation to our programmes, their standards and quality
        assurance is also publically available:

             All course information pages in the website electronic prospectus contain
              links to programme specifications. Full course documents are available our
              intranet.
             The procedures for programme approval, monitoring and review are
              available on the Quality A to Z, and outcomes such as Annual Course
              Monitoring Reports and Action Plans.
             The arrangements for assessment are contained in programme
              specifications with fuller detail of assessment and the assessment criteria
              within units in course documents. Assessment Regulations are also
              available.
             The arrangements for external examining, the names of current external
              examiners and External Examiner Reports and Action Plans are all on the
              Quality A to Z.
             The results of our internal Course Experience Questionnaire are publically
              available and reports of our NSS results are available within committee
              papers.

5.1.6   Ravensbourne publishes an appropriate range of marketing and pre-admissions
        material online and in hard copy (for instance the Prospectus). A mobile phone
        application is also available. Marketing and Communications are responsible for
        developing and updating this material. The Quality Team supply Marketing and

                                             50
        Communications with the validated curriculum information and this forms the basis
        for the material published. The Quality Team is responsible for checking that
        admissions and course information contained in marketing leaflets, the prospectus
        and other pre-admission materials issued by the Marketing department accurately
        reflect courses as validated. Certain marketing information and publicity material
        requires the approval of our validator and the Quality Team oversee this process.

        Intranet

5.1.7   Ravensbourne’s intranet is accessible by staff, students and other stakeholders. It
        therefore provides internal and external access to the institution’s key data and
        details of our quality assurance systems and processes. The software
        infrastructure of the site, which is maintained by the ICT department is, however,
        currently undergoing a major transformation, which entails that content will be
        developed, maintained and overseen by the individual departments.

        Student Information

5.1.8   Students are issued with an appropriate range of pre-arrival materials before
        enrolment. The key documents issued to students at enrolment are the Student
        Contract Handbook [28], Course Handbook and Assessment Regulations. These
        and a range of additional information related to areas such as Student Services,
        ICT, Registry, Information Centre, and the Study Zone, are issued to students as
        ‘locked’ documents on a USB stick, which provides sufficient storage for students
        to use throughout their studies [available on request]. The terms of their
        studentship are set out in the Student Contract Handbook [28]. The student
        induction programme ensures that entrants are quickly introduced to the institution
        and integrated into their course.

        UCAS

5.1.9   UCAS Information is loaded and linked centrally by the Registry.

        Unistats

5.1.10 Information on Unistats is derived from HESA and the NSS. An Employability
       Statement was added in Summer 2010.

        Key Information Set (KIS)

5.1.11 The development of national policy in respect of the Key Information Set during
       2010-11 was followed closely by Ravensbourne’s Online Group, which precede
       the overhaul of our intranet. Technical and logistical preparations for the
       publication of the Key Information Set (KIS) are now in train for the beginning of
       uploading at the end of March. The information associated with the KIS is readily
       accessible within our systems. Nevertheless, like all institutions, meeting the
       August 2012 final deadline for submission of KIS data and its sign off by the
       Director will be challenging, but Ravensbourne is confident that it will do so.




                                            51
SECTION 6: The institution’s enhancement of students’ learning
opportunities
6.0.1   Ravensbourne has always sought to create an ethos, which expects and
        encourages the enhancement of student learning opportunities. Notwithstanding
        our formal systems for setting standards and quality assuring our provision, it has
        always been the case that course teams have often exceeded these. Our
        academic staff also seek to continuously improve and add value to the student
        experience. Similarly, supports services do not adhere to a simple formula every
        year but seek to innovate, improve and make the most of the opportunities
        presented to them.

6.0.2   The Ravensbourne student learning experience is about much more than the
        formal curriculum. The standards and quality of the programme of study are at the
        heart of the Ravensbourne learning experience. However, we seek to continuously
        add value to this by providing students with an additional range of opportunities for
        self-development, and further experiences which contribute to their employability.

6.1     Quality Enhancement Strategy

6.1.1   Ravensbourne developed its Quality Enhancement Strategy 2008-13 in 2007 (see
        paragraphs 1.3.25 and 2.2.23 above) coinciding roughly with the development of
        its Strategic Plan 2008-13. The latter set out an aim to work towards becoming an
        internationally recognised centre of excellence in our specialist subject areas. The
        Quality Enhancement Strategy set out eight thematic aims and the objectives,
        which would support their achievement.

6.1.2   The Strategy’s definition of enhancement falls within the QAA definition of ‘the
        process of taking deliberate steps at institutional level to improve the quality of
        learning opportunities it makes available to students’ (QAA Handbook for
        Institutional Audit, 2006. However, the Strategy sought to encompass within that
        definition, themes and approaches which were meaningful to the Ravensbourne
        community. The aims sought to recognise and integrate in a systematic fashion a
        number of existing objectives and practices, as well as setting out some additional
        initiatives. Not all of the aims have been achieved but good progress has been
        made against most [QDC 31/01/12 paper 06].

        Planning and target setting for improvement

6.1.3   There has been some progress in embedding planning and target setting within
        our systems. For instance, an Enhancement and Innovation section was added to
        the standard Annual Course Monitoring template in Autumn 2008. As noted above,
        the Annual Service Monitoring procedure has been superseded by business
        planning and a new more holistic process of Strategic Review.

        Identification and dissemination of good practice internally and externally

6.1.4   The role which the ACM Plenary [2g] plays in the identification and dissemination of
        good practice is outlined above (paragraph 3.4.10). For instance, this year the
        Editing and Post Production course team developed a new method for providing
        formative and summative feedback on their assessed work using audio and video.
        Student feedback has been positive on this.

                                              52
6.1.5   The contribution of faculty-level staff development to the dissemination of good
        practice is noted above (paragraphs 4.1.10 to 4.1.14). For instance, the ‘SkillsFest’
        for staff, organised in July 2011, which covered the use of Moodle, and in
        particular Moodle 2.0 as we moved to the latest version of Moodle over the
        summer, 2011.

6.1.6   The Learning and Teaching Conference, now in its third year (see paragraph
        4.1.13 above), serves both as a stimulant to learning innovation and an
        opportunity for the sharing of good practice.

        Continuous improvement and innovation in the curriculum and its delivery

6.1.7   The validation of a two-year fast-track mode within the undergraduate framework
        is evidenced above (see paragraphs 1.3.16 to 1.3.17).

6.1.8   Validation with City University enabled a more timely minor modification system
        (see paragraph 3.4.7 above). There is plenty of evidence of use of the minor
        modification system to improve delivery in the record of Boards of Study and
        Curriculum and Programmes Board.

6.1.9   Ravensbourne has state of the art facilities and often uses the introduction of
        technology to stimulate curriculum development. Ravensbourne was the first
        Higher Education Institution to introduce a Media Asset Management System
        (MAM) of the kind seen in industry. Over the last two years we have also
        introduced new photography equipment, new 3D Television and film processes,
        the use of Nuke and Mystika (3D TV, film and animation software), and Rapid
        Prototyping facilities. Every new system or tool is integrated into our learning and
        teaching straight away to ensure the students gain immediate benefit.

6.1.10 Our creativity is enabled by technology (e.g. facilities, toolkits and a mobile
       approach to learning) but not led by it. Courses consider and use technology
       within a creative framework (e.g. storytelling, multiplatform, and blends of the real
       and virtual) and a ‘user-led’ approach (in line with industry) is foregrounded in
       order to ensure students are not limited by technical ability but empowered by it.
       We also seek to enhance students’ understanding of technology through extra-
       curricular activities. Our Computational Designer in Residence and the Digital
       Design Society provide students with access to thinking at the cutting edge of
       applied technology.

6.1.11 The former Head of Learning Innovation post played an important role in
       developing the learning experience, particularly in preparation for relocation. This
       role was discontinued following academic restructuring in summer 2011. However,
       it is now acknowledged that a role carrying responsibility for promoting learning
       innovation is necessary to promote ongoing development in this area.
       Ravensbourne is in the process of recruiting an Academic Development Manager
       – Learning Innovation.

        Technology for learning

6.1.12 Ravensbourne seeks to improve the student learning experience through the use
       of technology. We are developing a ‘blended learning’ approach, linking face-to-
       face sessions to material, which may be on our own intranet, Moodle or on

                                             53
        external providers websites. We have been pioneering a new kind of conversation
        around learning where the students are able to chat online to each other about
        projects during lectures and are encouraged to use their laptops to explore
        supporting online resources within lectures. For example, a recent lecture within
        the Professional Contexts unit encouraged students to find out media habits by
        launching instant polls and votes on Facebook, before feeding back to the whole
        class with results. Using the Walker Space we have experimented with providing
        lectures from international speakers via Skype, for example, Howard Rheingold.

6.1.13 We were amongst the first institutions to take on board the possibility of ubiquitous
       learning using laptops and mobile devices through our laptop project (see
       paragraphs 1.3.5 to 1.3.6 above) and to organise access to software deals (in
       some cases free use) with Apple, Adobe and other suppliers. This was an
       innovative move for higher education and this will be the focus of a forthcoming
       research project.

6.1.14 We have also sought to use technology to improve the efficiency of our delivery.
       Currently, we have an ongoing end-to-end assessment project.

        Deepening the interaction and inter relationship between Ravensbourne’s academic
        provision and the world of work

6.1.15 Ravensbourne has always sought input from industry into its curriculum and its
       development. Strategically, the Broadcast Advisory Board (BAB) has provided
       advice on the ongoing development of the curriculum. Ravensbourne maintains a
       programme of ongoing research by the Industry Liaison Consultant into industry
       developments and needs, which informs the development of its curriculum. At
       course level, course teams seek input from industry during course development.
       Delivery is enhanced by the use of sessional lecturers who are industry
       practitioners as well as other guest speakers. Ravensbourne actively pursues
       partnerships with employers who can assist us with the delivery of Live Projects.

6.1.16 This interaction is also visible in the Industry Days and other extra-curricular
       events which enhance the student experience (see 1.3.4 above). The move to the
       new building has amplified opportunities for students to engage and network with
       the creative industries.

6.1.17 The embedding of units engaged with enterprise and entrepreneurship at all levels
       of our undergraduate courses is noted above (paragraphs 1.3.19 to 1.3.20), as is
       the strong articulation between postgraduate programmes and Ravensbourne’s
       incubation activity (paragraph 1.1.10). The ‘Penrose Market’ gives final year
       undergraduate students a real business experience. This approach will evolve
       further this year as a ‘business club’ is developed to support and encourage
       students in the development of small businesses.

6.1.18 An Employability Working Group is currently working on the integration of
       curricular and extra-curricular activity related to the development of employability
       skills. In the evolving model, Personal Progress Reviews (PPRs), formerly known
       as Personal Tutorials, will be a key vehicle for students to integrate formal and
       informal learning opportunities related to career development.




                                             54
        Responding positively to the evolving needs of a diverse student body

6.1.19 As noted above (paragraph 1.3.18), Ravensbourne has responded to Skillset’s
       national “Build Your Own MA” Media Practice Short Course Framework with the
       development of a HE programme aimed at those already in employment.

6.1.20 Post relocation, Ravensbourne has reviewed its students support services and
       sought to strengthen them (see paragraph 3.4.14 above) [23a-b].

        Involvement of students in the academic life of the Institution

6.1.21 Ravensbourne continues to seek to involve students in the development of their
       own learning experience. The sense of empowerment, which this gives
       Ravensbourne students, is most visible in the integrated student-led design and
       media show organised by final year students. It also means that a significant
       proportion of students are already working professionally – including setting up
       freelance businesses – whilst still students, thus offsetting their study costs and
       ensuring that they are especially employable.

6.1.22 This is also seen in student initiatives such as ‘Penrose Media’ and in
       institutionally supported initiatives such as ‘Studio 6’. Both of which enable student
       access to freelance and other commercial opportunities.

6.1.23 As outlined above (paragraph 1.4.5), the Student Engagement Policy introduced in
       Spring 2011 seeks to strengthen the role of students as agents of change within
       the Ravensbourne community.

        Review of quality and regulatory frameworks

6.1.24 Ravensbourne recognises that to achieve excellence it will need to put in place
       processes of change, delivering real improvements that impact on the experience
       of students. A key example of this is the Student Experience Project (referenced in
       4.14.2 above).

6.1.25 Ravensbourne continues to keep all of its quality and regulatory framework under
       review. It evaluated its approach to quality enhancement in January 2011 [QDC
       25/01/11 paper 06] to see if its approach continued to be appropriate. This was
       perhaps premature as the institution was so heavily engaged with the early
       occupation of the new building. Ravensbourne will look again at this approach as it
       reviews its Learning and Teaching Strategy.




                                               55
SECTION 7: Thematic element of review
7.1.1   Students are issued with an appropriate range of pre-arrival materials before
        enrolment (see 5.1.8 above) in the form of send outs from Registry and Student
        Services. At enrolment, a range of additional information related to areas such as
        Student Services, ICT, Registry, Information Centre, and the Study Zone, are
        issued to students as ‘locked’ documents on a USB stick, which provides sufficient
        storage for students to use throughout their studies [available on request].

7.1.2   All new entrants to our programmes of study (whether at first level or otherwise)
        receive a thorough induction programme to ensure that they are quickly introduced
        to the institution and integrated into their course.

7.1.3   Ravensbourne has operated a Student Induction Policy for more than a decade
        [available on the Quality A-Z]. Over time, this has been increasingly planned and
        organised centrally but there is still a strong course element. This policy is a little
        out of date. Nevertheless, it forms our general approach to induction.

7.1.4   Relocation proved a stimulus to new thinking about how students should be
        enrolled and inducted. An extremely comprehensive induction and orientation
        process for all new and returning students was necessary [33, 34 and 35].

7.1.5   In 2011, Matt Marsh, one of our Visiting Professors, conducted a user-centred
        design project involving co-design with first level students to re-engineer the
        enrolment and orientation process. While not all elements of this have yet been
        carried forward, it has informed developments so far as well as our direction of
        travel. The induction process was again strengthened in 2011 [36a-k].

7.1.6   Although induction is planned and coordinated centrally, there is still a strong
        programme level induction which integrates with this [37]. The approach taken by a
        particular course will be bespoke, but will invariably involve taking students
        through the whole structure of the programme and the first level in particular in
        detail. Subject Leaders also set out their expectations of student commitment and
        often show examples of work.

7.1.7   83% of Level 0 and Level 1 students expressed satisfaction with the induction they
        received in the internal Course Experience Questionnaire [32].

7.1.8   Specific thought has been given in the development of our undergraduate
        programmes of study to the role that Level 1 plays in integrating students into our
        learning community [evidenced in the learning and teaching section of programme
        specifications].

7.1.9   Level 1 undergraduate specialist units encourage cohort identity-building, while
        core and shared units ensure that students get to know others on different
        courses, quickly develop networks, access the broader specialisms and
        experience a wider range of teaching.




                                               56
Acronyms
AB         Academic Board
ACM        Annual Course Monitoring
ACMR       Annual Course Monitoring Report
ADM        Academic Development Managers
AI         Academic Infrastructure
APL        Accreditation of Prior Learning
APRD       Annual Performance Review and Development
BAB        Broadcast Advisory Board
BoS        Board of Study
CB         City University Course Board
CDAF       Course Development Approval Form
CEQ        Course Experience Questionnaire
CLR        Central Loan Resource
CPB        Curriculum and Programmes Board
CUL        City University London
DC         Diversity Committee
DLHE       Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education
DSA        Disabled Study Allowance
DTT        Digital Terrestrial Television
EIC        Enterprise and Innovation Centre
E&E        Enterprise and Entrepreneurship
FC         Faculty Committees (pre-September 2008)
FE         Further Education
FHEQ       Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
FTE        Full Time Equivalent
HD TV      High Definition Television
HE         Higher Education
HEA        Higher Education Academy
HEA-ADM    Higher Education Academy – Art, Design and Media
HEAR       Higher Education Achievement Report
HEFCE      Higher Education Funding Council for England
HEIs       Higher Education Institutions
HESA       Higher Education Statistics Agency
IPTV       Internet Protocol Television
KPIs       Key Performance Indicators
KPTs       Key Performance Targets
HR         Human Resources
KIS        Key Information Set
LSC        Learning Skills Council
LTRC       Learning and Teaching Review Committee (pre-September
           2011)
LTSEC      Learning, Teaching and Student Experience Committee (post-
           September 2011)
MAM        Media Asset Management
MCFU       Mid-Cycle Follow Up Report
NSS        National Student Survey
NVI        National Virtual Incubator
OIA        Office of the Independent Adjudicator
PDG        Portfolio Development Group
PDP        Professional Development and Planning

                           57
PGCE     Postgraduate Certificate in Education
PPD      Personal and Professional Development
PPR      Personal Progress Review
PSRBs    Professional, Statutory and Regulatory Bodies
QAA      Quality Assurance Agency
QDC      Quality Development Committee
RAE      Research Assessment Exercise
RSU      Ravensbourne Student Union
SPA      Supporting Professionalism in Admissions
SLC      Student Liaison Committees (post-Autumn 2010)
SSDP     Strategic Skills Development Plan
SSLC     Staff Student Liaison Committees (pre-Autumn 2010)
SU       Student Union
UKCISA   UK Council for International Student Affairs
UoS      University of Sussex
UUK      Universities, UK
VLE      Virtual Learning Environment




                         58
Referencing
1     Strategic Plan 2010-16
2a    Annual Monitoring Report 2010-11
2b    Appendix 1 Ravensbourne Annual Monitoring Log 2010-2011
2c    Appendix 2 Summary of Course Strengths and Issues
2d    Appendix 3 Annual Course Monitoring Logs 2010-2011
2e    Appendix 4 Institution, Faculty and Course Statistics
2f    Appendix 5 Ravensbourne Annual Monitoring Log 2009-2010 updates
2g    Appendix 6 Extract from Curriculum and Programmes Board Minutes and Notes
      from ACM Plenary Day
2h    Appendix 7 Course Experience Questionnaire results
2i    Appendix 8 National Student Survey Results
3     Annual Monitoring Report 2008-09
4     City University Recognition Report 2007
5     City University External Validation Report, Postgraduate February 2008
6     Internal Validation Report, Postgraduate April 2009
7     City University External Validation Report, Undergraduate and Postgraduate May
      2009
8     City University External Validation Report, Undergraduate and Postgraduate May
      2011
9a    Proposed Themes for Validation 2008-09
9b    Ravensbourne Undergraduate Framework: the pros and cons of modularity
9c    Proposed Undergraduate Framework
10a   Internal Validation Report, Undergraduate January 2009
10b   Internal Validation Report, Undergraduate February 2009
11a   Internal Validation Committee, October 2010
11b   Internal Validation Committee, March 2011
11c   Internal Validation Committee, April 2011
12    Industry Issues and Perspectives for Validation, September 2008
13    Organogram
14    Mid-cycle follow up Report, June 2010
15a   Procedure for course development approval, validation and revalidation
15b   Guidance for Participants in Internal Validation
16    Quality Enhancement Strategy 2008-2013
17a   National Students Survey 2011 – Summary of Results
17b   National Student Survey 2011 – Full analysis of Ravensbourne Results
17c   Analysis of NSS 2011 Open Comments Report
17d   Annex A: NSS 2011 Open Comments analysis
17e   Annex B: NSS 2011 Open Comments text analysis report
18    Learning and Teaching Strategy 2006-07 to 2011-12
19    Curriculum Review Project: Findings from student workshops
20    Review of the Student Learning Experience on the current Ravensbourne
      Curriculum, April 2011
21    Guidance for Examination Boards for Postgraduate and Undergraduate Courses
22    Portfolio Development Group Terms of Reference
23a   Strategic Review of Student Support, March 2011
23b   Strategic Review of Student Support Action Plan
24    Staff Loading Report 2010-11
25    Ravensbourne Competition Analysis, Spring 2011
26    Example Final Examination Board spread sheet, July 2011
27a   Destination of Leavers in Higher Education Report 2009-10, May 2011

                                         59
27b   Destination of Leavers in Higher Education Report: Appendix 1 – Course level
      information
28    Student Contract Handbook 2011-12
29a International Engagement Strategy 2011-2014 cover sheet
29b International Engagement Strategy 2011-2014
30    Draft Research and Innovation Strategy
31    Admissions Policy
32    Course Experience Questionnaire 2011 – results by level of study
33    Induction and Orientation Plan 2010
34    Student induction welcome 2010 – PowerPoint presentation
35    Student Induction Tour guidelines, 2010
36a-k Departmental induction PowerPoint presentations, 2011
37    Example course induction timetable 2011




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posted:4/14/2012
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pages:60