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									                                               TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37




                                 2/13/06




               255 S. Champlain Street, Burlington, VT 05401-4717
               (888) 921-5990 (toll-free) (802) 658-1643 (fax)




            Residential Master
        Technical Reference Manual

                Number 2005-37
Measure Savings Algorithms and Cost Assumptions

           THIS MASTER MANUAL LISTS
ALL PREVIOUS AND CURRENTLY EFFECTIVE MEASURES
             THROUGH PORTFOLIO 37

  Previous TRM Master Manual Versions Sent to VT Department of Public Service:
        TRM Number           Updated Through           Date Sent to DPS
                               Portfolio No.
           No. 4-16                  16                     1/13/03
         No. 2004-25                 25                      1/1/04
         No. 2005-37                 37                     2/13/06

                       Please send questions and comments to:
                                 Carole Hakstian
                               Efficiency Vermont
                            255 S. Champlain Street
                                Burlington, VT 05401
                              (802) 658-6060 x1056
                               chakstian@veic.org
                                                                                            TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37




                                                           Table of Contents

LOADSHAPES ............................................................................................................................................. 8

LOW INCOME MULTI-FAMILY PROGRAM......................................................................................12
   LIGHTING END USE ....................................................................................................................................12
     CFL........................................................................................................................................................12
     Lighting .................................................................................................................................................15
     Lighting .................................................................................................................................................28
     CFL Lighting Package Reinstall ...........................................................................................................33
   CLOTHES WASHING END USE ....................................................................................................................36
     Clothes Dryer ........................................................................................................................................36
     Clothes Washer ......................................................................................................................................38
     ENERGY STAR Commercial Clothes Washer .......................................................................................40
   REFRIGERATION END USE ..........................................................................................................................43
     Energy Star Refrigerators .....................................................................................................................43
     Energy Star Refrigerators .....................................................................................................................45
     VendingMiser for Soft Drink Vending Machines ...................................................................................47
     Vending Miser for Soft Drink Vending Machines ..................................................................................49
   HOT WATER END USE ................................................................................................................................51
     Water Conservation ...............................................................................................................................51
     Water Conservation ...............................................................................................................................53
     Domestic Hot Water System ..................................................................................................................55
     Conservation Measures for Controlled DHW .......................................................................................56
     Fuel Switch for Controlled DHW ..........................................................................................................57
     Low Flow Showerhead ..........................................................................................................................58
     Low Flow Faucet Aerator......................................................................................................................60
   VENTILATION END USE ..............................................................................................................................62
     Ventilation Fan ......................................................................................................................................62
   SPACE HEATING END USE ..........................................................................................................................64
     Heating System ......................................................................................................................................64
     Thermal Shell Upgrades ........................................................................................................................65
   AIR CONDITIONING END USE .....................................................................................................................67
     Energy Star Air Conditioner..................................................................................................................67
   WATER CONSERVATION END USE..............................................................................................................69
     Toilet Diverter .......................................................................................................................................69
EFFICIENT PRODUCTS PROGRAM ....................................................................................................71
   CLOTHES WASHING END USE ....................................................................................................................71
     Energy Star Clothes Washers ................................................................................................................71
     Energy Star Clothes Washers ................................................................................................................73
     Energy Star Clothes Washer ..................................................................................................................75
     Energy Star Clothes Washer ..................................................................................................................78
     Energy Star Clothes Washer ..................................................................................................................81
     ENERGY STAR Clothes Washer ............................................................................................................84
     ENERGY STAR Clothes Washer ............................................................................................................87
BASELINE EFFICIENCIES – NEW OR REPLACEMENT .................................................................90
       Energy Star Refrigerators .....................................................................................................................93
       Energy Star Refrigerators .....................................................................................................................94
       Energy Star Refrigerators .....................................................................................................................96
       Energy Star Refrigerators .....................................................................................................................98
       Energy Star Refrigerators ...................................................................................................................100


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                                                                                         TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37


  ENERGY STAR Freezer ......................................................................................................................102
DISHWASHING END USE ...........................................................................................................................104
  Energy Star Dishwashers ....................................................................................................................104
  Energy Star Dishwashers ....................................................................................................................106
  Energy Star Dish Washer ....................................................................................................................108
  Energy Star Dish Washer ....................................................................................................................111
AIR CONDITIONING END USE ...................................................................................................................114
  Energy Star Room Air Conditioners ....................................................................................................114
  Energy Star Room Air Conditioners ....................................................................................................116
  Energy Star Room Air Conditioner .....................................................................................................118
LIGHTING END USE ..................................................................................................................................120
  CFL......................................................................................................................................................120
  CFL......................................................................................................................................................122
  CFL......................................................................................................................................................124
  CFL......................................................................................................................................................126
  CFL......................................................................................................................................................128
  CFL......................................................................................................................................................131
  CFL......................................................................................................................................................134
  CFL......................................................................................................................................................137
  CFL......................................................................................................................................................141
  CFL......................................................................................................................................................144
  CFL......................................................................................................................................................149
  CFL......................................................................................................................................................153
  Fluorescent Fixture .............................................................................................................................157
  Fluorescent Fixture .............................................................................................................................159
  Fluorescent Fixture .............................................................................................................................161
  Fluorescent Fixture .............................................................................................................................163
  Fluorescent Fixture .............................................................................................................................165
  Torchiere .............................................................................................................................................168
  Torchiere .............................................................................................................................................170
  Torchiere .............................................................................................................................................172
  Torchiere .............................................................................................................................................174
  Torchiere .............................................................................................................................................176
  Torchiere .............................................................................................................................................179
  Torchiere .............................................................................................................................................181
  Torchiere .............................................................................................................................................184
  Torchiere .............................................................................................................................................187
  Torchiere .............................................................................................................................................191
  Torchiere .............................................................................................................................................195
  Dedicated CF Table Lamps .................................................................................................................199
  Dedicated CF Table Lamps .................................................................................................................202
  Dedicated CF Table Lamps .................................................................................................................205
  Dedicated CF Table Lamps .................................................................................................................209
  Dedicated CF Table Lamps .................................................................................................................213
  Dedicated CF Floor Lamp ..................................................................................................................217
  Dedicated CF Floor Lamp ..................................................................................................................220
  Dedicated CF Floor Lamp ..................................................................................................................224
  Dedicated CF Floor Lamp ..................................................................................................................228
  Interior Fluorescent Fixture ................................................................................................................232
  Interior Fluorescent Fixture ................................................................................................................235
  Interior Fluorescent Fixture ................................................................................................................238
  Interior Fluorescent Fixture ................................................................................................................241
  Interior Fluorescent Fixture ................................................................................................................246
  Interior Fluorescent Fixture ................................................................................................................250
  Exterior Fluorescent Fixture ...............................................................................................................254
  Exterior Fluorescent Fixture ...............................................................................................................257
  Exterior Fluorescent Fixture ...............................................................................................................260



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                                                                                           TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37


    Exterior Fluorescent Fixture ...............................................................................................................264
    Exterior Fluorescent Fixture ...............................................................................................................267
    Exterior Fluorescent Fixture ...............................................................................................................271
    Exterior Fluorescent Fixture ...............................................................................................................274
  CEILING FAN END USE .............................................................................................................................277
    Energy Star Ceiling Fans ....................................................................................................................277
LOW INCOME SINGLE FAMILY PROGRAM ..................................................................................280
  HOT WATER END USE ..............................................................................................................................280
    Tank Wrap ...........................................................................................................................................280
    Tank Wrap ...........................................................................................................................................281
    Tank Wrap ...........................................................................................................................................284
    Pipe Wrap ............................................................................................................................................286
    Pipe Wrap ............................................................................................................................................287
    Pipe Wrap ............................................................................................................................................289
    Pipe Wrap ............................................................................................................................................291
    Tank Temperature Turn-Down ............................................................................................................293
    Tank Temperature Turn-Down ............................................................................................................294
    Tank Temperature Turn-Down ............................................................................................................296
    Tank Temperature Turn-Down ............................................................................................................298
    Low Flow Showerhead ........................................................................................................................300
    Low Flow Showerhead ........................................................................................................................301
    Low Flow Showerhead ........................................................................................................................303
    Low Flow Faucet Aerator....................................................................................................................305
    Low Flow Faucet Aerator....................................................................................................................306
    Low Flow Faucet Aerator....................................................................................................................308
    Tank Wrap for Controlled DHW .........................................................................................................310
    Pipe Wrap for Controlled DHW ..........................................................................................................313
    Tank Temperature Turn-Down for Controlled DHW ..........................................................................315
    Low Flow Showerhead for Controlled DHW ......................................................................................317
    Low Flow Faucet Aerator for Controlled DHW ..................................................................................319
    Fuel Switch for Controlled DHW ........................................................................................................321
  HOT WATER END USE (WITH ELECTRIC HOT WATER FUEL SWITCH) ......................................................322
    Pipe Wrap (with Electric Hot Water Fuel Switch) ..............................................................................322
    Tank Wrap (with Electric Hot Water Fuel Switch) ..............................................................................324
    Low Flow Shower Head (with Electric Hot Water Fuel Switch) .........................................................326
    Low Flow Faucet Aerator (with Electric Hot Water Fuel Switch) ......................................................328
  WATERBED END USE ...............................................................................................................................330
    Waterbed Insulating Pad .....................................................................................................................330
  LIGHTING END USE ..................................................................................................................................332
    CFL......................................................................................................................................................332
    CFL......................................................................................................................................................334
    CFL......................................................................................................................................................336
    Fluorescent Fixture .............................................................................................................................338
    Fluorescent Fixture .............................................................................................................................339
    Fluorescent Fixture .............................................................................................................................341
    Torchiere .............................................................................................................................................343
    Torchiere .............................................................................................................................................345
    Torchiere .............................................................................................................................................347
    Torchiere .............................................................................................................................................349
    CFL by Mail ........................................................................................................................................351
    CFL by Mail ........................................................................................................................................354
  VENTILATION END USE ...........................................................................................................................357
    Ventilation Fan ....................................................................................................................................357
  REFRIGERATION END USE ........................................................................................................................359
    Energy Star Refrigerators ...................................................................................................................359




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                                                                                         TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37


RESIDENTIAL NEW CONSTRUCTION PROGRAM ........................................................................361
  HOT WATER END USE ..............................................................................................................................361
    Tank Wrap ...........................................................................................................................................361
    Tank Wrap ...........................................................................................................................................363
    Tank Wrap ...........................................................................................................................................365
    Tank Wrap ...........................................................................................................................................367
    Pipe Wrap ............................................................................................................................................370
    Pipe Wrap ............................................................................................................................................371
    Tank Temperature Turn-Down ............................................................................................................373
    Tank Temperature Turn-Down ............................................................................................................374
    Tank Temperature Turn-Down ............................................................................................................376
    Low Flow Showerhead ........................................................................................................................378
    Low Flow Showerhead ........................................................................................................................379
    Low Flow Faucet Aerator....................................................................................................................381
    Low Flow Faucet Aerator....................................................................................................................382
  REFRIGERATION END USE ........................................................................................................................384
    Energy Star Refrigerators ...................................................................................................................384
    Energy Star Refrigerators ...................................................................................................................385
    Energy Star Refrigerators ...................................................................................................................387
    Energy Star Refrigerators ...................................................................................................................389
    Energy Star Refrigerators ...................................................................................................................391
    Energy Star Refrigerators ...................................................................................................................393
    Efficient Refrigerators .........................................................................................................................395
    Efficient Refrigerators .........................................................................................................................397
  LIGHTING END USE ..................................................................................................................................399
    CFL Direct Install ...............................................................................................................................399
    CFL Direct Install ...............................................................................................................................401
    CFL Direct Install ...............................................................................................................................403
    Interior Fluorescent Fixture ................................................................................................................405
    Interior Fluorescent Fixture ................................................................................................................406
    Interior Fluorescent Fixture ................................................................................................................408
    Interior Fluorescent Fixture ................................................................................................................410
    Interior Fluorescent Fixture ................................................................................................................413
    Interior Surface Fluorescent Fixture ...................................................................................................415
    Interior Recessed Fluorescent Fixture ................................................................................................417
    Interior Other Fluorescent Fixture ......................................................................................................419
    Exterior Fluorescent Fixture ...............................................................................................................421
    Exterior Fluorescent Fixture ...............................................................................................................422
    Exterior Fluorescent Fixture ...............................................................................................................424
    Exterior Fluorescent Fixture ...............................................................................................................427
    Exterior Fluorescent Fixture ...............................................................................................................429
    Exterior HID........................................................................................................................................431
    Exterior HID........................................................................................................................................433
    Exterior HID Fixture ...........................................................................................................................435
    Exterior Motion Sensor .......................................................................................................................436
    Exterior Motion Sensor .......................................................................................................................438
    LED Exit Sign ......................................................................................................................................440
    LED Exit Sign ......................................................................................................................................441
    Interior CFL Direct Install ..................................................................................................................443
    Interior CFL Direct Install ..................................................................................................................445
    Interior CFL Direct Install ..................................................................................................................447
    Exterior CFL Direct Install .................................................................................................................449
    Generic Linear Fluorescent Tube Fixture ...........................................................................................452
    Generic Linear Fluorescent Tube Fixture ...........................................................................................454
    Generic Linear Fluorescent Tube Fixture ...........................................................................................456
  VENTILATION END USE ............................................................................................................................458
    Ventilation Fan ....................................................................................................................................458


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                                                                                           TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37


    Ventilation Fan ....................................................................................................................................459
    Ventilation Fan ....................................................................................................................................461
    Ventilation Fan ....................................................................................................................................463
  SPACE HEATING END USE ........................................................................................................................465
    Heating Savings ...................................................................................................................................465
    Heating Savings ...................................................................................................................................467
    Heating Savings ...................................................................................................................................469
    Heating Savings ...................................................................................................................................472
    Heating Savings ...................................................................................................................................475
    Efficient Furnace Fan Motor ...............................................................................................................477
  SPACE COOLING END USE ........................................................................................................................481
    Central Air Conditioner ......................................................................................................................481
    Central Air Conditioner ......................................................................................................................483
    Central Air Conditioner ......................................................................................................................485
    Central Air Conditioner ......................................................................................................................487
    Central Air Conditioner ......................................................................................................................489
    Central Air Conditioner ......................................................................................................................491
  WATER HEATING END USE ......................................................................................................................493
    Fossil Fuel Water Heater ....................................................................................................................493
    Fossil Fuel Water Heater ....................................................................................................................495
    Fossil Fuel Water Heater ....................................................................................................................497
    Fossil Fuel Water Heater ....................................................................................................................499
    Fossil Fuel Water Heater ....................................................................................................................501
  DISHWASHING END USE ...........................................................................................................................503
    Energy Star Dishwasher ......................................................................................................................503
    Energy Star Dishwasher ......................................................................................................................505
    Energy Star Dishwasher ......................................................................................................................508
    Energy Star Dishwasher ......................................................................................................................511
RESIDENTIAL EMERGING MARKETS PROGRAM .......................................................................513
  HOT WATER END USE ..............................................................................................................................513
    Tank Wrap ...........................................................................................................................................513
    Pipe Wrap ............................................................................................................................................515
    Tank Temperature Turn-Down ............................................................................................................517
    Low Flow Showerhead ........................................................................................................................519
    Low Flow Faucet Aerator....................................................................................................................521
    Tank Wrap for Controlled DHW .........................................................................................................523
    Pipe Wrap for Controlled DHW ..........................................................................................................525
    Tank Temperature Turn-Down for Controlled DHW ..........................................................................527
    Low Flow Showerhead for Controlled DHW ......................................................................................529
    Low Flow Faucet Aerator for Controlled DHW ..................................................................................531
  HOT WATER END USE (WITH ELECTRIC HOT WATER FUEL SWITCH) ......................................................533
    Pipe Wrap (with Electric Hot Water Fuel Switch) ..............................................................................533
    Tank Wrap (with Electric Hot Water Fuel Switch) ..............................................................................535
    Low Flow Shower Head (with Electric Hot Water Fuel Switch) .........................................................537
    Low Flow Faucet Aerator (with Electric Hot Water Fuel Switch) ......................................................539
  LIGHTING END USE ..................................................................................................................................540
    CFL......................................................................................................................................................540
  SPACE HEATING END USE ........................................................................................................................544
    Efficient Furnace Fan Motor on an ENERGY STAR Furnace ............................................................544
    Efficient Furnace Fan Motor ...............................................................................................................547
    Efficient Furnace Fan Motor ...............................................................................................................550
    Duct Sealing ........................................................................................................................................554
    Air Sealing ...........................................................................................................................................558
    Insulation Upgrade ..............................................................................................................................561
    Efficient Space Heating System ...........................................................................................................564
  SPACE COOLING END USE ........................................................................................................................570


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                                                                                TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37


 ENERGY STAR Central Air Conditioner ............................................................................................570
 ENERGY STAR Central Air Conditioner ............................................................................................571
WATER HEATING END USE ......................................................................................................................573
 Electric Domestic Hot Water System Fuel Switch ...............................................................................573




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                                                             TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37




Loadshapes
The following table includes a listing of measure end-uses and associated loadshapes. In some cases, the
loadshapes have been developed through negotiations between Efficiency Vermont and the Vermont
Department of Public Service. In other cases, these loadshapes are based on engineering judgment.

                                  Loadshape Table of Contents
EndUse                 #   Winter-    Winter-    Summer      Summer-       Winter     Summer        Fall-
                           on kWh       off      -on kWh     off kWh        kW          kW         Spring
                                       kWh                                                          kW
Residential            1     28.7%      7.6%        36.0%        27.7%      23.2%        12.3%       22.3%
Indoor Lighting
Residential            2     19.8%      13.0%       28.9%        38.3%      11.4%         5.5%       11.2%
Outdoor Lighting
Residential            3     19.8%      13.0%       28.9%        38.3%      29.8%        14.5%       29.4%
Outdoor HID
Residential            4     22.5%      10.8%       33.7%        33.0%      62.3%        60.0%       56.8%
Refrigerator
Residential            5     45.5%      24.3%       16.7%        13.5%      26.9%         0.0%        9.8%
Space heat
Residential            6     31.6%       6.2%       37.1%        25.1%      45.4%        29.0%       44.1%
DHW fuel switch
Residential            7     22.3%      11.1%       33.3%        33.3%     100.0%      100.0%       100.0%
DHW insulation
Residential            8     28.4%       3.1%       46.5%        22.0%      77.5%        48.1%       64.9%
DHW conserve
Residential            9     34.2%       3.7%       42.0%        20.1%        7.3%        5.4%        6.1%
Clothes Washer
Residential          10      22.1%      11.1%       31.8%        35.0%      32.2%        32.2%       32.2%
Ventilation
Residential A/C      11       0.0%       0.0%       50.0%        50.0%       0.0%        60.0%        0.0%
Commercial           12      27.7%       5.4%       42.1%        24.8%      54.6%        56.2%       54.6%
Indoor Lighting
Commercial          12a      27.7%       5.4%       42.1%        24.8%      67.2%        72.0%       61.8%
Indoor Lighting
Commercial           13      19.9%      13.2%       30.3%        36.6%      35.0%        15.2%       35.0%
Outdoor Lighting
Commercial           14      19.7%       9.5%       35.9%        34.9%      59.5%        85.8%       63.4%
Refrigeration
Commercial A/C       15       0.3%       0.1%       51.8%        47.8%      40.2%        36.0%       15.3%
Commercial A/C      15a       0.3%       0.1%       51.8%        47.8%       0.3%        80.0%       40.2%
Commercial           16      16.9%       7.6%       37.2%        38.3%      36.5%        47.5%       42.0%
Ventilation
motor
Commercial           17      44.3%      37.8%        6.9%        11.0%      37.2%         0.3%       19.3%
Space heat
Industrial Indoor    18      27.7%       5.4%       42.1%        24.8%      92.2%        94.9%       92.2%
Lighting
Industrial           19      19.9%      13.3%       30.2%        36.6%      35.0%        15.2%       35.0%
Outdoor Lighting
Industrial A/C       20       0.3%       0.1%       51.8%        47.8%      40.2%        36.0%       15.3%
Industrial A/C      20a       0.3%       0.1%       51.8%        47.8%       0.3%        80.0%       40.2%
Industrial Motor     21      29.2%       4.2%       58.3%         8.3%      65.7%        90.0%       65.7%
Industrial Space     22      44.3%      37.8%        6.9%        11.0%      37.2%         0.3%       19.3%
heat


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                                                  TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37


Industrial           23   29.2%   4.2%    58.3%        8.3%     65.7%      90.0%      65.7%
Process
Dairy Farm           24   30.2%   6.3%    39.9%       23.6%     42.7%      22.3%      37.0%
Combined End
Uses
Flat (8760 hours)    25   22.0%   11.0%   32.0%       35.0%   100.0%     100.0%     100.0%
HVAC Pump            26   38.1%   19.0%   20.4%       22.5%   100.0%       0.0%      79.7%
(heating)
HVAC Pump            27   0.0%    0.0%    47.6%       52.4%      0.0%    100.0%       39.9%
(cooling)
HVAC Pump            28   19.0%   9.5%    34.0%       37.5%     50.0%      50.0%      59.8%
(unknown use)
Traffic Signal -     29   22.1%   11.1%   31.8%       35.0%     55.0%      55.0%      55.0%
Red Balls,
always changing
or flashing
Traffic Signal -     30   33.2%   0.0%    47.7%       19.1%     55.0%      55.0%      55.0%
Red Balls,
changing day, off
night
Traffic Signal -     31   22.1%   11.1%   31.8%       35.0%     42.0%      42.0%      42.0%
Green Balls,
always changing
Traffic Signal -     32   33.2%   0.0%    47.7%       19.1%     42.0%      42.0%      42.0%
Green Balls,
changing day, off
night
Traffic Signal -     33   22.1%   11.1%   31.8%       35.0%     90.0%      90.0%      90.0%
Red Arrows
Traffic Signal -     34   22.1%   11.1%   31.8%       35.0%     10.0%      10.0%      10.0%
Green Arrows
Traffic Signal -     35   22.1%   11.1%   31.8%       35.0%     50.0%      50.0%      50.0%
Flashing Yellows
Traffic Signal -     36   22.1%   11.1%   31.8%       35.0%     75.0%      75.0%      75.0%
“Hand” Don’t
Walk Signal
Traffic Signal -     37   22.1%   11.1%   31.8%       35.0%     21.0%      21.0%      21.0%
“Man” Walk
Signal
Commercial HP        38   31.2%   26.6%   20.2%       21.9%     37.5%      33.8%      33.5%
0-65 kBTUh
Commercial HP       38a   31.2%   26.6%   20.2%        22%      37.5%      74.8%      56.7%
0-65 kBTUh
Commercial HP        39   29.6%   25.2%   21.9%       23.3%     37.5%      36.3%      34.6%
65-375 kBTUh
Commercial HP       39a   29.6%   25.2%   21.9%       23.3%     37.5%      80.3%      59.5%
65-375 kBTUh
Commercial           40   29.5%   25.1%   22.0%       23.4%     37.5%      36.3%      34.6%
PTHP
Commercial          40a   29.5%   25.1%   22.0%       23.4%     37.5%      80.3%      59.5%
PTHP
Commercial           41   23.1%   19.7%   28.5%       28.7%     37.5%      36.3%      34.6%
Water-Source HP
Commercial          41a   23.1%   19.7%   28.5%       28.7%     37.5%      80.3%      59.5%
Water-Source HP



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                                                 TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37


Transformer         42   28.0%    5.0%   42.0%       25.0%   100.0%     100.0%     100.0%
Vending Miser       43    6.6%   26.5%    9.6%       57.3%     0.0%       0.0%       0.0%
Compressed Air      44   33.2%    0.0%   66.8%        0.0%    39.7%      66.7%      39.7%
- 1-shift (8/5)
Compressed Air      45   31.1%   2.1%    62.6%        4.2%     71.4%    100.0%       71.4%
- 2-shift (16/5)
Compressed Air      46   22.1%   11.1%   44.5%       22.3%     71.4%    100.0%       71.4%
- 3-shift (24/5)
Compressed Air      47   22.1%   11.1%   31.8%       35.0%   100.0%     100.0%     100.0%
- 4-shift (24/7)
Storage ESH         48   15.9%   65.4%   2.5%        16.2%      0.0%       0.0%       0.0%
(Statewide)
Controlled ESH      49   15.9%   65.4%   2.5%        16.2%      0.0%       0.0%       0.0%
(Statewide)
Storage ESH         50   42.9%   38.4%   7.0%        11.7%      4.3%       0.3%       0.2%
(GMP)
Controlled ESH      51   57.9%   23.4%   9.5%         9.2%      5.2%       0.2%       3.0%
(GMP)
Controlled DHW      52   31.6%   6.2%    37.1%       25.1%     33.2%      22.9%      30.9%
Fuel Switch
Controlled DHW      53   22.3%   11.1%   33.3%       33.3%     73.0%      79.0%      70.0%
Insulation
Controlled DHW      54   28.4%   3.1%    46.5%       22.0%     56.6%      38.0%      45.4%
Conservation
VFD Supply fans     55   23.5%   6.0%    47.5%       23.0%   100.0%       41.0%      71.0%
<10 HP
VFD Return fans     56   23.5%   6.0%    47.5%       23.0%   100.0%       66.0%      83.0%
<10 HP
VFD Exhaust         57   22.0%   11.0%   32.0%       35.0%   100.0%       37.0%      69.0%
fans <10 HP
VFD Boiler          58   44.0%   38.0%   7.0%        11.0%   100.0%       67.0%      83.0%
feedwater pumps
<10 HP
VFD Chilled         59   0.2%    0.1%    52.0%       48.0%      0.0%    100.0%       50.0%
water pumps <10
HP
Economizer          60   16.9%   7.6%    37.2%       38.3%      0.0%       0.0%      56.3%
VFD Milk            61   25.4%   7.6%    36.8%       30.2%     33.3%      24.4%      49.0%
Vacuum Pump
Computer Office     62   21.2%   11.9%   29.0%       37.9%     25.4%      23.5%      26.3%
Commercial          63   24.9%    4.8%   43.1%       27.2%     48.0%      72.0%      44.1%
Indoor Lighting
with cooling
bonus
Industrial Indoor   64   24.9%   4.8%    43.1%       27.2%     65.9%      94.9%      65.9%
Lighting with
cooling bonus
Continuous C&I      65   19.7%   9.9%    34.1%       36.3%     71.4%    100.0%       71.4%
Indoor Lighting
with cooling
bonus
Refrigeration       66   53.0%   28.4%   8.0%        10.6%   100.0%        0.0%      30.0%
Economizer
Strip Curtain       67   19.7%    9.5%   35.9%       34.9%   100.0%     100.0%     100.0%
Evaporator Fan      68   26.7%   14.0%   24.1%       35.2%    60.6%      37.7%      49.1%
Control


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                                                               TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37


Door Heater           69      35.7%      17.9%        22.1%         24.3%     100.0%          0.0%       88.9%
Control
Floating Head         70      23.7%      12.0%        29.9%         34.4%     100.0%          0.0%       53.7%
Pressure Control
Furnace Fan
Heating and           71      36.7%      19.7%        23.1%         20.5%       25.6%       75.8%         9.3%
Cooling
Traffic Signal -      72      22.1%      11.1%        31.8%         35.0%       100%         100%         100%
Bi-Modal
Walk/Don’t
Walk




Notes: See Excel spreadsheet <Lighting loadshape with cooling bonus-102103.xls> for derivation of
loadshapes 63, 64, and 65. Heavier weighting is given to the summer periods and less to the other periods
to account for the cooling bonus that is included in the kWh and kW savings.

All loadshape numbers referenced in the measure characterizations correspond to the most recent
generation of the loadshape as detailed in the loadshape table of contents. The coincident peak factors in
the standard load profiles above are based on the listed assumptions for full load hours. To account for the
effect on peak savings from a change in full load hours, use of full load hours different than the standard
will result in an automatic adjustment of the coincident peak factors (% of connected load kW) used in
screening and reported in the database, unless custom coincident peak factors are also entered. The
coincidence factors are multiplied by the ratio of [custom full load hours]/[standard full load hours], with a
maximum value of 100% for each factor. As a result, coincidence factors for particular measures may be
higher or lower than the standard factors listed above even when a standard load profile is used.




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                                                                TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37




Low Income Multi-Family Program

Lighting End Use
CFL
Measure Number: III-A-1-a (REEP, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                     Accepted with         Referred to
                  Accepted As Is         Edits               TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: none
Draft date: 2/20/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
An existing incandescent lamp is replaced with a lower wattage compact fluorescent.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = kWsave  HOURS

Demand Savings
kW = kWsave

Where:
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         kWsave = lighting connected load kW saved, baseline kW minus efficient kW
         HOURS = annual lighting hours of use per year as reported by customer
         kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light bulb with sufficient usage to justify replacement.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is compact fluorescent lamp.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                               Peak as % of connected load kW
                            % of annual kWh
                                                                            (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                 Peak Off-Peak Peak   Off-Peak                  Winter    Summer Fall/Spring
                                                               5.8%         3.1%          5.6%
                                                              per hour per hour        per hour
                  28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%
                                                              of daily     of daily     of daily
                                                             burn time burn time burn time
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).




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                                                             TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37



Freeridership
0% for low income customers.

Spillover
0%.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Incremental Cost
Actual costs (i.e. from weatherization agencies) are used.

O&M Savings
O&M savings are a function of the average hours of use for the lamp. See reference table.

Lifetimes
Lifetime is a function of the average hours of use for the lamp. Most CFLs have a rated lifetime of 10,000
hours. However, units that are turned on and off more frequently have shorter lives and those that stay on
for longer periods of time have longer lives. See the following table for details.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




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                                                     TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37


Reference Tables
CFL Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time    Lifetime Hours   Lifetime Years
       1                3,000             8.22
       2                5,000             6.85
       3                7,000             6.39
       4                9,000             6.16
       5                9,500             5.21
       6               10,000             4.57
       8               12,000             4.11
       10              12,000             3.29
       12              12,000             2.74
       24              12,000             1.37


CFL O&M Savings by Daily Burn Time


Daily Burn Time    O&M Savings
       1             $1.43
       2             $2.82
       3             $4.21
       4             $5.60
       5             $6.13
       6             $6.61
       8             $8.15
       10            $8.37
       12            $8.51
       24            $8.89




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                                                                TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37



Lighting
Measure Number: III-A-2-a (REEP, Lighting End Use)
Version Date & Revision History
                                Accepted with      Referred to
               Accepted As Is        Edits           TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: N/A
Draft date: 1/12/00
Approval date:
Effective date: 9/5/01
Superceded date:
Description
The list below shows assumed fixture replacements by location/function. These are based on REEP's
historical recommendations and reported installations. Energy-saving hardwired fixtures are used in all
areas: within residential units, exterior residential applications, exterior common lighting, and interior
common area lighting. Controls (timers, sensors, and photocells) are used to optimize performance and
minimize energy usage. Measures apply to REEP prescriptive track.

Lighting Fixtures: Common Areas-controlled
                                                                            Average Daily Burntimes in Hours        Weighted
                                                                              (for fixture installation, prior to
                                       High Efficiency
                                                                                                                    Average
                                                                                           controls)
               Location/Function       Measure and Baseline        Cost                                             kWh
EVT                                                                                                                 Savings
Measure
                                                                              Elderly              Family
Code                                                                          Housing              Housing
               Exterior Building       1x70w MH replace
                                                                   $200           12                  12              920
LFHHDMHN                               2x150w incandescent
                Exterior Entry         1x22w PL replace
                                                                   $35            12                  12              333
LFHCEFIX                               1x100w incandescent
                Indoor Hall/Stairway   1x32w Circline replace
                                                                   $35            24                  24              333
LFHCRFIX                               1x75w incandescent
                Corridor               1x32w T8 w/reflector
                                                                   $20            24                  24              526
LFHLRT08                               replace 2x40w T12
                Exit Lighting          LED replace 2x15w
                                                                   $30            24                  24              250
LFHESLED                               incandescent
                Laundry/common         1x32w T8 w/reflector
                                                                   $20            8                   12              240
LFHLRT08        areas                  replace 2x40w T12
                Controls               occupancy sensor/dual
                                                                   $100     Not Applicable      Not Applicable        430
LECOCCUP                               level light
Lighting Fixtures: Apartment-resident controlled
                Exterior Entry         1x13w PL replace 1x60w
                                                                   $35             3                    3              49
LFHCNFIX                               incandescent
                Entry Hall/Stairway    1x13w PL replace 1x60w
                                                                   $35             2                    3              45
LFHCNFIX                               incandescent
                Bathroom overhead      1x32w Circline replace
                                                                   $35             1                    3              34
LFHCRFIX                               1x75w incandescent
                Bathroom vanity        2x17w T8 replace
                                                                   $35             1                    3             186
LFHLFT08                               4x60w incandescent
                Kitchen overhead       1x32w T8 w/reflector
                                       replace 2x60w               $35             4                    6             362
LFHLRT08                               incandescent
                Kitchen task           1x32w Circline replace
                                                                   $35             2                    3              23
LFHCRFIX                               1x60w incandescent
                Living room            1x32w Circline replace
                                                                   $35             3                    5             136
LFHCRFIX                               2x60w incandescent
                Dining area            1x32w Circline replace
                                                                   $35             5                    5             128
LFHCRFIX                               2x60w incandescent
                Bedroom                1x32w Circline replace
                                                                   $50             1                    3              75
LFHCRFIX                               2x60w incandescent




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                                                              TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37


Incremental Costs per Unit
Average incremental cost per installed fixture is presented in the table above. Costs are based on data from
the REEP project database.
Savings Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = W x HOURS/1000

Demand Savings
kW = (kWh /HOURS)

Where: W       = wattage difference between fixtures, including ballast wattages, which ranges from 2
       to 20 watts, depending on fixture type
       kWh = annual customer kWh savings per installed fixture, CFL, or control
       ballast wattage = 2 to 5 watts depending on fixture
       HOURS = average hours of use per year
       kW      = customer connected load kW savings per installed fixture, CFL, or control for the
       measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline conditions are fixtures with incandescent or T-12 lamps, as specified in table above for each
location/function.
High Efficiency
High-efficiency are fixtures with compact fluorescent or T-8 lamps or LED for exit signage.
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                             % of annual kWh                 Peak as % of connected load kW
                                                                             (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer                  Winter    Summer Fall/Spring
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak           Off-Peak
indoor            28.7%      7.6%      36.0%     27.7%         23.2%       12.3%         22.3%
outdoor           19.7% 13.0%          28.9%     38.3%         11.4%       5.5 %         11.2 %
24 hour (flat) 22.0% 11.0%             32.0%     35.0%        100.0%      100.0%        100.0%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor and outdoor lighting load shapes).
Freeridership
10%
Spillover
0%
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes

Fixtures: Fixture lifetime is 20 years, remaining consistent with previous REEP program reporting and
screening (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs). Analysis period used by REEP
is consistent with 20-year life of fixture.

Controls: Control lifetime is 10 years, remaining consistent with previous REEP program reporting and
screening. Analysis period used by REEP is consistent with 10-year life of control mechanism.

Fluorescent Replacement Lamp and Ballast: Fluorescent fixture ballast and lamp lifetimes are a
function of the average hours of use for the lamp. Most ballasts and CFLs have rated lifetimes of 40,000
and 10,000 hours respectively. However, units that are turned on and off more frequently have shorter
lives and those that stay on for longer periods of time have longer lives. This is accounted for in fixture
screening analysis through degradation factors outlined in Reference Table A. Lives of specific lamps and
ballasts, Reference Table B, are determined using this in-use factor.




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                                                         TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37



                                         1
Lamp and Ballast Annual O&M Savings
Common
Area-control

EVT            Location/        High Efficiency              Setting2           Annual O&M
Measure Code   Function         Measure and Baseline                            Savings3
LFHHDMHN       Exterior         1x70w MH replace             E&F                $20.71
               Building         2x150w incandescent
LFHCEFIX       Exterior Entry   1x22w PL replace             E&F                $13.00
                                1x100w incandescent
LFHCRFIX       Indoor           1x32w Circline replace       E&F                $28.30
               Hallway/         1x75w incandescent
               Stairway
LFHLRT08       Corridor         1x32w T8 w/reflector         E&F                $1.98
                                replace 2x40w T12
LFHESLED       Exit Lighting    LED replace 2x15w            E&F                $173.07
                                incandescent
LFHLRT08       Laundry/         1x32w T8 w/reflector         F                  $1.04
               Common Areas     replace 2x40w T12
LFHLRT08       Laundry/         1x32w T8 w/reflector         E                  $0.37
               Common Areas     replace 2x40w T12
LECOCCUP       Controls         Occupancy sensor/dual        E&F                N/A
                                level light




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                                                             TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37



Resident-
Controlled

EVT               Location/         High Efficiency Measure       Setting              Annual O&M
Measure Code      Function          and Baseline                                       Savings
LFHCNFIX          Exterior Entry    1x13w PL replace 1x60w        E&F                  $1.41
                                    incandescent
LFHCNFIX          Entry Hall /      1x13w PL replace 1x60w        F                    $1.41
                  Stairs            incandescent
LFHCNFIX          Entry Hall /      1x13w PL replace 1x60w        E                    $0.67
                  Stairs            incandescent
LFHCRFIX          Bathroom          1x32w Circline replace        F                    $3.89
                  Overhead          1x75w incandescent
LFHCRFIX          Bathroom          1x32w Circline replace        E                    $1.05
                  Overhead          1x75w incandescent
LFHLFT08          Bathroom          2x17w T8 replace 4x60w        F                    $8.61
                  Vanity            incandescent
LFHLFT08          Bathroom          2x17w T8 replace 4x60w        E                    $2.02
                  Vanity            incandescent
LFHLRT08          Kitchen           1x32w T8 w/reflector          F                    $9.23
                  Overhead          replace 2x60w
                                    incandescent
LFHLRT08          Kitchen           1x32w T8 w/reflector          E                    $5.98
                  Overhead          replace 2x60w
                                    incandescent
LFHCRFIX          Kitchen Task      1x32w Circline replace        F                    $1.80
                                    1x60w incandescent
LFHCRFIX          Kitchen Task      1x32w Circline replace        E                    $0.98
                                    1x60w incandescent
LFHCRFIX          Living Room       1x32w Circline replace        F                    $7.23
                                    2x60w incandescent
LFHCRFIX          Living Room       1x32w Circline replace        E                    $4.00
                                    2x60w incandescent
LFHCRFIX          Dining Area       1x32w Circline replace        E&F                  $7.23
                                    2x60w incandescent
LFHCRFIX          Bedroom           1x32w Circline replace        F                    $4.00
                                    2x60w incandescent
LFHCRFIX          Bedroom           1x32w Circline replace        E                    $0.79
                                    2x60w incandescent
1
  = Savings based on measure costs and lives established in Reference Table B, see below.
2
  = Refers to type of facility where installation takes place. E= elderly; F= family
3
  = Refers to annual operation and maintenance costs associated with efficient measure in relation to
    operation and maintenance costs associated with baseline measure. Positive figures refer to savings.




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                                                                  TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37



Reference Tables

A. Lamp and Ballast O & M Cost Assumptions
EVT Code/          Baseline    Measure5                              Efficient   Measure6
Name
(Setting)4
                   Comp 17                 Comp 2                    Comp 1                 Comp 2
                   Life8       Cost9       Life            Cost      Life        Cost       Life       Cost
LFHHDMHN           0.17 yr     $6          N/A             N/A       2.74 yr     $37        10.96 yr   $120
Exterior           (750)                                             (12,000)               (48,000)
LFHCEFIX           0.17 yr     $3          N/A             N/A       2.74 yr     $14        10.96 yr   $20
Exterior Entry     (750)                                             (12,000)               (48,000)
LFHCRFIX           0.09 yr     $2          N/A             N/A       1.64 yr     $6         5.48 yr    $35
Interior Hall      (750)                                             (14,400)               (48,000)
LFHLRT08           2.74 yr     $8          5.84 yr         $20       2.74 yr     $6         9.59 yr    $27
Corridor           (24,000)                (48,000)                  (24,000)               (84,000)
LFHESLED           0.09 yr     $15         N/A             N/A       57.08 yr    $50        N/A        N\A
Exit Sign          (750)                                             (500,000)
LFHLRT08           5.48 yr     $8          10.96 yr        $20       5.48 yr     $6         23.97 yr   $27
Laundry (F)        (24,000)                (48,000)                  (24,000)               (84,000)
LFHLRT08           8.22 yr     $8          16.44 yr        $20       8.22 yr     $6         28.77 yr   $27
Laundry (E)        (24,000)                (48,000)                  (24,000)               (84,000)
LFHCNFIX/          2.28 yr     $6          N/A             N/A       6.93 yr     $8         25.57 yr   $35
Exterior           (2500)                                            (7,000)                (28,000)
LFHCNFIX/          2.28 yr     $6          N/A             N/A       13.70 yr    $8         25.57 yr   $35
Entry (F)          (2500)                                            (7,000)                (28,000)
LFHCNFIX/          3.42 yr     $6          N/A             N/A       6.85 yr     $8         27.40 yr   $35
Entry (E)          (2500)                                            (5,000)                (20,000)
LFHCRFIX/          0.68 yr     $3          N/A             N/A       7.67 yr     $6         25.57 yr   $35
Bath OH (F)        (750)                                             (8,400)                (28,000)
LFHCRFIX/          2.05 yr     $3          N/A             N/A       9.86 yr     $6         32.88 yr   $35
Bath OH (E)        (750)                                             (3,600)                (12,000)
LFHLFT08/          2.28 yr     $24         N/A             N/A       12.79 yr    $11        44.75 yr   $35
Bath Van (F)       (750)                                             (14,000)               (49,000)
LFHLFT08/          6.85 yr     $25         N/A             N/A       16.44 yr    $11        57.53 yr   $35
Bath Van (E)       (2500)                                            (6,000)                (21,000)
LFHLRT08/          1.14 yr     $12         N/A             N/A       9.13 yr     $6         31.96 yr   $27
Kitchen OH (F)     (2500)                                            (20,000)               (70,000)
LFHLRT08/          1.71 yr     $12         N/A             N/A       12.33 yr    $6         43.84 yr   $27
Kitchen OH (E)     (2500)                                            (18,000)               (64,000)
LFHCRFIX/          2.28 yr     $6          N/A             N/A       7.87 yr     $6         25.57 yr   $35
Kitchen Tsk (F)    (2500)                                            (8,400)                (28,000)
LFHCRFIX/          3.42 yr     $6          N/A             N/A       8.22 yr     $6         27.4 yr    $35
Kitchen Tsk (E)    (2500)                                            (6,000)                (20,000)
LFHCRFIX/          1.37 yr     $12         N/A             N/A       6.25 yr     $6         20.82 yr   $35
Living Rm (F)      (2500)                                            (11,400)               (38,000)
LFHCRFIX/          2.28 yr     $12         N/A             N/A       7.67 yr     $6         25.57 yr   $35
Living Rm (E)      (2500)                                            (8,400)                (28,000)
LFHCRFIX/          1.37 yr     $12         N/A             N/A       6.25 yr     $6         28.82 yr   $35
Dining Area        (2500)                                            (11,400)               (38,000)
LFHCRFIX/          2.28 yr     $12         N/A             N/A       7.67 yr     $6         25.57 yr   $35
Bedroom (F)        (2500)                                            (8,400)                (28,000)
LFHCRFIX/          6.85 yr     $12         N/A             N/A       9.56 yr     $6         32.88 yr   $35
Bedroom (E)        (2500)                                            (3,600)                (12,000)


4
  = Refers to the EVT measure code and measure description/name. (F) refers to family facility. (E) refers
     to elderly facility. No notation indicates the measure applies to both family and elderly facilities.
5
  = Refers to the measure to be replaced.
6
  = Refers to the efficient product being introduced.
7
  = Component 1 refers to the lamp of the respective measure. Component 2 refers to the ballast of the
     respective measure.
8
  = Refers to the life of the indicated component. Life in years (life in hours).
9
  = Refers to the cost of the indicated component. Costs are based on REEP project experience and



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                                                              TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37


    research at area lighting suppliers. Costs include installation labor charges: $2.67 per lamp
    replacement and $12.50 per ballast replacement consistent with REEP project reporting.


B. Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time       Lamp Lifetime      Lamp Lifetime Ballast Lifetime             Ballast
                          Hours              Years                Hours         Lifetime Years
         1                 3,000              8.22                12,000             32.88
         2                 5,000              6.85                20,000             27.40
         3                 7,000              6.39                28,000             25.57
         4                 9,000              6.16                36,000             24.66
         5                 9,500              5.21                38,000             20.82
         6                10,000              4.57                40,000             18.26
         8                12,000              4.11                48,000             16.44
         10               12,000              3.29                48,000             13.15
         12               12,000              2.74                48,000             10.96
         24               12,000              1.37                48,000              5.48
Note: The values above are determined using a standard lamp rated at 10,000 hours and a standard
ballast rated at 40,000. Lives of lamps and ballasts with rated lives other than 10,000 hours and 40,000
hours, respectively, were determined by factoring off the values displayed above.




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                                                                TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37


Lighting

Measure Number: III-A-2-b (REEP, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                     Accepted with         Referred to
                  Accepted As Is         Edits               TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 9/5/01
Draft date: 9/15/01

Description
The list below shows assumed fixture replacements by location/function. These are based on REEP's
historical recommendations and reported installations. Energy-saving hardwired fixtures are used in all
areas: within residential units, exterior residential applications, exterior common lighting, and interior
common area lighting. Controls (timers, sensors, and photocells) are used to optimize performance and
minimize energy usage. Measures apply to REEP prescriptive track.

Lighting Fixtures: Common Areas-controlled
                                                                            Average Daily Burntimes in Hours
                                                                              (for fixture installation, prior to   WEIGHTED
                                       High Efficiency                                     controls)                AVERAGE
EVT            Location/Function       Measure and Baseline         Cost                                            KWH
Measure                                                                     Elderly Housing   Family Housing
                                                                                                                    SAVINGS
Code
               Exterior Building       1x70w MH replace
                                                                    $200          12                  12               920
LFHHDMHN                               2x150w incandescent
                Exterior Entry         1x22w PL replace
                                                                    $35           12                  12               333
LFHCEFIX                               1x100w incandescent
                Indoor Hall/Stairway   1x32w Circline replace
                                                                    $35           24                  24               333
LFHCRFIX                               1x75w incandescent
                Corridor               1x32w T8 w/reflector
                                                                    $20           24                  24               526
LFHLRT08                               replace 2x40w T12
                Exit Lighting          LED replace 2x15w
                                                                    $30           24                  24               250
LFHESLED                               incandescent
                Laundry/common         1x32w T8 w/reflector
                                                                    $20           8                   12               240
LFHLRT08        areas                  replace 2x40w T12
                Controls               occupancy sensor/dual
                                                                    $100    Not Applicable      Not Applicable         430
LECOCCUP                               level light
Lighting Fixtures: Apartment-resident controlled
                Exterior Entry         1x13w PL replace 1x60w
                                                                    $35            3                    3              49
LFHCNFIX                               incandescent
                Entry Hall/Stairway    1x13w PL replace 1x60w
                                                                    $35            2                    3              45
LFHCNFIX                               incandescent
                Bathroom overhead      1x32w Circline replace
                                                                    $35            1                    3              34
LFHCRFIX                               1x75w incandescent
                Bathroom vanity        2x17w T8 replace
                                                                    $35            1                    3              186
LFHLFT08                               4x60w incandescent
                Kitchen overhead       1x32w T8 w/reflector
                                       replace 2x60w                $35            4                    6              362
LFHLRT08                               incandescent
                Kitchen task           1x32w Circline replace
                                                                    $35            2                    3              23
LFHCRFIX                               1x60w incandescent
                Living room            1x32w Circline replace
                                                                    $35            3                    5              136
LFHCRFIX                               2x60w incandescent
                Dining area            1x32w Circline replace
                                                                    $35            5                    5              128
LFHCRFIX                               2x60w incandescent
                Bedroom                1x32w Circline replace
                                                                    $50            1                    3              75
LFHCRFIX                               2x60w incandescent




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                                                              TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37


Incremental Costs per Unit
Average incremental cost per installed fixture is presented in the table above. Costs are based on data from
the REEP project database.

Savings Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = W x HOURS/1000

Demand Savings
kW = (kWh /HOURS)

Where: W       = wattage difference between fixtures, including ballast wattages, which ranges from 2
       to 20 watts, depending on fixture type
       kWh = annual customer kWh savings per installed fixture, CFL, or control
       ballast wattage = 2 to 5 watts depending on fixture
       HOURS = average hours of use per year
       kW      = customer connected load kW savings per installed fixture, CFL, or control for the
       measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline conditions are fixtures with incandescent or T-12 lamps, as specified in table above for each
location/function.

High Efficiency
High-efficiency are fixtures with compact fluorescent or T-8 lamps or LED for exit signage.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                        % of annual kWh                     Peak as % of connected load kW
                                                                         (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer                Winter   Summer Fall/Spring
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak
indoor            28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%         23.2%      12.3%         22.3%
outdoor           19.7% 13.0%        28.9%       38.3%         11.4%       5.5 %       11.2 %
24 hour (flat) 22.0% 11.0%           32.0%       35.0%        100.0%      100.0%       100.0%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor and outdoor lighting load shapes).

Freeridership
10%

Spillover
0%

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes

Fixtures: Fixture lifetime is 20 years, remaining consistent with previous REEP program reporting and
screening (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs). Analysis period used by REEP
is consistent with 20-year life of fixture.

Controls: Control lifetime is 10 years, remaining consistent with previous REEP program reporting and
screening. Analysis period used by REEP is consistent with 10-year life of control mechanism.




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Fluorescent Replacement Lamp and Ballast: Fluorescent fixture ballast and lamp lifetimes are a
function of the average hours of use for the lamp. Most ballasts and CFLs have rated lifetimes of 40,000
and 10,000 hours respectively. However, units that are turned on and off more frequently have shorter
lives and those that stay on for longer periods of time have longer lives. This is accounted for in fixture
screening analysis through degradation factors outlined in Reference Table A. Lives of specific lamps and
ballasts, Reference Table B, are determined using this in-use factor.

                                               1
Lamp and Ballast Annual O&M Savings
Common
Area-control

EVT               Location/          High Efficiency              Setting2              Annual O&M
Measure Code      Function           Measure and Baseline                               Savings3
LFHHDMHN          Exterior           1x70w MH replace             E&F                   $20.71
                  Building           2x150w incandescent
LFHCEFIX          Exterior Entry     1x22w PL replace             E&F                   $13.00
                                     1x100w incandescent
LFHCRFIX          Indoor             1x32w Circline replace       E&F                   $28.30
                  Hallway/           1x75w incandescent
                  Stairway
LFHLRT08          Corridor           1x32w T8 w/reflector         E&F                   $1.98
                                     replace 2x40w T12
LFHESLED          Exit Lighting      LED replace 2x15w            E&F                   $173.07
                                     incandescent
LFHLRT08          Laundry/           1x32w T8 w/reflector         F                     $1.04
                  Common Areas       replace 2x40w T12
LFHLRT08          Laundry/           1x32w T8 w/reflector         E                     $0.37
                  Common Areas       replace 2x40w T12
LECOCCUP          Controls           Occupancy sensor/dual        E&F                   N/A
                                     level light




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                                                             TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37



Resident-
Controlled

EVT               Location/         High Efficiency Measure       Setting              Annual O&M
Measure Code      Function          and Baseline                                       Savings
LFHCNFIX          Exterior Entry    1x13w PL replace 1x60w        E&F                  $1.41
                                    incandescent
LFHCNFIX          Entry Hall /      1x13w PL replace 1x60w        F                    $1.41
                  Stairs            incandescent
LFHCNFIX          Entry Hall /      1x13w PL replace 1x60w        E                    $0.67
                  Stairs            incandescent
LFHCRFIX          Bathroom          1x32w Circline replace        F                    $3.89
                  Overhead          1x75w incandescent
LFHCRFIX          Bathroom          1x32w Circline replace        E                    $1.05
                  Overhead          1x75w incandescent
LFHLFT08          Bathroom          2x17w T8 replace 4x60w        F                    $8.61
                  Vanity            incandescent
LFHLFT08          Bathroom          2x17w T8 replace 4x60w        E                    $2.02
                  Vanity            incandescent
LFHLRT08          Kitchen           1x32w T8 w/reflector          F                    $9.23
                  Overhead          replace 2x60w
                                    incandescent
LFHLRT08          Kitchen           1x32w T8 w/reflector          E                    $5.98
                  Overhead          replace 2x60w
                                    incandescent
LFHCRFIX          Kitchen Task      1x32w Circline replace        F                    $1.80
                                    1x60w incandescent
LFHCRFIX          Kitchen Task      1x32w Circline replace        E                    $0.98
                                    1x60w incandescent
LFHCRFIX          Living Room       1x32w Circline replace        F                    $7.23
                                    2x60w incandescent
LFHCRFIX          Living Room       1x32w Circline replace        E                    $4.00
                                    2x60w incandescent
LFHCRFIX          Dining Area       1x32w Circline replace        E&F                  $7.23
                                    2x60w incandescent
LFHCRFIX          Bedroom           1x32w Circline replace        F                    $4.00
                                    2x60w incandescent
LFHCRFIX          Bedroom           1x32w Circline replace        E                    $0.79
                                    2x60w incandescent
1
  = Savings based on measure costs and lives established in Reference Table B, see below.
2
  = Refers to type of facility where installation takes place. E= elderly; F= family
3
  = Refers to annual operation and maintenance costs associated with efficient measure in relation to
    operation and maintenance costs associated with baseline measure. Positive figures refer to savings.




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                                                             TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37




Reference Tables

A. Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time     Lamp Lifetime      Lamp Lifetime Ballast Lifetime             Ballast
                         Hours              Years              Hours          Lifetime Years
      1                  3,000              8.22              12,000               32.88
      2                  5,000              6.85              20,000               27.40
      3                  7,000              6.39              28,000               25.57
      4                  9,000              6.16              36,000               24.66
      5                  9,500              5.21              38,000               20.82
      6                  10,000             4.57              40,000               18.26
      8                  12,000             4.11              48,000               16.44
      10                 12,000             3.29              48,000               13.15
      12                 12,000             2.74              48,000               10.96
      24                 12,000             1.37              48,000                5.48
Note: The values above are determined using a standard lamp rated at 10,000 hours and a standard
       ballast rated at 40,000. Lives of lamps and ballasts with rated lives other than 10,000 hours and
       40,000 hours, respectively, were determined by factoring off the values displayed above.




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                                                                     TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37




B. Lamp and Ballast O & M Cost Assumptions
EVT Code/             Baseline    Measure5                              Efficient   Measure6
Name
(Setting)4
                      Comp 17                 Comp 2                    Comp 1                 Comp 2
                      Life8       Cost9       Life            Cost      Life        Cost       Life       Cost
LFHHDMHN              0.23 yr     $6          N/A             N/A       2.74 yr     $37        10.96 yr   $120
Exterior              (1000)                                            (12,000)               (48,000)
LFHCEFIX              0.17 yr     $3          N/A             N/A       2.74 yr     $14        10.96 yr   $20
Exterior Entry        (750)                                             (12,000)               (48,000)
LFHCRFIX              0.09 yr     $3          N/A             N/A       1.64 yr     $6         5.48 yr    $35
Interior Hall         (750)                                             (14,400)               (48,000)
LFHLRT08              2.74 yr     $10         5.84 yr         $20       2.74 yr     $5         9.59 yr    $27
Corridor              (24,000)                (48,000)                  (24,000)               (84,000)
LFHESLED              0.23 yr     $10         N/A             N/A       57.08 yr    $50        N/A        N\A
Exit Sign             (2000)                                            (500,000)
LFHLRT08              5.48 yr     $8          10.96 yr        $20       5.48 yr     $6         23.97 yr   $27
Laundry (F)           (24,000)                (48,000)                  (24,000)               (84,000)
LFHLRT08              8.22 yr     $8          16.44 yr        $20       8.22 yr     $6         28.77 yr   $27
Laundry (E)           (24,000)                (48,000)                  (24,000)               (84,000)
LFHCNFIX/             2.28 yr     $6          N/A             N/A       6.93 yr     $8         25.57 yr   $35
Exterior              (2500)                                            (7,000)                (28,000)
LFHCNFIX/             2.28 yr     $6          N/A             N/A       13.70 yr    $8         25.57 yr   $35
Entry (F)             (2500)                                            (7,000)                (28,000)
LFHCNFIX/             3.42 yr     $6          N/A             N/A       6.85 yr     $8         27.40 yr   $35
Entry (E)             (2500)                                            (5,000)                (20,000)
LFHCRFIX/             0.68 yr     $3          N/A             N/A       7.67 yr     $6         25.57 yr   $35
Bath OH (F)           (750)                                             (8,400)                (28,000)
LFHCRFIX/             2.05 yr     $3          N/A             N/A       9.86 yr     $6         32.88 yr   $35
Bath OH (E)           (750)                                             (3,600)                (12,000)
LFHLFT08/             2.28 yr     $24         N/A             N/A       12.79 yr    $11        44.75 yr   $35
Bath Van (F)          (750)                                             (14,000)               (49,000)
LFHLFT08/             6.85 yr     $25         N/A             N/A       16.44 yr    $11        57.53 yr   $35
Bath Van (E)          (2500)                                            (6,000)                (21,000)
LFHLRT08/             1.14 yr     $12         N/A             N/A       9.13 yr     $6         31.96 yr   $27
Kitchen OH (F)        (2500)                                            (20,000)               (70,000)
LFHLRT08/             1.71 yr     $12         N/A             N/A       12.33 yr    $6         43.84 yr   $27
Kitchen OH (E)        (2500)                                            (18,000)               (64,000)
LFHCRFIX/             2.28 yr     $6          N/A             N/A       7.87 yr     $6         25.57 yr   $35
Kitchen Tsk (F)       (2500)                                            (8,400)                (28,000)
LFHCRFIX/             3.42 yr     $6          N/A             N/A       8.22 yr     $6         27.4 yr    $35
Kitchen Tsk (E)       (2500)                                            (6,000)                (20,000)
LFHCRFIX/             1.37 yr     $12         N/A             N/A       6.25 yr     $6         20.82 yr   $35
Living Rm (F)         (2500)                                            (11,400)               (38,000)
LFHCRFIX/             2.28 yr     $12         N/A             N/A       7.67 yr     $6         25.57 yr   $35
Living Rm (E)         (2500)                                            (8,400)                (28,000)
LFHCRFIX/             1.37 yr     $12         N/A             N/A       6.25 yr     $6         28.82 yr   $35
Dining Area           (2500)                                            (11,400)               (38,000)
LFHCRFIX/             2.28 yr     $12         N/A             N/A       7.67 yr     $6         25.57 yr   $35
Bedroom (F)           (2500)                                            (8,400)                (28,000)
LFHCRFIX/             6.85 yr     $12         N/A             N/A       9.56 yr     $6         32.88 yr   $35
Bedroom (E)           (2500)                                            (3,600)                (12,000)
4
    = Refers to the EVT measure code and measure description/name. (F) refers to family facility. (E) refers


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                                                               TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37


     to elderly facility. No notation indicates the measure applies to both family and elderly facilities.
5
  = Refers to the measure to be replaced.
6
  = Refers to the efficient product being introduced.
7
  = Component 1 refers to the lamp of the respective measure. Component 2 refers to the ballast of the
     respective measure.
8
  = Refers to the life of the indicated component. Life in years (life in hours).
9
  = Refers to the cost of the indicated component. Costs are based on REEP project experience and
     research at area lighting suppliers. Costs include installation labor charges: $2.67 per lamp
     replacement and $12.50 per ballast replacement consistent with REEP project reporting.




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                                                                         TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37



Lighting
Measure Number: III-A-2-c (Low Income Multifamily Program (REEP), Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:      9/15/01
Effective Date: 12/01/01
End Date:       TBD

Description
The list below shows assumed fixture replacements by location/function. These are based on REEP's
historical recommendations and reported installations. Energy-saving hardwired fixtures are used in all
areas: within residential units, exterior residential applications, exterior common lighting, and interior
common area lighting. Controls (timers, sensors, and photocells) are used to optimize performance and
minimize energy usage. Measures apply to REEP prescriptive track.

Lighting Fixtures: Common Areas-controlled
                                                                                   Average Daily Burntimes
                                                                                             in Hours                WEIGHTED
                                            High Efficiency Measure               (for fixture installation, prior   AVERAGE
                 Location/Function          and Baseline                                    to controls)             KWH
EVT Measure                                                                Cost      Elderly           Family        SAVINGS
Code                                                                                Housing           Housing
                 Exterior Building         1x70w MH replace 2x150w
                                                                           $200        12                12             920
LFHHDMHN                                   incandescent
                 Exterior Entry            1x22w PL replace 1x100w
                                                                           $35         12                12             333
LFHCEFIX                                   incandescent
                 Indoor Hall/Stairway      1x32w Circline replace
                                                                           $35         24                24             333
LFHCRFIX                                   1x75w incandescent
                 Corridor                  1x32w T8 w/reflector
                                                                           $20         24                24             526
LFHLRT08                                   replace 2x40w T12
                 Exit Lighting             LED replace 2x15w
                                                                           $30         24                24             250
LFHESLED                                   incandescent
                 Laundry/common areas      1x32w T8 w/reflector
                                                                           $20         8                 12             240
LFHLRT08                                   replace 2x40w T12
                 Controls                  occupancy sensor/dual level              Not               Not
                                                                           $100                                         430
LECOCCUP                                   light                                  Applicable        Applicable
Lighting Fixtures: Apartment-resident controlled
                 Exterior Entry            1x13w PL replace 1x60w
                                                                           $35        3.1               3.1             51
LFHCNFIX                                   incandescent
                 Entry Hall/Stairway       1x13w PL replace 1x60w
                                                                           $35        1.6               1.6             26
LFHCNFIX                                   incandescent
                 Bathroom overhead         1x32w Circline replace
                                                                           $35        1.5               1.5             21
LFHCRFIX                                   1x75w incandescent
                 Bathroom vanity           2x17w T8 replace
                                                                           $35        1.5               1.5             113
LFHLFT08                                   4x60w incandescent
                 Kitchen overhead          1x32w T8 w/reflector
                                                                           $35        3.5               3.5             187
LFHLRT08                                   replace 3x60w incandescent
                 Kitchen task              1x32w Circline replace
                                                                           $35        3.5               3.5             29
LFHCRFIX                                   1x60w incandescent
                 Living room               1x32w Circline replace
                                                                           $35        3.3               3.3             100
LFHCRFIX                                   2x60w incandescent
                 Dining area               1x32w Circline replace
                                                                           $35        3.3               3.3             100
LFHCRFIX                                   2x60w incandescent
                 Bedroom                   1x32w Circline replace
                                                                           $50        1.6               1.6             48
LFHCRFIX                                   2x60w incandescent



Incremental Costs per Unit
Average incremental cost per installed fixture is presented in the table above. Costs are based on data from
the REEP project database.




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Savings Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = W x HOURS/1000

Demand Savings
kW = (kWh /HOURS)

Where: W    =         wattage difference between fixtures
       kWh =          annual customer kWh savings per installed fixture or control
       HOURS =         average hours of use per year
       kW   =         connected load kW savings per installed fixture or control for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline conditions are fixtures with incandescent or T-12 lamps, as specified in table above for each
location/function.

High Efficiency
High-efficiency are fixtures with compact fluorescent or T-8 lamps or LED for exit signage.

Loadshapes
Loadshape #1, Residential Indoor Lighting
Loadshape #2, Residential Outdoor Lighting
Loadshape #25, Flat

Freeridership/Spillover Factors

                                           Lighting Hardwired            Lighting Hardwired           Lighting Hardwired
 Measure Category                                Fixture                       Fixture                       Fixture
 Measure Code                                 LFHHDMHN                       LFHLFT08                     LFHLRT08
                                           Metal halide fixture                                      Linear fluorescent T8,
 Product Description                           normal start             Linear fluorescent T8              w/reflector
 Track Name             Track No.        Freerider      Freerider      Spillover     Spillover       Freerider      Spillover
 Act250 NC              6014A250            n/a             n/a           n/a           n/a             n/a            n/a
 Cust Equip Rpl         6013CUST            n/a             n/a           n/a           n/a             n/a            n/a
 Farm NC                6014FARM            n/a             n/a           n/a           n/a             n/a            n/a
 Farm Equip Rpl         6013FARM            n/a             n/a           n/a           n/a             n/a            n/a
 Non Act 250 NC         6014NANC            n/a             n/a           n/a           n/a             n/a            n/a
 Pres Equip Rpl         6013PRES            n/a             n/a           n/a           n/a             n/a            n/a
 C&I Retro              6012CNIR            n/a             n/a           n/a           n/a             n/a            n/a
 MF Mkt Retro           6012MFMR            0.9             1.0           0.9           1.0             0.9            1.0
 Efficient Products     6032EPEP            n/a             n/a           n/a           n/a             n/a            n/a
 LISF Retrofit          6034LISF            n/a             n/a           n/a           n/a             n/a            n/a
 LIMF Retrofit          6017RETR            1.0             1.0           1.0           1.0             1.0            1.0
 LIMF NC                6018LINC            0.9             1.0           0.9           1.0             0.9            1.0
 LIMF Rehab             6018LIRH            0.9             1.0           0.9           1.0             0.9            1.0
 RES Retrofit           6036RETR            n/a             n/a           n/a           n/a             n/a            n/a
 RNC VESH               6038VESH            n/a             n/a           n/a           n/a             n/a            n/a
 MF Mkt NC              6019MFNC           0.88             1.1          0.86           1.0            0.86            1.1




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                                           Lighting Hardwired           Lighting Hardwired          Lighting Hardwired
 Measure Category                                Fixture                       Fixture                    Fixture
 Measure Code                                 LFHCEFIX               LFHCNFIX, LFHCRFIX                LFHESLED
                                                                        Compact fluorescent
                                          Compact fluorescent         interior fixture, Circline
 Product Description                         exterior fixture            fluorescent fixture          Exit signs, LED
 Track Name            Track No.         Freerider       Freerider    Spillover       Spillover    Freerider      Spillover
 Act250 NC             6014A250             n/a             n/a           n/a             n/a         n/a            n/a
 Cust Equip Rpl        6013CUST             n/a             n/a           n/a             n/a         n/a            n/a
 Farm NC               6014FARM             n/a             n/a           n/a             n/a         n/a            n/a
 Farm Equip Rpl        6013FARM             n/a             n/a           n/a             n/a         n/a            n/a
 Non Act 250 NC        6014NANC             n/a             n/a           n/a             n/a         n/a            n/a
 Pres Equip Rpl        6013PRES             n/a             n/a           n/a             n/a         n/a            n/a
 C&I Retro             6012CNIR             n/a             n/a           n/a             n/a         n/a            n/a
 MF Mkt Retro          6012MFMR             0.9            1.05           0.9            1.05         0.9            1.0
 Efficient Products    6032EPEP             n/a             n/a           n/a             n/a         n/a            n/a
 LISF Retrofit         6034LISF             n/a             n/a           n/a             n/a         n/a            n/a
 LIMF Retrofit         6017RETR             1.0             1.0           1.0             1.0         1.0            1.0
 LIMF NC               6018LINC             0.9             1.0           0.9             1.0         0.9            1.0
 LIMF Rehab            6018LIRH             0.9             1.0           0.9             1.0         0.9            1.0
 RES Retrofit          6036RETR             n/a             n/a           n/a             n/a         n/a            n/a
 RNC VESH              6038VESH             n/a             n/a           n/a             n/a         n/a            n/a
 MF Mkt NC             6019MFNC            0.91             1.1          0.86             1.1         0.9            1.0

                                                 Lighting
 Measure Category                          Efficiency/Controls
 Measure Code                                 LECOCCUP
 Product Description                       Occupancy sensors
 Track Name            Track No.         Freerider      Freerider
 Act250 NC             6014A250             n/a            n/a
 Cust Equip Rpl        6013CUST             n/a            n/a
 Farm NC               6014FARM             n/a            n/a
 Farm Equip Rpl        6013FARM             n/a            n/a
 Non Act 250 NC        6014NANC             n/a            n/a
 Pres Equip Rpl        6013PRES             n/a            n/a
 C&I Retro             6012CNIR             n/a            n/a
 MF Mkt Retro          6012MFMR             0.9            0.9
 Efficient Products    6032EPEP             n/a            n/a
 LISF Retrofit         6034LISF             n/a            n/a
 LIMF Retrofit         6017RETR             1.0            1.0
 LIMF NC               6018LINC             0.9            0.9
 LIMF Rehab            6018LIRH             0.9            0.9
 RES Retrofit          6036RETR             n/a            n/a
 RNC VESH              6038VESH             n/a            n/a
 MF Mkt NC             6019MFNC             1.0            1.0

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes



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                                                                       TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37



Fixtures: Fixture lifetime is 20 years, remaining consistent with previous REEP program reporting and
screening (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs). Analysis period used by REEP
is consistent with 20-year life of fixture.

Controls: Control lifetime is 10 years, remaining consistent with previous REEP program reporting and
screening. Analysis period used by REEP is consistent with 10-year life of control mechanism.

Fluorescent Replacement Lamp and Ballast: Fluorescent fixture ballast and lamp lifetimes are a
function of the average hours of use for the lamp. Most ballasts and CFLs have rated lifetimes of 40,000
and 10,000 hours respectively. However, units that are turned on and off more frequently have shorter
lives and those that stay on for longer periods of time have longer lives. This is accounted for in fixture
screening analysis through degradation factors outlined in Reference Table A. Lives of specific lamps and
ballasts, Reference Table B, are determined using this in-use factor.

O&M Cost Adjustments




                     A. Fluorescent Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time       Lamp Lifetime          Lamp Lifetime       Ballast Lifetime         Ballast
                         Hours                  Years                 Hours           Lifetime Years
        1                3,000                   8.22                12,000                32.88
        2                5,000                   6.85                20,000                27.40
        3                7,000                   6.39                28,000                25.57
        4                9,000                   6.16                36,000                24.66
        5                9,500                   5.21                38,000                20.82
        6                10,000                  4.57                40,000                18.26
        8                12,000                  4.11                48,000                16.44
        10               12,000                  3.29                48,000                13.15
        12               12,000                  2.74                48,000                10.96
        24               12,000                  1.37                48,000                 5.48
Note:    The values above are determined using a standard Compact Fluorescent lamp rated at 10,000 hours and a
         standard Compact Fluorescent ballast rated at 40,000. Lives of lamps and ballasts with rated lives other than
         10,000 hours and 40,000 hours, respectively, were determined by factoring off the values displayed above.
         Circline fixtures have a rated lamp life of 12,000, while T8 fixtures have a rated lamp life of 20,000 and a
         rated ballast life of 70,000.


                             B. Lamp and Ballast O & M Cost Assumptions
EVT Code/           Baseline      Measure3                                Efficient   Measure4
Name
(Setting)2
                    Comp 15                     Comp 2                    Comp 1                    Comp 2
                         6             7
                    Life          Cost          Life            Cost      Life        Cost          Life          Cost
LFHHDMHN              0.5 yr        $15           N/A            N/A        2.28 yr     $37          9.13 yr      $127
Exterior             (2000)                                                (10,000)                 (40,000)
LFHCEFIX             0.17 yr          $3          N/A           N/A         2.74 yr       $14       10.96 yr       $23
Exterior Entry        (750)                                                (12,000)                 (48,000)
LFHCRFIX             0.09 yr          $3          N/A           N/A         1.64 yr       $6         5.48 yr       $29
Interior Hall         (750)                                                (14,400)                 (48,000)
LFHLRT08             2.74 yr         $10         5.84 yr        $10         2.74 yr       $6         9.59 yr       $35
Corridor            (24,000)                    (48,000)                   (24,000)                 (84,000)
LFHESLED             0.23 yr         $10          N/A           N/A        57.08 yr       $50         N/A          N\A
Exit Sign            (2000)                                               (500,000)
LFHLRT08             6.00 yr         $10        12.00 yr        $20         6.00 yr       $6         21.00 yr      $35


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Laundry              (24,000)                   (48,000)                 (24,000)                   (84,000)
LFHCNFIX/             1.13 yr         $3          N/A          N/A        6.19 yr         $5        24.75 yr   $18
Exterior              (1000)                                              (7,000)                   (28,000)
LFHCNFIX/             0.58 yr         $3           N/A         N/A        5.14 yr         $5        20.55 yr   $18
Entry                 (1000)                                              (3,000)                   (12,000)
LFHCRFIX/             0.55 yr         $3           N/A         N/A        6.58 yr         $6        21.92 yr   $29
Bath OH                (750)                                              (3,600)                   (12,000)
LFHLFT08/             0.55 yr        $16           N/A         N/A       10.96 yr        $11        38.36 yr   $46
Bath Van              (1000)                                              (6,000)                   (21,000)
LFHLRT08/             1.28 yr        $10           N/A         N/A       12.52 yr         $6        43.84 yr   $35
Kitchen OH            (1000)                                             (16,000)                   (56,000)
LFHCRFIX/             1.28 yr         $3           N/A         N/A        7.51 yr         $6        25.05 yr   $29
Kitchen Task          (1000)                                              (9,600)                   (32,000)
LFHCRFIX/              1.2 yr         $6           N/A         N/A        6.97 yr         $6        23.25 yr   $29
Living Rm             (1000)                                              (8,400)                   (28,000)
LFHCRFIX/              1.2 yr         $6           N/A         N/A        6.97 yr         $6        23.25 yr   $29
Dining Area           (1000)                                              (8,400)                   (28,000)
LFHCRFIX/             0.58 yr         $6           N/A         N/A        6.16 yr         $6        20.55 yr   $29
Bedroom               (1000)                                              (3,600)                   (12,000)

2
  = Refers to the EVT measure code and measure description/name. (F) refers to family facility. (E) refers
     to elderly facility. No notation indicates the measure applies to both family and elderly facilities.
3
  = Refers to the measure to be replaced.
4
  = Refers to the efficient product being introduced.
5
  = Component 1 refers to the lamp of the respective measure. Component 2 refers to the ballast of the
     respective measure.
6
  = Refers to the life of the indicated component. Life in years (life in hours).
7
  = Refers to the cost of the indicated component. Costs are based on REEP project experience and
     research at area lighting suppliers. Costs include installation labor charges: $2.67 per lamp
     replacement and $12.50 per ballast replacement consistent with REEP project reporting.




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        CFL Lighting Package Reinstall
        Measure Number: III-A-3-a (REEP, Lighting End Use)
        Version Date & Revision History

        Draft date: 10/31/01
        Effective date:

        Referenced Documents: none

        Description
        A three-lamp CFL lighting kit is offered to tenants in buildings that have been served by REEP.
        Lighting kits coupons are provided by the property manager to new tenants who send coupons in to
        program staff. Two lighting kits are available: bright lighting kit and variety lighting kit. The variety
        lighting kit is designed for normal household use. The bright lighting kit is designed for use in elderly
        housing or in other applications where brighter lighting is required.


        Estimated Measure Impacts

                    Average Annual MWH Savings              Average number of measures per          Average Annual MWH savings
                    per unit                                year                                    per year
Variety Kit         .1989                                   50                                      9.9
Bright Kit          .2295                                   100                                     22.9

        Algorithms

        Energy Savings
        kWh = 198.9 (variety kit)
        kWh = 229.5 (bright kit)


        Demand Savings
        kW = .1362 (variety kit)
        kW = .1572 (bright kit)


        Where:
                  kWh  = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
                  HOURS = annual hours of use per year
                  HOURS = 13721
                  ISR   = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used
                  ISR   = .9
                  kW   = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

        Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
        The Baseline efficiency is an incandescent lamp. For the variety lighting kit 2, incandescent bulbs with the
        follwing wattages are assumed to be baseline: 60, 75 and 85. For the bright lighting kit, three 85-watt
        incandescent bulbs are assumed to be baseline.



        1
          Annual hours of use per year based on 3.76 hours of use per day. Daily usage based on REEP project reporting for
        CFL direct install measure. This use rate is based on the assumption that CFL re-install will go into same locations.
        2
          The variety lighting kit comes with 3 CFLs with wattages: 15, 20 and 23. These lamps are assumed to replace
        incandescent bulbs with the following wattages respectively: 60, 75, 85.


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High Efficiency
The High efficiency is a CFL lamp. Each measure includes three lamps. The variety lighting kit includes
one lamp at each wattage: 15, 20 and 23. The bright lighting kit includes three 85-watt CFLs.
Operating Hours
1372 hours per year,
3.76 hours per day
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                              Peak as % of connected load kW
                              % of annual kWh
                                                                             (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer                   Winter    Summer Fall/Spring
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak             Off-Peak
Residential       28.7%       7.6%      36.0%      27.7%         23%        12%           22%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).
Freeridership
0%
Spillover
0%
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
6.2 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime. Lifetime based on life of CFL. CFL life is rated by hours of
use per day. (See table below)
Measure Cost
The cost for the variety kit is $20.48 and $25.483.
The cost for the bright kit is $21.48 and $26.48.
O&M Cost Adjustments
The annual O&M savings for the measure, both variety and bright kits, is $1.81. (See reference table
below.)
Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil-fuel algothrithms or default values for this measure.
Water Descriptions
There are no water algothrithms or default values for this measure.
Reference Tables


B. Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
                   Efficient Measures                        Baseline Measures
Component          Cost               Life4                  Cost                       Life
Variety Kit        $16.25             6.2 years              $1.50                      0.7 years
Lamps (3)
Bright Kit         $17.25                  6.2 years         $1.50                      0.7 years
Lamps (3)




A. Lamp Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time         Lamp Lifetime         Lamp Lifetime

3
  Two costs are give for each kit for two levels of incentive. The first cost listed for each kit is the cost of the measure
and shipping. The second cost listed for each kit include a five dollar incentive paid to the building manager for each
unit registered in the program. This five-dollar incentive is included in program design to encourage property
managers who would otherwise have no incentive to inform tenant of the program.
4
  Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.


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                        Hours              Years
      1                  3,000              8.22
      2                  5,000              6.85
      3                  7,000              6.39
      4                  9,000              6.16
      5                  9,500              5.21
      6                 10,000              4.57
      8                 12,000              4.11
      10                12,000              3.29
      12                12,000              2.74
      24                12,000              1.37
Note: The values above are determined using a standard lamp rated at 10,000 hours. Lives of lamps
       with rated lives other than 10,000 hours were determined by factoring off the values displayed
       above.




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Clothes Washing End Use
Clothes Dryer
Measure Number: III-B-1-a (REEP, Clothes Washing End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                         Accepted with           Referred to
                    Accepted As Is           Edits                 TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: N/A
Draft date: 1/12/00
Approval date:
Effective date: 9/5/01
Superceded date:

EVT Measure Codes: OTFYNPROP; OTFYNNGAS
Description
Install commercial-grade propane- or natural gas-fired clothes dryer instead of electric clothes dryer in
central on-site laundry facility. Measure applies to REEP prescriptive track.
Incremental Cost per Dryer
Incremental cost per dryer is $375 (including cost of gas hook-up). This estimate is based on REEP
judgement informed by past experience.
Algorithms
Energy Savings5
kWh = 942 kWh
MMBtu = -3.38 MMBtu 6 (negative indicates increase in fuel consumption)

Demand Savings
kW = 4.5 kW7 (max kW per REEP project screening)

Where:
           kWh          = weighted average8 annual kWh savings per dryer per residential unit
           942           = weighted average customer kWh savings per dryer per residential unit for measure
           MMBtu        = weighted average fossil fuel energy savings per dryer per residential unit in MMBtu (million
                         Btu)
           -3.38         = weighted average customer MMBtu of fossil fuel increase per dryer per residential unit for
                         measure
           kW           = weighted average connected load kW savings per dryer
           4.5           = weighted average customer kW savings per dryer for measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline efficiency is an electric dryer used in conjunction with a standard top-loading clothes washer.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is a propane or natural gas dryer used in conjunction with a standard top-loading clothes
washer.
5
  Savings are per dryer per residential unit, so that if dryer serves two residential units, savings are doubled; if dryer
serves three residential units, savings are tripled. Savings are for heating only – see footnote 4 below.
6
  Assumes 95% combustion efficiency for gas dryer (per 6/01 agreement between EVT and DPS) and 100% efficiency
for electric dryer.
7
  Considers only demand savings related to heating as fuel switch is directly related to heat production. Energy used to
power motor for tumbling is assumed to remain constant between similar models using different heating fuels.
Assumption based on REEP project reporting 2000-2001.
8
  Weighted average of occupancy type (74% family and 26% elderly) based on REEP project experience.


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Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                             % of annual kWh                 Peak as % of connected load kW (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak           Off-Peak      Winter     Summer         Fall/Spring
Washer            34.2%      3.7%      42.0%     20.1%          7%          5%              6%
All factors are consistent with Vermont screening tool clothes washing load shape #9.
Freeridership
0%
Spillover
0%
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
14 years (same as for clothes washers in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is 30 years (fuel switch).




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Clothes Washer
Measure Number: III-B-2-a (REEP, Clothes Washing End Use)
Version Date & Revision History
                                 Accepted with    Referred to
               Accepted As Is        Edits           TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: N/A
Draft date: 1/12/00
Approval date:
Effective date: 9/5/01
Superceded date:

EVT Measure Code: CKLCWASH
Description
Install commercial-grade front-loading clothes washer in central onsite laundry facility. Measure applies to
REEP prescriptive track.
Incremental Cost per Washer
Incremental cost per clothes washer is $750 based on prior REEP project reporting 2000-2001.
Algorithms
Energy Savings 9
MMBtu = 2.57 MMBtu per clothes washer per residential unit.

Where:
           MMBtu        = weighted average10 fossil fuel energy savings in MMBtu (million Btu) per clothes washer
                         per residential unit
           2.57          = weighted average customer MMBtu of fossil fuel savings11 per clothes washer per residential
                         unit for measure

Water Savings12
CCF = 5.0 CCF (weighted average from REEP historical projects)

Where:
         CCF      = weighted average annual customer water savings per clothes washer per residential unit
                   in CCF (hundreds of cubic feet)
         5.0       = weighted average annual customer water savings per clothes washer per residential unit
                   for measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline efficiency is a top-loading commercial-grade clothes washer.
High Efficiency
High-efficiency is a front-load commercial-grade clothes washer meeting the criteria for any tier
established by the Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE).




9
  Savings are per washer per residential unit, so that if washer serves two residential units, savings are doubled; if
washer serves three residential units, savings are tripled. Savings are combination of water heater and dryer
savings. Dryer savings are weighted average savings from propane and natural gas dryers. Dryer savings
assumed 95% combustion efficiency for natural gas/propane. See worksheet “washer dryer assumptions2.xls”.
10
   Weighted average of occupancy type (74% family and 26% elderly). See worksheet “washer dryer
assumptions2.xls”.
11
   For TRB purposes, EVT will separately track propane and natural gas savings.
12
   See worksheet “washer dryer assumptions2.xls”.


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Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                       Peak as % of connected load kW
                         % of annual kWh
                                                                    (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak           Off-Peak      Winter    Summer Fall/Spring
Washer            34.2%      3.7%      42.0%     20.1%          7%        5%       6%
All factors are consistent with Vermont screening tool load shape #9.
Freeridership
0%
Spillover
0%
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
14 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




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ENERGY STAR Commercial Clothes Washer
Version Date & Revision History

Measure Number: III-B-2-b (Low Income Multifamily Program, Clothes Washing End Use)

Draft date:        Portfolio 25
Effective date:    1/1/04
End date:          TBD

EVT Measure Code: CKLCWASH

Referenced Documents: 1) 2004_MFCW_savings_analysis.xls.

Description
Install in central onsite laundry facility a commercial-grade clothes washer meeting minimum qualifying
efficiency standards established under ENERGY STAR Program with an MEF >=1.42. Measure applies to
multifamily prescriptive Comprehensive Track.

Algorithms

Energy Savings
kWh     =     NumUnits  kWhsave / NumWashers

Where:
            kWh             = gross annual customer kWh savings per clothes washer for the measure
            NumUnits         = number of residential units served by the central laundry facility
            kWhsave          = annual customer kWh savings per residential unit for the measure
            NumWashers       = total number of clothes washers in central laundry facility

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline efficiency is a top-loading commercial-grade clothes washer.

High Efficiency
High-efficiency is defined as any commercial-grade clothes washer meeting Energy Star standards –
currently with an MEF of at least 1.42 or higher. EVT’s energy and water savings estimates are based on
the weighted average MEF factor for Energy Star qualifying models based on the residential models
rebated during the previous calendar year. This is presumed to be a conservative estimate because the
commercial-grade washers meeting Energy Star standards that are on the market have a higher average
MEF than the Residential-grade washers meeting Energy Star standards that are on the market.

Operating Cycles
271 clothes washer cycles / year 13

Loadshape
Loadshape #9, Residential Clothes Washing, Vermont State Screening Tool.

Freeridership
0%

Spillover

13
   Weighted average of 271 clothes washer cycles per year. Based on average washer cycles per year by household size
from U.S. Department of Energy, Final Rule Technical Support Document (TSD): Energy Efficiency Standards for
Consumer Products: Clothes Washers, December, 2000. Page 7-6, and on U.S. Census data on distribution of
household sizes in renter-occupied multi-family housing. See file 2004_MFCW_savings_analysis.xls.


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0%

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
14 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $750 per clothes washer, based on prior REEP project reporting
2000-2001.

O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure.

Fossil Fuel Descriptions

MMBtu =           NumUnits  MMBtusave. / NumWashers

Where:
           MMBtu            = gross annual fossil fuel energy savings in MMBtu (million Btu) per
                             clothes washer for the measure
           NumUnits          = number of residential units served by the central laundry facility
           MMBtusave         = annual customer MMBtu of fossil fuel savings per residential unit for the
                             measure from reference table below
           NumWashers        = total number of clothes washers in central laundry facility

Water Descriptions
CCF      =     NumUnits  4.3 / NumWashers

Where:
           CCF              = annual customer water savings per clothes washer in CCF (hundreds of
                             cubic feet)
           NumUnits          = number of residential units served by the central laundry facility
           4.314             = annual customer water savings per clothes washer per residential unit for
                             the measure, in CCF (hundreds of cubic feet)
           NumWashers        = total number of clothes washers in central laundry facility




Reference Tables
Customer Energy Savings by Water Heater and Dryer Fuel Type

14
  Water savings based on weighted average of 271 clothes washer cycles per year and average MEF of 1.72. See file
2004_MFCW_savings_analysis.xls.


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                                                       Per Unit Savings

                                                       MMBTU MMBTU MMBTU
Dryer/DHW Fuel Combo                        kWh            Oil       Propane Natural Gas
Electric Dryer/Electric DHW                  305          0.00         0.00     0.00
Electric Dryer/Propane DHW                   139          0.00         0.71     0.00
Electric Dryer/Natural Gas DHW               139          0.00         0.00     0.71
Electric Dryer/Oil DHW                       139          0.71         0.00     0.00
Propane Dryer/Electric DHW                   202          0.00         0.35     0.00
Propane Dryer/Propane DHW                     36          0.00         1.06     0.00
Propane Dryer/Oil DHW                         36          1.06         0.00     0.00
Natural Gas Dryer/Electric DHW               202          0.00         0.00     0.35
Natural Gas Dryer/Natural Gas DHW             36          0.00         0.00     1.06
Natural Gas Dryer/Oil DHW                   36.35         1.06         0.00     0.00
Savings based on weighted average of 271 clothes washer cycles per year and average MEF of 1.72. See
file 2004_MFCW_savings_analysis.xls.
Where dryer and DHW use different fossil fuels, savings are combined under the DHW fossil fuel because
a single measure can generally only have one fuel type for screening purposes.




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Refrigeration End Use
Energy Star Refrigerators
Measure Number: III-C-1-a (REEP, Refrigeration End Use)
Version Date & Revision History
                                 Accepted with     Referred to
               Accepted As Is        Edits            TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: N/A
Draft date: 1/12/00
Approval date:
Effective date: 9/5/01
Superceded date:

EVT Measure Code: RFRESRRP

Description
Install refrigerators that meet Energy Star efficiency standards. Measure applies to REEP prescriptive track.
Incremental Cost per Unit
Average incremental cost is $30 per residential unit (consistent with Residential New Construction and
Efficient Products programs).
Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 183 kWh

Demand Savings
kW = 0.021 kW

Where:
         kWh      = annual kWh savings per refrigerator
         183       = the weighted average15 customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency for
                   the measure
         kW       = connected load kW savings per refrigerator
         0.021     = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline efficiency is the current minimum federal efficiency standard.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is defined as any model meeting Energy Star standards. New Energy Star standards went
into effect on January 1, 2001, and require that Energy Star rated models manufactured after this date be
10% better than the new minimum federal efficiency standards that go into effect July 1, 2001. Models
meeting the new Energy Star standards will not be readily available on the market until the middle of year
2001. As such, REEP proposes the use of current savings of 183 kWh (reflecting the average savings
between a pre January 1, 2001 Energy Star model and current minimum efficiency standard model) for
installations in 2001. REEP further proposes a savings of 50 kWh (reflecting the average savings between
a January 1, 2001 Energy Star model and July 1, 2001 minimum efficiency standard model) for
installations beginning in 200216.


15
   Historically, 75% of refrigerators installed in REEP projects are Magic Chef, rated at 437 kWh annual consumption.
Baseline model is rated at 636 kWh annual consumption. 183 kWh is weighted average of 199 kWh savings for Magic
Chefs (75%) and 136 kWh savings for baseline Energy Star model (25%).
16
   DOE, Cost-Efficiency Analysis in Support of the Energy Conservation Standards for Refrigerators/Freezers.


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Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                             % of annual kWh                  Peak as % of connected load kW (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                  Peak Off-Peak Peak            Off-Peak      Winter    Summer       Fall/Spring
Refrigerator 22.5% 10.8%               33.7%     33.0%         62%       60%            57%
All factors are consistent with Vermont screening tool load shape #4.
Freeridership
0%
Spillover
0%
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
17 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




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Energy Star Refrigerators
Measure Number: III-C-1-b (Low Income Multifamily Program, Refrigeration End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     Portfolio 23
Effective date: 1/1/04
End date:       TBD


Referenced Documents: ES.ref.kWh.2004.xls

Description
Install refrigerators that meet ENERGY STAR efficiency standards. Measure applies to REEP prescriptive
track.

Algorithms

Demand Savings
kW            = ((WattsBASE – WattsEE) /1000)* ISR
kW            = (114.3 – 97.2)/1000*1=0.0171

Energy Savings
kWh           = kW  HOURS
kWh           = 0.0171*5000=85.5

Where:
         kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         WattsBASE         = Baseline connected kW
         WattsEE           = Energy efficient connected kW
         kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         ISR               = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used
         HOURS             = average hours of use per year

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline efficiency is the current minimum federal efficiency standard.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is defined as any model meeting ENERGY STAR standards as of January 1, 2004

Loadshape
Loadshape #4, Residential Refrigeration, Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.

Freeridership
0%

Spillover
0%

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
17 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




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Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $30.

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $50.

O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure.

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.




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VendingMiser for Soft Drink Vending Machines
Measure Number: III-C-2-a (REEP, Refrigeration End Use)

Version Date & Revision History

Draft date: 4/1/02
Effective date:

Referenced Documents: Vending_miser_loadshape_calc.xls

Description
The VendingMiser is an energy control device for refrigerated vending machines. Using an occupancy
sensor, during times of inactivity the VendingMiser turns off the machine’s lights and duty cycles the
compressor based on the ambient air temperature. The VendingMiser is applicable for conditioned indoor
installations.

Estimated Measure Impacts

Average Annual MWH Savings          Average number of measures per   Average Annual MWH savings
per unit                            year                             per year
1.724                               15                               25.86

Algorithms

Energy Savings
kWh = 1724

Where:
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         1724   = 120 Volts x 3.56 Amps x 0.95 Power factor x 8760 hours x 48.5% savings / 1000
         3.56 Amps = Average Ampere loading of 44 sampled indoor vending machines, by Bayview
                        Tech.
         48.5% = Savings based on average of 6 different independent lab tests of VendingMiser.

Demand Savings
N/A

Waste Heat Adjustment
N/A

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The Baseline is soft-drink vending machine without a VendingMiser device.

High Efficiency
The high efficiency is a soft-drink vending machine with a VendingMiser device.

Operating Hours
8760 hrs per year, or 24 hrs per day, 365 days per year




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Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                                                                    Peak as % of calculated demand
                                   % of annual kWh
                                                                           savings kW (CF)
                     Winter      Winter    Summer     Summer                                  Fall/
     Application     Peak       Off-Peak    Peak      Off-Peak       Winter     Summer
                                                                                             Spring
Vending
                     6.6%      26.5%          9.6%      57.3%          0%            0%       0%
Miser
Source: Loadshape for savings occurring from 8 PM to 6 AM, seven days a week, 12 months per year
(percentages calculated in spreadsheet file named Vending_miser_loadshape_calc.xls).

Freeridership
0%

Spillover
0%

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
15 years
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $16017

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $40.

O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure.

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil-fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.




17
     Price quoted from manufacturer.


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Vending Miser for Soft Drink Vending Machines
Measure Number: III-C-2-b (Low Income Multifamily Program, Refrigeration End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     Portfolio 17
Effective date: 1/1/03
End date:       TBD

Description
The VendingMiser is an energy control device for refrigerated vending machines. Using an occupancy
sensor, during times of inactivity the Vending Miser turns off the machine’s lights and duty cycles the
compressor based on the ambient air temperature. The Vending Miser is applicable for conditioned indoor
installations.

Algorithms

Energy Savings
kWh = 1,635

Where:
         kWh    = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         1,635   = 120 Volts x 3.56 Amps x 0.95 Power factor x 8760 hours x 46% savings / 1000
         3.56 Amps = Average Ampere loading of 44 sampled indoor vending machines, by Bayview Tech.
         46%     = Savings based on average of 6 different independent lab tests of VendingMiser.

Demand Savings
N/A

Waste Heat Adjustment
N/A

Baseline Efficiencies
The Baseline is a soft-drink vending machine without a VendingMiser device (typical usage of 3555 kWh).

Operating Hours
8760 hrs per year, or 24 hrs per day, 365 days per year


Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                              Peak as % of calculated demand
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                     savings kW (CF)
              Winter Winter Summer              Summer
 Application  Peak Off-Peak  Peak               Off-Peak     Winter      Summer      Fall/Spring
Vending Miser 6.6%   26.5%   9.6%                57.3%         0%          0%           0%
     Source: Loadshape for savings occurring from 8 PM to 6 AM, seven days a week, 12 months per year
          (percentages calculated in spreadsheet file named <Vending_miser_loadshape_calc.xls>).

Freeridership
0%

Spillover
0%

Persistence
The persistence factor is 66.6%.



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Installed Cost
$16018

Operation and Maintenance Savings
N/A

Lifetime
Engineering measure life is 15 years.
Adjusted measure lifetime with persistence is 10 years.




18
     Price quoted from manufacturer.


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Hot Water End Use
Water Conservation
Measure Number: III-D-1-a (REEP, Hot Water End Use)
Version Date & Revision History
                                Accepted with     Referred to
               Accepted As Is        Edits          TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: N/A
Draft date: 1/12/00
Approval date:
Effective date: 9/5/01
Superceded date:

EVT Measure Codes: HWESHOWR; HWEFAUCT
Description
Measures apply to REEP prescriptive track. Lowest-flow aerators and showerheads possible used, as
follows:

                             Baseline19     Non-Circulating DHW System               Circulating DHW System
                              (gpm)                    (gpm)                                   (gpm)
Bathroom faucet aerator        2.35                      1.5                                     0.5
Kitchen faucet aerator         2.35                      2.0                                     1.5
Showerhead                     2.65                      2.0                                     2.0

Incremental Cost per Unit
There is no incremental cost for installing lower-flow rate aerators and showerheads.
Algorithms

Energy Savings20
MMBtu = 1.9 MMBtu (weighted average from REEP historical projects)

Demand Savings
Where:
        MMBtu          = weighted average fossil fuel energy savings per residential unit in MMBtu (million Btu)
        1.9             = the weighted average customer MMBtu of fossil fuel savings per residential unit for the
                        measure


Water Savings21
CCF = 9.1 CCF (weighted average from REEP historical projects)
19
   Based on weighted averages determined through REEP project reporting. 50% of systems meet 1992 Federal aerator
and faucet standards (<2.2 gpm for lavatory and kitchen faucets and <2.5 gpm for showerheads) and 50% of baseline
systems not meeting the 1992 standards and therefore at Federal standard +0.3 gpm as per REEP project reporting.
20
   Based on weighted average of type of DHW system (50% circulating and 50% non-circulating) systems and
occupancy type (74% family and 26% elderly). Savings for circulating systems are identical, in BTU terms, to savings
assumptions used for RNC and LISF programs. Savings for non-circulating systems are assumed to be higher since
much lower gallon-per-minute faucet aerators are used with such systems. See worksheet “REEPprescriptive
assumptionsv5.xls”.
21
   Ibid.


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Where:
         CCF     = weighted average annual water savings per residential unit in CCF
                  (hundreds of cubic feet)
         9.1      = weighted average customer annual water savings per residential unit for measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline conditions are the standard flow rates typically specified in new construction projects.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is a lower flow aerator or showerhead than typically specified, with specific flow rate
dependent on DHW system.
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
Not applicable
Freeridership
0%
Spillover
0%
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
9 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




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Water Conservation
Version Date & Revision History
                                       Accepted with          Referred to
                   Accepted As Is          Edits                TAG
EVT
DPS

Measure Number: III-D-1-b (REEP, Hot Water End Use)

Previous measure effective date: N/A
Draft date: 1/12/00
Approval date:
Effective date: 9/5/01
Superceded date:

EVT Measure Codes: HWESHOWR; HWEFAUCT
Description
Measures apply to REEP prescriptive track. Lowest-flow aerators and showerheads possible used, as
follows:

                             Baseline22     Non-Circulating DHW System               Circulating DHW System
                              (gpm)                    (gpm)                                   (gpm)
Bathroom faucet aerator        2.35                      1.5                                     0.5
Kitchen faucet aerator         2.35                      2.0                                     1.5
Showerhead                     2.65                      2.0                                     2.0

Incremental Cost per Unit
There is no incremental cost for installing lower-flow rate aerators and showerheads.
Algorithms

Energy Savings23
MMBtu = 1.9 MMBtu (weighted average from REEP historical projects)

Demand Savings
Where:
        MMBtu          = weighted average fossil fuel energy savings per residential unit in MMBtu (million Btu)
        1.9             = the weighted average customer MMBtu of fossil fuel savings per residential unit for the
                        measure


Water Savings24
CCF = 9.1 CCF (weighted average from REEP historical projects)




22
   Based on weighted averages determined through REEP project reporting. 50% of systems meet 1992 Federal aerator
and faucet standards (<2.2 gpm for lavatory and kitchen faucets and <2.5 gpm for showerheads) and 50% of baseline
systems not meeting the 1992 standards and therefore at Federal standard +0.3 gpm as per REEP project reporting.
23
   Based on weighted average of type of DHW system (50% circulating and 50% non-circulating) systems and
occupancy type (74% family and 26% elderly). Savings for circulating systems are identical, in BTU terms, to savings
assumptions used for RNC and LISF programs. Savings for non-circulating systems are assumed to be higher since
much lower gallon-per-minute faucet aerators are used with such systems. See worksheet “REEPprescriptive
assumptionsv5.xls”.
24
   Ibid.


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Where:
         CCF     = weighted average annual water savings per residential unit in CCF
                  (hundreds of cubic feet)
         9.2      = weighted average customer annual water savings per residential unit for measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline conditions are the standard flow rates typically specified in new construction projects.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is a lower flow aerator or showerhead than typically specified, with specific flow rate
dependent on DHW system.
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors

For DHW systems not on Utility Controlled DHW programs (Default):
                                                             Peak as % of connected load kW
                            % of annual kWh
                                                                          (CF)
                Winter Winter Summer Summer
                Peak Off-Peak  Peak  Off-Peak                 Winter      Summer Fall/Spring

                 28.4%        3.1%     46.5%          22%        77.5%        48.1%        64.9%


For DHW systems on Utility Controlled DHW programs:
                                                             Peak as % of connected load kW
                            % of annual kWh
                                                                          (CF)
                Winter Winter Summer Summer
                Peak Off-Peak  Peak  Off-Peak                 Winter      Summer Fall/Spring

                 28.4%        3.1%     46.5%        22.0%        56.6%        38.0%        45.4%

Freeridership
0%
Spillover
0%
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
9 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




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Domestic Hot Water System
Measure Number: III-D-2-a (REEP, Hot Water End Use)
Version Date & Revision History
                                Accepted with     Referred to
               Accepted As Is        Edits          TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: N/A
Draft date: 1/12/00
Approval date: 9/5/01
Effective date:
Superceded date:

EVT Measure Codes: HWRNFOIL; HWRNNGAS; HWRNPROP
Description
Install efficient indirect-fired water heating off high-efficiency boiler. Measure applies to REEP
prescriptive track.
Incremental Costs per Unit
Average incremental cost is $77 per residential unit for an efficient central domestic hot water system.
This is based on an analysis of REEP historical data.
Algorithms
Energy Savings
MMBtu = 1.43 MMBtu

Demand Savings25
Not applicable

Where:
             MMBtu       = weighted average fossil fuel energy savings per residential unit in MMBtu (million Btu)
             1.43         = weighted average customer MMBtu of fossil fuel savings per residential unit for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies
Central mid-efficiency standalone DHW system.
High Efficiency
Indirect-fired off high-efficiency boiler.
Operating Hours
Not applicable
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
Not applicable
Freeridership
0%
Spillover
0%
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetime
15 years
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.
Reference Tables
None



25
     Savings based on REEP historical data.


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Conservation Measures for Controlled DHW

Measure Number: III-D-3-a (CLOSED: INTEGRATED INTO III-D-1-b) (REEP, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/10/01

Description
Conservation measures, including but not limited to faucet aerators, showerhead aerators, pipe and tank
insulation as well as tank temperature turn down are applied to an existing electric domestic hot water
heating system on a utility-controlled DHW program. These are custom measures.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
Custom, based on field data.

Demand Savings
Custom, based on field data.

Water Savings
Custom, based on field data.

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an existing electric domestic hot water system on a utility-controlled program.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a domestic hot water on a utility-controlled DHW program with conservation measures,
including but not limited to faucet aerators, showerhead aerators, pipe and tank insulation as well as tank
temperature turn down.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                             Peak as % of calculated demand
                               % of annual kWh
                                                                    savings kW (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak      Winter     Summer Fall/Spring
                  22.4% 15.3%       26.9%        35.4%      20.88%      16.69%     17.47%
All factors are based on VEIC review of three-study data from K. Bailey End Use Model, Based on 1987
Survey.

Freeridership
0%

Spillover
0%.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
Custom, based on field data.


Lifetimes
Custom, based on field data.




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Fuel Switch for Controlled DHW

Measure Number: III-D-4-a (CLOSED: CUSTOM MEASURE) (REEP, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/10/01

Description
An existing electric domestic hot water heating system is replaced by a system powered by other fuel.
DHW fuel switch is a custom measure.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
Custom, based on field data.

Demand Savings
Custom, based on field data.

Water Savings
Custom, based on field data.

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an existing electric domestic hot water system on a utility-controlled program.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a domestic hot water system powered by non-electric fuel.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                             Peak as % of calculated demand
                               % of annual kWh
                                                                    savings kW (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak      Winter     Summer Fall/Spring
                  22.4% 15.3%       26.9%        35.4%      20.88%      16.69%     17.47%
All factors are based on VEIC review of three-study data from K. Bailey End Use Model, Based on 1987
Survey.

Freeridership
0%

Spillover
0%.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
Custom, based on field data.


Lifetimes
Custom, based on field data.




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Low Flow Showerhead
Measure Number: III-D-5-a (Low Income Multifamily Program, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     Portfolio No. 17
Effective date: 1/1/03
End date:       TBD

Referenced Documents: N/A

Description
An existing or proposed showerhead with a high flow rate is replaced with a new low flow showerhead.

Algorithms
Water Savings
CCF = (FLOWbase - FLOWeffic)* MIN * (BR+1) * 365 * (1/748)

Where:
         CCF            = customer annual water savings per residential unit in hundreds of cubic feet for
                         the measure
         FLOWbase        = flow rate in gallons per minute of baseline showerhead
         FLOWeffic       = flow rate in gallons per minute of efficient showerhead
         MIN             = the number of minutes of shower use per adjusted number of bedrooms per day
                         (default is 2.5 minutes for family housing and 1.5 minutes for elderly housing)
         BR              = number of bedrooms per residential unit (assume efficiency units have zero
                         bedrooms)
         365             = number of days per year
         748             = conversion factor from CCF to gallons (gal/CCF)

Energy Savings
kWh = CCF * 8.33 * 748 * DT * (1/) * (1/3413) * FLAG

MMBtu = CCF * 8.33 * 748 * DT * (1/) * (10-6) * (1-FLAG)

Where:
         kWh            = gross customer annual kWh savings per residential unit for the measure
         CCF            = customer annual water savings per residential unit in hundreds of cubic feet for
                         the measure
         8.33            = energy content of water (Btu/gallon/°F)
         748             = conversion factor from CCF to gallons (gal/CCF)
         DT              = average difference in temperature between cold intake water and shower water
                         (default is 105°F minus 55°F = 50°F)
                        = Domestic Hot Water system efficiency
         3413            = conversion factor from kWh to Btus (Btu/kWh)
         FLAG            = 1 if domestic hot water system is electric; 0 otherwise
         MMBtu          = annual MMBtu fossil fuel savings per residential unit for the measure
         10-6            = conversion factor from Btus to MMBtus (MMBtu/Btu)

Demand Savings
kW = kWh / HOURS




Where:


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         kW              = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         kWh             = gross customer annual kWh savings per residential unit for the measure
         HOURS            = annual full load hours (equals 3427)

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an existing or proposed showerhead with a high flow. In new construction
projects, the baseline condition is assumed to be a showerhead with a rated flow of 2.5 gpm – the maximum
allowable under EPAct.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a low flow showerhead.

Operating Hours
3427 annual full load hours for electric water heaters per the standard Residential DHW Conservation
loadshape.

Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                                                           Peak as % of calculated kW savings
                            % of annual kWh
                                                                          (CF)
                Winter Winter Summer           Summer
                Peak Off-Peak  Peak            Off-Peak      Winter       Summer    Fall/Spring
Residential
DHW            28.4%      3.1%      46.5%      22.0%         77.5%         48.1%      64.9%
conserve (#8)
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.

Freeridership
10%

Spillover
0%

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
9 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for low-flow showerheads is presumed to be zero for new construction or major rehab
projects, and $15 for retrofit applications.

O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
See above under Energy Savings




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Low Flow Faucet Aerator
Measure Number: III-D-6-a (Low Income Multifamily Program, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History

Draft date:       Portfolio No. 17
Effective date:   1/1/03
End date:         TBD

Referenced Documents: N/A

Description
An existing or proposed faucet aerator with a high flow rate is replaced with a new low flow rate faucet
aerator.

Algorithms

Water Savings
CCF = (FLOWbase - FLOWeffic) * VMIN * (BR+1) * 365 * (1/748)

Where:
         CCF             = customer annual water savings per residential unit in hundreds of cubic feet for
                          the measure
         FLOWbase         = flow rate in gallons per minute of baseline faucet aerator
         FLOWeffic        = flow rate in gallons per minute of efficient faucet aerator
         VMIN             = the number of minutes of faucet use per adjusted number of bedrooms per day
                          (default is 1.5 minutes for kitchen faucets and 0.75 minutes for bathroom faucets)
         BR               = number of bedrooms per residential unit (assume efficiency units have zero
                          bedrooms)
         365              = number of days per year
         748              = conversion factor from CCF to gallons (gal/CCF)

Energy Savings
kWh = CCF * 8.33 * 748 * DT * (1/) * (1/3413) * FLAG

MMBtu = CCF * 8.33 * 748 * DT * (1/) * (10-6) * (1-FLAG)

Where:
         kWh             = gross customer annual kWh savings per residential unit for the measure
         CCF             = customer annual water savings per residential unit in hundreds of cubic feet for
                          the measure
         8.33             = energy content of water (Btu/gallon/°F)
         748              = conversion factor from CCF to gallons (gal/CCF)

         DT               = average difference in temperature between cold intake water and faucet water
                          (default is 80°F minus 55°F = 25°F)
                         = Domestic Hot Water system efficiency
         3413             = conversion factor from kWh to Btus (Btu/kWh)
         FLAG             = 1 if domestic hot water system is electric; 0 otherwise
         MMBtu           = annual MMBtu fossil fuel savings per residential unit for the measure
         10-6             = conversion factor from Btus to MMBtus (MMBtu/Btu)

Demand Savings
kW = kWh / HOURS
Where:


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         kW              = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         kWh             = gross customer annual kWh savings per residential unit for the measure
         HOURS            = annual full load hours (equals 3427)

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an existing or proposed faucet aerator with a high flow. In new construction and
major rehab projects projects, the baseline condition is assumed to be a faucet aerator with a rated flow of
2.2 gpm – the maximum allowable under EPAct.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a low flow faucet aerator.

Operating Hours
N/A

Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                                                                Peak as % of calculated kW
                            % of annual kWh
                                                                       savings (CF)
                Winter Winter Summer Summer
                Peak Off-Peak Peak   Off-Peak                  Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
Residential
DHW           28.4%         3.1%      46.5%       22.0%        77.5%        48.1%        64.9%
conserve (#8)
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.

Freeridership
10%

Spillover
0%

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
9 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for low-flow faucet aerators is presumed to be zero for new construction or major
rehab projects, and $10 for retrofit applications.

O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
See above under Energy Savings




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Ventilation End Use
Ventilation Fan
Measure Number: III-E-1-a (REEP, Ventilation End Use)
Version Date & Revision History
                                 Accepted with     Referred to
               Accepted As Is        Edits            TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: N/A
Draft date: 1/12/00
Approval date:
Effective date: 9/5/01
Superceded date:

EVT Measure Code: VNTXCEIL
Description
Efficient ventilation fan. Measure applies to REEP prescriptive track.
Incremental Cost per Unit
Incremental cost per installed fan is $110, the same incremental cost used in other Efficiency Vermont
programs.
Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 169 kWh per fan

Demand Savings
kW = 0.06 kW

Where:
         kWh     = weighted average annual kWh savings per ventilation fan
         169      = annual customer kWh savings from DPS screening of RNC program
         kW      = weighted average connected load kW savings per ventilation fan
         0.06     = customer kW savings from DPS screening of RNC program (20 Watt versus 80 Watt
         fan)
Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Standard efficiency ventilation fan (80 watts).
High Efficiency
High efficiency ventilation fan (20 watts).
Operating Hours
2817 hours per year (from DPS screening of RNC program)
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                             % of annual kWh              Peak as % of connected load kW (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                 Peak Off-Peak Peak             Off-Peak   Winter   Summer       Fall/Spring
Ventilation      22.1%       11.1% 31.8%            35.0%   32.2%       32.2%            32.2%

Freeridership
0%
Spillover
0%
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.



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Lifetime
10 years
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.
Reference Tables
None




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Space Heating End Use
Heating System
Measure Number: III-F-1-a (REEP, Space Heating End Use)
Version Date & Revision History
                                 Accepted with     Referred to
               Accepted As Is        Edits           TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: N/A
Draft date: 1/12/00
Approval date:
Effective date: 9/5/01
Superceded date:

EVT Measure Code: SHRBFOIL; SHRBNGAS; SHRBPROP
Description
Install high-efficiency boiler(s) and controls that optimize boiler performance. Measure applies to REEP
prescriptive track..
Incremental Cost per Unit
Incremental cost per residential unit for a central high-efficiency boiler is $134. This assumption is based
on analysis of historic REEP data. It reflects the fact that the average REEP project averages more than
residential unit per boiler.
Algorithms

Energy Savings
Fossil fuel savings will be calculated as part of the Energy Star Rating process. Pump electrical savings
from higher efficiency unit are assumed to be negated by longer running cycles of a properly sized system.

Demand Savings
Not applicable

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Mid-efficiency boiler
High Efficiency
High-efficiency boiler, with smart controls
Operating Hours
Not applicable
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
Not applicable
Freeridership
0%
Spillover
0%
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetime
25 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.
Reference Tables
None




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Thermal Shell Upgrades
Measure Number: III-F-2-a (REEP, Space Heating End Use)
Version Date & Revision History
                                 Accepted with     Referred to
               Accepted As Is        Edits           TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: N/A
Draft date: 1/12/00
Approval date:
Effective date: 9/5/01
Superceded date:
Description
Installation of shell materials with higher insulating properties than baseline. Measures apply to REEP
prescriptive track.
Incremental Costs per Residential Unit

EVT              High Efficiency Measure                                   New         Rehabilit
Measure                                                                 Construction    ation
Code
TSHWINDO         Low-E argon windows with Warmedge spacers                  $30
TSHWINDO         Low-E storms on retained single pane windows                             $120
TSHAIRSL         Air sealing detailing                                      $50            $50
TSHNACWL         Inspected cellulose in all attic flats                     $50            $50
TSHNFNDE         Basement insulation and slab edge detailing                $10            $25
TSHNACWL         Dense pack or wet spray cellulose in walls                               $100
TSHNACWL         Install 1” of rigid foam insulation on sloped                             $25
                 ceilings
                 Total Incremental Cost                                     $140          $370

Algorithms

Energy Savings
Savings will be calculated as part of the Energy Star Rating process.

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement

Baseline                                                      New Construction            Rehabilitation
Low-e windows                                                       X
Double pane windows                                                                              X
Single-pane windows w/ poor quality storm retained                                               X
Minimal air sealing detailing                                           X                        X
Inspection of attic flat insulation
Basement insulation                                                     X
Slab edge detailing
Fiberglass batt insulation in walls                                                              X
Fiberglass batt insulation in sloped ceilings                                                    X




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                                                             TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37



High Efficiency

High Efficiency Measure                                      New Construction        Rehabilitation
Low-E argon windows                                                X                      X
Low-E storms (on retained weather-sealed windows)                                         X
Air sealing detailing                                                X                    X
Inspected cellulose in all attic flats                               X                    X
Basement insulation                                                  X                    X
Slab edge detailing                                                  X                    X
Dense pack or wet spray cellulose in walls                                                X
Install 1” of rigid foam insulation on sloped ceilings                                    X

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
Not applicable
Freeridership
0%
Spillover
0%
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetime
25 years, as used in Residential New Construction Program.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.
Reference Tables
None




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Air Conditioning End Use
Energy Star Air Conditioner
Measure Number: III-G-1-a (REEP, Air Conditioning End Use)
Version Date & Revision History

Draft date: 8/30/01
Effective date:

Referenced Documents: www.energystar.gov; www.ari.org

Description
Room air conditioners with an output less than or equal to 18,000Btu meeting minimum qualifying
efficiency established by Energy Star Program.

Estimated Measure Impacts

Gross Annual MWH Savings per          Average number of measures per         Gross MWH savings per year
unit                                  year
.07260                                1526                                   1.089

Algorithms

Energy Savings
kWh = 72.61

kWh = (kWbase – kWeffic)  HOURS

Demand Savings
kW = .145224

kW = kWbase – kWeffic

Where:
         kWh    = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         .927832 = baseline connected load kW
         .782608 = efficient connected load kW
         500     = annual full load hours
         .145224 = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline efficiency is the current minimum federal efficiency standard. (EER 9.7 for sizes included in
measure)27
High Efficiency
High efficiency is defined as any model meeting Energy Star standards (EER 11.5 for sizes included in
measure)28
Operating Hours
500 operating hours yearly.29

26
   Estimate based on REEP program forecasting.
27
   Energy Star Data.(standard applied October 1, 2000). www.energystar.gov
28
   Id.
29
   Actual operating hours based on Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute data for Vermont. www.ari.org
Operating hours (500/yr) determined by ARI are considered to be high for typical families in Vermont. However, this
estimate is realistic for residencies in the REEP program given health and age issues.


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Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                                                                      Peak as % of calculated kW
                                 % of annual kWh
                                                                             savings (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                  Peak Off-Peak Peak            Off-Peak      Winter           Summer Fall/Spring
Residential       0.0%      0.0%     50.0%       50.0%          0%               60%         0%
All factors are consistent with Vermont screening tool load shapes.

Freeridership
0%
Spillover
0%
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
10 years (same as DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.
Measure Cost
$4030
O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure
Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithm or default values for this measure
Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure




30
     APT study of retailers knowledgeable about the energy star program.


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Water Conservation End Use
Toilet Diverter
Measure Number: III-H-1-a (Low Income Multifamily Program, Water Conservation End Use)

Version Date & Revision History

Draft date:        Portfolio No. 15
Effective date:    1/1/03
End date:          TBD

Referenced Documents: N/A

Description
An existing toilet is fitted with a toilet diverter to increase water flow to the tank and reduce water flow to
the bowl during the flush.

Algorithms

Water Savings
CCF = FLUSHGAL * REDUCE * FLUSHES * (BR+1) * 365 * (1/748)

Where:
          CCF              = customer annual water savings per residential unit in hundreds of cubic feet for
                            the measure
          FLUSHGAL          = gallons of water per flush
          REDUCE            = percent reduction (10% for 1.6 gpf, 20% for 3.0 gpf, 35% for greater than 3.0
                            gpf)
          FLUSHES           = the number of flushes per adjusted number of bedrooms per day (default is 5)
          BR                = number of bedrooms per residential unit (assume efficiency units have zero
                            bedrooms)
          365               = number of days per year
          748               = conversion factor from CCF to gallons (gal/CCF)

Energy Savings
There are no electric or fossil fuel savings with this measure.

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an existing toilet without a toilet diverter.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a toilet with a toilet diverter installed.

Operating Hours
N/A

Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
N/A

Freeridership
0%
Spillover
0%




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Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
9 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for toilet diverters is presumed to be $5.

O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
See above under Energy Savings




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Efficient Products Program

Clothes Washing End Use
Energy Star Clothes Washers
Measure Number: IV-A-1-a (EPP, Clothes Washing End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/31/00
Description
Clothes washers meeting minimum qualifying efficiency.
Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = CkWhsave
MMBtu = CMMBtusave

Demand Savings
kW = CkWsave

Where:
           kWh            = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
           CkWhsav         = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency (see
                           Table below)
           MMBtu          = fossil fuel energy savings in MMBtu (million Btu)
           CMMBtusave      = the average customer MMBtu of fossil fuel savings (see Table below)
           kW             = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
           CkWsave         = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency (see Table
                           below)

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline efficiency is the current minimum federal efficiency standard for Energy Factor (EF) of 1.18 and
industry-accepted Water Factor (WF) of 13.3 Remaining Moisture Content (RMC) of 62%.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is defined as any model meeting Energy Star standards – currently Energy Factor of at least
2.50, water factor of at least 11.0. Qualifying models can be further subdivided into each of 6 different
efficiency tiers developed by the Consortium for Energy Efficiency. The most efficient of the CEE
efficiency tiers has a minimum EF of 3.25, minimum WF of 9.0 and maximum RMC of 40%.
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                             Peak as % of connected load kW
                              % of annual kWh
                                                                             (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak            Off-Peak      Winter     Summer Fall/Spring
Washer            34.2%      3.7%      42.0%      20.1%          7%          5%           6%
All factors are consistent with Vermont screening tool load shapes.
Freeridership
22% based on a comparison between 1999 market shares in Vermont and the national average adjusted
downward by 40% to reflect influence of various regional programs. 31


31
  The average Vermont and national market share for the four quarters of 1999 were 22.7% and 8.5%, respectively.
By assuming that 40% of national sales are attributable to regional efficiency programs, we are assuming that the
national market share would have been 5.1% in the absence of such programs. This assumed baseline market share is


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Spillover
41% (i.e. for every rebate participant, there are another 0.41 buyers of qualifying models). This is based on
a comparison of rebated units that were purchased in 1999 from Sears and Circuit City (1043) and actual
sales of qualifying products from those stores in Vermont (1470).
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
14 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.
Reference Tables
                                                                                                    32
                Customer Energy Savings by Water Heater and Dryer Fuel Type
                                                        kWh                MMBTU Oil                MMBTU Gas
Electric Dryer/Electric DHW                             571                  0.00                     0.00
Electric Dryer/Gas DHW                                  151                  0.00                     1.90
Electric Dryer/Oil DHW                                  151                  1.90                     0.00
Gas Dryer/Electric DHW                                  421                  0.00                     0.56
Gas Dryer/Gas DHW                                         1                  0.00                     2.46

                 Customer Demand Savings by Water Heater and Dryer Fuel Type
                                                 Connected Load
                                                      kW
Electric Dryer/Electric DHW                    1.5817
Electric Dryer/Gas DHW                         0.4183
Electric Dryer/Oil DHW                         0.4183
Gas Dryer/Electric DHW                         1.1662
Gas Dryer/Gas DHW                              0.0028




23% of the Vermont market share (i.e. 5.1/22.7=0.22). Note that is may be appropriate to adjust this rate in the future
as both Vermont and national market shares change.
32
   These savings estimates are based on Appendix C of The Consortium for Energy Efficiency’s (CEE) High Efficiency
Clothes Washer Initiative. CEE’s savings estimates for models just meeting the minimum efficiency criteria (e.g.
Energy Factor and Remaining Moisture Content) of its 6 efficiency tiers were adjusted upward to reflect the fact that
the average washer in each tier had characteristics that were better than the minimums for that tier. Weighted average
savings across all 6 efficiency tiers were then computed based on the actual characteristics of clothes washers rebated
by Efficiency Vermont between 3/1/00 and 6/30/00 (i.e. EF of 3.92, volume of 2.71 and RMC of 46%).


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Energy Star Clothes Washers
Measure Number: IV-A-1-b (EPP, Clothes Washing End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                         Accepted with          Referred to
                     Accepted As Is          Edits                TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 1/26/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
Clothes washers meeting minimum qualifying efficiency.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh =392
MMBtuoil = 0.41
MMBtugas = 0.48

Demand Savings
kW = 1.0859
Water Savings
CCF = 6.4

Where:
            kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            392               = the weighted average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency
                              (see Table below)
            MMBtuoil         = oil energy savings in MMBtu (million Btu)
            0.41              = the weighted average customer MMBtu of oil savings from upgrading to high
                              efficiency (see Table below)
            MMBtugas         = gas energy savings in MMBtu (million Btu)
            0.48              = the weighted average customer MMBtu of gas savings (see Table below)
            kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
            1.0859             = weighted average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency33
            CCF              = customer water savings in hundreds of cubic feet for the measure
            6.4               = customer water savings from upgrading to high efficiency 34

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline efficiency is the current minimum federal efficiency standard for Energy Factor (EF) of 1.18 and
industry-accepted Water Factor (WF) of 13.3 Remaining Moisture Content (RMC) of 62%.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is defined as any model meeting Energy Star standards – currently Energy Factor of at least
2.50, water factor of at least 11.0. Qualifying models can be further subdivided into each of 6 different
efficiency tiers developed by the Consortium for Energy Efficiency. The most efficient of the CEE
efficiency tiers has a minimum EF of 3.25, minimum WF of 9.0 and maximum RMC of 40%.


33
     Calculated by dividing weighted average kWh savings (392) by 361 full load hours from Vermont screening tool.
34
     Based on CEE estimate of savings. Agreed to by DPS in negotiations on EVT TRB goal (September 2000).


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Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                  Peak as % of connected load kW
                              % of annual kWh
                                                                               (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak           Off-Peak      Winter             Summer Fall/Spring
Washer            34.2%      3.7%     42.0%      20.1%          7%                  5%              6%
All factors are consistent with Vermont screening tool load shapes.
Freeridership
5%35
Spillover
20%36
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$270 (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs)

Lifetimes
14 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.
Reference Tables
                                                                                   37
Customer Energy Savings by Water Heater and Dryer Fuel Type


                                              VT Star Frequency kWh             MMBTU Oil           MMBTU Gas
Electric Dryer/Electric DHW                               54.6%           571                   0                  0
Electric Dryer/Gas DHW                                    11.7%           151                   0                1.9
Electric Dryer/Oil DHW                                    21.8%           151                 1.9                  0
Gas Dryer/Electric DHW                                     2.1%           421                   0               0.56
Gas Dryer/Gas DHW                                          9.8%             1                   0               2.46
Weighted average dryer/DHW                                                372                0.41               0.48
savings
Water pump savings                                                         20
Weighted average total savings                                            392                0.41               0.48

Note: Water pump kWh savings based on typical 19 kWh/month water pump use (CVPS Appliance Use
Table), 50 gallons/day/person typical water usage (VEIC experience), 3 people/household, and 6.36 ccf
water savings per washer (Energy Star vs baseline models). At 748 gallons per ccf, water savings = 8.7%
of total household use. Assuming 228 kWh typical water pump use (19 kWh/month x 12), reduced water
pump use = 20 kWh annually. Savings from households on municipal water supplies assumed
proportional. KW savings from screening tool results for this level of kWh savings.




35
   Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
36
   Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
37
   These savings estimates are based on Appendix C of The Consortium for Energy Efficiency’s (CEE) High Efficiency
Clothes Washer Initiative. CEE’s savings estimates for models just meeting the minimum efficiency criteria (e.g.
Energy Factor and Remaining Moisture Content) of its 6 efficiency tiers were adjusted upward to reflect the fact that
the average washer in each tier had characteristics that were better than the minimums for that tier. Weighted average
savings across all 6 efficiency tiers were then computed based on the actual characteristics of clothes washers rebated
by Efficiency Vermont between 3/1/00 and 6/30/00 (i.e. EF of 3.92, volume of 2.71 and RMC of 46%).


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Energy Star Clothes Washer
Measure Number: IV-A-1-c (EPP, Clothes Washing End Use)
Version Date & Revision History

Draft date: 8/30/01
Effective date:

Referenced Documents: washer savings comparison.xls; waterpumpsavigns.doc

Description
Clothes washer meeting minimum qualifying efficiency standards established under Energy Star Program.

Estimated Measure Impacts

Gross Annual MWH Savings per          Average number of measures per         Gross MWH savings per year
unit                                  year
.312                                  3000                                   936

Algorithms

Energy Savings
kWh = 31238

kWh = (kWbase – kWeffic)  HOURS

Demand Savings
kW = .8643

kW = kWbase – kWeffic

Where:
         kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         312               = the weighted average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency
                           (see Table below)
         MMBtuoil         = oil energy savings in MMBtu (million Btu)
         0.5               = the weighted average customer MMBtu of oil savings from upgrading to high
                           efficiency (see Table below)
         MMBtugas         = gas energy savings in MMBtu (million Btu)
         0.7               = the weighted average customer MMBtu of gas savings (see Table below)
         kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         .8643              = weighted average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency 39
         CCF              = customer water savings in hundreds of cubic feet for the measure
         6.4               = customer water savings from upgrading to high efficiency 40


Baseline Efficiency
Baseline efficiency is the current minimum federal efficiency standard for Energy Factor (EF) of 1.18 and
industry-accepted Water Factor (WF) of 13.3 Remaining Moisture Content (RMC) of 62%.


38
   Savings (312kWh) includes 12kWh savings from reduced demand on water pump. These water pump-related
savings are not counted toward overall measure savings in screening as water pump-related savings are accounted for
in avoided water costs. See referenced document: waterpumpsavings.doc. Measure screened with savings of 300kWh.
39
   Calculated by dividing weighted average kWh savings (312) by 361 full load hours from Vermont screening tool.
40
   Based on CEE estimate of savings. Agreed to by DPS in negotiations on EVT TRB goal (September 2000).


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High Efficiency
High efficiency is defined as any model meeting Energy Star standards – currently Energy Factor of at least
2.50, water factor of at least 11.0. Qualifying models can be further subdivided into each of 6 different
efficiency tiers developed by the Consortium for Energy Efficiency. The most efficient of the CEE
efficiency tiers has a minimum EF of 3.25, minimum WF of 9.0 and maximum RMC of 40%.

Operating Hours
N/A
Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                                                                  Peak as % of calculated kW
                               % of annual kWh
                                                                         savings (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak           Off-Peak      Winter        Summer Fall/Spring
Washer            34.2%     3.7%     42.0%       20.1%          7%             5%           6%
All factors are consistent with Vermont screening tool load shapes.


Freeridership
5%41
Spillover
20%42
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
14 years (same as DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.
Measure Cost
$270 (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs)
O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure
Fossil Fuel Descriptions
MMBtuoil = 0.50
MMBtugas = 0.70
Water Descriptions
CCF=6.4




41
     Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
42
     Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.


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Reference Tables
                                                                                   43
Customer Energy Savings by Water Heater and Dryer Fuel Type

                                              VT Star Frequency kWh             MMBTU Oil           MMBTU Gas
Electric Dryer/Electric DHW                               38.2%           571                   0                  0
Electric Dryer/Gas DHW                                    18.2%           151                   0                1.9
Electric Dryer/Oil DHW                                    23.7%           151                 1.9                  0
Gas Dryer/Electric DHW                                     4.3%           421                   0               0.56
Gas Dryer/Gas DHW                                         12.8%             1                   0               2.46
Gas Dryer/Oil DHW                                          2.8%             1                 1.9               0.56
Weighted average dryer/DHW                                                300                0.50               0.70
savings
Water pump savings                                                         12
Weighted average total savings                                            312                0.50               0.70

Note: Water pump kWh savings based on typical 19 kWh/month water pump use (CVPS Appliance Use
Table), 50 gallons/day/person typical water usage (VEIC experience), 3 people/household, and 6.36 ccf
water savings per washer (Energy Star vs baseline models). At 748 gallons per ccf, water savings = 8.7%
of total household use. Assuming 228 kWh typical water pump use (19 kWh/month x 12), reduced water
pump use = 20 kWh annually. Savings from households on municipal water supplies assumed
proportional. KW savings from screening tool results for this level of kWh savings.




43
  These savings estimates are based on Appendix C of The Consortium for Energy Efficiency’s (CEE) High Efficiency
Clothes Washer Initiative. CEE’s savings estimates for models just meeting the minimum efficiency criteria (e.g.
Energy Factor and Remaining Moisture Content) of its 6 efficiency tiers were adjusted upward to reflect the fact that
the average washer in each tier had characteristics that were better than the minimums for that tier. Weighted average
savings across all 6 efficiency tiers were then computed based on the actual characteristics of clothes washers rebated
by Efficiency Vermont between 3/1/00 and 6/30/00 (i.e. EF of 3.92, volume of 2.71 and RMC of 46%).


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Energy Star Clothes Washer
Measure Number: IV-A-1-d (EPP, Clothes Washing End Use)
Version Date & Revision History

Draft date: 2/15/02
Effective date:

Referenced Documents: washer_fuel_types_2001_alldata.xls; waterpumpsavings.doc;
2002_CW_savings_analysis.xls; 2002_EVT_CW_sales(2001).xls
Description
Clothes washer meeting minimum qualifying efficiency standards established under Energy Star Program.

Estimated Measure Impacts

Gross Annual MWH Savings per        Average number of measures per       Gross MWH savings per year
unit                                year
.32                                 2300                                 736

Algorithms

Energy Savings
kWh = 32044

kWh = (kWbase – kWeffic)  HOURS

Demand Savings
kW = 0.8837

kW = kWbase – kWeffic

Where:
         kWh               = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         320                = the weighted average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency
                            (see Table below)
         MMBtuoil          = oil energy savings in MMBtu (million Btu)
         0.50               = the weighted average customer MMBtu of oil savings from upgrading to high
                            efficiency (see Table below)
         MMBtugas          = natural gas energy savings in MMBtu (million Btu)
         0.65               = the weighted average customer MMBtu of gas savings (see Table below)
         kW                = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         .8864               = weighted average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency
         CCF               = customer water savings in hundreds of cubic feet for the measure
         6.4                = customer water savings from upgrading to high efficiency 45
Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline efficiency is the current minimum federal efficiency standard for Energy Factor (EF) of 1.18 and
industry-accepted Water Factor (WF) of 13.3 Remaining Moisture Content (RMC) of 62%.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is defined as any model meeting Energy Star standards – currently Energy Factor of at least
2.50, water factor of at least 11.0. Qualifying models can be further subdivided into each of 6 different


44
   Savings (320kWh) include 12kWh savings from reduced demand on water pump. These water pump-related savings
are not counted toward overall measure savings in screening as water pump-related savings are accounted for in
avoided water costs. See referenced document: waterpumpsavings.doc. Measure screened with savings of 308kWh.
45
   Based on CEE estimate of savings. Agreed to by DPS in negotiations on EVT TRB goal (September 2000).


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                                                                 TRM Residential Master Manual No. 2005-37


efficiency tiers developed by the Consortium for Energy Efficiency. The most efficient of the CEE
efficiency tiers has a minimum EF of 3.25, minimum WF of 9.0 and maximum RMC of 40%.
Operating Hours

361 hours / year
Consistent with Residential Clothes Washing Loadshape (#9) in Vermont State Screening Tool.

Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                                                                  Peak as % of calculated kW
                               % of annual kWh
                                                                         savings (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak            Off-Peak       Winter     Summer Fall/Spring
Washer            34.2%      3.7%      42.0%       20.1%          7%          5%         6%
All factors are consistent with loadshape 9 (residential clothes washing) from Vermont State Screening
Tool.
Freeridership
5%46
Spillover
20%47
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
14 years (same as DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.
Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $270
Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $50.
O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure.
Fossil Fuel Descriptions
MMBtuoil = 0.50
MMBtunatgas = 0.65
Water Descriptions
CCF=6.4




46
     Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
47
     Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.


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Reference Tables

Customer Energy Savings by Water Heater and Dryer Fuel Type 48

                                        Adjusted            Per Unit Savings
Dryer/DHW Fuel Combo                   Frequency          kWh        MMBTU Oil    MMBTU Gas
Electric Dryer/Electric DHW                39.6%              566            0.00       0.00
Electric Dryer/Gas DHW                     17.9%              159            0.00       1.84
Electric Dryer/Oil DHW                     24.8%              159            1.84       0.00
Gas Dryer/Electric DHW                      4.0%              407            0.00       0.59
Gas Dryer/Gas DHW                          11.7%                 1           0.00       2.43
Gas Dryer/Oil DHW                           2.2%                 1           1.84       0.59
Oil Dryer/Electric DHW                      0.0%              407            0.59       0.00
weighted average                                              308            0.50       0.65
water pump savings                                             12
weighted avg. total savings                                   320




48
  These savings estimates are based on Appendix C of The Consortium for Energy Efficiency’s (CEE) High Efficiency
Clothes Washer Initiative. CEE’s savings estimates for models just meeting the minimum efficiency criteria (e.g.
Energy Factor and Remaining Moisture Content) of its 6 efficiency tiers were adjusted upward to reflect the fact that
the average washer in each tier had characteristics that were better than the minimums for that tier. Weighted average
savings across all 6 efficiency tiers were then computed based on the actual characteristics of clothes washers rebated
by Efficiency Vermont between 3/1/00 and 6/30/00 (i.e. EF of 3.92, volume of 2.71 and RMC of 46%).


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Energy Star Clothes Washer
Measure Number: IV-A-1-e (Efficient Products Program, Clothes Washing End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:       Portfolio 19
Effective date: Submitted for 1/1/03, however, Never made effective, (see IV-A-1-f)
End date:
Referenced Documents: 2003_CW_savings_analysis.xls; waterpumpsavings.doc; U.S. Department of
Energy, Final Rule Technical Support Document (TSD): Energy Efficiency Standards for Consumer
Products: Clothes Washers, December, 2000

Description
Clothes washer meeting minimum qualifying efficiency standards established under Energy Star Program.

Estimated Measure Impacts
Gross Annual MWH Savings per         Average number of measures per        Gross MWH savings per year
unit                                 year
            0.434                                1823                                     791.2

Algorithms

Energy Savings49
kWh = 43450
kWh = (kWbase – kWeffic) CYCLES

Demand Savings
kW = 1.202051
kW = kWbase – kWeffic


Where:
         kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         434               = the weighted average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency
                           (see Table below)
         MMBtuoil         = oil energy savings in MMBtu (million Btu)
         0.52              = the weighted average customer MMBtu of oil savings from upgrading to high
                           efficiency (see Table below)
         MMBtugas         = natural gas energy savings in MMBtu (million Btu)
         0.57              = the weighted average customer MMBtu of gas savings (see Table below)
         kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         1.2020             = weighted average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency
         CCF              = customer water savings in hundreds of cubic feet for the measure
         8.3               = customer water savings from upgrading to high efficiency


49
   Energy and water savings estimate is based on an analysis provided by U.S. Department of Energy, Final Rule
Technical Support Document (TSD): Energy Efficiency Standards for Consumer Products: Clothes Washers,
December, 2000 and the weighted MEF factors for clothes washers rebated by EVT in 2002.
50
   Savings (434kWh) include 16kWh savings from reduced demand on water pump. These water pump-related savings
are not counted toward overall measure savings in screening as they are accounted for in avoided water costs. See
referenced document: waterpumpsavings.doc. Measure screened with savings of 418kWh. Note, estimated water pump
kWh savings are based on the water savings of 8.3 CCF. This kWh estimate is based on the proportional kWh per
CCF savings first agreed on in 2001 by DPS/EVT in a negotiated agreement of 12 kWh savings for 6.4 ccf of water
savings.
51
   KW estimate is based on screening tool estimate of kW, increased by 3.8% to account for the 16 kWh waterpump
savings not included in the screening.


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Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline efficiency is determined according to the modified energy factor (MEF) that takes into
account the energy and water required per clothes washer cycle, including energy required by the clothes
dryer per clothes washer cycle. The baseline MEF is 0.817.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is defined as any model meeting Energy Star standards – currently with an MEF of at least
1.26 or higher. EVT’s energy and water savings estimates are based on the weighted average MEF factor
for Energy Star qualifying models based on the models rebated during the previous calendar year.
Operating Cycles
392 cycles / year
Consistent with Residential Clothes Washing Loadshape (#9) in Vermont State Screening Tool.

Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                                                               Peak as % of calculated kW savings
                               % of annual kWh
                                                                              (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak        Peak      Off-Peak      Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
Washer            34.2%      3.7%      42.0%       20.1%          7%          5%         6%
All factors are consistent with loadshape 9 (residential clothes washing) from Vermont State Screening
Tool.

Freeridership
5%52

Spillover
20%53

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
14 years (same as DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $270

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $50.

O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure.

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
MMBtuoil = 0.52
MMBtunatgas = 0.57

Water Descriptions
CCF=8.3

Reference Tables

Customer Energy Savings by Water Heater and Dryer Fuel Type


52
     Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
53
     Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.


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                                        Adjusted            Per Unit Savings
Dryer/DHW Fuel Combo                   Frequency         kWh         MMBTU Oil            MMBTU Gas
Electric Dryer/Electric DHW              47.4%           676             0.00               0.00
Electric Dryer/Gas DHW                   15.2%           209             0.00               2.01
Electric Dryer/Oil DHW                   24.0%           209             2.01               0.00
Gas Dryer/Electric DHW                   2.2%            507             0.00               0.58
Gas Dryer/Gas DHW                        9.5%             39             0.00               2.58
Gas Dryer/Oil DHW                        1.7%             39             2.01               0.58

weighted average                                          418               0.52                0.57
water pump savings                                         16
weighted avg. total savings                               434
Notes:
1) Adjusted frequency is the frequency among those forms that reported both a dryer and DHW fuel type
2) These water pump-related savings are not counted toward overall measure savings in screening as they are accounted
for in avoided water costs.




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ENERGY STAR Clothes Washer
Measure Number: IV-A-1-f (Efficient Products Program, Clothes Washing End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     Portfolio 25
Effective date: 1/1/03
End date:       12/31/03
Referenced Documents: 2003d_CW_savings_analysis.xls;

Description
Clothes washer meeting minimum qualifying efficiency standards established under Energy Star Program
with an MEF >=1.26.

Estimated Measure Impacts
Gross Annual MWH Savings per          Average number of measures per         Gross MWH savings per year
unit                                  year
            0.363                                3,500                                     1,270.5

Algorithms

Energy SavingskWh = 36354


Demand Savings
kW = 1.006




Where:
         kWh                = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure

         MMBtuoil           = oil energy savings in MMBtu (million Btu)

         MMBtugas           = natural gas energy savings in MMBtu (million Btu)
         MMBtupropane       = propane gas energy savings in MMBtu (million Btu

         kW                 = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

         CCF                = customer water savings in hundreds of cubic feet for the measure



Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline efficiency is determined according to the modified energy factor (MEF) that takes into
account the energy and water required per clothes washer cycle, including energy required by the clothes
dryer per clothes washer cycle. The baseline MEF is 0.817.



54
  Energy and water savings estimate is based on an analysis provided by U.S. Department of Energy, Final Rule
Technical Support Document (TSD): Energy Efficiency Standards for Consumer Products: Clothes Washers,
December, 2000 and the weighted MEF factors for clothes washers rebated by EVT in 2002.


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High Efficiency
High efficiency is defined as any model meeting Energy Star standards – currently with an MEF of at least
1.26 or higher. EVT’s energy and water savings estimates are based on the weighted average MEF factor
for Energy Star qualifying models based on the models rebated during the previous calendar year.

Operating Cycles
379 clothes washer cycles / year 55

Loadshape
Loadshape #9, Residential Clothes Washing, Vermont State Screening Tool.



Freeridership
5%56

Spillover
20%57

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
14 years (same as DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $270

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $50.

O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure.

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
MMBtuoil =      0.55
MMBtunatgas = 0.13
MMBtupropane = 0.31

Water Descriptions
CCF=8.3

Reference Tables

Customer Energy Savings by Water Heater and Dryer Fuel Type
                                                        Per Unit
                                          Adjusted      Savings

                                                                                MMBTU               MMBTU            MMBTU
Dryer/DHW Fuel Combo                             Frequency         kWh           Oil               Natural Gas       Propane
DHW Type

55
   Weighted average of 379 clothes washer cycles per year. U.S. Department of Energy, Final Rule Technical Support
Document (TSD): Energy Efficiency Standards for Consumer Products: Clothes Washers, December, 2000. Page 7-5.
56
   Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
57
   Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.


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Electric DHW                                     40.4%           507
Natural Gas DHW                                   5.7%            39                              2.01
Propane DHW                                      13.5%            39                                            2.01
Oil DHW                                          27.3%            39           2.01
Other DHW                                        13.1%            39
DHW Totals                                      100.0%           228           0.55               0.11          0.27
Dryer Type
Electric Dryer                                   79.5%           169
Natural Gas Dryer                                 3.0%                                            0.58
Propane Dryer                                     7.1%                                                          0.58
Oil Dryer                                         0.1%                         0.58
Other Dryer                                      10.4%
Dryer Totals                                    100.0%           135           0.00               0.02          0.04
Weighted Avg Total Savings                                       363           0.55               0.13          0.31
 1) This revised summary table reflects assigning all the data entries of "Blank", "Don't Know" for DHW
type or CD type with the same distribution of fuel types for the rebated homes with a complete data set.
Data sets that were partially complete, were included, with the unspecified other half assigned the surrogate
fuel type percentage.
2) EVT proposes to change the rebate form for 2004 to capture "No Dryer" as an option and revise "Nat
gas" to "Gas", thereby capturing natural gas and propane customers. EVT proposes to use the DPS Fuel
Wood study as the basis for subsequent allocation of the "Gas" category into "Propane" and "Nat Gas"




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ENERGY STAR Clothes Washer
Measure Number: IV-A-1-g (Efficient Products Program, Clothes Washing End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     Portfolio 25
Effective date: 1/1/04
End date:       TBD
Referenced Documents: 2004a_CW_savings_analysis.xls;

Description
Clothes washer meeting minimum qualifying efficiency standards established under Energy Star Program
with an MEF >=1.42.

Estimated Measure Impacts
Gross Annual MWH Savings per          Average number of measures per         Gross MWH savings per year
unit                                  year
            0.254                                3,500                                       889

Algorithms

Energy Savings
kWh = 25458

Demand Savings
kW = 0.704

Where:
         kWh                = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         kW                 = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         MMBtuoil           = oil energy savings in MMBtu (million Btu)
         MMBtugas           = natural gas energy savings in MMBtu (million Btu)
         MMBtupropane       = propane gas energy savings in MMBtu (million Btu
         CCF                = customer water savings in hundreds of cubic feet for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline efficiency is determined according to the modified energy factor (MEF) that takes into
account the energy and water required per clothes washer cycle, including energy required by the clothes
dryer per clothes washer cycle. The baseline MEF is 1.04.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is defined as any model meeting Energy Star standards – currently with an MEF of at least
1.42 or higher. EVT’s energy and water savings estimates are based on the weighted average MEF factor
for Energy Star qualifying models based on the models rebated during the previous calendar year.

Operating Cycles
379 clothes washer cycles / year 59

Loadshape
Loadshape #9, Residential Clothes Washing, Vermont State Screening Tool.


58
   Energy and water savings estimate is based on an analysis provided by U.S. Department of Energy, Final Rule
Technical Support Document (TSD): Energy Efficiency Standards for Consumer Products: Clothes Washers,
December, 2000 and the weighted MEF factors for clothes washers rebated by EVT in 2003 >=1.42.
59
   Weighted average of 379 clothes washer cycles per year. U.S. Department of Energy, Final Rule Technical Support
Document (TSD): Energy Efficiency Standards for Consumer Products: Clothes Washers, December, 2000. Page 7-5.


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Freeridership
5%60

Spillover
20%61

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
14 years (same as DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $270

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $50.

O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure.

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
MMBtuoil =      0.28
MMBtunatgas = 0.07
MMBtupropane = 0.17

Water Descriptions
CCF=5.9




Reference Tables


60
     Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
61
     Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.


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Customer Energy Savings by Water Heater and Dryer Fuel Type
                                                             Per Unit
                                               Adjusted      Savings

                                                                              MMBTU             MMBTU           MMBTU
Dryer/DHW Fuel Combo                           Frequency        kWh             Oil            Natural Gas      Propane
DHW Type
Electric DHW                                     38.7%           282
Natural Gas DHW                                   5.9%           51                               0.99
Propane DHW                                      14.0%           51                                               0.99
Oil DHW                                          27.7%           51            0.99
Other DHW                                        13.7%           51
DHW Totals                                      100.0%           140           0.27               0.06            0.14
Dryer Type
Electric Dryer                                   79.3%          143
Natural Gas Dryer                                 3.0%                                            0.49
Propane Dryer                                     7.2%                                                            0.49
Oil Dryer                                         0.1%                         0.49
Other Dryer                                      10.3%
Dryer Totals                                100.0%           114         0.00              0.01                 0.04
Weighted Avg Total Savings                                   254         0.28              0.07                 0.17
 1) This revised summary table reflects assigning all the data entries of "Blank", "Don't Know" for DHW
type or CD type with the same distribution of fuel types for the rebated homes with a complete data set.
Data sets that were partially complete, were included, with the unspecified other half assigned the surrogate
fuel type percentage. 2) EVT proposes to change the rebate form for 2004 to capture "No Dryer" as an
option and revise "Nat gas" to "Gas", thereby capturing natural gas and propane customers. EVT proposes
to use the DPS Fuel Wood study as the basis for subsequent allocation of the "Gas" category into "Propane"
and "Nat Gas"




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ENERGY STAR Clothes Washer
Measure Number: IV-A-1-h (Efficient Products Program, Clothes Washing End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     Portfolio 34
Effective date: 1/1/05
End date:       TBD
Referenced Documents: 2005b_CW_savings_analysis.xls;

Description
Clothes washer meeting minimum qualifying efficiency standards established under Energy Star Program
with an MEF >=1.42.

Estimated Measure Impacts
Gross Annual MWH Savings per          Average number of measures per   Gross MWH savings per year
unit                                  year
            0.212                                3,500                               742

Algorithms

Energy Savings
kWh = 212
Demand Savings
kW = 0.587

Where:
         kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         MMBtuoil         = oil energy savings in MMBtu (million Btu)
         MMBtugas         = natural gas energy savings in MMBtu (million Btu)
         MMBtupropane     = propane gas energy savings in MMBtu (million Btu
         CCF              = customer water savings in hundreds of cubic feet for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline efficiency is determined according to the modified energy factor (MEF) that takes into
account the energy and water required per clothes washer cycle, including energy required by the clothes
dryer per clothes washer cycle. The federal baseline MEF of 1.04 is inflated by 10% to 1.14 for savings
comparison to account for non-ENERGY STAR models that are higher then the federal baseline MEF.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is defined as any model meeting Energy Star standards – currently with an MEF of at least
1.42 or higher. EVT’s energy and water savings estimates are based on the weighted average MEF factor
for Energy Star qualifying models based on the models rebated during the previous calendar year.


Operating Cycles
379 clothes washer cycles / year 62

Loadshape
Loadshape #9, Residential Clothes Washing, Vermont State Screening Tool.


62
  Weighted average of 379 clothes washer cycles per year. U.S. Department of Energy, Final Rule
Technical Support Document (TSD): Energy Efficiency Standards for Consumer Products: Clothes
Washers, December, 2000. Page 7-5. The cycles per year estimate is detailed in Chapter 7, Page 7-5.
http://www.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/residential/pdfs/chapter_7.pdf See reference
document “2005_CW_savings_analysis.xls”, select worksheet tab titled “CW Savings”


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Freeridership
5%63

Spillover
20%64

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
14 years (same as DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $270

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $50.

O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure.

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
MMBtuoil =      0.10
MMBtunatgas = 0.12
MMBtupropane = 0.12

Water Descriptions
CCF=5.9




Reference Tables

Customer Energy Savings by Water Heater and Dryer Fuel Type
                                                 Adjusted       Per Unit

63
     Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
64
     Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.


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                                                                     Savings

                                                                                     MMBTU                 MMBTU              MMBTU
Dryer/DHW Fuel Combo                                Frequency          kWh            Oil                 Natural Gas         Propane
DHW Type
Electric DHW                                           38.%             108
Natural Gas DHW                                        24%               23                                   0.36
Propane DHW                                           10.0%              23                                                    0.36
Oil DHW                                                29%               23             0.36

DHW Totals                                           100.0%             55              0.10                  0.09             0.04
Dryer Type
Electric Dryer                                        82%              178
Natural Gas Dryer                                      5%                                                     0.75
Propane Dryer                                         12%                                                                      0.75
No Dryer                                               2%
Dryer Totals                                         100.0%             146             0.00                  0.04             0.09
Water Pump Savings                                                       11
Weighted Avg Total Savings                                              212             0.10                  0.12             0.12
     1)   This revised summary table reflects assigning all the data entries of "Blank", "Don't Know" for DHW type or CD
          type with the same distribution of fuel types for the rebated homes with a complete data set. Data sets that were
          partially complete, were included, with the unspecified other half assigned the surrogate fuel type percentage.
EVT used the DPS Fuel Wood study as the basis for subsequent allocation of the "Gas" category into "Propane" and "Nat Gas".




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Refrigeration End Use
Energy Star Refrigerators
Measure Number: IV-B-1-a (EPP, Refrigeration End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/31/00
Description
Refrigerators meeting minimum qualifying efficiency.
Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 156.2 kWh

Demand Savings
kW = 0.0312 kW

Where:
            kWh     = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            156.2    = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 65
            kW      = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
            0.0312   = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline efficiency is the current minimum federal efficiency standard.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is defined as any model meeting Energy Star standards – currently defined as a model
consuming at least 20% less than the minimum federal efficiency standard.
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                             Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                          (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                  Peak Off-Peak Peak            Off-Peak      Winter    Summer Fall/Spring
Refrigerator 22.5% 10.8%               33.7%     33.0%         62%        60%          57%
All factors are consistent with Vermont screening tool load shapes.

Freeridership
0%. Free riders will be accounted for in the approach used to estimate participants in the year 2000 – e.g.
based on differences between Vermont market shares and those of other states.
Spillover
0%. Spillover will be accounted for in the approach used to estimate participants in the year 2000 – e.g.
based on differences between Vermont market shares and those of other states.
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
17 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




65
     RLW Analytics, Energy Star Market Update, Final Report for National Grid USA, June 28, 2000.


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Energy Star Refrigerators
Measure Number: IV-B-1-b (EPP, Refrigeration End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                        Accepted with          Referred to
                     Accepted As Is         Edits                TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 2/2/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
Refrigerators meeting minimum qualifying efficiency.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 156.2

Demand Savings
kW = 0.0312

Where:
            kWh     = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            156.2    = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 66
            kW      = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
            0.0312   = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline efficiency is the current minimum federal efficiency standard.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is defined as any model meeting Energy Star standards. The Energy Star standard in effect
through the end of 2000 was a 15% reduction in energy use relative to the 1992 minimum federal
efficiency standard.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                   Peak as % of connected load kW
                                % of annual kWh
                                                                                (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                  Peak Off-Peak Peak            Off-Peak      Winter           Summer Fall/Spring
Refrigerator 22.5% 10.8%             33.7%       33.0%         62%               60%           57%
All factors are consistent with Vermont screening tool load shapes.

Freeridership
0%. Free riders will be accounted for in the approach used to estimate participants in the year 2000 – e.g.
based on differences between Vermont market shares and those of other states.




66
     RLW Analytics, Energy Star Market Update, Final Report for National Grid USA, June 28, 2000.


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Spillover
0%. Spillover will be accounted for in the approach used to estimate participants in the year 2000 – e.g.
based on differences between Vermont market shares and those of other states.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$3067

Lifetimes
17 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




67
     Same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility core programs.


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Energy Star Refrigerators
Measure Number: IV-B-1-c (EPP, Refrigeration End Use)
Version Date & Revision History

Draft date: 2/15/02
Effective date:

Referenced Documents: ES.ref.kWh.2002.sized.xls
Description

An Energy Star-qualifying refrigerator replaces a refrigerator of baseline efficiency.

Estimated Measure Impacts

Average Annual MWH Savings           Average number of measures per        Average Annual MWH savings
per unit                             year                                  per year
.0521                                0                                     0

Algorithms

Energy Savings
kWh = 52.1

Demand Savings
kW = .0104

Where:
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         52.1   = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 68
         kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         0.0104 = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency69
         HOURS = annual motor hours of use per year
         5000   = HOURS

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline efficiency is a refrigerator meeting the minimum federal efficiency standard for refrigerator
efficiency. The minimum NAECA standard varies by model. Generally, annual energy consumption at the
baseline falls between 440 kWh/year and 560kWh/year.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is a refrigerator meeting Energy Star specifications for energy efficiency. The Energy Star
specification varies by model but generally falls between 394kWh/year and 440 kWh/year.
Operating Hours
5000 hours / year




68
   Energy savings assumption based on EVT analysis of models meeting Energy Star specifications in 2002 (see
ES.ref.kWh.2002.sized.xls).
69
   Demand savings calculated based on assumed energy savings using Vermont State Cost Effectiveness Screening
Tool.


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Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                             % of annual kWh                     Peak as % of calculated kW
                                   (RPF)                                savings (CF)
                Winter Winter Summer Summer
                 Peak Off-Peak Peak              Off-Peak       Winter   Summer Fall/Spring
Residential
                    23%         11%       34%           33%         62%       60%         57%
Refrigeration
Source: Loadshape #4 (Residential Refrigeration) from the Vermont State Screening Tool.
Freeridership
0%
Spillover
0%
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
17 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.
Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $30.
Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $0.
O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure.
Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.
Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.




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Energy Star Refrigerators
Measure Number: IV-B-1-d (Efficient Products Program, Refrigeration End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft:         Portfolio 14, July ‘02
Effective:     10/1/02
End:           TBD

Referenced Documents: ES.ref.kWh.2002.sized.xls, ES.ref.kWh.doc

Description
An Energy Star-qualifying refrigerator replaces a refrigerator of baseline efficiency.

Estimated Measure Impacts
Average Annual MWH Savings             Average number of measures per         Average Annual MWH savings
per unit                               year70                                 per year
           0.0521                                 1,500                                   78.15

Algorithms

Energy Savings
kWh = 52.1
kWh = (kWbase – kWeffic)  HOURS

Demand Savings
kW = .0104
kW = kWbase – kWeffic

Where:
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         52.1   = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 71
         kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         0.0104 = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency72
         HOURS = annual motor hours of use per year
         5000   = HOURS

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline efficiency is a refrigerator meeting the minimum federal efficiency standard for refrigerator
efficiency. The minimum NAECA standard varies by model. Generally, annual energy consumption at the
baseline falls between 440 kWh/year and 560kWh/year.

High Efficiency
The High Efficiency level is a refrigerator meeting Energy Star specifications for efficiency established
January 1, 200173

Operating Hours
5000 hours / year

70
   Estimate 300 refrigerators will be sold per month during the active incentive period from August-December, 2002.
71
   Energy savings assumption based on EVT analysis of models meeting Energy Star specifications in 2002 (see
ES.ref.kWh.2002.sized.xls).
72
   Demand savings calculated based on assumed energy savings using Vermont State Cost Effectiveness Screening
Tool.
73
   See referenced document: ES.ref.kWh.doc for Energy Star qualifying models’ energy consumption.
                                                                                         TRM Master Manual No. 4



Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                          % of annual kWh                    Peak as % of calculated kW
                                (RPF)                               savings (CF)
 Application Winter Winter Summer Summer
                Peak Off-Peak Peak            Off-Peak      Winter     Summer Fall/Spring
Residential
                23%       11%        34%         33%         62%         60%         57%
Refrigeration
Source: Loadshape #4 (Residential Refrigeration) from the Vermont State Screening Tool.

Freeridership
33%74

Spillover
33%75

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
17 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $30.

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $25.

O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure.

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.




74
   The 33% freerider rate assumes that after the rebate is made available the market share in VT will increase to 30%
for E-Star refrigerators. In the absence of any EVT efforts to promote E-Star refrigerators the market share would have
been 10% (.10/.30=.33). The current VT market share is 19%, however it is assumed that this includes positive effects
from longstanding EVT marketing and trade ally outreach. (1st quarter 2002 data, provided by D+R International,
5/17/02)
75
   The estimated spillover rate of 33% is consistent with both past Efficiency Vermont experience for clothes washers
and qualitative reports from manufacturers and large retailers regarding the number of customers who do not cash
rebate coupons-
                                                                                   TRM Master Manual No. 4



Energy Star Refrigerators
Measure Number: IV-B-1-e (Efficient Products Program, Refrigeration End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft:         Portfolio 23
Effective:     1/1/04
End:           TBD

Referenced Documents: ES.ref.kWh.2004.xls,

Description
An Energy Star-qualifying refrigerator replaces a refrigerator of baseline efficiency.

Estimated Measure Impacts
Average Annual MWH Savings          Average number of measures per        Average Annual MWH savings
per unit                            year                                  per year
           0.0855                              1,500                                 128.25

Algorithms

Demand Savings
kW            = ((WattsBASE – WattsEE) /1000)* ISR
kW            = (114.3 – 97.2)/1000*1=0.0171

Energy Savings
kWh           = kW  HOURS
kWh           = 0.0171*5000=85.5


Where:
         kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         WattsBASE         = Baseline connected kW
         WattsEE           = Energy efficient connected kW
         kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         ISR               = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used
         HOURS             = average hours of use per year

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline efficiency is a refrigerator meeting the minimum federal efficiency standard for refrigerator
efficiency.

High Efficiency
The High Efficiency level is a refrigerator meeting Energy Star specifications for efficiency established
January 1, 2004

Operating Hours
5000 hours / year

Loadshape
Loadshape #4, Residential Refrigeration, Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.
                                                                                        TRM Master Manual No. 4



Freeridership
33%76

Spillover
33%77

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
17 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $30.

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $25.

O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure.

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.




76
   The 33% freerider rate assumes that after the rebate is made available the market share in VT will increase to 30%
for E-Star refrigerators.
77
   The estimated spillover rate of 33% is consistent with both past Efficiency Vermont experience for clothes washers
and qualitative reports from manufacturers and large retailers regarding the number of customers who do not cash
rebate coupons-
                                                                                        TRM Master Manual No. 4



ENERGY STAR Freezer
Measure Number: IV-B-2-a (Efficient Products Program, Refrigeration End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft:         Portfolio 25
Effective:     1/1/04
End:           TBD

Referenced Documents: a) 2003 D&R Int. Freezer Fact Sheet, b) 2003 Freezer kWh Estimate

Description
An ENERGY STAR qualifying residential freezer replaces a freezer of baseline efficiency.

Estimated Measure Impacts
Average Annual MWH Savings             Average number of measures per         Average Annual MWH savings
per unit                               year                                   per year
           0.0567                                   25                                    1.42

Algorithms

Demand Savings78
kW    = (kWBASE – kWEE) * ISR
kW    = (0.0926-0.0813)*1 = 0.0113


Energy Savings
kWh = kW  HOURS
kWh = 0.0113*5000 = 56.7

Where:
         kW                 = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         kWBASE              = Baseline connected kW
         kWEE                = Energy efficient connected kW
         ISR                 = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used
         kWh                = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         HOURS               = average hours of use per year

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline efficiency is a residential freezer meeting the minimum federal efficiency standard for freezer
efficiency.

High Efficiency
The High Efficiency level is a freezer meeting ENERGY STAR specifications for efficiency established
January 1, 200479

Operating Hours
5000 hours / year




78
   E-Star freezers currently are not available in Vermont. As such, calculations are based on 2001 national AHAM
shipment data for standard freezers with weighted average savings for ENERGY STAR chest and upright models.
Sources: a) 2003 Freezer kWh Estimate.xls, b) 2003 D& R Int. Freezer Fact Sheet.
79
   2003 Freezer kWh Estimate.xls
                                                                                        TRM Master Manual No. 4


Loadshape
Loadshape #4, Residential Refrigeration, Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.

Freeridership
33%80

Spillover
33%81

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
16 years82
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $3083.

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $25.

O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure.

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.

In Service Rate (ISR): 1.0




80
   Equivalent to freerider rate for Energy Star Refrigerators.
81
   The estimated spillover rate of 33% is consistent with both past Efficiency Vermont experience for clothes washers
and qualitative reports from manufacturers and large retailers regarding the number of customers who do not cash
rebate coupons.
82
   Source: 2003 D&R Int. Freezer Fact Sheet
83
   Source: Personal communication from Matt Frank, Director of Retail Sales, W.C. Wood. 8/6/03
                                                                                    TRM Master Manual No. 4




Dishwashing End Use
Energy Star Dishwashers
Measure Number: IV-C-1-a (EPP, Dishwashing End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/31/00
Description
Dishwashers meeting minimum qualifying efficiency.
Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 100 kWh
MMBtu = 0.20 MMBtu

Demand Savings
kW = 0.0292 kW

Where:
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         100    = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency84
         MMBtu = fossil fuel energy savings in MMBtu
         0.20   = the average customer MMBtu of fossil fuel savings85
         kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         0.0292 = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency86

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline efficiency is the current minimum federal efficiency standard.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is defined as any model meeting Energy Star standards – currently defined as a model that
consumes 13% less energy than one meeting the current minimum federal efficiency standard.
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                             % of annual kWh                 Peak as % of connected load kW
                                                                          (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                  Peak Off-Peak Peak            Off-Peak      Winter    Summer Fall/Spring
Dishwasher 28.4%             3.1%      46.5%     22.0%         78%        48%          65%
All factors are consistent with Vermont screening tool load shapes.

Freeridership
0%. Free riders will be accounted for in the approach used to estimate participants in the year 2000 – e.g.
based on differences between Vermont market shares and those of other states.


84
   Assumes 143.5 kWh savings for homes with electric DHW and 43 kWh savings for homes with fossil fuel heated
water (RLW Analytics, Energy Star Market Update, Final Report for National Grid USA, June 28, 2000. Also assumes
that 56.7% of participants have electric DHW (the same percentage as customers obtaining rebates for Energy Star
clothes washers between 3/1/00 and 6/30/00).
85
   Assumes 0.46 MMBtu savings for homes with fossil fuel heated water. Also assumes that 21.8% of homes have oil
heated water and 21.5% of homes have LP heated water (the same percentage as customers obtaining Efficiency
Vermont rebates for Energy Star clothes washers).
86
   Assumes 0.0419 kW savings for homes with electric DHW and 0.0125 kWsavings for homes with fossil fuel heated
water. Also assumes that 56.7% of homes have electric DHW (the same percentage as customers obtaining Efficiency
Vermont rebates for Energy Star clothes washers between 3/1/00 and 6/30/00).
                                                                                     TRM Master Manual No. 4



Spillover
0%. Spillover will be accounted for in the approach used to estimate participants in the year 2000 – e.g.
based on differences between Vermont market shares and those of other states.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
13 years.87
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




87
  Koomey, Jonathan et al. (Lawrence Berkeley National Lab), Projected Regional Impacts of Appliance Efficiency
Standards for the U.S. Residential Sector, February 1998.
                                                                                    TRM Master Manual No. 4



Energy Star Dishwashers
Measure Number: IV-C-1-b (EPP, Dishwashing End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                     Accepted with        Referred to
                  Accepted As Is         Edits              TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 2/2/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date
Description
Dishwashers meeting minimum qualifying efficiency.
Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 100 kWh
MMBtu = 0.20 MMBtu

Demand Savings
kW = 0.0292 kW

Where:
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         100    = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency88
         MMBtu = fossil fuel energy savings in MMBtu
         0.20   = the average customer MMBtu of fossil fuel savings89
         kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         0.0292 = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency90

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline efficiency is the current minimum federal efficiency standard.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is defined as any model meeting Energy Star standards – currently defined as a model that
consumes 13% less energy than one meeting the current minimum federal efficiency standard.




88
   Assumes 143.5 kWh savings for homes with electric DHW and 43 kWh savings for homes with fossil fuel heated
water (RLW Analytics, Energy Star Market Update, Final Report for National Grid USA, June 28, 2000. Also assumes
that 56.7% of participants have electric DHW (the same percentage as customers obtaining rebates for Energy Star
clothes washers between 3/1/00 and 6/30/00).
89
   Assumes 0.46 MMBtu savings for homes with fossil fuel heated water. Also assumes that 21.8% of homes have oil
heated water and 21.5% of homes have LP heated water (the same percentage as customers obtaining Efficiency
Vermont rebates for Energy Star clothes washers).
90
   Assumes 0.0419 kW savings for homes with electric DHW and 0.0125 kWsavings for homes with fossil fuel heated
water. Also assumes that 56.7% of homes have electric DHW (the same percentage as customers obtaining Efficiency
Vermont rebates for Energy Star clothes washers between 3/1/00 and 6/30/00).
                                                                                     TRM Master Manual No. 4


Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                        % of annual kWh                        Peak as % of connected load kW
                                                                            (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                  Peak Off-Peak Peak            Off-Peak      Winter     Summer Fall/Spring
Dishwasher 28.4%            3.1%     46.5%       22.0%         78%          48%           65%
All factors are consistent with Vermont screening tool load shapes.
Freeridership
0%. Free riders will be accounted for in the approach used to estimate participants in the year 2000 – e.g.
based on differences between Vermont market shares and those of other states.

Spillover
0%. Spillover will be accounted for in the approach used to estimate participants in the year 2000 – e.g.
based on differences between Vermont market shares and those of other states.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$27

Lifetimes
13 years.91
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




91
  Koomey, Jonathan et al. (Lawrence Berkeley National Lab), Projected Regional Impacts of Appliance Efficiency
Standards for the U.S. Residential Sector, February 1998.
                                                                                      TRM Master Manual No. 4



Energy Star Dish Washer
Measure Number: IV-C-1-c (EPP, Dishwashing End Use)
Version Date & Revision History

Draft date: 2/15/02
Effective date:

Referenced Documents: a) ES.DW.kWh.b.2001.xls ; b) 2002_EPP_DW_savings.xls

Description
A dishwasher meeting Energy Star efficiency specifications replaces a non-Energy Star model.

Estimated Measure Impacts

Average Annual MWH Savings            Average number of measures per        Average Annual MWH savings
per unit                              year                                  per year
.1089                                 0                                     0

Algorithms

Energy Savings
kWh = 108.9

Demand Savings
kW = .0318

Where:


         kWh92            = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         108.9             = the weighted average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency
                           (see Table below)
         kW93             = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         .0318              = weighted average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency
         HOURS             = annual motor hours of use per year
         N/A               = HOURS
         MMBtuoil         = oil energy savings in MMBtu (million Btu)
         0.12              = the weighted average customer MMBtu of oil savings from upgrading to high
                           efficiency (see Table below)
         MMBtugas         = natural gas energy savings in MMBtu (million Btu)
         0.13              = the weighted average customer MMBtu of gas savings (see Table below)
         CCF              = customer water savings in hundreds of cubic feet for the measure
         0.2               = customer water savings from upgrading to high efficiency94


Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The Baseline reflects the minimum federal efficiency standards for dishwashers effective January 1, 2001.

92
   Energy savings based assumption based on EVT analysis (2002) of models meeting Energy Star specifications (see
ES.DW.kWh.b.2001.xls). Savings assumption amended based on distribution of DHW fuel types observed during
program year 2001 (see 2002_EPP_DW_savings.xls).
93
   Demand savings calculated based on assumed energy savings using Vermont State Cost Effectiveness Screening
Tool.
94
   Based on CEE estimate of savings. Agreed to by DPS in negotiations on EVT TRB goal (September 2000).
                                                                                      TRM Master Manual No. 4


High Efficiency
High Efficiency is an Energy Star dishwasher meeting specifications of the Energy Star program effective
January 1, 2001.
Operating Hours
No specific assumed hours for dishwasher usage exist. Screening of measure uses load shape for
residential water conservation measures. This load shape has full load hours assumed at 3,427 hours
annually.
Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                             % of annual kWh                 Peak as % of connected load kW
                                                                            (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                  Peak Off-Peak Peak            Off-Peak      Winter     Summer Fall/Spring
Dishwasher 28.4%            3.1%     46.5%       22.0%         78%          48%         65%
All factors are consistent with Vermont screening tool load shapes for water conservation measures (#8).

Freeridership
0%
Spillover
0%
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
13 years.95
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.
Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $27.
Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $0.
O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure.
Fossil Fuel Descriptions
MMBtuoil = 0.1296
MMBtunatgas = 0.1397
Water Descriptions
CCF=0.298




95
   Koomey, Jonathan et al. (Lawrence Berkeley National Lab), Projected Regional Impacts of Appliance Efficiency
Standards for the U.S. Residential Sector, February 1998.
96
   Assumes 26.9% of customers use oil as primary DHW fuel.
97
   Assumes 29.5% of customers use gas as primary DHW fuel.
98
   Assumes .5 gal less water use per cycle and 322 cycles per year (RLW Analytics, Energy Star Market Update, Final
Report for National Grid USA, June 28, 2000)
                                                                    TRM Master Manual No. 4



Reference Tables

Customer Energy Savings by Water Heater Fuel Type

                                  Adjusted        Per Unit Savings
DHW Fuel Type                    Frequency      kWh        MMBTU Oil    MMBTU Gas
Electric DHW                         43.6%          180            0.00       0.00
Oil DHW                              26.9%           54            0.43       0.00
Gas DHW                              29.5%           54            0.00       0.43
weighted average                                  108.9            0.12       0.13
                                                                                      TRM Master Manual No. 4



Energy Star Dish Washer
Measure Number: IV-C-1-d (Efficient Products Program, Dishwashing End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     Portfolio 17
Effective date: 1/1/03
End date:       TBD
Referenced Documents: a)EPP_ES.DW.kWh.2002rev.xls

Description
A dishwasher meeting Energy Star efficiency specifications replaces a non-Energy Star model.

Estimated Measure Impacts
Average Annual MWH Savings            Average number of measures per        Average Annual MWH savings
per unit                              year                                  per year
           0.0686                                  0                                     0

Algorithms
Demand Savings
kW     = 0.0318

Energy Savings
kWh = 68.6

Where:
         kWh99              = the weighted average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency
                             (see Table below)
         kW100              = weighted average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency
         MMBtuoil           = the weighted average customer MMBtu (million Btu)of oil savings from
                             upgrading to high efficiency (see Table below)
         MMBtugas           = the weighted average customer MMBtu of natural gas energy savings (see
                             Table below)
         MMBtupropane       = the weighted average customer MMBtu of propane energy savings (see Table
                             below
         CCF                = customer water savings in hundreds of cubic feet from upgrading to high
                             efficiency101


Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The Baseline reflects the minimum federal efficiency standards for dishwashers effective January 1, 2001.

High Efficiency
High Efficiency is an Energy Star dishwasher meeting specifications of the Energy Star program effective
January 1, 2001.




99
   Energy savings based assumption based on EVT analysis (2002) of models meeting Energy Star specifications (see
EPP_ES.DW.kWh.2002rev.xls). Savings assumption amended based on distribution of DHW fuel types observed
during program year 2001 and DOE estimated 18% reduction in cycles per year from 322 to 264 .
100
    Demand savings calculated based on assumed energy savings using Vermont State Cost Effectiveness Screening
Tool.
101
    Based on CEE estimate of savings. Agreed to by DPS in negotiations on EVT TRB goal (September 2000).
                                                                                        TRM Master Manual No. 4



Operating Hours
No specific assumed hours for dishwasher usage exist.102 Screening of measure uses load shape for
residential water conservation measures. This load shape has full load hours assumed at 3,427 hours
annually.

Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                         % of annual kWh                          Peak as % of calculated kW savings
                                                                                 (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer               Summer
                  Peak Off-Peak  Peak                Off-Peak       Winter       Summer       Fall/Spring
Dishwasher
               28.4%      3.1%      46.5%      22.0%                77.5%         48.1%         64.9%
(#8)
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.

Freeridership
0%

Spillover
0%

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
13 years.103
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $27.

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $0.

O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure.

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
MMBtuoil = 0.09
MMBtunatgas = 0.10

Water Descriptions
CCF=0.18104




102
    As of June 17, 2002 the Department of Energy revised the estimated cycles per year from 322 to 264, a decrease of
approximately 18%.
103
    Koomey, Jonathan et al. (Lawrence Berkeley National Lab), Projected Regional Impacts of Appliance Efficiency
Standards for the U.S. Residential Sector, February 1998.
104
    Assumes 0.5 gal less water use per cycle and 264 cycles per year (RLW Analytics, Energy Star Market Update,
Final Report for National Grid USA, June 28, 2000)
                                                                     TRM Master Manual No. 4




Reference Tables
Customer Energy Savings by Water Heater Fuel Type for EPP Energy Star Dishwashers 105
                        Adjusted               Per Unit Savings
DHW Fuel Type          Frequency           kWh           MMBTU Oil        MMBTU MMBTU Propane
                                                                            Gas
Electric DHW             43.6%             113.3             0.00           0.00      0.00
Oil DHW                  26.9%               34              0.35           0.00      0.00
Gas DHW                  29.5%               34              0.00           0.35      0.00
Propane DHW              0.00%               34              0.00           0.00      0.35
weighted average                            68.6             0.09           0.10      0.00




 105
       Source: EPP_ES.DW.kWh.2002rev.xls
                                                                                  TRM Master Manual No. 4




Air Conditioning End Use
Energy Star Room Air Conditioners
Measure Number: IV-D-1-a (EPP, Air Conditioning End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/31/00
Description
Room air conditioners meeting minimum qualifying efficiency.
Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = CkWh

Demand Savings
kW = CkW

Where:
         kWh     = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         CkWh     = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency (see table below)
         kW      = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         CkW      = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency (see table below)

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline efficiency is the current minimum federal efficiency standard.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is defined as any model meeting Energy Star standards – currently ranging from a
minimum EER of 9.2 (for units <6000 Btu/hr or >20,000 Btu/hr) to a minimum EER of 10.35 (for units
between 8000 and 14000 Btu/hr).
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                             Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                            (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                  Peak Off-Peak Peak            Off-Peak      Winter     Summer Fall/Spring
Residential       0.0%       0.0%      50.0%     50.0%          0%          60%            0%
Commercial        0.3%       0.1%      51.8%     47.8%          0%          36%           15%
All factors are consistent with Vermont screening tool load shapes.
Freeridership
0%. Free riders will be accounted for in the approach used to estimate participants in the year 2000 – e.g.
based on differences between Vermont market shares and those of other states.

Spillover
0%. Spillover will be accounted for in the approach used to estimate participants in the year 2000 – e.g.
based on differences between Vermont market shares and those of other states.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
10 years (same as DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.
                                                                                       TRM Master Manual No. 4


Reference Table
                                                                                       106
                             Energy and Demand Savings by Customer Type
                                                         kWh                    kW
Residential                                              40.3                  0.215
Commercial                                               60.5                  0.217




106
      Same as values used by DPS in screening of Efficiency Utility program.
                                                                                  TRM Master Manual No. 4



Energy Star Room Air Conditioners
Measure Number: IV-D-1-b (EPP, Air Conditioning End Use)

Version Date & Revision History

                                    Accepted with       Referred to
                  Accepted As Is        Edits             TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 2/8/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
Room air conditioners meeting minimum qualifying efficiency.
Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 40.3

Demand Savings
kW = 0.2015

Where:
         kWh     = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         40.3     = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency (see table below)
         kW      = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         0.2015   = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency (see table below)

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline efficiency is the current minimum federal efficiency standard.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is defined as any model meeting Energy Star standards – currently ranging from a
minimum EER of 9.2 (for units <6000 Btu/hr or >20,000 Btu/hr) to a minimum EER of 10.35 (for units
between 8000 and 14000 Btu/hr).
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                             Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                            (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                  Peak Off-Peak Peak            Off-Peak      Winter     Summer Fall/Spring
Residential       0.0%       0.0%      50.0%     50.0%          0%          60%            0%
Commercial        0.3%       0.1%      51.8%     47.8%          0%          36%           15%
All factors are consistent with Vermont screening tool load shapes.
Freeridership
0%. Free riders will be accounted for in the approach used to estimate participants in the year 2000 – e.g.
based on differences between Vermont market shares and those of other states.

Spillover
0%. Spillover will be accounted for in the approach used to estimate participants in the year 2000 – e.g.
based on differences between Vermont market shares and those of other states.
                                                                                       TRM Master Manual No. 4



Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$40107

Lifetimes
10 years (same as DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Reference Table
                                                                108
Energy and Demand Savings by Customer Type
                                                         kWh                    KW
Residential                                              40.3                  0.215
Commercial                                               60.5                  0.217




107
      APT study of retailers knowledgeable about the energy star program.
108
      Same as values used by DPS in screening of Efficiency Utility program.
                                                                                        TRM Master Manual No. 4



Energy Star Room Air Conditioner
Measure Number: IV-D-1-c (Efficient Products Program, Air Conditioning End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft:         Portfolio 14, July ‘02
Effective:     10/1/02
End:           TBD

Referenced Documents: www.energystar.gov; www.ari.org; EPP_AC_savings_6_2002.xls

Description
Room air conditioners with an output less than or equal to 18,000Btu meeting minimum qualifying
efficiency established by Energy Star Program.

Estimated Measure Impacts
             Gross Annual MWH                     Average number of measures             Gross MWH savings per
             Savings per unit                     per year                               year
Residential            .0396                                  650                                25.74
Commercial             .1057                                   0                                   0

Algorithms

Energy Savings
Residential:   kWh = 39.6
Commercial:    kWh = 105.7
kWh = (kWbase – kWeffic)  HOURS

Demand Savings
kW = .1057
kW = kWbase – kWeffic

Where:
         kWbase = baseline connected load kW
         1.0282 = kWbase
         kWeffic = efficient connected load kW
         0.9225 = kWeffic
         HOURS = annual full load hours
         375109 = Residential HOURS
         1000110 = Commercial HOURS
         kW     = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         .1057 = kW
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline efficiency is the current minimum federal efficiency standard. (average EER 9.7 for sizes
included in measure)111



109
    ARI data indicates 500 full load hours for A/C use in Vermont. VEIC experience in other states suggests that ARI
estimates for A/C use tend to be overstated. In an effort to compensate for this overstatement, Efficiency Vermont
applied a .75 multiplier to the ARI estimate in determining residential A/C hours of use.
110
    FLH for commercial applications consistent with loadshape #15 from Vermont State Screening Tool.
111
    Energy Star Data.(standard applied October 1, 2000). www.energystar.gov
                                                                                         TRM Master Manual No. 4




Rating Period & Coincidence Factors

                                                                       Peak as % of calculated kW
                                % of annual kWh
                                                                              savings (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                  Peak Off-Peak Peak            Off-Peak      Winter            Summer        Fall/Spring
 Commercial 0.0%            0.0%     52.0%       48.0%          0%                 80%            40%
 Residential 0.0%           0.0%     50.0%       50.0%          0%                 60%             0%
All factors are consistent with Vermont screening tool load shapes.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is defined as any model meeting Energy Star standards (average EER 11.5 for sizes
included in measure)112

Operating Hours
375 operating hours yearly for residential customers.
1000 operating hours yearly for commercial customers.

Freeridership
33%113

Spillover
33%114

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
13 years (same as DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
$40115

O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithm or default values for this measure

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure

112
    Id.
113
    The 33% freerider rate assumes that after the rebate is made available the market share in VT will increase to 30%
for E-Star room air conditioners. In the absence of any EVT efforts to promote E-Star room air conditioners the
market share would have been 10% (.10/.30=.33). The current VT market share is approximately 19%, however it is
assumed that this includes positive effects from longstanding EVT marketing and trade ally outreach. (D&R
International, 2001 Sales Data).
114
    The estimated spillover rate of 33% for room air conditioners is consistent with past Efficiency Vermont experience
for large appliance items like clothes washers and qualitative reports from manufacturers and large retailers regarding
the number of customers who do not cash rebate coupons.
115
      APT study of retailers knowledgeable about the energy star program.
                                                                                          TRM Master Manual No. 4


Lighting End Use
CFL
Measure Number: IV-E-1-a (EPP, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/31/00
Description
An existing incandescent lamp is replaced with a lower wattage compact fluorescent.
Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 0.0548  HOURS  ISR

Demand Savings
kW = (kWh /HOURS)

Where:
          kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
          0.0548 = average kilowattage reduction116
          HOURS = average hours of use per year (see table below)
          ISR    = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used (see table below)
          kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light bulb.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is compact fluorescent lamp.
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                            % of annual kWh                        Peak as % of connected load kW
                                                                                (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer                       Winter   Summer Fall/Spring
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak
Residential       28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%         23%          12%           22%
Commercial 27.7%            5.4%     42.1%       24.8%         55%          56%           55%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).
Freeridership
1.8%.117
Spillover
27.1%.118




116
    From evaluation of nearly identical program in southern New England (Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of
Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern
Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
117
    Ibid.
118
    This figure has two components: (1) spillover of 7.1% which reflects additional products that participants purchase
but for which they do not obtain rebates (from Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights
Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New
England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000); and (2) spillover of 20% which reflects products purchased by non-
participants as a result of program (VEIC estimate).
                                                                                        TRM Master Manual No. 4



Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
Lifetime is a function of the average hours of use for the lamp. Most CFLs have a rated lifetime of 10,000
hours. However, units that are turned on and off more frequently have shorter lives and those that stay on
for longer periods of time have longer lives. Thus, CFLs rebated through this program are assumed to have
a life of 8000 hours for residential applications (assumed average daily usage of 3.4 hours) and 12,000
hours for commercial applications (assumed daily usage of 9.6 hours). That translates to 6.4 years for
residential applications and 3.4 years for commercial applications.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.


Reference Tables
CFL Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                         Average               Average
                       Annual Hours          In Use Rate
                          of Use
      Residential        1241119               0.816120
      Commercial         3500121               1.000122




119
    Evaluation of nearly identical southern New England program suggests average daily hours of use of 3.4 (Xenergy,
Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison,
Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
120
    Ibid.
121
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
122
    Ibid.
                                                                                       TRM Master Manual No. 4



CFL
Measure Number: IV-E-1-b (EPP, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                       Accepted with        Referred to
                   Accepted As Is          Edits              TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 2/2/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
An existing incandescent lamp is replaced with a lower wattage compact fluorescent.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 0.0548  HOURS  ISR

Demand Savings
kW = (kWh /HOURS)

Where:
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         0.0548 = average kilowattage reduction123
         HOURS = average hours of use per year (see table below)
         ISR    = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used (see table below)
         kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Annual Operations and Maintenance Savings

                   Annual O&M Savings124
Residential                  $0.88
Commercial                   $10.23




123
    From evaluation of nearly identical program in southern New England (Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of
Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern
Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
124
    From VT State screening tool
                                                                                        TRM Master Manual No. 4



Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light bulb.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a compact fluorescent lamp.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                        % of annual kWh                           Peak as % of connected load kW
                                                                               (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer                      Winter   Summer Fall/Spring
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak
Residential       28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%         23%          12%           22%
Commercial 27.7%            5.4%     42.1%       24.8%         55%          56%           55%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).


Freeridership
2%.125

Spillover
15%126

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Cost
$13

Lifetimes
Lifetime is a function of the average hours of use for the lamp. Most CFLs have a rated lifetime of 10,000
hours. However, units that are turned on and off more frequently have shorter lives and those that stay on
for longer periods of time have longer lives. Thus, CFLs rebated through this program are assumed to have
a life of 8000 hours for residential applications (assumed average daily usage of 3.4 hours) and 12,000
hours for commercial applications (assumed daily usage of 9.6 hours). That translates to 6.4 years for
residential applications and 3.4 years for commercial applications.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.
Reference Tables
CFL Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                         Average               Average
                       Annual Hours          In Use Rate
                          of Use
      Residential        1241127               0.816128
      Commercial         3500129               1.000130



125
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
126
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
127
    Evaluation of nearly identical southern New England program suggests average daily hours of use of 3.4 (Xenergy,
Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison,
Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
128
    Ibid.
129
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
130
    Ibid.
                                                                                       TRM Master Manual No. 4



CFL
Measure Number: IV-E-1-c (EPP, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                       Accepted with        Referred to
                   Accepted As Is          Edits              TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 6/01/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
An existing incandescent light bulb is replaced with a lower wattage compact fluorescent.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 0.0548  HOURS  ISR

Demand Savings
kW = (kWh /HOURS)

Where:
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         1.548 = average kilowattage reduction131
         HOURS = average hours of use per year (see table below)
         ISR   = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used (see table below)
         kW   = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Annual Operations and Maintenance Savings

                   Annual O&M Savings132
Residential                  $0.88
Commercial                   $10.23


Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light bulb.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a compact fluorescent lamp.




131
    From evaluation of nearly identical program in southern New England (Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of
Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern
Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
132
    From VT State screening tool
                                                                                        TRM Master Manual No. 4


Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                        % of annual kWh                           Peak as % of connected load kW
                                                                               (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer                      Winter   Summer Fall/Spring
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak
Residential       28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%         23%          12%           22%
Commercial 27.7%            5.4%     42.1%       24.8%         55%          56%           55%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).

Freeridership
2%.133

Spillover
15%134

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Cost
$13

Lifetimes
Lifetime is a function of the average hours of use for the lamp. Most CFLs have a rated lifetime of 10,000
hours. However, units that are turned on and off more frequently have shorter lives and those that stay on
for longer periods of time have longer lives. Thus, CFLs rebated through this program are assumed to have
a life of 8000 hours for residential applications (assumed average daily usage of 3.4 hours) and 12,000
hours for commercial applications (assumed daily usage of 9.6 hours). That translates to 6.4 years for
residential applications and 3.4 years for commercial applications.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.


Reference Tables
CFL Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                         Average               Average
                       Annual Hours          In Use Rate
                          of Use
      Residential        1241135               0.900136
      Commercial         3500137               1.000138




133
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
134
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
135
    Evaluation of nearly identical southern New England program suggests average daily hours of use of 3.4 (Xenergy,
Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison,
Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
136
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
137
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
138
    Ibid.
                                                                                       TRM Master Manual No. 4



CFL
Measure Number: IV-E-1-d (EPP, Lighting End Use)
Version Date & Revision History
                                Accepted with               Referred to
               Accepted As Is        Edits                    TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 6/01/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
An existing incandescent light bulb is replaced with a lower wattage compact fluorescent.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 0.0548  HOURS  ISR

Demand Savings
kW = (kWh /HOURS)

Where:
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         1.549 = average kilowattage reduction139
         HOURS = average hours of use per year (see table below)
         ISR   = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used (see table below)
         kW   = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Annual Operations and Maintenance Savings

                   Annual O&M Savings140
Residential                  $0.88
Commercial                   $10.23


Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light bulb.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a compact fluorescent lamp.




139
    From evaluation of nearly identical program in southern New England (Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of
Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern
Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
140
    From VT State screening tool
                                                                                        TRM Master Manual No. 4



Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                        % of annual kWh                           Peak as % of calculated demand
                                                                          savings kW (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer                      Winter    Summer Fall/Spring
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak
Residential       28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%         23%          12%           22%
Commercial 27.7%            5.4%     42.1%       24.8%         55%          56%           55%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).

Freeridership
2%.141

Spillover
15%142

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Cost
$13

Lifetimes
Lifetime is a function of the average hours of use for the lamp. Most CFLs have a rated lifetime of 10,000
hours. However, units that are turned on and off more frequently have shorter lives and those that stay on
for longer periods of time have longer lives. Thus, CFLs rebated through this program are assumed to have
a life of 8000 hours for residential applications (assumed average daily usage of 3.4 hours) and 12,000
hours for commercial applications (assumed daily usage of 9.6 hours). That translates to 6.4 years for
residential applications and 3.4 years for commercial applications.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.


Reference Tables
CFL Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                         Average               Average
                       Annual Hours          In Use Rate
                          of Use
      Residential        1241143               0.900144
      Commercial         3500145               1.000146




141
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
142
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
143
    Evaluation of nearly identical southern New England program suggests average daily hours of use of 3.4 (Xenergy,
Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison,
Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
144
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
145
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
146
    Ibid.
                                                                                       TRM Master Manual No. 4



CFL
Measure Number: IV-E-1-e (EPP, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                       Accepted with        Referred to
                   Accepted As Is          Edits              TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 2/2/01
Draft date: 9/15/01


Description
An existing incandescent lamp is replaced with a lower wattage compact fluorescent.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 0.0548  HOURS  ISR

Demand Savings
kW = (kWh /HOURS)

Where:
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         0.0548 = average kilowattage reduction147
         HOURS = average hours of use per year (see table below)
         ISR    = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used (see table below)
         kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Annual Operations and Maintenance Savings

                   Annual O&M Savings148
Residential                   $0.88
Commercial                    $10.23

See reference tables below.

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light bulb.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a compact fluorescent lamp.




147
    From evaluation of nearly identical program in southern New England (Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of
Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern
Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
148
    From VT State screening tool
                                                                                    TRM Master Manual No. 4


Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                        % of annual kWh                        Peak as % of connected load kW
                                                                            (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer                   Winter   Summer Fall/Spring
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak
Residential       28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%         23%          12%           22%
Commercial 27.7%            5.4%     42.1%       24.8%         55%          56%           55%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).

Freeridership
2%.149

Spillover
15%150

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Cost
$13

Lifetimes
Lifetime is a function of the average hours of use for the lamp. Most CFLs have a rated lifetime of 10,000
hours. However, units that are turned on and off more frequently have shorter lives and those that stay on
for longer periods of time have longer lives. Thus, CFLs rebated through this program are assumed to have
a life of 8000 hours for residential applications (assumed average daily usage of 3.4 hours) and 12,000
hours for commercial applications (assumed daily usage of 9.6 hours). That translates to 6.4 years for
residential applications and 3.4 years for commercial applications.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




149
      Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
150
      Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
                                                                                        TRM Master Manual No. 4



Reference Tables
CFL Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                         Average               Average
                       Annual Hours          In Use Rate
                          of Use
      Residential        1241151                0.90152
      Commercial         3500153               1.000154




Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
                    Efficient Measures                     Baseline Measures
Component           Cost155            Life156             Cost                    Life
Lamp                $6.00              6.26 years          $1.00                   0.6 years




151
    Evaluation of nearly identical southern New England program suggests average daily hours of use of 3.4 (Xenergy,
Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison,
Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
152
    Ibid.
153
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
154
    Ibid.
155
    Costs include labor rates. Rates are as follow: $2.67 per installed lamp; $12.50 per installed ballast.
156
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
                                                                                        TRM Master Manual No. 4




CFL
Measure Number: IV-E-1-f (EPP, Lighting End Use)
Version Date & Revision History

Draft date: 2/15/02
Effective date:

Referenced Documents: 1) 2001_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls; 2) Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of
Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth
Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000

Description
An existing incandescent lamp is replaced with a lower wattage compact fluorescent.

Estimated Measure Impacts

                           Average Annual MWH               Average number of measures per         Average Annual MWH
                           Savings per unit                 year                                   savings per year
      Residential          .0581                            73412                                  4265.2
      Commercial           .182                             8157                                   1484.6

Algorithms

Energy Savings
kWh = 0.052  HOURS  ISR

kWh (Residential)           = 58.1
kWh (Commercial)            = 182

Demand Savings
kW = (kWh /HOURS)

kW(Residential)             = .0468
kW(Commercial)              = .0520

Where:
         0.052157          = average kilowattage reduction
         HOURS158          = average hours of use per year
         ISR159            = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used
         kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         kW160            = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light bulb.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is a compact fluorescent lamp.

157
    Assumed difference in wattage between installed CFL and the incandescent bulb it replaces. 52 watts based on EVT
analysis of CFLs rebated through Efficient Products Program during 2001 (see 2001_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls).
158
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.
159
    ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR at each application.
160
    Demand savings calculated based on assumed energy savings using Vermont State Cost Effectiveness Screening
Tool.
                                                                                          TRM Master Manual No. 4


Operating Hours
Residential: 1241161 hours / year
Commercial: 3500162 hours / year
Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                            % of annual kWh                        Peak as % of connected load kW
                                                                                (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer                       Winter   Summer Fall/Spring
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak              Off-Peak
Residential       28.7%      7.6%       36.0%       27.7%       23%          12%          22%
Commercial 27.7%             5.4%       42.1%       24.8%       55%          56%          55%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (indoor lighting load shapes).
Freeridership
2%.163
Spillover
15%164
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
Lifetime is a function of the average hours of use for the lamp. Most CFLs have a rated lifetime of 10,000
hours. However, units that are turned on and off more frequently have shorter lives and those that stay on
for longer periods of time have longer lives. Thus, CFLs rebated through this program are assumed to have
a life of 8000 hours for residential applications (assumed average daily usage of 3.4 hours) and 12,000
hours for commercial applications (assumed daily usage of 9.6 hours). That translates to 6.4 years for
residential applications and 3.4 years for commercial applications.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.
Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $13.
Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $4.
O&M Cost Adjustments
                    Annual O&M Savings165
Residential                     $1.51
Commercial                      $3.28

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.
Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.




161
    Residential hours of used based on evaluation of nearly identical southern New England program suggesting
average daily hours of use of 3.4 (see Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential
Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power
Service Company, July 23, 2000).
162
    Commercial hours of used based on standard hours of use for commercial indoor lighting from Vermont State Cost
Effectiveness Screening Tool.
163
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
164
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
165
    From VT State screening tool
                                                                                          TRM Master Manual No. 4


Reference Tables
CFL Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                          Average              Average
                        Annual Hours         In Use Rate
                           of Use
      Residential         1241166               0.90167
      Commercial          3500168                1.0169


Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential

                Efficient Measures                         Baseline Measures
                                             170
Component       Cost                     Life              Cost                    Life
Lamp            $6.00                    6.39              $1.00                   0.6

Commercial

                Efficient Measures                         Baseline Measures
                                             171
Component       Cost                     Life              Cost                    Life
Lamp            $6.00                    3.42              $1.00                   0.28


Lamp Life by Daily Burn Time


Daily Burn Time         Lamp Lifetime       Lamp Lifetime
                           Hours               Years
          1                3,000                8.22
          2                5,000                6.85
          3                7,000                6.39
          4                9,000                6.16
          5                9,500                5.21
          6                10,000               4.57
          8                12,000               4.11
          10               12,000               3.29
          12               12,000               2.74
          24               12,000               1.37




166
    Evaluation of nearly identical southern New England program suggests average daily hours of use of 3.4 (Xenergy,
Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison,
Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
167
    Ibid.
168
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
169
    Ibid.
170
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
171
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
CFL
Measure Number: IV-E-1-g (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:      Portfolio No. 15
Effective date: 1/1/02
End date:       TBD

Referenced Documents: 1) 2001_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls; 2) Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of
Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth
Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000

Description
An existing incandescent lamp is replaced with a lower wattage ENERGY STAR qualified compact
fluorescent.

Estimated Measure Impacts

                           Average Annual MWH               Average number of measures per         Average Annual MWH
                           Savings per unit                 year                                   savings per year
      Residential                   0.0581                             73,412                                 4,265.2
      Commercial                     0.182                              8,157                                 1,484.6

Algorithms

Demand Savings172
kW                          = ((WattsBASE – WattsEE) /1000)* ISR
kW(Residential)             = ((73-21) / 1000) * 0.90) = 0.0468
kW(Commercial)              = ((73-21) / 1000) * 1.0 ) = 0.0520

Energy Savings
kWh                         = kW  HOURS
kWh (Residential)           = (0.0468 * 1241) = 58.1
kWh (Commercial)            = ( 0.0520 * 3500) =182

Where:
           kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
           WattsBASE         = Baseline connected kW
           WattsEE           = Energy efficient connected kW
           kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
           ISR               = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used 173
           HOURS             = average hours of use per year174

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light bulb.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is an ENERGY STAR qualified compact fluorescent lamp.


172
    Assumed difference in wattage between installed CFL and the incandescent bulb it replaces. based on EVT analysis
of CFLs rebated through Efficient Products Program during 2001 (see 2001_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls).
173
    ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR at each application.
174
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.



                                                         134
Operating Hours
Residential: 1,241 hours / year175
Commercial: 3,500 hours / year176

Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                         % of annual kWh                           Peak as % of calculated kW savings
                                                                                  (CF)
                    Winter Winter Summer              Summer        Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
                    Peak Off-Peak  Peak               Off-Peak
Residential
Indoor              28.7%      7.6%       36.0%        27.7%         23.2%         12.3%          22.3%
Lighting (#1)
Commercial
Indoor
                    27.7%      5.4%       42.1%        24.8%         67.2%          72%           61.8%
Lighting
(#12a)
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.

Freeridership
6%.177

Spillover
15%178

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
Lifetime is a function of the average hours of use for the lamp. Most CFLs have a rated lifetime of 10,000
hours. However, units that are turned on and off more frequently have shorter lives and those that stay on
for longer periods of time have longer lives. Thus, CFLs rebated through this program are assumed to have
a life of 8,000 hours for residential applications (assumed average daily usage of 3.4 hours) and 12,000
hours for commercial applications (assumed daily usage of 9.6 hours). That translates to 6.4 years for
residential applications and 3.4 years for commercial applications.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $9.

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $4.
O&M Cost Adjustments
                  Annual O&M Savings179
Residential                     $1.51

175
    Residential hours of used based on evaluation of nearly identical southern New England program suggesting
average daily hours of use of 3.4 (see Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential
Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power
Service Company, July 23, 2000).
176
    Commercial hours of used based on standard hours of use for commercial indoor lighting from Vermont State Cost
Effectiveness Screening Tool.
177
   Freerider rate is based on an agreement between EVT and DPS after reviewing numerous CFL program
evaluations across the country.
178
      Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
179
      From VT State screening tool



                                                          135
Commercial                      $3.28

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.

Reference Tables
CFL Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                         Average               Average
                       Annual Hours          In Use Rate
                          of Use
      Residential        1,241180                 0.90181
      Commercial         3,500182                  1.0183
Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential
                Efficient Measures                          Baseline Measures
                                                184
Component       Cost                     Life               Cost                  Life
Lamp                    $6.00                   6.39               $1.00                 0.6

Commercial
                Efficient Measures                          Baseline Measures
                                                185
Component       Cost                     Life               Cost                  Life
Lamp                    $6.00                   3.42               $1.00              0.28



Lamp Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time        Lamp Lifetime        Lamp Lifetime
                          Hours                Years
          1               3,000                 8.22
          2               5,000                 6.85
          3               7,000                 6.39
          4               9,000                 6.16
          5               9,500                 5.21
          6               10,000                4.57
          8               12,000                4.11
          10              12,000                3.29
          12              12,000                2.74
          24              12,000                1.37




180
    Evaluation of nearly identical southern New England program suggests average daily hours of use of 3.4 (Xenergy,
Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison,
Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
181
    Ibid.
182
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
183
    Ibid.
184
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
185
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                            136
CFL
Measure Number: IV-E-1-h (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:      Portfolio No. 19
Effective date: 1/1/03
End date:       TBD

Referenced Documents: 1) 2003_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls; 2) Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of
Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth
Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000

Description
An existing incandescent lamp is replaced with a lower wattage ENERGY STAR qualified compact
fluorescent.

Estimated Measure Impacts

                           Average Annual MWH               Average number of measures per         Average Annual MWH
                           Savings per unit                 year                                   savings per year
      Residential                    0.061                             89,916                                 5,484.9
      Commercial                     0.190                              4,825                                  916.8

Algorithms

Demand Savings186
kW                          = ((WattsBASE – WattsEE) /1000)* ISR
kW(Residential)             = ((76-21.4) / 1000) * 0.90) = 0.0491
kW(Commercial)              = ((75.7-21.4) / 1000) * 1.0 )= 0.0543

Energy Savings
kWh                         = kW  HOURS
kWh (Residential)           = (0.0491 * 1241) = 60.9
kWh (Commercial)            = ( 0.0543 * 3500) =190.1

Where:
           kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
           WattsBASE         = Baseline connected kW
           WattsEE           = Energy efficient connected kW
           kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
           ISR               = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used 187
           HOURS             = average hours of use per year188

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light bulb.


186
    Assumed difference in wattage between installed CFL and the incandescent bulb it replaces. Based on EVT analysis
of CFLs rebated through Efficient Products Program during 2002 (see 2003_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls).
187
    ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR at each application.
188
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.



                                                         137
High Efficiency
High efficiency is an ENERGY STAR qualified compact fluorescent lamp.

Operating Hours
Residential: 1,241 hours / year189
Commercial: 3,500 hours / year190

Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                         % of annual kWh                            Peak as % of calculated kW savings
                                                                                   (CF)
                    Winter Winter Summer              Summer         Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
                    Peak Off-Peak  Peak               Off-Peak
Residential
Indoor              28.7%      7.6%       36.0%        27.7%          23.2%         12.3%         22.3%
Lighting (#1)
Commercial
Indoor
                    27.7%      5.4%       42.1%        24.8%          67.2%          72%          61.8%
Lighting
(#12a)
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.

Freeridership
6%.191

Spillover
15%192

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
Lifetime is a function of the average hours of use for the lamp. Most CFLs have a rated lifetime of 10,000
hours. However, units that are turned on and off more frequently have shorter lives and those that stay on
for longer periods of time have longer lives. Thus, CFLs rebated through this program are assumed to have
a life of 8,000 hours for residential applications (assumed average daily usage of 3.4 hours) and 12,000
hours for commercial applications (assumed daily usage of 9.6 hours). That translates to 6.4 years for
residential applications and 3.4 years for commercial applications.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $9.

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $3


189
    Residential hours of use based on evaluation of nearly identical southern New England program suggesting average
daily hours of use of 3.4 (see Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting
Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service
Company, July 23, 2000).
190
    Commercial hours of used based on standard hours of use for commercial indoor lighting from Vermont State Cost
Effectiveness Screening Tool.
191
   Freerider rate is based on an agreement between EVT and DPS after reviewing numerous CFL program
evaluations across the country.
192
      Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.



                                                          138
O&M Cost Adjustments
              Annual O&M Savings193
Residential                     $1.51
Commercial                      $3.28

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.

Reference Tables


CFL Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                         Average               Average
                       Annual Hours          In Use Rate
                          of Use
      Residential        1,241194                 0.90195
      Commercial         3,500196                  1.0197


Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential
                Efficient Measures                          Baseline Measures
                                                198
Component       Cost                     Life               Cost                   Life
Lamp                    $6.00                   6.39               $1.00                  0.6

Commercial
                Efficient Measures                          Baseline Measures
                                                199
Component       Cost                     Life               Cost                   Life
Lamp                    $6.00                   3.42               $1.00               0.28




193
    From VT State screening tool
194
    Evaluation of nearly identical southern New England program suggests average daily hours of use of 3.4 (Xenergy,
Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison,
Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
195
    Ibid.
196
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
197
    Ibid.
198
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
199
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                            139
Lamp Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time   Lamp Lifetime   Lamp Lifetime
                     Hours           Years
      1              3,000            8.22
      2              5,000            6.85
      3              7,000            6.39
      4              9,000            6.16
      5              9,500            5.21
      6              10,000           4.57
      8              12,000           4.11
      10             12,000           3.29
      12             12,000           2.74
      24             12,000           1.37




                                            140
CFL
Measure Number: IV-E-1-i (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:      Portfolio No. 24
Effective date: 1/1/04
End date:       TBD

Referenced Documents: 1) 2004_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls; 2) Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of
Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth
Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000

Description
An existing incandescent lamp is replaced with a lower wattage ENERGY STAR qualified compact
fluorescent.

Estimated Measure Impacts

                           Average Annual MWH               Average number of measures per         Average Annual MWH
                           Savings per unit                 year                                   savings per year
      Residential                   0.0634                             89,916                                 5,700.7
      Commercial                    0.2051                              4,825                                  989.6

Algorithms

Demand Savings200
kW                          = ((WattsBASE – WattsEE) /1000)* ISR
kW(Residential)             = ((79-22.2) / 1000) * 0.90) = 0.0511
kW(Commercial)              = ((81.3-22.7) / 1000) * 1.0 )= 0.0586

Energy Savings
kWh                         = kW  HOURS
kWh (Residential)           = (0.0511 * 1241) = 63.4
kWh (Commercial)            = ( 0.0586 * 3500) =205.1

Where:
           kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
           WattsBASE         = Baseline connected kW
           WattsEE           = Energy efficient connected kW
           kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
           ISR               = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used 201
           HOURS             = average hours of use per year202

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light bulb.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is an ENERGY STAR qualified compact fluorescent lamp.


200
    Assumed difference in wattage between installed CFL and the incandescent bulb it replaces. Based on EVT analysis
of CFLs rebated through Efficient Products Program.
201
    ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR at each application.
202
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.



                                                         141
Operating Hours
Residential: 1,241 hours / year203
Commercial: 3,500 hours / year204

Loadshape
Residential Indoor Lighting, #1
Commercial Indoor Lighting ,#12
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.

Freeridership
6%.205

Spillover
15%206

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
Lifetime is a function of the average hours of use for the lamp. Most CFLs have a rated lifetime of 10,000
hours. However, units that are turned on and off more frequently have shorter lives and those that stay on
for longer periods of time have longer lives. Thus, CFLs rebated through this program are assumed to have
a life of 8,000 hours for residential applications (assumed average daily usage of 3.4 hours) and 12,000
hours for commercial applications (assumed daily usage of 9.6 hours). That translates to 6.4 years for
residential applications and 3.4 years for commercial applications.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $6

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $3

O&M Cost Adjustments
              Annual O&M Savings207
Residential                     $1.51
Commercial                      $3.28

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.

Reference Tables

203
    Residential hours of use based on evaluation of nearly identical southern New England program suggesting average
daily hours of use of 3.4 (see Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting
Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service
Company, July 23, 2000).
204
    Commercial hours of used based on standard hours of use for commercial indoor lighting from Vermont State Cost
Effectiveness Screening Tool.
205
   Freerider rate is based on an agreement between EVT and DPS after reviewing numerous CFL program
evaluations across the country.
206
      Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
207
      From VT State screening tool



                                                          142
       CFL Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                        Average          Average
                     Annual Hours      In Use Rate
                         of Use
      Residential       1,241208          0.90209
                              210
      Commercial        3,500              1.0211

Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential
            Efficient Measures               Baseline Measures
Component       Cost                     Life212          Cost                     Life
Lamp                    $6.00                6.39                 $0.50                   0.6

Commercial
                Efficient Measures                        Baseline Measures
                                                213
Component       Cost                     Life             Cost                     Life
Lamp                    $6.00                   3.42              $0.50                0.28


Lamp Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time    Lamp Lifetime            Lamp Lifetime
                       Hours                   Years
       1                3,000                   8.22
       2                5,000                   6.85
       3                7,000                   6.39
       4                9,000                   6.16
       5                9,500                   5.21
       6               10,000                   4.57
       8               12,000                   4.11
       10              12,000                   3.29
       12              12,000                   2.74
       24              12,000                   1.37




208
    Evaluation of nearly identical southern New England program suggests average daily hours of use of 3.4 (Xenergy,
Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison,
Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
209
    Ibid.
210
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
211
    Ibid.
212
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
213
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                         143
CFL
Measure Number: IV-E-1-j (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:      Portfolio No. 28
Effective date: 7/1/04
End date:       TBD

Referenced Documents: 1) 2004_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls; 2) Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of
Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth
Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000

Description
An existing incandescent lamp is replaced with a lower wattage ENERGY STAR qualified compact
fluorescent.

Estimated Measure Impacts

                           Average Annual MWH               Average number of measures per          Average Annual MWH
                           Savings per unit                 year                                    savings per year
      Residential                   0.0634                             89,916                                  5,700.7
      Commercial                    0.2296                              4,825                                   1107.8

Algorithms

Demand Savings214
kW                          = ((WattsBASE – WattsEE) /1000)  ISR  WHFd
kW(Residential)             = ((79-22.2) / 1000)  0.90)  1.0 = 0.0511
kW(Commercial)              = ((81.3-22.7) / 1000)  1.0 )  1.4 = 0.0820

Energy Savings
kWh                         = kW  HOURS  WHFe / WHFd
kWh (Residential)           = (0.0511  1241)  1.0 / 1.0 = 63.4
kWh (Commercial)            = ( 0.0820  3500)  1.12 / 1.4 = 229.6

Where:
           kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
           WattsBASE         = Baseline connected kW
           WattsEE           = Energy efficient connected kW
           kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
           ISR               = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used 215
           WHFd              = Waste heat factor for demand to account for cooling savings from efficient lighting.
                               For a cooled space, the value is 1.40 (calculated as 1 + 1 / 2.5). Based on 2.5 COP
                               cooling system efficiency. For an uncooled space, the value is one. The Winter and
                               Fall/Spring coincident factors in loadshape #63 have been decreased to offset the
                               increase in the kW due to the WHFd. Therefore, the cooling savings are only added
                               to the summer peak savings.216
           WHFe              = Waste heat factor for energy to account for cooling savings from efficient lighting. For


214
    Assumed difference in wattage between installed CFL and the incandescent bulb it replaces. Based on EVT analysis
of CFLs rebated through Efficient Products Program.
215
    ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR in each application.
216
    Waste heat factor differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for WHF d in each
application.



                                                         144
                                a cooled space, the value is 1.12 (calculated as 1 + 0.29 / 2.5). Based on 0.29
                                ASHRAE Lighting waste heat cooling factor for Vermont 217 and 2.5 C.O.P. typical
                                cooling system efficiency. For an uncooled space, the value is one. 218

         HOURS                = average hours of use per year219

Waste Heat Adjustment
Cooling savings are incorporated into the electric savings algorithm with the waste heat factor (WHF). See
above.

Heating Increased Usage
MMBTUWH                = (kWh / WHFe)  0.003413  HF / 0.75
MMBTUWH (Residential) = (63.4 / 1)  0.003413  0.00 / 0.75 = 0.0
MMBTUWH (Commercial) = (229.6 / 1.12)  0.003413  0.39 / 0.75 = 0.364

Where:
         MMBTUWH             = gross customer annual heating MMBTU fuel increased usage for the measure
                              from the reduction in lighting heat.
         0.003413           = conversion from kWh to MMBTU
         HF                 = ASHRAE heating factor for lighting waste heat for Burlington, Vermont 220
         0.75               = average heating system efficiency
         Oil heating is assumed typical for commercial.

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light bulb.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is an ENERGY STAR qualified compact fluorescent lamp.

Operating Hours
Residential: 1,241 hours / year221
Commercial: 3,500 hours / year222

Loadshape

Residential: Loadshape #1: Residential Indoor Lighting
Commercial: Loadshape #63: Commercial Indoor Lighting with cooling bonus. This is a combined lighting
and cooling loadshape
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.




217
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993
218
    Waste heat factor differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for WHFe in each application.
219
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.
220
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993. Heating factor
differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HF in each application.
221
    Residential hours of use based on evaluation of nearly identical southern New England program suggesting average
daily hours of use of 3.4 (see Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting
Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service
Company, July 23, 2000).
222
    Commercial hours of used based on standard hours of use for commercial indoor lighting from Vermont State Cost
Effectiveness Screening Tool.



                                                         145
Freeridership/Spillover Factors

 Measure Category                         Light Bulbs/Lamps
 Measure Code                                LBLCFBLB
                                               Compact
                                          Fluorescent screw-
 Product Description                          base bulbs
 Track Name                Track No.     Freerider Spillover
 Act250 NC                 6014A250         n/a         n/a
 Cust Equip Rpl            6013CUST         n/a         n/a
 Farm NC                   6014FARM         n/a         n/a
 Farm Equip Rpl            6013FARM         n/a         n/a
 Non Act 250 NC            6014NANC         n/a         n/a
 Pres Equip Rpl            6013PRES         n/a         n/a
 C&I Retro                 6012CNIR         n/a         n/a
 MF Mkt Retro              6012MFMR         n/a         n/a
 Efficient Products        6032EPEP        0.94        1.15
 LISF Retrofit             6034LISF         n/a         n/a
 LIMF Retrofit             6017RETR         n/a         n/a
 LIMF NC                   6018LINC         n/a         n/a
 LIMF Rehab                6018LIRH         n/a         n/a
 RES Retrofit              6036RETR         n/a         n/a
 RNC VESH                  6038VESH         n/a         n/a
 MF Mkt NC                 6019MFNC         n/a         n/a

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
Lifetime is a function of the average hours of use for the lamp. Most CFLs have a rated lifetime of 10,000
hours. However, units that are turned on and off more frequently have shorter lives and those that stay on
for longer periods of time have longer lives. Thus, CFLs rebated through this program are assumed to have
a life of 8,000 hours for residential applications (assumed average daily usage of 3.4 hours) and 12,000
hours for commercial applications (assumed daily usage of 9.6 hours). That translates to 6.4 years for
residential applications and 3.4 years for commercial applications.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $6

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $3

O&M Cost Adjustments
              Annual O&M Savings223
Residential                      $1.51
Commercial                       $3.28




223
      From VT State screening tool



                                                    146
Fossil Fuel Descriptions
See Heating Increased Usage above..

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.

Reference Tables

       Hours of Use,In Use Rates, and Waste Heat Factors by Customer Type
                         Average
                                          Average
                       Annual Hours                        WHFd           WHFe                               HF
                                        In Use Rate
                          of Use
      Residential        1,241224          0.90225           1.0           1.0                               0.0
                               226
      Commercial         3,500              1.0227           1.4          1.12                              0.39


Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential
            Efficient Measures               Baseline Measures
Component       Cost                     Life228          Cost                     Life
Lamp                    $6.00                6.39                 $0.50                   0.6

Commercial
                Efficient Measures                        Baseline Measures
Component       Cost                     Life229          Cost                     Life
Lamp                    $6.00                3.42                 $0.50                0.28




Lamp Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time   Lamp Lifetime             Lamp Lifetime
                      Hours                    Years
       1              3,000                     8.22
       2              5,000                     6.85
       3              7,000                     6.39
       4              9,000                     6.16
       5              9,500                     5.21
       6              10,000                    4.57
       8              12,000                    4.11
       10             12,000                    3.29
       12             12,000                    2.74
       24             12,000                    1.37


224
    Evaluation of nearly identical southern New England program suggests average daily hours of use of 3.4 (Xenergy,
Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison,
Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
225
    Ibid.
226
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
227
    Ibid.
228
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
229
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                         147
148
CFL
Measure Number: IV-E-1-k (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:      Portfolio No. 31
Effective date: 1/1/04
End date:       TBD

Referenced Documents: 1) 2005_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls
Description
An existing incandescent screw-in bulb is replaced with a lower wattage ENERGY STAR qualified
compact fluorescent screw-in bulb

Estimated Measure Impacts

                           Average Annual MWH               Average number of measures per          Average Annual MWH
                           Savings per unit                 year                                    savings per year
      Residential                   0.0442                             65,000                                  2,873.0
      Commercial                    0.2296                              4,825                                   1107.8

Algorithms

Demand Savings230
kW                          = ((Watts) /1000)  ISR  WHFd
kW(Residential)             = ((48.7) / 1000)  0.73)  1.0 = 0.0356
kW(Commercial)              = ((81.3-22.7) / 1000)  1.0 )  1.4 = 0.0820

Energy Savings
kWh                         = kW  HOURS  WHFe / WHFd
kWh (Residential)           = (0.0356  1241)  1.0 / 1.0 = 44.2
kWh (Commercial)            = ( 0.0820  3500)  1.12 / 1.4 = 229.6

Where:
           Watts            = EVT and DPS October 2004 negotiated delta watts from WattsBASE – WattsEE
           kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
           WattsBASE         = Baseline connected kW
           WattsEE           = Energy efficient connected kW
           kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
           ISR               = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used 231
           WHFd              = Waste heat factor for demand to account for cooling savings from efficient lighting.
                               For a cooled space, the value is 1.40 (calculated as 1 + 1 / 2.5). Based on 2.5 COP
                               cooling system efficiency. For an uncooled space, the value is one. The Winter and
                               Fall/Spring coincident factors in loadshape #63 have been decreased to offset the
                               increase in the kW due to the WHFd. Therefore, the cooling savings are only added
                               to the summer peak savings.232
           WHFe              = Waste heat factor for energy to account for cooling savings from efficient lighting. For




230
    Assumed difference in wattage between installed CFL and the incandescent bulb it replaces. Based on EVT analysis
of CFLs rebated through Efficient Products Program.
231
    ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR in each application.
232
    Waste heat factor differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for WHF d in each
application.



                                                         149
                                a cooled space, the value is 1.12 (calculated as 1 + 0.29 / 2.5). Based on 0.29
                                ASHRAE Lighting waste heat cooling factor for Vermont 233 and 2.5 C.O.P. typical
                                cooling system efficiency. For an uncooled space, the value is one. 234

         HOURS                = average hours of use per year235

Waste Heat Adjustment
Cooling savings are incorporated into the electric savings algorithm with the waste heat factor (WHF). See
above.

Heating Increased Usage
MMBTUWH                = (kWh / WHFe)  0.003413  HF / 0.75
MMBTUWH (Residential) = (44.2 / 1)  0.003413  0.00 / 0.75 = 0.0
MMBTUWH (Commercial) = (229.6 / 1.12)  0.003413  0.39 / 0.75 = 0.364

Where:
         MMBTUWH             = gross customer annual heating MMBTU fuel increased usage for the measure
                              from the reduction in lighting heat.
         0.003413           = conversion from kWh to MMBTU
         HF                 = ASHRAE heating factor for lighting waste heat for Burlington, Vermont 236
         0.75               = average heating system efficiency
         Oil heating is assumed typical for commercial.

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light bulb.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is an ENERGY STAR qualified compact fluorescent lamp.

Operating Hours
Residential: 1,241 hours / yearCommercial: 3,500 hours / year 237

Loadshape

Residential: Loadshape #1: Residential Indoor Lighting
Commercial: Loadshape #63: Commercial Indoor Lighting with cooling bonus. This is a combined lighting
and cooling loadshape
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.




233
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993
234
    Waste heat factor differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for WHFe in each application.
235
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.
236
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993. Heating factor
differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HF in each application.
237
    Commercial hours of use based on standard hours of use for commercial indoor lighting from Vermont State Cost
Effectiveness Screening Tool.



                                                         150
Freeridership/Spillover Factors

 Measure Category                         Light Bulbs/Lamps
 Measure Code                                LBLCFBLB
                                               Compact
                                          Fluorescent screw-
 Product Description                          base bulbs
 Track Name                Track No.     Freerider Spillover
 Act250 NC                 6014A250         n/a         n/a
 Cust Equip Rpl            6013CUST         n/a         n/a
 Farm NC                   6014FARM         n/a         n/a
 Farm Equip Rpl            6013FARM         n/a         n/a
 Non Act 250 NC            6014NANC         n/a         n/a
 Pres Equip Rpl            6013PRES         n/a         n/a
 C&I Retro                 6012CNIR         n/a         n/a
 MF Mkt Retro              6012MFMR         n/a         n/a
 Efficient Products        6032EPEP        0.94        1.25
 LISF Retrofit             6034LISF         n/a         n/a
 LIMF Retrofit             6017RETR         n/a         n/a
 LIMF NC                   6018LINC         n/a         n/a
 LIMF Rehab                6018LIRH         n/a         n/a
 RES Retrofit              6036RETR         n/a         n/a
 RNC VESH                  6038VESH         n/a         n/a
 MF Mkt NC                 6019MFNC         n/a         n/a

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
Lifetime is a function of the average hours of use for the lamp. Most CFLs have a rated lifetime of 10,000
hours. However, units that are turned on and off more frequently have shorter lives and those that stay on
for longer periods of time have longer lives. Thus, CFLs rebated through this program are assumed to have
a life of 8,000 hours for residential applications (assumed average daily usage of 3.4 hours) and 12,000
hours for commercial applications (assumed daily usage of 9.6 hours). That translates to 6.4 years for
residential applications and 3.4 years for commercial applications.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $6

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $3

O&M Cost Adjustments
              Annual O&M Savings238
Residential                      $1.51
Commercial                       $3.28




238
      From VT State screening tool



                                                    151
Fossil Fuel Descriptions
See Heating Increased Usage above.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.

Reference Tables

       Hours of Use,In Use Rates, and Waste Heat Factors by Customer Type
                         Average
                                          Average
                       Annual Hours                        WHFd           WHFe        HF
                                        In Use Rate
                          of Use
      Residential          1,241            0.73             1.0           1.0         0.0
      Commercial         3,500239          1.0240            1.4          1.12        0.39


Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential
            Efficient Measures               Baseline Measures
Component               Cost                 Life241               Cost        Life
Lamp                    $6.00                 6.39                 $0.50       0.6

Commercial
                Efficient Measures                         Baseline Measures
Component               Cost                 Life242               Cost        Life
Lamp                    $6.00                 3.42                 $0.50       0.28


Lamp Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time   Lamp Lifetime              Lamp Lifetime
                      Hours                     Years
       1              3,000                      8.22
       2              5,000                      6.85
       3              7,000                      6.39
       4              9,000                      6.16
       5              9,500                      5.21
       6              10,000                     4.57
       8              12,000                     4.11
       10             12,000                     3.29
       12             12,000                     2.74
       24             12,000                     1.37




239
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
240
    Ibid.
241
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
242
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                          152
CFL
Measure Number: IV-E-1-l (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     Portfolio No. 37
Effective date: 1/1/05
End date:       TBD

Referenced Documents: 1) 2005_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls
Description
An existing incandescent screw-in bulb is replaced with a lower wattage ENERGY STAR qualified
compact fluorescent screw-in bulb

Estimated Measure Impacts

                           Average Annual MWH              Average number of measures per         Average Annual MWH
                           Savings per unit                year                                   savings per year
      Residential                   0.0442                            65,000                                 2,873.0
      Commercial                    0.1626                             4,825                                  784.5

Algorithms

Demand Savings243
kW                          = ((Watts) /1000)  ISR  WHFd
kW(Residential)             = ((48.7) / 1000)  0.73)  1.0 = 0.0356
kW(Commercial)              = ((48.7) / 1000)  0.9 )  1.2 = 0.0526

Energy Savings
kWh                         = kW  HOURS  WHFe / WHFd
kWh (Residential)           = (0.0356  1241)  1.0 / 1.0 = 44.2
kWh (Commercial)            = ( 0.0526  3500)  1.06/ 1.2 = 162.6


Where:
           Watts            = EVT and DPS October 2004 negotiated delta watts from WattsBASE – WattsEE
           kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
           WattsBASE         = Baseline connected kW
           WattsEE           = Energy efficient connected kW
           kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
           ISR               = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used 244
           WHFd              = Waste heat factor for demand to account for cooling savings from efficient
                               lighting. For a cooled space, the value is 1.2 (calculated as 1 + (0.50*(0.85) /
                               2.5)). Based on 2.5 COP cooling system efficiency and assuming 50% of
                               spaces that are cooled and 85% of lighting heat that needs to be mechanically
                               cooled at time of summer peak. (From 1993 ASHRAE Journal: Calculating
                               Lighting and HVAC interactions which assumes that 80% of lighting heat
                               offsets heating requirements, and 90% of lighting heat needs to be
                               mechanically cooled.) For an uncooled space, the value is one. The Winter
                               and Fall/Spring coincident factors in loadshape #63 have been decreased to


243
    Assumed difference in wattage between installed CFL and the incandescent bulb it replaces. Based on EVT analysis
of CFLs rebated through Efficient Products Program.
244
    ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR in each application.



                                                        153
                                offset the increase in the kW due to the WHFd. Therefore, the cooling
                                savings are only added to the summer peak savings.
         WHFe                 = Waste heat factor for energy to account for cooling savings from efficient
                                lighting. For a cooled space, the value is 1.06 (calculated as 1 + (0.50*(0.29) /
                                2.5)). Based on 0.29 ASHRAE Lighting waste heat cooling factor for
                                Vermont 245 and 50% of spaces that are cooled and 2.5 C.O.P. typical cooling
                                system efficiency. For an uncooled space, the value is one. 246
         HOURS                = average hours of use per year247

Waste Heat Adjustment
Cooling savings are incorporated into the electric savings algorithm with the waste heat factor (WHF). See
above.

Heating Increased Usage
MMBTUWH                = (kWh / WHFe)  0.003413  AR  HF / 0.75
MMBTUWH (Residential) = (44.2 / 1)  0.003413  1.00  0.00 / 0.75 = 0.0
MMBTUWH (Commercial) = (162.6 / 1.06)  0.003413  0.70  0.39 / 0.75 = 0.191

Where:
         MMBTUWH           = gross customer annual heating MMBTU fuel increased usage for the measure
                              from the reduction in lighting heat.
         0.003413           = conversion from kWh to MMBTU
         AR                 = Typical aspect ratio factor. ASHRAE heating factor applies to perimeter
                              zoneheat, therefore it must be adjusted to account for lighting in core zones. It
                              is assumed that 70% is the typical square footage of commercial buildings
                              within 15 feet of exterior wall. The assumed aspect ratio for residential
                              buildings is 100%.
         HF                 = ASHRAE heating factor for lighting waste heat for Burlington, Vermont 248
         0.75               = average heating system efficiency
         Oil heating is assumed typical for commercial.

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light bulb.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is an ENERGY STAR qualified compact fluorescent lamp.

Operating Hours
Residential: 1,241 hours / year
Commercial: 3,500 hours / year249

Loadshape

Residential: Loadshape #1: Residential Indoor Lighting
Commercial: Loadshape #63: Commercial Indoor Lighting with cooling bonus. This is a combined lighting
and cooling loadshape
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.



245
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993
246
    Waste heat factor differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for WHFe in each application.
247
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.
248
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993. Heating factor
differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HF in each application.
249
    Commercial hours of use based on standard hours of use for commercial indoor lighting from Vermont State Cost
Effectiveness Screening Tool.



                                                         154
Freeridership/Spillover Factors

 Measure Category                        Light Bulbs/Lamps
 Measure Code                               LBLCFBLB
                                              Compact
                                         Fluorescent screw-
 Product Description                         base bulbs
 Track Name             Track No.       Freerider Spillover
 Act250 NC              6014A250           n/a         n/a
 Cust Equip Rpl         6013CUST           n/a         n/a
 Farm NC                6014FARM           n/a         n/a
 Farm Equip Rpl         6013FARM           n/a         n/a
 Non Act 250 NC         6014NANC           n/a         n/a
 Pres Equip Rpl         6013PRES           n/a         n/a
 C&I Retro              6012CNIR           n/a         n/a
 MF Mkt Retro           6012MFMR           n/a         n/a
 Efficient Products     6032EPEP          0.94        1.25
 LISF Retrofit          6034LISF           n/a         n/a
 LIMF Retrofit          6017RETR           n/a         n/a
 LIMF NC                6018LINC           n/a         n/a
 LIMF Rehab             6018LIRH           n/a         n/a
 RES Retrofit           6036RETR           n/a         n/a
 RNC VESH               6038VESH           n/a         n/a
 MF Mkt NC              6019MFNC           n/a         n/a

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
Lifetime is a function of the average hours of use for the lamp. Most CFLs have a rated lifetime of 10,000
hours. However, units that are turned on and off more frequently have shorter lives and those that stay on
for longer periods of time have longer lives. Thus, CFLs rebated through this program are assumed to have
a life of 8,000 hours for residential applications (assumed average daily usage of 3.4 hours) and 12,000
hours for commercial applications (assumed daily usage of 9.6 hours). That translates to 6.4 years for
residential applications and 3.4 years for commercial applications.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $6

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $2




                                                   155
O&M Cost Adjustments
              Annual O&M Savings250
Residential                     $1.51
Commercial                      $3.28



Fossil Fuel Descriptions
See Heating Increased Usage above.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.

Reference Tables

  Hours of Use, In Use Rates, and Waste Heat Factors by Customer Type
                  Average          Average
                Annual Hours      In Service     WHFd       WHFe                 AR     HF
                    of Use           Rate
 Residential        1,241            0.73         1.0         1.0                 1.0    0.0
 Commercial        3,500251         0.9252        1.2        1.06                 0.7   0.39


Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential
            Efficient Measures               Baseline Measures
Component               Cost                 Life253               Cost        Life
Lamp                    $6.00                 6.39                 $0.50       0.6

Commercial
                Efficient Measures                         Baseline Measures
Component               Cost                 Life254               Cost        Life
Lamp                    $6.00                 3.42                 $0.50       0.28


Lamp Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time   Lamp Lifetime              Lamp Lifetime
                      Hours                     Years
       1              3,000                      8.22
       2              5,000                      6.85
       3              7,000                      6.39
       4              9,000                      6.16
       5              9,500                      5.21
       6              10,000                     4.57
       8              12,000                     4.11
       10             12,000                     3.29
       12             12,000                     2.74
       24             12,000                     1.37

250
    From VT State screening tool
251
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
252
    2005 TAG agreement
253
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
254
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                          156
Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: IV-E-2-a (EPP, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/31/00
Description
An existing incandescent lighting fixture is replaced by a fluorescent fixture.
Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 0.0754  HOURS  ISR

Demand Savings
kWj = (kWh /HOURS)

Where:
          kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
          0.0754 = average kilowattage reduction255
          HOURS = average hours of use per year (see table below)
          ISR    = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used (see table below)
          kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure


Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light fixture with sufficient usage to justify replacement.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a fluorescent fixture.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                   Peak as % of connected load kW
                               % of annual kWh
                                                                                (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer                       Winter   Summer Fall/Spring
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak
Residential       28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%         23%          12%           22%
Commercial 27.7%            5.4%     42.1%       24.8%         55%          56%           55%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).

Freeridership
1.7%.256
Spillover
23.2%.257
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

255
    From evaluation of nearly identical program in southern New England (Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of
Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern
Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
256
    Ibid.
257
    This figure has two components: (1) spillover of 3.2% which reflects additional products that participants purchase
but for which they do not obtain rebates (from Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights
Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New
England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000); and (2) spillover of 20% which reflects products purchased by non-
participants as a result of program (VEIC estimate).



                                                          157
Lifetimes
20 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Reference Tables
CFL Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                         Average               Average
                       Annual Hours          In Use Rate
                          of Use
      Residential        1241258               0.881259
      Commercial         3500260               1.000261




258
    Evaluation of nearly identical southern New England program suggests average daily hours of use of 3.4 (Xenergy,
Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison,
Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
259
    Based on southern New England evaluation report of current in-service rate ((Xenergy, Process and Impact
Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth
Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000), adjusted upward to reflect the
fact that most customers who reported not having installed rebated fixtures could be expected to install them in the
future. VEIC has assumed future installations by 80% of those who had not yet “gotten around to it”, 95% of those
who had “not yet done remodeling” for which the fixture was purchased, 67% of those who “bought it as a gift”, and
50% of those who “bought it as a spare”.
260
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
261
    Ibid.



                                                          158
Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: IV-E-2-b (EPP, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History

                                       Accepted with          Referred to
                   Accepted As Is          Edits                TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 2/2/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date
Description
An existing incandescent lighting fixture is replaced by a fluorescent fixture (including table lamps, but
excluding torchieres). [revised by KT]

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 0.0754  HOURS  ISR

Demand Savings
kWj = (kWh /HOURS)

Where:
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         0.0754 = average kilowattage reduction262
         HOURS = average hours of use per year (see table below)
         ISR    = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used (see table below)
         kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Annual Operations and Maintenance Savings
               Annual O&M Savings263
Residential                  $1.28
Commercial                   $18.80

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light fixture with sufficient usage to justify replacement.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a fluorescent fixture.




262
    From evaluation of nearly identical program in southern New England (Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of
Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern
Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
263
    From VT State screening tool



                                                        159
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                  Peak as % of connected load kW
                              % of annual kWh
                                                                               (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer                      Winter   Summer Fall/Spring
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak
Residential       28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%         23%          12%           22%
Commercial 27.7%            5.4%     42.1%       24.8%         55%          56%           55%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).

Freeridership
2%.264

Spillover
7%.265

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$20

Lifetimes
20 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.
Reference Tables
Fluorescent Fixture Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                         Average               Average
                       Annual Hours          In Use Rate
                          of Use
      Residential        1241266               0.881267
      Commercial         3500268               1.000269




264
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
265
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS
266
    Evaluation of nearly identical southern New England program suggests average daily hours of use of 3.4 (Xenergy,
Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison,
Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
267
    Based on southern New England evaluation report of current in-service rate ((Xenergy, Process and Impact
Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth
Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000), adjusted upward to reflect the
fact that most customers who reported not having installed rebated fixtures could be expected to install them in the
future. VEIC has assumed future installations by 80% of those who had not yet “gotten around to it”, 95% of those
who had “not yet done remodeling” for which the fixture was purchased, 67% of those who “bought it as a gift”, and
50% of those who “bought it as a spare”.
268
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
269
    Ibid.



                                                          160
Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: IV-E-2-c (EPP, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History

                                       Accepted with          Referred to
                   Accepted As Is          Edits                TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 06/01/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date:

Description
An existing incandescent lighting fixture is replaced by a fluorescent lighting fixture. Measures include
table lamps, but exclude torchieres.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 0.0754  HOURS  ISR

Demand Savings
kWj = (kWh /HOURS)

Where:
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         0.0754 = average kilowattage reduction270
         HOURS = average hours of use per year (see table below)
         ISR    = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used (see table below)
         kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Annual Operations and Maintenance Savings
               Annual O&M Savings271
Residential                  $1.28
Commercial                   $18.80

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light fixture with sufficient usage to justify replacement.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a fluorescent fixture.




270
    From evaluation of nearly identical program in southern New England (Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of
Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern
Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
271
    From VT State screening tool



                                                        161
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                  Peak as % of connected load kW
                              % of annual kWh
                                                                               (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer                      Winter   Summer Fall/Spring
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak
Residential       28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%         23%          12%           22%
Commercial 27.7%            5.4%     42.1%       24.8%         55%          56%           55%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).

Freeridership
2%.272

Spillover
7%.273

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$20

Lifetimes
20 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Reference Tables
Fluorescent Fixture Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                         Average               Average
                       Annual Hours          In Use Rate
                          of Use
      Residential        1241274               0.950275
      Commercial         3500276               1.000277




272
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
273
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS
274
    Evaluation of nearly identical southern New England program suggests average daily hours of use of 3.4 (Xenergy,
Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison,
Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
275
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS
276
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
277
    Ibid.



                                                          162
Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: IV-E-2-d (EPP, Lighting End Use)
Version Date & Revision History

                                       Accepted with          Referred to
                   Accepted As Is          Edits                TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 06/01/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date:

Description
An existing incandescent lighting fixture is replaced by a fluorescent lighting fixture. Measures include
table lamps, but exclude torchieres.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 0.0754  HOURS  ISR

Demand Savings
kWj = (kWh /HOURS)

Where:
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         0.0754 = average kilowattage reduction278
         HOURS = average hours of use per year (see table below)
         ISR    = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used (see table below)
         kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Annual Operations and Maintenance Savings
               Annual O&M Savings279
Residential                  $1.28
Commercial                   $18.80

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light fixture with sufficient usage to justify replacement.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a fluorescent fixture.




278
    From evaluation of nearly identical program in southern New England (Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of
Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern
Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
279
    From VT State screening tool



                                                        163
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                  Peak as % of calculated demand
                              % of annual kWh
                                                                          savings kW (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer                      Winter    Summer Fall/Spring
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak
Residential       28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%         23%          12%           22%
Commercial 27.7%            5.4%     42.1%       24.8%         55%          56%           55%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).

Freeridership
2%.280

Spillover
7%.281

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$20

Lifetimes
20 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Reference Tables
Fluorescent Fixture Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                         Average               Average
                       Annual Hours          In Use Rate
                          of Use
      Residential        1241282               0.950283
      Commercial         3500284               1.000285




280
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
281
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS
282
    Evaluation of nearly identical southern New England program suggests average daily hours of use of 3.4 (Xenergy,
Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison,
Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
283
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS
284
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
285
    Ibid.



                                                          164
Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: IV-E-2-e (EPP, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History

                                       Accepted with          Referred to
                   Accepted As Is          Edits                TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 2/2/01
Draft date: 9/15/01


Description
An existing incandescent lighting fixture is replaced by a dedicated fluorescent fixture (including table
lamps but excluding torchieres).

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 0.0754  HOURS  ISR

Demand Savings
kWj = (kWh /HOURS)

Where:
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         0.0754 = average kilowattage reduction286
         HOURS = average hours of use per year (see table below)
         ISR    = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used (see table below)
         kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Annual Operations and Maintenance Savings
               Annual O&M Savings287
Residential                  $1.28
Commercial                   $18.80

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light fixture with sufficient usage to justify replacement.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a fluorescent fixture.




286
    From evaluation of nearly identical program in southern New England (Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of
Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern
Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
287
    From VT State screening tool



                                                        165
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                               Peak as % of connected load kW
                               % of annual kWh
                                                                            (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer                   Winter   Summer Fall/Spring
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak
Residential       28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%         23%          12%           22%
Commercial 27.7%            5.4%     42.1%       24.8%         55%          56%           55%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).

Freeridership
2%.288

Spillover
7%.289

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$20

Lifetimes
20 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




288
      Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
289
      Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS



                                                       166
Reference Tables
Fluorescent Fixture Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                         Average               Average
                       Annual Hours          In Use Rate
                          of Use
      Residential        1241290                0.95291
      Commercial         3500292               1.000293

Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
                     Efficient Measures                    Baseline Measures
 Component           Cost294          Life295              Cost                    Life
Lamp                 $6.00            6.45 years           $1.00                   0.6 years
Ballast              $14.00           32.23 years          N/A                     N/A




290
    Evaluation of nearly identical southern New England program suggests average daily hours of use of 3.4 (Xenergy,
Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison,
Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
291
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
292
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
293
    Ibid.
294
    Costs do not include labor rates as homeowner is expected to carry out maintance.
295
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                          167
Torchiere
Measure Number: IV-E-3-a (EPP, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History

                                         Accepted with         Referred to
                     Accepted As Is          Edits               TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: New Measure
Draft date: 2/2/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
An existing halogen torchiere is replaced by a fluorescent fixture.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 0.222  HOURS  ISR

Demand Savings
kWj = (kWh /HOURS)

Where:
            kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            0.222 = average kilowattage reduction296
            HOURS = average hours of use per year (see table below)
            ISR   = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used (see table below)
            kW   = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Annual Operations and Maintenance Savings

                      Annual O&M Savings297
Residential                     $13.88
Commercial                      $36.08


Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light fixture with sufficient usage to justify replacement.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a fluorescent fixture.




296
      Assumes 300 watt typical halogen 78 watt CFL torchiere. [edited by CN]
297
      From VT State screening tool



                                                         168
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                Peak as % of connected load kW
                            % of annual kWh
                                                                             (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer                    Winter   Summer Fall/Spring
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak
Residential       28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%         23%          12%           22%
Commercial 27.7%            5.4%     42.1%       24.8%         55%          56%           55%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).

Freeridership
2%.298

Spillover
12%.299

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Incremental Cost
$50

Lifetimes
10 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Reference Tables
Flourescent Torchiere Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                        Average             Average
                      Annual Hours        In Use Rate
                         of Use
      Residential       1241300                0.881301
      Commercial        3500302                1.000303




298
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
299
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
300
    Same as for flourescent hard-wired fixtures. [edited by CN]
301
    Same as for flourescent hard-wired fixtures. [edited by CN]
302
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
303
    Ibid.



                                                          169
Torchiere
Measure Number: IV-E-3-b (EPP, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History

                                      Accepted with          Referred to
                   Accepted As Is         Edits                TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 2/2/01
Draft date: 6/01/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
An existing halogen torchiere is replaced by a fluorescent fixture.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 0.243  HOURS  ISR

Demand Savings
kWj = (kWh /HOURS)

Where:
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         0.243 = average kilowattage reduction304
         HOURS = average hours of use per year (see table below)
         ISR   = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used (see table below)
         kW   = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Annual Operations and Maintenance Savings

                   Annual O&M Savings305
Residential                  $13.88
Commercial                   $36.08


Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent of halogen torciere with sufficient usage to justify replacement.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a fluorescent torchiere.




304
    Assumes 300 watt typical halogen replaced by a 57.3 watt CFL torchiere. [CLF wattage is an average of more than
3600 distributed by EVT in 2000 torchiere turn-in event. These represent the vast majority of torchieres rebated in
2000.]
305
    From VT State screening tool



                                                       170
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                Peak as % of connected load kW
                            % of annual kWh
                                                                             (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer                    Winter   Summer Fall/Spring
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak
Residential       28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%         23%          12%           22%
Commercial 27.7%            5.4%     42.1%       24.8%         55%          56%           55%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).

Freeridership
2%.306

Spillover
12%.307

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Incremental Cost
$50

Lifetimes
10 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Reference Tables
Flourescent Torchiere Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                        Average             Average
                      Annual Hours        In Use Rate
                         of Use
      Residential       1241308                0.950309
      Commercial        3500310                1.000311




306
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
307
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
308
    Same as for flourescent hard-wired fixtures. [edited by CN]
309
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
310
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
311
    Ibid.



                                                          171
Torchiere
Measure Number: IV-E-3-c (EPP, Lighting End Use)
Version Date & Revision History

                                      Accepted with          Referred to
                   Accepted As Is         Edits                TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 2/2/01
Draft date: 6/01/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
An existing halogen torchiere is replaced by a fluorescent fixture.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 0.243  HOURS  ISR

Demand Savings
kWj = (kWh /HOURS)

Where:
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         0.243 = average kilowattage reduction312
         HOURS = average hours of use per year (see table below)
         ISR   = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used (see table below)
         kW   = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Annual Operations and Maintenance Savings

                   Annual O&M Savings313
Residential                  $13.88
Commercial                   $36.08


Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light fixture with sufficient usage to justify replacement.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a fluorescent fixture.




312
    Assumes 300 watt typical halogen replaced by a 57.3 watt CFL torchiere. [CLF wattage is an average of moer than
3600 distributed by EVT in 2000 torchiere turn-in event. These represent the vast majority of torchieres rebated in
2000.]
313
    From VT State screening tool



                                                       172
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                Peak as % of calculated demand
                            % of annual kWh
                                                                        savings kW (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer                    Winter    Summer Fall/Spring
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak
Residential       28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%         23%          12%           22%
Commercial 27.7%            5.4%     42.1%       24.8%         55%          56%           55%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).

Freeridership
2%.314

Spillover
12%.315

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Incremental Cost
$50

Lifetimes
10 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Reference Tables
Flourescent Torchiere Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                        Average             Average
                      Annual Hours        In Use Rate
                         of Use
      Residential       1241316                0.950317
      Commercial        3500318                1.000319




314
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
315
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
316
    Same as for flourescent hard-wired fixtures. [edited by CN]
317
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
318
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
319
    Ibid.



                                                          173
Torchiere
Measure Number: IV-E-3-d (EPP, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History

                                          Accepted with         Referred to
                      Accepted As Is          Edits               TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 2/2/01
Draft date: 9/15/01


Description
An existing halogen torchiere is replaced by a fluorescent torchiere.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 0.243  HOURS  ISR

Demand Savings
kWj = (kWh /HOURS)

Where:
            kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            0.243 = average kilowattage reduction320
            HOURS = average hours of use per year (see table below)
            ISR   = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used (see table below)
            kW   = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Annual Operations and Maintenance Savings

                      Annual O&M Savings321
Residential                     $13.88
Commercial                      $36.08

See reference tables below.

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is a halogen torchiere fixture with sufficient usage to justify replacement.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a fluorescent fixture.




320
      Assumes 300 watt typical halogen 57 watt CFL torchiere (as per EVT data collected at Torchiere Turn-In Event)
321
      From VT State screening tool



                                                          174
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                             (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer                    Winter   Summer Fall/Spring
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak
Residential       28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%         23%          12%           22%
Commercial 27.7%            5.4%     42.1%       24.8%         55%          56%           55%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).

Freeridership
2%.322

Spillover
12%.323

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Incremental Cost
$50

Lifetimes
10 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Reference Tables
Flourescent Torchiere Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                         Average            Average
                       Annual Hours       In Use Rate
                          of Use
      Residential        1241324                0.95325
      Commercial         3500326               1.000327


Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
                    Efficient Measures                    Baseline Measures
 Component          Cost328            Life329            Cost                Life
Lamp                $24.00             6.45 years         $10.00              0.6 years




322
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
323
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
324
    Same as for flourescent hard-wired fixtures. [edited by CN]
325
    Same as for flourescent hard-wired fixtures. [edited by CN]
326
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
327
    Ibid.
328
    Costs do not include labor rates associated with mainance as homeowner is expected to carry out task.
329
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                          175
Torchiere
Measure Number: IV-E-3-e (EPP, Lighting End Use)
Version Date & Revision History

Draft date: 2/15/02
Effective date:

Referenced Documents: 1) 2002_torchiere_savings.doc; 2) 2001_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls; 3) Xenergy,
Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for
Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July
23, 2000

Description
A high efficiency florescent torchiere replaces a halogen torchiere of baseline efficiency.

Estimated Measure Impacts

                           Average Annual MWH               Average number of          Average Annual MWH
                           Savings per unit                 measures per year          savings per year
      Residential          .3195                            2086                       666.5
      Commercial           .9485                            232                        220


Algorithms

Energy Savings
kWh = 0.271  HOURS  ISR

kWh (Residential)           = 319.5
kWh (Commercial)            = 948.5

Demand Savings
kW = (kWh /HOURS)

kW(Residential)              = .2574
kW(Commercial)               = .2710

Where:
           0.271330          = average kilowattage reduction
           HOURS331          = average hours of use per year
           ISR332            = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used
           kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
           kW333            = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is halogen torchiere with sufficient usage to justify replacement.

330
    Assumed difference in wattage between installed torchiere and the baseline product it replaces. 271 watts based on
EVT analysis of torchieres rebated through Efficient Products Program during 2001 (see
2001_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls).
331
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.
332
    ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR at each application.
333
    Demand savings calculated based on assumed energy savings using Vermont State Cost Effectiveness Screening
Tool.



                                                         176
High Efficiency
High efficiency is a torchiere designed for operation with pin-based CFLs.

Operating Hours
Residential: 1241334 hours / year
Commercial: 3500335 hours / year
Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                                                                  Peak as % of calculated demand
                              % of annual kWh
                                                                          savings kW (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer                      Winter    Summer Fall/Spring
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak
Residential       28.7%      7.6%      36.0%     27.7%         23%         12%                   22%
Commercial 27.7%             5.4%      42.1%     24.8%         55%         56%                   55%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (indoor lighting load shapes).
Freeridership
2%.336
Spillover
12%.337
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
10 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.
Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $50.
Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $20.
O&M Cost Adjustments
                    Annual O&M Savings338
Residential                    $2.70
Commercial                     $8.43

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.
Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.




334
    Evaluation of nearly identical southern New England program suggests average daily hours of use of 3.4 (Xenergy,
Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison,
Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
335
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
336
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
337
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
338
    From VT State screening tool



                                                         177
Reference Tables
Fluorescent Torchiere Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                          Average            Average
                        Annual Hours       In Use Rate
                           of Use
      Residential           1241              0.950339
      Commercial            3500              1.000340


Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential

                Efficient Measures                       Baseline Measures
                                            341
Component       Cost                    Life             Cost                Life
Lamp            $7.50                   6.44 years       $6.00               1.61 years

Commercial

                Efficient Measures                       Baseline Measures
                                            342
Component       Cost                    Life             Cost                Life
Lamp            $7.50                   3.42 years       $6.00               0.57 years


Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time


Daily Burn Time         Lamp Lifetime     Lamp Lifetime
                           Hours             Years
          1                3,000              8.22
          2                5,000              6.85
          3                7,000              6.39
          4                9,000              6.16
          5                9,500              5.21
          6                10,000             4.57
          8                12,000             4.11
          10               12,000             3.29
          12               12,000             2.74
          24               12,000             1.37




339
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
340
    Ibid.
341
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
342
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                         178
Torchiere
(2002 CORRECTION PER SAVINGS VERIFICATION)

Measure Number: IV-E-3-e(a) (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     2/15/02
Effective date: 6/15/02
End date:       12/31/02

Referenced Documents: 1) 2002_torchiere_savings.doc; 2) 2001_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls; 3) Xenergy,
Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for
Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July
23, 2000

Description
A high efficiency florescent torchiere replaces a halogen torchiere of baseline efficiency.

Estimated Measure Impacts

                           Average Annual MWH               Average number of          Average Annual MWH
                           Savings per unit                 measures per year          savings per year
      Residential                   0.2466                         2086                          514.4
      Commercial                    0.7321                          232                          169.8


Algorithms

Energy Savings
kWh = kW  HOURS  ISR
kWh (Residential) = 246.6
kWh (Commercial)  = 732.1

Demand Savings
kW = (kWh /HOURS)
kW(Residential)    = 0.1987
kW(Commercial)     = 0..2092

Where:

           HOURS343          = average hours of use per year
           ISR344            = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used
           kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
           kW345            = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is halogen torchiere with sufficient usage to justify replacement.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is a torchiere designed for operation with pin-based CFLs.


343
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.
344
    ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR at each application.
345
    Demand savings calculated based on assumed energy savings using Vermont State Cost Effectiveness Screening
Tool.



                                                         179
Operating Hours
Residential: 1241346 hours / year
Commercial: 3500347 hours / year
Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                                                                  Peak as % of calculated kW savings
                               % of annual kWh
                                                                                 (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer                      Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
                   Peak Off-Peak      Peak      Off-Peak
Residential       28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%         23%         12%                   22%
Commercial        27.7%     5.4%     42.1%       24.8%         55%         56%                   55%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (indoor lighting load shapes).

Freeridership
2%.348

Spillover
12%.349

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
10 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $50.

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $25.

O&M Cost Adjustments
              Annual O&M Savings350
Residential                    $2.70
Commercial                     $8.43

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.




346
    Evaluation of nearly identical southern New England program suggests average daily hours of use of 3.4 (Xenergy,
Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison,
Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
347
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
348
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
349
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
350
    From VT State screening tool



                                                         180
Torchiere
Measure Number: IV-E-3-f (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     Portfolio 19
Effective date: 1/1/03
End date:       TBD

Referenced Documents: 1) 2003_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls; 3) Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of
Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth
Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000

Description
A high efficiency fluorescent torchiere replaces a halogen torchiere of baseline efficiency.

Estimated Measure Impacts

                              Average Annual MWH              Average number of           Average Annual MWH
                              Savings per unit                measures per year           savings per year
      Residential                      0.2579                        4,326                         1,115.7
      Commercial                       0.7896                         359                           283.5


Algorithms

Demand Savings
kW = ((WattsBASE – WattsEE) /1000)* ISkW(Residential) = ((283-64.3)/1000)* 0.95) = 0.2078
kW(Commercial) =((292.5-66.9)/1000)*1.0) = 0.2256


Energy Savings
kWh                            = kW  HOURS
kWh (Residential)              = (0.2078 * 1241) = 257.9
kWh (Commercial)               = (0.2256 * 3500) = 789.6

Where:
            kW                 = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
            WattsBASE           = Baseline connected kW
            WattsEE             = Energy efficient connected kW
            kWh                = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            ISR                 = In service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used 351
            HOURS               = average hours of use per year352

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is halogen torchiere with sufficient usage to justify replacement.




351
      ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR at each application.
352
      Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.



                                                           181
High Efficiency
High efficiency is a torchiere designed for operation with pin-based CFLs.

Operating Hours
Residential: 1241353 hours / year
Commercial: 3500354 hours / year

Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                                                                  Peak as % of calculated kW savings
                               % of annual kWh
                                                                                 (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer                      Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
                   Peak Off-Peak      Peak      Off-Peak
Residential       28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%         23%         12%                   22%
Commercial        27.7%     5.4%     42.1%       24.8%         55%         56%                   55%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (indoor lighting load shapes).

Freeridership
2%.355

Spillover
12%.356

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
10 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $50.

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $20.

O&M Cost Adjustments
              Annual O&M Savings357
Residential                    $2.70
Commercial                     $8.43

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.


353
    Evaluation of nearly identical southern New England program suggests average daily hours of use of 3.4 (Xenergy,
Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison,
Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
354
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
355
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
356
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
357
    From VT State screening tool



                                                         182
Reference Tables


Fluorescent Torchiere Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                        Average             Average
                      Annual Hours        In Use Rate
                         of Use
      Residential         1241              0.950358
      Commercial          3500              1.000359


Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential
                Efficient Measures                      Baseline Measures
                                              360
Component             Cost                Life                Cost               Life
Lamp                  $7.50             6.44 years            $6.00           1.61 years

Commercial
                Efficient Measures                      Baseline Measures
                                              361
Component             Cost                Life                Cost               Life
Lamp                  $7.50             3.42 years            $6.00           0.57 years


Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time
 Daily Burn Time      Lamp Lifetime      Lamp Lifetime
                         Hours              Years
          1              3,000               8.22
          2              5,000               6.85
          3              7,000               6.39
          4              9,000               6.16
          5              9,500               5.21
          6              10,000              4.57
          8              12,000              4.11
          10             12,000              3.29
          12             12,000              2.74
          24             12,000              1.37




358
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
359
    Ibid.
360
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
361
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                       183
Torchiere
Measure Number: IV-E-3-g (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)
Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     Portfolio 24
Effective date: 1/1/04
End date:       TBD

Referenced Documents: 1) 2004_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls; 3) Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of
Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth
Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000

Description
A high efficiency ENERGY STAR fluorescent torchiere replaces a halogen torchiere of baseline
efficiency.

Estimated Measure Impacts

                              Average Annual MWH              Average number of           Average Annual MWH
                              Savings per unit                measures per year           savings per year
      Residential                      0.2611                        4,000                         1,044.4
      Commercial                       0.7700                         300                            231


Algorithms

Demand Savings
kW = ((WattsBASE – WattsEE) /1000)* ISR
kW(Residential) = ((286.8-65.3)/1000)* 0.95) = 0.2104
kW(Commercial) =((284.2-64.2)/1000)*1.0) = 0.2200


Energy Savings
kWh                            = kW  HOURS
kWh (Residential)              = (0.2104 * 1241) = 261.1
kWh (Commercial)               = (0.2200 * 3500) = 770.0

Where:
            kW                 = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
            WattsBASE           = Baseline connected kW
            WattsEE             = Energy efficient connected kW
            kWh                = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            ISR                 = In service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used 362
            HOURS               = average hours of use per year363

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is halogen torchiere with sufficient usage to justify replacement.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a ENERGY STAR torchiere designed for operation with pin-based CFLs.

362
      ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR at each application.
363
      Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.



                                                           184
Operating Hours
Residential: 1241364 hours / year
Commercial: 3500365 hours / year

Loadshape
Residential Indoor Lighting, #1
Commercial Indoor Lighting ,#12
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.


Freeridership
2%366

Spillover
12%367

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
10 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $20.

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $20.

O&M Cost Adjustments
              Annual O&M Savings368
Residential                    $2.70
Commercial                     $8.43

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.


Reference Tables
Fluorescent Torchiere Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                  Average           Average
                  Annual Hours      In Use Rate
                  of Use
Residential       1241              0.950369

364
    Evaluation of nearly identical southern New England program suggests average daily hours of use of 3.4 (Xenergy,
Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison,
Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
365
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
366
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
367
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
368
    From VT State screening tool



                                                         185
 Commercial          3500                1.000370

 Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings

 Residential
                Efficient Measures                     Baseline Measures
                                              371
 Component             Cost               Life                Cost                Life
 Lamp                  $7.50            6.44 years            $6.00            1.61 years

 Commercial
Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time


                Efficient Measures                     Baseline Measures
                                              372
 Component             Cost               Life                Cost                Life
 Lamp                  $7.50            3.42 years            $6.00            0.57 years


 Daily Burn Time      Lamp Lifetime       Lamp Lifetime
                         Hours               Years
         1               3,000                8.22
         2               5,000                6.85
         3               7,000                6.39
         4               9,000                6.16
         5               9,500                5.21
         6               10,000               4.57
         8               12,000               4.11
         10              12,000               3.29
         12              12,000               2.74
         24              12,000               1.37




 369
     Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
 370
     Ibid.
 371
     Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
 372
     Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                      186
Torchiere
Measure Number: IV-E-3-h (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)
Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     Portfolio 28
Effective date: 7/1/04
End date:       TBD

Referenced Documents: 1) 2004_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls; 3) Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of
Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth
Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000

Description
A high efficiency ENERGY STAR fluorescent torchiere replaces a halogen torchiere of baseline
efficiency.

Estimated Measure Impacts

                           Average Annual MWH               Average number of           Average Annual MWH
                           Savings per unit                 measures per year           savings per year
      Residential                   0.2611                         4,000                         1,044.4
      Commercial                    0.8624                          300                           258.7


Algorithms

Demand Savings
kW = ((WattsBASE – WattsEE) /1000)  ISR  WHFd
kW(Residential) = ((286.8-65.3)/1000)  0.95)  1.0 = 0.2104
kW(Commercial) =((284.2-64.2)/1000)  1.0)  1.4 = 0.3080


Energy Savings
kWh                         = kW  HOURS  WHFe / WHFd
kWh (Residential)           = (0.2104  1241)  1.0 / 1.0 = 261.1
kWh (Commercial)            = (0.3080  3500)  1.12 / 1.4= 862.4

Where:
           kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
           WattsBASE         = Baseline connected kW
           WattsEE           = Energy efficient connected kW
           kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
           ISR               = In service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used 373
           WHFd              = Waste heat factor for demand to account for cooling savings from efficient lighting.
                               For a cooled space, the value is 1.40 (calculated as 1 + 1 / 2.5). Based on 2.5 COP
                               cooling system efficiency. For an uncooled space, the value is one. The Winter and
                               Fall/Spring coincident factors in loadshape #63 have been decreased to offset the
                               increase in the kW due to the WHFd. Therefore, the cooling savings are only added
                               to the summer peak savings.374
           WHFe              = Waste heat factor for energy to account for cooling savings from efficient lighting. For



373
   ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR in each application.
374
   Waste heat factor differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for WHF d in each
application.



                                                         187
                                a cooled space, the value is 1.12 (calculated as 1 + 0.29 / 2.5). Based on 0.29
                                ASHRAE Lighting waste heat cooling factor for Vermont 375 and 2.5 C.O.P. typical
                                cooling system efficiency. For an uncooled space, the value is one. 376

         HOURS                = average hours of use per year377

Waste Heat Adjustment
Cooling savings are incorporated into the electric savings algorithm with the waste heat factor (WHF). See
above.


Heating Increased Usage
MMBTUWH                = (kWh / WHFe)  0.003413  HF / 0.75
MMBTUWH (Residential) = (261.1/ 1)  0.003413  0.00 / 0.75 = 0.0
MMBTUWH (Commercial) = (862.4 / 1.12)  0.003413  0.39 / 0.75 = 1.367

Where:
         MMBTUWH             = gross customer annual heating MMBTU fuel increased usage for the measure
                              from the reduction in lighting heat.
         0.003413           = conversion from kWh to MMBTU
         HF                 = ASHRAE heating factor for lighting waste heat for Burlington, Vermont 378
         0.75               = average heating system efficiency
         Oil heating is assumed typical for commercial.


Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is halogen torchiere with sufficient usage to justify replacement.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a ENERGY STAR torchiere designed for operation with pin-based CFLs.

Operating Hours
Residential: 1241379 hours / year
Commercial: 3500380 hours / year

Loadshape
Residential:, Loadshape, #1: Residential Indoor Lighting
Commercial:, Loadshape #63: Commercial Indoor Lighting with cooling bonus. This is a combined
lighting and cooling loadshape
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.


Freeridership/Spillover Factors

 Measure Category                            Light Bulb/Lamps
 Measure Code                                  LBLTORCH


375
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993
376
    Waste heat factor differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for WHFe in each application.
377
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.
378
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993. Heating factor
differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HF in each application.
379
    Evaluation of nearly identical southern New England program suggests average daily hours of use of 3.4 (Xenergy,
Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison,
Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
380
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.



                                                         188
                                         Torchiere, Compact
 Product Description                          Fluorescent
 Track Name                Track No.     Freerider Spillover
 Act250 NC                 6014A250         n/a         n/a
 Cust Equip Rpl            6013CUST         n/a         n/a
 Farm NC                   6014FARM         n/a         n/a
 Farm Equip Rpl            6013FARM         n/a         n/a
 Non Act 250 NC            6014NANC         n/a         n/a
 Pres Equip Rpl            6013PRES         n/a         n/a
 C&I Retro                 6012CNIR         n/a         n/a
 MF Mkt Retro              6012MFMR         n/a         n/a
 Efficient Products        6032EPEP        0.98        1.12
 LISF Retrofit             6034LISF         n/a         n/a
 LIMF Retrofit             6017RETR         n/a         n/a
 LIMF NC                   6018LINC         n/a         n/a
 LIMF Rehab                6018LIRH         n/a         n/a
 RES Retrofit              6036RETR         n/a         n/a
 RNC VESH                  6038VESH         n/a         n/a
 MF Mkt NC                 6019MFNC         n/a         n/a
 Customer Credit           6015CC           n/a         n/a

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
10 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $20.

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $20.

O&M Cost Adjustments
              Annual O&M Savings381
Residential                      $2.70
Commercial                       $8.43

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
See Heating Increased Usage above.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.




381
      From VT State screening tool



                                                    189
 Reference Tables
 Hours of Use,In Use Rates, and Waste Heat Factors by Customer Type
                       Average
                                        Average
                    Annual Hours                        WHFd                             WHFe                 HF
                                      In Use Rate
                        of Use
   Residential         1,241382          0.95383          1.0                              1.0                0.0
                             384
   Commercial          3,500              1.0385          1.4                             1.12               0.39

 Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings

 Residential
                 Efficient Measures                        Baseline Measures
                                                  386
 Component               Cost                Life                  Cost                 Life
 Lamp                    $7.50             6.44 years              $6.00             1.61 years

 Commercial
                 Efficient Measures                        Baseline Measures
 Component               Cost                Life387               Cost                 Life
 Lamp                    $7.50             3.42 years              $6.00             0.57 years

Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time
 Daily Burn Time        Lamp Lifetime        Lamp Lifetime
                           Hours                Years
         1                 3,000                 8.22
         2                 5,000                 6.85
         3                 7,000                 6.39
         4                 9,000                 6.16
         5                 9,500                 5.21
         6                 10,000                4.57
         8                 12,000                4.11
         10                12,000                3.29
         12                12,000                2.74
         24                12,000                1.37




 382
     Evaluation of nearly identical southern New England program suggests average daily hours of use of 3.4 (Xenergy,
 Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison,
 Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
 383
     Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
 384
     Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
 385
     Ibid.
 386
     Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
 387
     Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                          190
Torchiere
Measure Number: IV-E-3-i (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)
Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     Portfolio 31
Effective date: 1/1/04
End date:       TBD

Referenced Documents: 1) 2005_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls;
Description
A high efficiency ENERGY STAR fluorescent torchiere replaces a mix of halogen and incandescent
torchieres..

Estimated Measure Impacts

                           Average Annual MWH                Average number of           Average Annual MWH
                           Savings per unit                  measures per year           savings per year
      Residential                   0.1052                          4,000                          420.8
      Commercial                    0.8624                           300                           258.7


Algorithms

Demand Savings
kW = ((((Watts) /1000)  ISR  WHFd
kW(Residential) = ((115.8)/1000)  0.83)  1.0 = 0.0961
kW(Commercial) =((284.2-64.2)/1000)  1.0)  1.4 = 0.3080


Energy Savings
kWh                          = kW  HOURS  WHFe / WHFd
kWh (Residential)            = (0.0961  1095)  1.0 / 1.0 = 105.2
kWh (Commercial)             = (0.3080  3500)  1.12 / 1.4= 862.4

Where:
           Watts             = EVT and DPS October 2004 negotiated delta watts from WattsBASE – WattsEE
           kW                = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
           WattsBASE          = Baseline connected kW
           WattsEE            = Energy efficient connected kW
           kWh               = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
           ISR                = In service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used 388
           WHFd               = Waste heat factor for demand to account for cooling savings from efficient lighting.
                                For a cooled space, the value is 1.40 (calculated as 1 + 1 / 2.5). Based on 2.5 COP
                                cooling system efficiency. For an uncooled space, the value is one. The Winter and
                                Fall/Spring coincident factors in loadshape #63 have been decreased to offset the
                                increase in the kW due to the WHFd. Therefore, the cooling savings are only added
                                to the summer peak savings.389
           WHFe               = Waste heat factor for energy to account for cooling savings from efficient lighting. For
                                a cooled space, the value is 1.12 (calculated as 1 + 0.29 / 2.5). Based on 0.29
                                ASHRAE Lighting waste heat cooling factor for Vermont 390 and 2.5 C.O.P. typical
                                cooling system efficiency. For an uncooled space, the value is one. 391

388
    ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR in each application.
389
    Waste heat factor differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for WHF d in each
application.
390
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993



                                                          191
         HOURS                = average hours of use per year392

Waste Heat Adjustment
Cooling savings are incorporated into the electric savings algorithm with the waste heat factor (WHF). See
above.


Heating Increased Usage
MMBTUWH                = (kWh / WHFe)  0.003413  HF / 0.75
MMBTUWH (Residential) = (105.2/ 1)  0.003413  0.00 / 0.75 = 0.0
MMBTUWH (Commercial) = (862.4 / 1.12)  0.003413  0.39 / 0.75 = 1.367

Where:
         MMBTUWH             = gross customer annual heating MMBTU fuel increased usage for the measure
                              from the reduction in lighting heat.
         0.003413           = conversion from kWh to MMBTU
         HF                 = ASHRAE heating factor for lighting waste heat for Burlington, Vermont 393
         0.75               = average heating system efficiency
         Oil heating is assumed typical for commercial.


Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is halogen torchiere with sufficient usage to justify replacement.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a ENERGY STAR torchiere designed for operation with pin-based CFLs.

Operating Hours
Residential: 1095 hours / year
Commercial: 3500394 hours / year

Loadshape
Residential:, Loadshape, #1: Residential Indoor Lighting
Commercial:, Loadshape #63: Commercial Indoor Lighting with cooling bonus. This is a combined
lighting and cooling loadshape
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.


Freeridership/Spillover Factors

 Measure Category                           Light Bulb/Lamps
 Measure Code                                  LBLTORCH
                                           Torchiere, Compact
 Product Description                            Fluorescent
 Track Name               Track No.        Freerider Spillover
 Act250 NC                6014A250            n/a        n/a
 Cust Equip Rpl           6013CUST            n/a        n/a
 Farm NC                  6014FARM            n/a        n/a

391
    Waste heat factor differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for WHFe in each application.
392
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.
393
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993. Heating factor
differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HF in each application.
394
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.



                                                         192
 Farm Equip Rpl         6013FARM            n/a        n/a
 Non Act 250 NC         6014NANC            n/a        n/a
 Pres Equip Rpl         6013PRES            n/a        n/a
 C&I Retro              6012CNIR            n/a        n/a
 MF Mkt Retro           6012MFMR            n/a        n/a
 Efficient Products     6032EPEP           0.94       1.03
 LISF Retrofit          6034LISF            n/a        n/a
 LIMF Retrofit          6017RETR            n/a        n/a
 LIMF NC                6018LINC            n/a        n/a
 LIMF Rehab             6018LIRH            n/a        n/a
 RES Retrofit           6036RETR            n/a        n/a
 RNC VESH               6038VESH            n/a        n/a
 MF Mkt NC              6019MFNC            n/a        n/a
 Customer Credit        6015CC              n/a        n/a

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
10 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $20.

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $15.

O&M Cost Adjustments
              Annual O&M Savings395
Residential                  $2.70
Commercial                   $8.43

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
See Heating Increased Usage above.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.


Reference Tables
Hours of Use,In Use Rates, and Waste Heat Factors by Customer Type
                      Average
                                       Average
                   Annual Hours                        WHFd                      WHFe                HF
                                     In Use Rate
                       of Use
  Residential          1,095            0.83396          1.0                       1.0               0.0
                            397
  Commercial          3,500              1.0398          1.4                      1.12              0.39


395
    From VT State screening tool
396
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
397
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
398
    Ibid.



                                                     193
 Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings

 Residential
                    Efficient Measures                         Baseline Measures
                                                     399
 Component                  Cost                Life                   Cost           Life
 Lamp                       $7.50              6.39years               $6.00       1.61 years

 Commercial
                    Efficient Measures                         Baseline Measures
                                                     400
 Component                  Cost                 Life                  Cost           Life
 Lamp                       $7.50              3.42 years              $6.00       0.57 years
Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time
 Daily Burn Time           Lamp Lifetime        Lamp Lifetime
                              Hours                Years
            1                 3,000                 8.22
            2                 5,000                 6.85
            3                 7,000                 6.39
            4                 9,000                 6.16
            5                 9,500                 5.21
            6                 10,000                4.57
            8                 12,000                4.11
            10                12,000                3.29
            12                12,000                2.74
            24                12,000                1.37




 399
       Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
 400
       Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                             194
Torchiere
Measure Number: IV-E-3-j (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)
Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     Portfolio 37
Effective date: 1/1/05
End date:       TBD

Referenced Documents: 1) 2005_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls;
Description
A high efficiency ENERGY STAR fluorescent torchiere replaces a mix of halogen and incandescent
torchieres.

Estimated Measure Impacts

                              Average Annual MWH                Average number of           Average Annual MWH
                              Savings per unit                  measures per year           savings per year
      Residential                      0.1052                          4,000                          420.8
      Commercial                       0.3865                           300                           116.0


Algorithms

Demand Savings
kW = ((((Watts) /1000)  ISR  WHFd
kW(Residential) = ((115.8)/1000)  0.83)  1.0 = 0.0961
kW(Commercial) =((115.8)/1000) 0.9)  1.2 = 0.125


Energy Savings
kWh                            = kW  HOURS  WHFe / WHFd
kWh (Residential)              = (0.0961  1095)  1.0 / 1.0 = 105.2
kWh (Commercial)               = (0.125  3500)  1.06 / 1.2= 386.5

Where:
            Watts              = EVT and DPS October 2004 negotiated delta watts from WattsBASE – WattsEE
            kW                 = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
            WattsBASE           = Baseline connected kW
            WattsEE             = Energy efficient connected kW
            kWh                = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            ISR                 = In service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used 401
            WHFd                = Waste heat factor for demand to account for cooling savings from efficient
                                  lighting. For a cooled space, the value is 1.2 (calculated as 1 (0.50*(0.85) /
                                  2.5)). Based on 2.5 COP cooling system efficiency and assuming 50% of
                                  spaces that are cooled and 85% of lighting heat that needs to be mechanically
                                  cooled at time of summer peak. (From 1993 ASHRAE Journal: Calculating
                                  Lighting and HVAC interactions which assumes that 80% of lighting heat
                                  offsets heating requirements, and 90% of lighting heat needs to be
                                  mechanically cooled.) For an uncooled space, the value is one. The Winter
                                  and Fall/Spring coincident factors in loadshape #63 have been decreased to
                                  offset the increase in the kW due to the WHFd. Therefore, the cooling
                                  savings are only added to the summer peak savings.

401
      ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR in each application.



                                                            195
         WHFe                 = Waste heat factor for energy to account for cooling savings from efficient
                                lighting. For a cooled space, the value is 1.06 (calculated as 1 + (0.50*(0.29) /
                                2.5)). Based on 0.29 ASHRAE Lighting waste heat cooling factor for
                                Vermont 402 and 50% of spaces that are cooled and 2.5 C.O.P. typical cooling
                                system efficiency. For an uncooled space, the value is one. 403
         HOURS                = average hours of use per year404

Waste Heat Adjustment
Cooling savings are incorporated into the electric savings algorithm with the waste heat factor (WHF). See
above.


Heating Increased Usage
MMBTUWH                = (kWh / WHFe)  0.003413  AR  HF / 0.75
MMBTUWH (Residential) = (105.2/ 1)  0.003413  1.00  0.00 / 0.75 = 0.0
MMBTUWH (Commercial) = (386.5 / 1.06)  0.003413  0.70  0.39 / 0.75 = 0.453

Where:
         MMBTUWH           = gross customer annual heating MMBTU fuel increased usage for the measure
                              from the reduction in lighting heat.
         0.003413           = conversion from kWh to MMBTU
         AR                 = Typical aspect ratio factor. ASHRAE heating factor applies to perimeter
                              zoneheat, therefore it must be adjusted to account for lighting in core zones. It
                              is assumed that 70% is the typical square footage of commercial buildings
                              within 15 feet of exterior wall. The assumed aspect ratio for residential
                              buildings is 100%.
         HF                 = ASHRAE heating factor for lighting waste heat for Burlington, Vermont 405
         0.75               = average heating system efficiency
         Oil heating is assumed typical for commercial.


Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is halogen torchiere with sufficient usage to justify replacement.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a ENERGY STAR torchiere designed for operation with pin-based CFLs.

Operating Hours
Residential: 1095 hours / year
Commercial: 3500406 hours / year

Loadshape
Residential:, Loadshape, #1: Residential Indoor Lighting
Commercial:, Loadshape #63: Commercial Indoor Lighting with cooling bonus. This is a combined
lighting and cooling loadshape
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.




402
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993
403
    Waste heat factor differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for WHFe in each application.
404
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.
405
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993. Heating factor
differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HF in each application.
406
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.



                                                         196
Freeridership/Spillover Factors

 Measure Category                         Light Bulb/Lamps
 Measure Code                                LBLTORCH
                                         Torchiere, Compact
 Product Description                          Fluorescent
 Track Name                Track No.     Freerider Spillover
 Act250 NC                 6014A250         n/a         n/a
 Cust Equip Rpl            6013CUST         n/a         n/a
 Farm NC                   6014FARM         n/a         n/a
 Farm Equip Rpl            6013FARM         n/a         n/a
 Non Act 250 NC            6014NANC         n/a         n/a
 Pres Equip Rpl            6013PRES         n/a         n/a
 C&I Retro                 6012CNIR         n/a         n/a
 MF Mkt Retro              6012MFMR         n/a         n/a
 Efficient Products        6032EPEP        0.94        1.03
 LISF Retrofit             6034LISF         n/a         n/a
 LIMF Retrofit             6017RETR         n/a         n/a
 LIMF NC                   6018LINC         n/a         n/a
 LIMF Rehab                6018LIRH         n/a         n/a
 RES Retrofit              6036RETR         n/a         n/a
 RNC VESH                  6038VESH         n/a         n/a
 MF Mkt NC                 6019MFNC         n/a         n/a
 Customer Credit           6015CC           n/a         n/a

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
10 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $20.

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $15.

O&M Cost Adjustments
              Annual O&M Savings407
Residential                      $2.70
Commercial                       $8.43

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
See Heating Increased Usage above.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.

407
      From VT State screening tool



                                                    197
 Reference Tables
 Hours of Use,In Use Rates, and Waste Heat Factors by Customer Type
                    Average         Average
                  Annual Hours     In Service      WHFd      WHFe                   AR           HF
                     of Use           Rate
  Residential        1,095           0.83408        1.0        1.0                   1.0          0.0
                          409
  Commercial        3,500             0.9410        1.2       1.06                   0.7         0.39

 Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings

 Residential
                Efficient Measures                     Baseline Measures
 Component             Cost               Life411             Cost                Life
 Lamp                  $7.50             6.39years            $6.00            1.61 years

 Commercial
                Efficient Measures                     Baseline Measures
                                              412
 Component             Cost               Life                Cost                Life
 Lamp                  $7.50            3.42 years            $6.00            0.57 years

Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time
 Daily Burn Time      Lamp Lifetime       Lamp Lifetime
                         Hours               Years
         1               3,000                8.22
         2               5,000                6.85
         3               7,000                6.39
         4               9,000                6.16
         5               9,500                5.21
         6               10,000               4.57
         8               12,000               4.11
         10              12,000               3.29
         12              12,000               2.74
         24              12,000               1.37




 408
     Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
 409
     Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
 410
     2005 TAG agreement
 411
     Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
 412
     Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                      198
 Dedicated CF Table Lamps
Measure Number: IV-E-4-a (EPP, Lighting End Use)
Version Date & Revision History

Draft date: 9/30/01
Effective date:

Referenced Documents: 1) Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential
Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New
England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000; 2) EVT, Technical Reference Manual, September 15,
2001.

Description
A table lamp dedicated to use with a compact fluorescent bulb replaces a table lamp with an incandescent
bulb.

Estimated Measure Impacts

Customer Class                     Average Annual MWH              Average number of measures    Average Annual MWH
                                   Savings per unit                per year                      savings per year
Residential                        0.0771                          327                           25.21
Commercial                         0.2758                          21                            5.79

Algorithms

Energy Savings
kWh = 0.0788  HOURS  ISR

Demand Savings
kW = (kWh /HOURS)


Where:
            kWh   = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            0.0788 = average kilowattage reduction413
            HOURS = average hours of use per year (see table below)
            ISR    = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used (see table below)
            kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The Baseline reflects a table lamp with an incandescent bulb.
High Efficiency
The High Efficiency reflects a table lamp that is dedicated for use with a plug-in compact fluorescent bulb.
These lamps are inoperable with an incandescent bulb.




413
      Savings based on actual wattage of products available to customers through catalog sale.



                                                            199
Operating Hours
Residential: 2.82 hours / day414; 1029.9 hours / year
Commercial: 9.58 hours / day; 3500415 hours / year
Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                                                                  Peak as % of connected load kW
                              % of annual kWh
                                                                               (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer                      Winter   Summer Fall/Spring
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak
Residential       28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%         23%          12%           22%
Commercial 27.7%            5.4%     42.1%       24.8%         55%          56%           55%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).

Freeridership
2%.416
Spillover
12%.417
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
10 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.
Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $20.418
O&M Cost Adjustments
                    Annual O&M Savings419
Residential                    $0.40
Commercial                     $0.43

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algothrithms or default values for this measure.
Water Descriptions
There are no water algothrithms or default values for this measure.



Reference Tables

Fluorescent Fixture Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                          Average
                        In Use Rate
      Residential          0.95420

414
    2.82 hours of use daily reflect use patters established by VEIC review of nearly identical program in southern New
England. Based on average use in following settings: living room (3.27), bedroom (1.47), den (2.7), family room
(3.27), game room (3.11) and other (3.11). See referenced document: Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint
Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern
Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000.
415
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
416
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS
(same level as applied to residential torchiere measure, see TRM, Sept 15, 2001).
417
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS
(same level as applied to residential torchiere measure, see TRM, Sept 15, 2001)..
418
    Incremental cost based on analysis of materials needed for efficiency upgrade in similar lighting fixtures.
419
    From VT State screening tool
420
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.



                                                         200
      Commercial           1.000421

Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential

                Efficient Measures                         Baseline Measures
Component       Cost                      Life422          Cost                Life
Lamp            $5.10                     9.71 years       $1.00               1.92 years
Ballast         $14.00                    38.83 years      N/A                 N/A

Commercial

                Efficient Measures                         Baseline Measures
                                              423
Component       Cost                      Life             Cost                Life
Lamp            $5.10                     2.86 years       $1.00               0.57 years
Ballast         $14.00                    11.43 years      N/A                 N/A




421
    Ibid.
422
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
423
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                          201
Dedicated CF Table Lamps
Measure Number: IV-E-4-b (EPP, Lighting End Use)
Version Date & Revision History

Draft date:        2/15/02
Effective date:    6/15/02
End date:          6/30/04

Referenced Documents: 1) Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential
Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New
England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000; 2) 2001_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls
Description
A table lamp dedicated to use with a compact fluorescent bulb replaces a table lamp with an incandescent
bulb.

Estimated Measure Impacts

Customer Class                  Average Annual MWH              Average number of         Average Annual MWH
                                Savings per unit                measures per year         savings per year
Residential                     0.0628                          547                       34.4
Commercial                      0.2247                          61                        13.7

Algorithms

Energy Savings
kWh = 0.0642  HOURS  ISR

kWh (Residential)           = 62.8
kWh (Commercial)            = 224.7

Demand Savings
kW = (kWh /HOURS)

kW(Residential)              = .0610
kW(Commercial)               = .0642

Where:
         0.0642424                    = average kilowattage reduction
         HOURS425            = average hours of use per year
         ISR426              = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used
         kWh                = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         kW427              = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The Baseline reflects a table lamp with an incandescent bulb.


424
    Assumed difference in wattage between installed CF Table Lamp and the baseline product it replaces. 64.2 watts
based on EVT analysis of CF Table Lamps rebated through Efficient Products Program during 2001 (see
2001_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls).
425
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.
426
    ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR at each application.
427
    Demand savings calculated based on assumed energy savings using Vermont State Cost Effectiveness Screening
Tool.



                                                         202
High Efficiency
The High Efficiency reflects a table lamp that is dedicated for use with a plug-in compact fluorescent bulb.
These lamps are inoperable with an incandescent bulb.
Operating Hours
Residential: 1029428 hours / year
Commercial: 3500429 hours / year
Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                                                              Peak as % of connected load kW
                            % of annual kWh
                                                                              (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer                  Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak            Off-Peak
Residential       28.7%     7.6%       36.0%       27.7%         23%         12%          22%
Commercial 27.7%            5.4%       42.1%       24.8%         55%         56%          55%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).

Freeridership
2%.430
Spillover
12%.431
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
10 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.
Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $20.432
Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $15.
O&M Cost Adjustments
                    Annual O&M Savings433
Residential                    $0.71
Commercial                     $2.59

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.
Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.

Reference Tables

Fluorescent Fixture Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                          Average              Average

428
    2.82 hours of use daily reflect use patters established by VEIC review of nearly identical program in southern New
England. Based on average use in following settings: living room (3.27), bedroom (1.47), den (2.7), family room
(3.27), game room (3.11) and other (3.11). See referenced document: Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint
Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern
Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000.
429
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
430
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS
(same level as applied to residential torchiere measure, see TRM, Sept 15, 2001).
431
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS
(same level as applied to residential torchiere measure, see TRM, Sept 15, 2001)..
432
    Incremental cost based on analysis of materials needed for efficiency upgrade in similar lighting fixtures.
433
    From VT State screening tool



                                                         203
                        Annual Hours       In Use Rate
                           of Use
      Residential           1029             0.950434
      Commercial            3500             1.000435

Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential

                Efficient Measures                       Baseline Measures
Component       Cost                    Life436          Cost                       Life
Lamp            $4.00                   6.39 years       $1.00                      0.97 years

Commercial

                Efficient Measures                       Baseline Measures
Component       Cost                    Life437          Cost                       Life
Lamp            $4.00                   3.42 years       $1.00                      0.29 years

Lamp Life by Daily Burn Time

Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time         Lamp Lifetime     Lamp Lifetime          Ballast Lifetime         Ballast
                           Hours             Years                    Hours           Lifetime Years
          1                3,000              8.22                   12,000                32.88
          2                5,000              6.85                   20,000                27.40
          3                7,000              6.39                   28,000                25.57
          4                9,000              6.16                   36,000                24.66
          5                9,500              5.21                   38,000                20.82
          6                10,000             4.57                   40,000                18.26
          8                12,000             4.11                   48,000                16.44
          10               12,000             3.29                   48,000                13.15
          12               12,000             2.74                   48,000                10.96
          24               12,000             1.37                   48,000                 5.48




434
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
435
    Ibid.
436
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
437
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                        204
Dedicated CF Table Lamps
Measure Number: IV-E-4-c (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:      Portfolio 28
Effective date: 7/1/04
End date:       TBD

Referenced Documents: 1) Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential
Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New
England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000; 2) 2003_lighting_wattage_EPP_Table Lamps.xls

Description
A table lamp dedicated to use with a compact fluorescent bulb replaces a table lamp with an incandescent
bulb.

Estimated Measure Impacts

Customer Class                 Average Annual MWH               Average number of         Average Annual MWH
                               Savings per unit                 measures per year         savings per year
Residential                              0.048                         215                            10.3
Commercial                              0.1761                           5                             0.9

Algorithms
Demand Savings438
kW                          = ((WattsBASE – WattsEE) /1000)  ISR  WHFd
kW(Residential)             = ((76.3-27.2) / 1000)  0.95)  1.0 = 0.0466
kW(Commercial)              = ((70.2-25.3) / 1000)  1.0)  1.4 = 0.0629

Energy Savings
kWh                         = kW  HOURS  WHFe / WHFd
kWh (Residential)           = (0.0466  1029)  1.0 / 1.0 = 48.0
kWh (Commercial)            = ( 0.0629  3500)  1.12 / 1.4 = 176.1


Where:
         kW                 = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         WattsBASE           = Baseline connected kW
         WattsEE             = Energy efficient connected kW
         kWh                = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         ISR                 = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used 439
         WHFd                = Waste heat factor for demand to account for cooling savings from efficient lighting.
                               For a cooled space, the value is 1.40 (calculated as 1 + 1 / 2.5). Based on 2.5 COP
                               cooling system efficiency. For an uncooled space, the value is one. The Winter and
                               Fall/Spring coincident factors in loadshape #63 have been decreased to offset the
                               increase in the kW due to the WHFd. Therefore, the cooling savings are only added
                               to the summer peak savings.440
         WHFe                = Waste heat factor for energy to account for cooling savings from efficient lighting. For


438
    Assumed difference in wattage between installed CFL and the incandescent bulb it replaces. Based on EVT analysis
of CFLs rebated through Efficient Products Program.
439
    ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR in each application.
440
    Waste heat factor differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for WHF d in each
application.



                                                         205
                                a cooled space, the value is 1.12 (calculated as 1 + 0.29 / 2.5). Based on 0.29
                                ASHRAE Lighting waste heat cooling factor for Vermont 441 and 2.5 C.O.P. typical
                                cooling system efficiency. For an uncooled space, the value is one. 442

         HOURS                = average hours of use per year443

Waste Heat Adjustment
Cooling savings are incorporated into the electric savings algorithm with the waste heat factor (WHF). See
above.

Heating Increased Usage
MMBTUWH                = (kWh / WHFe)  0.003413  HF / 0.75
MMBTUWH (Residential) = (48.0 / 1)  0.003413  0.00 / 0.75 = 0.0
MMBTUWH (Commercial) = (176.1 / 1.12)  0.003413  0.39 / 0.75 = 0.279

Where:
         MMBTUWH             = gross customer annual heating MMBTU fuel increased usage for the measure
                              from the reduction in lighting heat.
         0.003413           = conversion from kWh to MMBTU
         HF                 = ASHRAE heating factor for lighting waste heat for Burlington, Vermont 444
         0.75               = average heating system efficiency
         Oil heating is assumed typical for commercial.


Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The Baseline reflects a table lamp with an incandescent bulb.


High Efficiency
The High Efficiency reflects a table lamp that is dedicated for use with a plug-in compact fluorescent bulb.
These lamps are inoperable with an incandescent bulb.

Operating Hours
Residential: 1029445 hours / year
Commercial: 3500446 hours / year

Loadshape
Residential:, Loadshape, #1: Residential Indoor Lighting
Commercial:, Loadshape #63: Commercial Indoor Lighting with cooling bonus. This is a combined
lighting and cooling loadshape
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.

Freeridership/Spillover Factors

 Measure Category                            Light Bulb/Lamps

441
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993
442
    Waste heat factor differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for WHFe in each application.
443
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.
444
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993. Heating factor
differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HF in each application.
445
    2.82 hours of use daily reflect use patters established by VEIC review of nearly identical program in southern New
England. Based on average use in following settings: living room (3.27), bedroom (1.47), den (2.7), family room
(3.27), game room (3.11) and other (3.11). See referenced document: Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint
Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern
Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000.
446
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.



                                                         206
 Measure Code                                      LBLTABLE
                                                Table/Desk Lamp,
                                                     Compact
 Product Description                                Fluorescent
 Track Name                  Track No.         Freerider Spillover
 Act250 NC                   6014A250             n/a         n/a
 Cust Equip Rpl              6013CUST             n/a         n/a
 Farm NC                     6014FARM             n/a         n/a
 Farm Equip Rpl              6013FARM             n/a         n/a
 Non Act 250 NC              6014NANC             n/a         n/a
 Pres Equip Rpl              6013PRES             n/a         n/a
 C&I Retro                   6012CNIR             n/a         n/a
 MF Mkt Retro                6012MFMR             n/a         n/a
 Efficient Products          6032EPEP            0.98        1.12
 LISF Retrofit               6034LISF             n/a         n/a
 LIMF Retrofit               6017RETR             n/a         n/a
 LIMF NC                     6018LINC             n/a         n/a
 LIMF Rehab                  6018LIRH             n/a         n/a
 RES Retrofit                6036RETR             n/a         n/a
 RNC VESH                    6038VESH             n/a         n/a
 MF Mkt NC                   6019MFNC             n/a         n/a
 Customer Credit             6015CC               n/a         n/a

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
10 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $20.447

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $15.

O&M Cost Adjustments
              Annual O&M Savings448
Residential                        $0.71
Commercial                         $2.59

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
See Heating Increased Usage above.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.

Reference Tables



447
      Incremental cost based on analysis of materials needed for efficiency upgrade in similar lighting fixtures.
448
      From VT State screening tool



                                                             207
Hours of Use, In Use Rates, and Waste Heat Factors by Customer Type
                      Average
                                       Average
                   Annual Hours                        WHFd                      WHFe                HF
                                     In Use Rate
                       of Use
  Residential          1,029            0.95449         1.0                        1.0               0.0
  Commercial           3,500             1.0450         1.4                       1.12              0.39

Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential
               Efficient Measures                     Baseline Measures
                                             451
Component             Cost               Life                Cost                Life
Lamp                  $4.00            6.39 years            $1.00            0.97 years

Commercial
               Efficient Measures                     Baseline Measures
Component             Cost               Life452             Cost                Life
Lamp                  $4.00            3.42 years            $1.00            0.29 years

Lamp Life by Daily Burn Time

Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time      Lamp Lifetime       Lamp Lifetime     Ballast Lifetime        Ballast
                        Hours               Years               Hours          Lifetime Years
       1                3,000                8.22              12,000               32.88
       2                5,000                6.85              20,000               27.40
       3                7,000                6.39              28,000               25.57
       4                9,000                6.16              36,000               24.66
       5                9,500                5.21              38,000               20.82
       6                10,000               4.57              40,000               18.26
       8                12,000               4.11              48,000               16.44
       10               12,000               3.29              48,000               13.15
       12               12,000               2.74              48,000               10.96
       24               12,000               1.37              48,000                5.48




449
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
450
    Ibid.
451
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
452
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                     208
Dedicated CF Table Lamps
Measure Number: IV-E-4-d (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:      Portfolio 31
Effective date: 1/1/04
End date:       TBD

Referenced Documents: 1) 2005_lighting_wattage_EPP_Table Lamps.xls

Description
A table lamp dedicated to use with a compact fluorescent bulb replaces a table lamp with an incandescent
bulb.

Estimated Measure Impacts

Customer Class                 Average Annual MWH               Average number of         Average Annual MWH
                               Savings per unit                 measures per year         savings per year
Residential                             0.0439                         215                             9.4
Commercial                              0.1761                           5                             0.9

Algorithms
Demand Savings453
kW                          = ((Watts) /1000)  ISR  WHFd
kW(Residential)             = ((48.7) / 1000)  0.95)  1.0 = 0.0463
kW(Commercial)              = ((70.2-25.3) / 1000)  1.0)  1.4 = 0.0629

Energy Savings
kWh                         = kW  HOURS  WHFe / WHFd
kWh (Residential)           = (0.0463  949)  1.0 / 1.0 = 43.9
kWh (Commercial)            = ( 0.0629  3500)  1.12 / 1.4 = 176.1


Where:
         Watts              = EVT and DPS October 2004 Negotiated delta watts from WattsBASE – WattsEE
         kW                 = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         WattsBASE           = Baseline connected kW
         WattsEE             = Energy efficient connected kW
         kWh                = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         ISR                 = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used 454
         WHFd                = Waste heat factor for demand to account for cooling savings from efficient lighting.
                               For a cooled space, the value is 1.40 (calculated as 1 + 1 / 2.5). Based on 2.5 COP
                               cooling system efficiency. For an uncooled space, the value is one. The Winter and
                               Fall/Spring coincident factors in loadshape #63 have been decreased to offset the
                               increase in the kW due to the WHFd. Therefore, the cooling savings are only added
                               to the summer peak savings.455
         WHFe                = Waste heat factor for energy to account for cooling savings from efficient lighting. For



453
    Assumed difference in wattage between installed CFL and the incandescent bulb it replaces. Based on EVT analysis
of CFLs rebated through Efficient Products Program.
454
    ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR in each application.
455
    Waste heat factor differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for WHF d in each
application.



                                                         209
                                a cooled space, the value is 1.12 (calculated as 1 + 0.29 / 2.5). Based on 0.29
                                ASHRAE Lighting waste heat cooling factor for Vermont 456 and 2.5 C.O.P. typical
                                cooling system efficiency. For an uncooled space, the value is one. 457

         HOURS                = average hours of use per year458

Waste Heat Adjustment
Cooling savings are incorporated into the electric savings algorithm with the waste heat factor (WHF). See
above.

Heating Increased Usage
MMBTUWH                = (kWh / WHFe)  0.003413  HF / 0.75
MMBTUWH (Residential) = (43.9 / 1)  0.003413  0.00 / 0.75 = 0.0
MMBTUWH (Commercial) = (176.1 / 1.12)  0.003413  0.39 / 0.75 = 0.279

Where:
         MMBTUWH             = gross customer annual heating MMBTU fuel increased usage for the measure
                              from the reduction in lighting heat.
         0.003413           = conversion from kWh to MMBTU
         HF                 = ASHRAE heating factor for lighting waste heat for Burlington, Vermont 459
         0.75               = average heating system efficiency
         Oil heating is assumed typical for commercial.


Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The Baseline reflects a table lamp with an incandescent bulb.


High Efficiency
The High Efficiency reflects a table lamp that is dedicated for use with a plug-in compact fluorescent bulb.
These lamps are inoperable with an incandescent bulb.

Operating Hours
Residential: 949 hours / year
Commercial: 3500460 hours / year

Loadshape
Residential:, Loadshape, #1: Residential Indoor Lighting
Commercial:, Loadshape #63: Commercial Indoor Lighting with cooling bonus. This is a combined
lighting and cooling loadshape
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.

Freeridership/Spillover Factors

 Measure Category                            Light Bulb/Lamps
 Measure Code                                  LBLTABLE
                                             Table/Desk Lamp,
                                                 Compact
 Product Description                            Fluorescent

456
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993
457
    Waste heat factor differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for WHFe in each application.
458
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.
459
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993. Heating factor
differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HF in each application.
460
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.



                                                         210
 Track Name                  Track No.         Freerider     Spillover
 Act250 NC                   6014A250             n/a           n/a
 Cust Equip Rpl              6013CUST             n/a           n/a
 Farm NC                     6014FARM             n/a           n/a
 Farm Equip Rpl              6013FARM             n/a           n/a
 Non Act 250 NC              6014NANC             n/a           n/a
 Pres Equip Rpl              6013PRES             n/a           n/a
 C&I Retro                   6012CNIR             n/a           n/a
 MF Mkt Retro                6012MFMR             n/a           n/a
 Efficient Products          6032EPEP            0.92          1.04
 LISF Retrofit               6034LISF             n/a           n/a
 LIMF Retrofit               6017RETR             n/a           n/a
 LIMF NC                     6018LINC             n/a           n/a
 LIMF Rehab                  6018LIRH             n/a           n/a
 RES Retrofit                6036RETR             n/a           n/a
 RNC VESH                    6038VESH             n/a           n/a
 MF Mkt NC                   6019MFNC             n/a           n/a
 Customer Credit             6015CC               n/a           n/a

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
10 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $20.461

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $15.

O&M Cost Adjustments
              Annual O&M Savings462
Residential                        $0.71
Commercial                         $2.59

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
See Heating Increased Usage above.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.

Reference Tables




461
      Incremental cost based on analysis of materials needed for efficiency upgrade in similar lighting fixtures.
462
      From VT State screening tool



                                                             211
Hours of Use, In Use Rates, and Waste Heat Factors by Customer Type
                      Average
                                       Average
                   Annual Hours                        WHFd                      WHFe                HF
                                     In Use Rate
                       of Use
  Residential           949             0.95463         1.0                        1.0               0.0
  Commercial           3,500             1.0464         1.4                       1.12              0.39

Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential
               Efficient Measures                     Baseline Measures
                                             465
Component             Cost               Life                Cost                Life
Lamp                  $4.00             6.6 years            $1.00            0.97 years

Commercial
               Efficient Measures                     Baseline Measures
Component             Cost               Life466             Cost                Life
Lamp                  $4.00            3.42 years            $1.00            0.29 years

Lamp Life by Daily Burn Time

Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time      Lamp Lifetime       Lamp Lifetime     Ballast Lifetime        Ballast
                        Hours               Years               Hours          Lifetime Years
       1                3,000                8.22              12,000               32.88
       2                5,000                6.85              20,000               27.40
       3                7,000                6.39              28,000               25.57
       4                9,000                6.16              36,000               24.66
       5                9,500                5.21              38,000               20.82
       6                10,000               4.57              40,000               18.26
       8                12,000               4.11              48,000               16.44
       10               12,000               3.29              48,000               13.15
       12               12,000               2.74              48,000               10.96
       24               12,000               1.37              48,000                5.48




463
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
464
    Ibid.
465
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
466
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                     212
Dedicated CF Table Lamps
Measure Number: IV-E-4-e (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:      Portfolio 37
Effective date: 1/1/05
End date:       TBD

Referenced Documents: 1) 2005_lighting_wattage_EPP_Table Lamps.xls

Description
A table lamp dedicated to use with a compact fluorescent bulb replaces a table lamp with an incandescent
bulb.

Estimated Measure Impacts

Customer Class                 Average Annual MWH              Average number of        Average Annual MWH
                               Savings per unit                measures per year        savings per year
Residential                             0.0439                        215                            9.4
Commercial                              0.1626                          5                            0.8

Algorithms
Demand Savings467
kW                          = ((Watts) /1000)  ISR  WHFd
kW(Residential)             = ((48.7) / 1000)  0.95)  1.0 = 0.0463
kW(Commercial)              = ((48.7) / 1000) 0.9)  1.2 = 0.0526


Energy Savings
kWh                         = kW  HOURS  WHFe / WHFd
kWh (Residential)           = (0.0463  949)  1.0 / 1.0 = 43.9
kWh (Commercial)            = ( 0.0526  3500)  1.06 / 1.2 = 162.6


Where:
         Watts              = EVT and DPS October 2004 Negotiated delta watts from WattsBASE – WattsEE
         kW                 = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         WattsBASE           = Baseline connected kW
         WattsEE             = Energy efficient connected kW
         kWh                = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         ISR                 = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used 468
         WHFd                = Waste heat factor for demand to account for cooling savings from efficient
                               lighting. For a cooled space, the value is 1.2 (calculated (0.50*(0.85) / 2.5)).
                               Based on 2.5 COP cooling system efficiency and assuming 50% of spaces that
                               are cooled and 85% of lighting heat that needs to be mechanically cooled at
                               time of summer peak. (From 1993 ASHRAE Journal: Calculating Lighting
                               and HVAC interactions which assumes that 80% of lighting heat offsets
                               heating requirements, and 90% of lighting heat needs to be mechanically

467
    Assumed difference in wattage between installed CFL and the incandescent bulb it replaces. Based on EVT analysis
of CFLs rebated through Efficient Products Program.
468
    ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR in each application.



                                                        213
                                cooled.) For an uncooled space, the value is one. The Winter and Fall/Spring
                                coincident factors in loadshape #63 have been decreased to offset the increase
                                in the kW due to the WHFd. Therefore, the cooling savings are only added
                                to the summer peak savings.

         WHFe                 = Waste heat factor for energy to account for cooling savings from efficient
                                lighting. For a cooled space, the value is 1.06 (calculated as 1 + (0.50*(0.29) /
                                2.5)). Based on 0.29 ASHRAE Lighting waste heat cooling factor for
                                Vermont 469 and 50% of spaces that are cooled and 2.5 C.O.P. typical cooling
                                system efficiency. For an uncooled space, the value is one. 470
         HOURS                = average hours of use per year471

Waste Heat Adjustment
Cooling savings are incorporated into the electric savings algorithm with the waste heat factor (WHF). See
above.

Heating Increased Usage
MMBTUWH                = (kWh / WHFe)  0.003413  AR  HF / 0.75
MMBTUWH (Residential) = (43.9 / 1)  0.003413  1.00  0.00 / 0.75 = 0.0
MMBTUWH (Commercial) = (162.6 / 1.06)  0.003413  0.70  0.39 / 0.75 = 0.191

Where:
         MMBTUWH             = gross customer annual heating MMBTU fuel increased usage for the measure
                              from the reduction in lighting heat.
         0.003413           = conversion from kWh to MMBTU
         AR                 = Typical aspect ratio factor. ASHRAE heating factor applies to perimeter
                              zoneheat, therefore it must be adjusted to account for lighting in core zones. It
                              is assumed that 70% is the typical square footage of commercial buildings
                              within 15 feet of exterior wall. The assumed aspect ratio for residential
                              buildings is 100%.
         HF                 = ASHRAE heating factor for lighting waste heat for Burlington, Vermont 472
         0.75               = average heating system efficiency
         Oil heating is assumed typical for commercial.


Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The Baseline reflects a table lamp with an incandescent bulb.


High Efficiency
The High Efficiency reflects a table lamp that is dedicated for use with a plug-in compact fluorescent bulb.
These lamps are inoperable with an incandescent bulb.

Operating Hours
Residential: 949 hours / year
Commercial: 3500473 hours / year

Loadshape
Residential:, Loadshape, #1: Residential Indoor Lighting

469
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993
470
    Waste heat factor differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for WHFe in each application.
471
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.
472
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993. Heating factor
differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HF in each application.
473
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.



                                                         214
Commercial:, Loadshape #63: Commercial Indoor Lighting with cooling bonus. This is a combined
lighting and cooling loadshape
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.

Freeridership/Spillover Factors

 Measure Category                               Light Bulb/Lamps
 Measure Code                                      LBLTABLE
                                                Table/Desk Lamp,
                                                     Compact
 Product Description                                Fluorescent
 Track Name                  Track No.         Freerider Spillover
 Act250 NC                   6014A250             n/a         n/a
 Cust Equip Rpl              6013CUST             n/a         n/a
 Farm NC                     6014FARM             n/a         n/a
 Farm Equip Rpl              6013FARM             n/a         n/a
 Non Act 250 NC              6014NANC             n/a         n/a
 Pres Equip Rpl              6013PRES             n/a         n/a
 C&I Retro                   6012CNIR             n/a         n/a
 MF Mkt Retro                6012MFMR             n/a         n/a
 Efficient Products          6032EPEP            0.92        1.04
 LISF Retrofit               6034LISF             n/a         n/a
 LIMF Retrofit               6017RETR             n/a         n/a
 LIMF NC                     6018LINC             n/a         n/a
 LIMF Rehab                  6018LIRH             n/a         n/a
 RES Retrofit                6036RETR             n/a         n/a
 RNC VESH                    6038VESH             n/a         n/a
 MF Mkt NC                   6019MFNC             n/a         n/a
 Customer Credit             6015CC               n/a         n/a

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
10 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $20.474

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $15.

O&M Cost Adjustments
              Annual O&M Savings475
Residential                        $0.71
Commercial                         $2.59

Fossil Fuel Descriptions

474
      Incremental cost based on analysis of materials needed for efficiency upgrade in similar lighting fixtures.
475
      From VT State screening tool



                                                             215
See Heating Increased Usage above.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.

Reference Tables

Hours of Use, In Use Rates, and Waste Heat Factors by Customer Type
                    Average        Average
                 Annual Hours     In Service      WHFd       WHFe                  AR           HF
                     of Use          Rate
 Residential          949           0.95476         1.0       1.0                   1.0          0.0
 Commercial          3,500           0.9477         1.2      1.06                   0.7         0.39

              Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential
               Efficient Measures                     Baseline Measures
Component             Cost               Life478             Cost                Life
Lamp                  $4.00             6.6 years            $1.00            0.97 years

Commercial
               Efficient Measures                     Baseline Measures
                                             479
Component             Cost               Life                Cost                Life
Lamp                  $4.00            3.42 years            $1.00            0.29 years

                                     Lamp Life by Daily Burn Time

                              Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time      Lamp Lifetime       Lamp Lifetime     Ballast Lifetime        Ballast
                        Hours               Years               Hours          Lifetime Years
       1                3,000                8.22              12,000               32.88
       2                5,000                6.85              20,000               27.40
       3                7,000                6.39              28,000               25.57
       4                9,000                6.16              36,000               24.66
       5                9,500                5.21              38,000               20.82
       6                10,000               4.57              40,000               18.26
       8                12,000               4.11              48,000               16.44
       10               12,000               3.29              48,000               13.15
       12               12,000               2.74              48,000               10.96
       24               12,000               1.37              48,000                5.48




476
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
477
    2005 TAG agreement
478
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
479
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                     216
Dedicated CF Floor Lamp
Measure Number: IV-E-7-a (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)
Version Date & Revision History

Draft date:           Portfolio 25
Effective date:       1/1/04
End date:             6/30/04

Referenced Documents: 1) Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential
Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New
England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000; 2) 2004_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls.

Description
An existing floor lamp with incandescent bulbs is replaced by a dedicated ENERGY STAR floor lamp
wired for exclusive use with pin-based compact fluorescent lamps.

Estimated Measure Impacts

                              Average Annual MWH              Average number of           Average Annual MWH
                              Savings per unit                measures per year           savings per year
      Residential                      0.0534                         100                             5.3
      Commercial                       0.1586                         100                            15.9


Algorithms

Demand Savings
kW                             = ((WattsBASE – WattsEE) /1000)* ISR
kW(Residential)                = ((67.3-22.0 / 1000) * 0.95) = 0.0430
kW(Commercial)                 = ((67.3-22.0) / 1000) * 1.0 )= 0.0453

Energy Savings
kWh                            = kW  HOURS
kWh (Residential)              = (0.0430 * 1241) = 53.4
kWh (Commercial)               = (0.0453 * 3500) = 158.6


Where:
            kW                 = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
            WattsBASE           = Baseline connected kW
            WattsEE             = Energy efficient connected kW
            kWh                = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            ISR                 = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used 480
            HOURS               = average hours of use per year481


Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an interior incandescent light.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is an interior fluorescent fixture.
480
      ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR at each application.
481
      Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.



                                                           217
Operating Hours
Residential Applications: 1241482 hours / year
Commercial Applications: 3500483 hours / year

Loadshape
Residential Indoor Lighting, #1
Commercial Indoor Lighting ,#12
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.

Freeridership
2%.484

Spillover
12%.485

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
10 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $20

Incentive Level
The incentive for this measure is $15

O&M Cost Adjustments
              Annual O&M Savings486
Residential                    $2.70
Commercial                     $8.43

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.




482
    Usage rates for residential program taken from analysis of study of nearly identical program in southern New
England (Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared
for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23,
2000). Note, hourly usage rates from various interior setting averaged. See page 4-9 of cited study.
483
    Usage rates for commercial applications reflect agreement made between Efficiency Vermont and the VT
Department of Public Service during program year 2001.
484
    Same as Torchiere, used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between
EVT and VT DPS.
485
    Same as Torchiere, used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between
EVT and VT DPS
486
    From VT State screening tool for Torchieres.



                                                         218
Reference Tables

Fluorescent Fixture Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type

                        Average             Average
                      Annual Hours        In Use Rate
                         of Use
      Residential         1241               0.95487
      Commercial          3500              1.000488

Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential Applications
               Efficient Measures            Baseline Measures
Component             Cost         Life489          Cost                         Life
Lamp                  $7.50         6.44            $6.00                        1.61

Commercial Applications
             Efficient Measures                        Baseline Measures
Component           Cost                 Life490              Cost               Life
Lamp               $6.00                  3.42                $6.00              0.57

Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time   Lamp Lifetime     Lamp Lifetime            Ballast Lifetime       Ballast
                       Hours           Years                      Hours         Lifetime Years
       1               3,000            8.22                     12,000              32.88
       2               5,000            6.85                     20,000              27.40
       3               7,000            6.39                     28,000              25.57
       4               9,000            6.16                     36,000              24.66
       5               9,500            5.21                     38,000              20.82
       6              10,000            4.57                     40,000              18.26
       8              12,000            4.11                     48,000              16.44
       10             12,000            3.29                     48,000              13.15
       12             12,000            2.74                     48,000              10.96
       24             12,000            1.37                     48,000               5.48




487
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
488
    Ibid.
489
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
490
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                       219
Dedicated CF Floor Lamp

Measure Number: IV-E-7-b (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)
Version Date & Revision History

Draft date:         Portfolio 28
Effective date:     7/1/04
End date:           Superceded by later version- made effective on 1/1/04 ending on 12/31/04

Referenced Documents: 1) Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential
Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New
England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000; 2) 2004_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls.

Description
An existing floor lamp with incandescent bulbs is replaced by a dedicated ENERGY STAR floor lamp
wired for exclusive use with pin-based compact fluorescent lamps.

Estimated Measure Impacts

                           Average Annual MWH               Average number of           Average Annual MWH
                           Savings per unit                 measures per year           savings per year
      Residential                   0.0534                          100                             5.3
      Commercial                    0.1775                          100                            17.7


Algorithms

Demand Savings
kW                          = ((WattsBASE – WattsEE) /1000)* ISR WHFd
kW(Residential)             = ((67.3-22.0 / 1000) * 0.95)  1.0 = 0.0430
kW(Commercial)              = ((67.3-22.0) / 1000) * 1.0 )  1.4 = 0.0634

Energy Savings
kWh                         = kW  HOURS WHFe / WHFd
kWh (Residential)           = (0.0430 * 1241)  1.0 / 1.0 = 53.4
kWh (Commercial)            = (0.0634 * 3500)  1.12 / 1.4 = 177.5


Where:
           kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
           WattsBASE         = Baseline connected kW
           WattsEE           = Energy efficient connected kW
           kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
           ISR               = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used 491
           WHFd              = Waste  heat factor for demand to account for cooling savings from efficient lighting.
                                For a cooled space, the value is 1.40 (calculated as 1 + 1 / 2.5). Based on 2.5 COP
                                cooling system efficiency. For an uncooled space, the value is one. The Winter and
                                Fall/Spring coincident factors in loadshape #63 have been decreased to offset the
                                increase in the kW due to the WHFd. Therefore, the cooling savings are only added
                                to the summer peak savings.492

491
   ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR in each application.
492
   Waste heat factor differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for WHF d in each
application.



                                                         220
         WHFe                 = Waste heat factor for energy to account for cooling savings from efficient lighting. For
                                a cooled space, the value is 1.12 (calculated as 1 + 0.29 / 2.5). Based on 0.29
                                ASHRAE Lighting waste heat cooling factor for Vermont 493 and 2.5 C.O.P. typical
                                cooling system efficiency. For an uncooled space, the value is one. 494
         HOURS                = average hours of use per year495

Waste Heat Adjustment
Cooling savings are incorporated into the electric savings algorithm with the waste heat factor (WHF). See
above.

Heating Increased Usage
MMBTUWH                = (kWh / WHFe)  0.003413  HF / 0.75
MMBTUWH (Residential) = (53.4 / 1)  0.003413  0.00 / 0.75 = 0.0
MMBTUWH (Commercial) = (177.5 / 1.12)  0.003413  0.39 / 0.75 = 0.281

Where:
         MMBTUWH             = gross customer annual heating MMBTU fuel increased usage for the measure
                              from the reduction in lighting heat.
         0.003413           = conversion from kWh to MMBTU
         HF                 = ASHRAE heating factor for lighting waste heat for Burlington, Vermont 496
         0.75               = average heating system efficiency
         Oil heating is assumed typical for commercial.


Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an interior incandescent light.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is an interior fluorescent fixture.

Operating Hours
Residential Applications: 1241497 hours / year
Commercial Applications: 3500498 hours / year

Loadshape
Residential:, Loadshape, #1: Residential Indoor Lighting
Commercial:, Loadshape #63: Commercial Indoor Lighting with cooling bonus. This is a combined
lighting and cooling loadshape
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.


Freeridership/Spillover Factors

 Measure Category                            Light Bulb/Lamps
 Measure Code                                  LBLFLOOR

493
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993
494
    Waste heat factor differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for WHFe in each application.
495
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.
496
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993. Heating factor
differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HF in each application.
497
    Usage rates for residential program taken from analysis of study of nearly identical program in southern New
England (Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared
for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23,
2000). Note, hourly usage rates from various interior setting averaged. See page 4-9 of cited study.
498
    Usage rates for commercial applications reflect agreement made between Efficiency Vermont and the VT
Department of Public Service during program year 2001.



                                                          221
                                                 Floor Lamp,
                                                   Compact
 Product Description                              Fluorescent
 Track Name                 Track No.        Freerider Spillover
 Act250 NC                  6014A250            n/a         n/a
 Cust Equip Rpl             6013CUST            n/a         n/a
 Farm NC                    6014FARM            n/a         n/a
 Farm Equip Rpl             6013FARM            n/a         n/a
 Non Act 250 NC             6014NANC            n/a         n/a
 Pres Equip Rpl             6013PRES            n/a         n/a
 C&I Retro                  6012CNIR            n/a         n/a
 MF Mkt Retro               6012MFMR            n/a         n/a
 Efficient Products         6032EPEP           0.98        1.12
 LISF Retrofit              6034LISF            n/a         n/a
 LIMF Retrofit              6017RETR            n/a         n/a
 LIMF NC                    6018LINC            n/a         n/a
 LIMF Rehab                 6018LIRH            n/a         n/a
 RES Retrofit               6036RETR            n/a         n/a
 RNC VESH                   6038VESH            n/a         n/a
 MF Mkt NC                  6019MFNC            n/a         n/a
 Customer Credit            6015CC              n/a         n/a

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
10 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $20

Incentive Level
The incentive for this measure is $15

O&M Cost Adjustments
              Annual O&M Savings499
Residential                       $2.70
Commercial                        $8.43

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
See Heating Increased Usage above.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.


Reference Tables




499
      From VT State screening tool for Torchieres.



                                                        222
Hours of Use, In Use Rates, and Waste Heat Factors by Customer Type
                      Average
                                       Average
                    Annual Hours                        WHFd                            WHFe                 HF
                                     In Use Rate
                       of Use
  Residential         1,241500          0.95501          1.0                              1.0                0.0
                            502
  Commercial          3,500              1.0503          1.4                             1.12               0.39




Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential Applications
               Efficient Measures            Baseline Measures
Component             Cost         Life504          Cost                               Life
Lamp                  $7.50         6.44            $6.00                              1.61

Commercial Applications
             Efficient Measures                           Baseline Measures
Component           Cost                    Life505              Cost                  Life
Lamp               $6.00                     3.42                $6.00                 0.57




Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time   Lamp Lifetime     Lamp Lifetime               Ballast Lifetime         Ballast
                       Hours           Years                         Hours           Lifetime Years
       1               3,000            8.22                        12,000                32.88
       2               5,000            6.85                        20,000                27.40
       3               7,000            6.39                        28,000                25.57
       4               9,000            6.16                        36,000                24.66
       5               9,500            5.21                        38,000                20.82
       6              10,000            4.57                        40,000                18.26
       8              12,000            4.11                        48,000                16.44
       10             12,000            3.29                        48,000                13.15
       12             12,000            2.74                        48,000                10.96
       24             12,000            1.37                        48,000                 5.48




500
    Evaluation of nearly identical southern New England program suggests average daily hours of use of 3.4 (Xenergy,
Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison,
Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
501
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
502
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
503
    Ibid.
504
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
505
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                         223
Dedicated CF Floor Lamp

Measure Number: IV-E-7-c (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)
Version Date & Revision History

Draft date:         Portfolio 31
Effective date:     1/1/04
End date:           TBD

Referenced Documents: 1) 2005_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls.

Description
An existing floor lamp with incandescent bulbs is replaced by a dedicated ENERGY STAR floor lamp
wired for exclusive use with pin-based compact fluorescent lamps.

Estimated Measure Impacts

                           Average Annual MWH               Average number of           Average Annual MWH
                           Savings per unit                 measures per year           savings per year
      Residential                   0.0438                          100                             4.4
      Commercial                    0.1775                          100                            17.7


Algorithms

Demand Savings
kW                          = ((Watts) /1000)* ISR WHFd
kW(Residential)             = ((48.7 / 1000) * 0.95)  1.0 = 0.0462
kW(Commercial)              = ((67.3-22.0) / 1000) * 1.0 )  1.4 = 0.0634

Energy Savings
kWh                         = kW  HOURS WHFe / WHFd
kWh (Residential)           = (0.0462 * 949)  1.0 / 1.0 = 43.8
kWh (Commercial)            = (0.0634 * 3500)  1.12 / 1.4 = 177.5


Where:
           Watts            = EVT and DPS October 2004 negotiated delta watts from WattsBASE – WattsEE
           kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
           WattsBASE         = Baseline connected kW
           WattsEE           = Energy efficient connected kW
           kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
           ISR               = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used 506
           WHFd              = Waste heat factor for demand to account for cooling savings from efficient lighting.
                               For a cooled space, the value is 1.40 (calculated as 1 + 1 / 2.5). Based on 2.5 COP
                               cooling system efficiency. For an uncooled space, the value is one. The Winter and
                               Fall/Spring coincident factors in loadshape #63 have been decreased to offset the
                               increase in the kW due to the WHFd. Therefore, the cooling savings are only added
                               to the summer peak savings.507
           WHFe              = Waste heat factor for energy to account for cooling savings from efficient lighting. For

506
   ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR in each application.
507
   Waste heat factor differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for WHF d in each
application.



                                                         224
                                a cooled space, the value is 1.12 (calculated as 1 + 0.29 / 2.5). Based on 0.29
                                ASHRAE Lighting waste heat cooling factor for Vermont 508 and 2.5 C.O.P. typical
                                cooling system efficiency. For an uncooled space, the value is one. 509
         HOURS                = average hours of use per year510

Waste Heat Adjustment
Cooling savings are incorporated into the electric savings algorithm with the waste heat factor (WHF). See
above.

Heating Increased Usage
MMBTUWH                = (kWh / WHFe)  0.003413  HF / 0.75
MMBTUWH (Residential) = (43.8 / 1)  0.003413  0.00 / 0.75 = 0.0
MMBTUWH (Commercial) = (177.5 / 1.12)  0.003413  0.39 / 0.75 = 0.281

Where:
         MMBTUWH             = gross customer annual heating MMBTU fuel increased usage for the measure
                              from the reduction in lighting heat.
         0.003413           = conversion from kWh to MMBTU
         HF                 = ASHRAE heating factor for lighting waste heat for Burlington, Vermont 511
         0.75               = average heating system efficiency
         Oil heating is assumed typical for commercial.


Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an interior incandescent light.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is an interior fluorescent fixture.

Operating Hours
Residential Applications: 949 hours / year
Commercial Applications: 3500512 hours / year

Loadshape
Residential:, Loadshape, #1: Residential Indoor Lighting
Commercial:, Loadshape #63: Commercial Indoor Lighting with cooling bonus. This is a combined
lighting and cooling loadshape
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.


Freeridership/Spillover Factors

 Measure Category                           Light Bulb/Lamps
 Measure Code                                  LBLFLOOR
                                               Floor Lamp,
                                                 Compact
 Product Description                           Fluorescent
 Track Name          Track No.             Freerider Spillover

508
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993
509
    Waste heat factor differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for WHFe in each application.
510
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.
511
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993. Heating factor
differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HF in each application.
512
    Usage rates for commercial applications reflect agreement made between Efficiency Vermont and the VT
Department of Public Service during program year 2001.



                                                         225
 Act250 NC                  6014A250             n/a     n/a
 Cust Equip Rpl             6013CUST             n/a     n/a
 Farm NC                    6014FARM             n/a     n/a
 Farm Equip Rpl             6013FARM             n/a     n/a
 Non Act 250 NC             6014NANC             n/a     n/a
 Pres Equip Rpl             6013PRES             n/a     n/a
 C&I Retro                  6012CNIR             n/a     n/a
 MF Mkt Retro               6012MFMR             n/a     n/a
 Efficient Products         6032EPEP            0.92    1.04
 LISF Retrofit              6034LISF             n/a     n/a
 LIMF Retrofit              6017RETR             n/a     n/a
 LIMF NC                    6018LINC             n/a     n/a
 LIMF Rehab                 6018LIRH             n/a     n/a
 RES Retrofit               6036RETR             n/a     n/a
 RNC VESH                   6038VESH             n/a     n/a
 MF Mkt NC                  6019MFNC             n/a     n/a
 Customer Credit            6015CC               n/a     n/a

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
10 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $20

Incentive Level
The incentive for this measure is $15

O&M Cost Adjustments
              Annual O&M Savings513
Residential                       $2.70
Commercial                        $8.43

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
See Heating Increased Usage above.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.


Reference Tables




513
      From VT State screening tool for Torchieres.



                                                       226
       Hours of Use, In Use Rates, and Waste Heat Factors by Customer Type
                          Average
                                          Average
                       Annual Hours                        WHFd            WHFe                      HF
                                        In Use Rate
                           of Use
      Residential          949514          0.95515           1.0            1.0                      0.0
                                516
      Commercial          3,500             1.0517           1.4           1.12                     0.39


Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential Applications
               Efficient Measures            Baseline Measures
Component             Cost         Life518          Cost                        Life
Lamp                  $7.50          6.6            $6.00                       1.61

Commercial Applications
             Efficient Measures                       Baseline Measures
Component           Cost                 Life519             Cost               Life
Lamp               $6.00                  3.42               $6.00              0.57


Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time   Lamp Lifetime     Lamp Lifetime          Ballast Lifetime        Ballast
                       Hours           Years                    Hours          Lifetime Years
       1               3,000            8.22                   12,000               32.88
       2               5,000            6.85                   20,000               27.40
       3               7,000            6.39                   28,000               25.57
       4               9,000            6.16                   36,000               24.66
       5               9,500            5.21                   38,000               20.82
       6              10,000            4.57                   40,000               18.26
       8              12,000            4.11                   48,000               16.44
       10             12,000            3.29                   48,000               13.15
       12             12,000            2.74                   48,000               10.96
       24             12,000            1.37                   48,000                5.48




515
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
516
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
517
    Ibid.
518
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
519
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                     227
Dedicated CF Floor Lamp

Measure Number: IV-E-7-d (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)
Version Date & Revision History

Draft date:           Portfolio 37
Effective date:       1/1/05
End date:             TBD

Referenced Documents: 1) 2005_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls.

Description
An existing floor lamp with incandescent bulbs is replaced by a dedicated ENERGY STAR floor lamp
wired for exclusive use with pin-based compact fluorescent lamps.

Estimated Measure Impacts

                              Average Annual MWH                Average number of           Average Annual MWH
                              Savings per unit                  measures per year           savings per year
      Residential                      0.0438                           100                             4.4
      Commercial                       0.1626                           100                            16.3


Algorithms

Demand Savings
kW                             = ((Watts) /1000)* ISR WHFd
kW(Residential)                = ((48.7 / 1000) * 0.95)  1.0 = 0.0462
kW(Commercial)                 = ((48.7) / 1000) * 0.9 )  1.2 = 0.0526

Energy Savings
kWh                            = kW  HOURS WHFe / WHFd
kWh (Residential)              = (0.0462 * 949)  1.0 / 1.0 = 43.8
kWh (Commercial)               = (0.0526 * 3500)  1.06 / 1.2 = 162.6


Where:
            Watts              = EVT and DPS October 2004 negotiated delta watts from WattsBASE – WattsEE
            kW                 = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
            WattsBASE           = Baseline connected kW
            WattsEE             = Energy efficient connected kW
            kWh                = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            ISR                 = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used 520
            WHFd                = Waste heat factor for demand to account for cooling savings from efficient
                                  lighting. For a cooled space, the value is 1.2 (calculated as 1 + (0.50*(0.85) /
                                  2.5)). Based on 2.5 COP cooling system efficiency and assuming 50% of
                                  spaces that are cooled and 85% of lighting heat that needs to be mechanically
                                  cooled at time of summer peak. (From 1993 ASHRAE Journal: Calculating
                                  Lighting and HVAC interactions which assumes that 80% of lighting heat
                                  offsets heating requirements, and 90% of lighting heat needs to be

520
      ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR in each application.



                                                            228
                                mechanically cooled.) For an uncooled space, the value is one. The Winter
                                and Fall/Spring coincident factors in loadshape #63 have been decreased to
                                offset the increase in the kW due to the WHFd. Therefore, the cooling
                                savings are only added to the summer peak savings.
         WHFe                 = Waste heat factor for energy to account for cooling savings from efficient
                                lighting. For a cooled space, the value is 1.06 (calculated as 1 + (0.50*(0.29) /
                                2.5)). Based on 0.29 ASHRAE Lighting waste heat cooling factor for
                                Vermont 521 and 50% of spaces that are cooled and 2.5 C.O.P. typical cooling
                                system efficiency. For an un cooled space, the value is one. 522
         HOURS                = average hours of use per year523

Waste Heat Adjustment
Cooling savings are incorporated into the electric savings algorithm with the waste heat factor (WHF). See
above.

Heating Increased Usage
MMBTUWH                = (kWh / WHFe)  0.003413  AR  HF / 0.75
MMBTUWH (Residential) = (43.8 / 1)  0.003413  1.00  0.00 / 0.75 = 0.0
MMBTUWH (Commercial) = (162.6 / 1.06)  0.003413  0.70  0.39 / 0.75 = 0.191

Where:
         MMBTUWH           = gross customer annual heating MMBTU fuel increased usage for the measure
                              from the reduction in lighting heat.
         0.003413           = conversion from kWh to MMBTU
         AR                 = Typical aspect ratio factor. ASHRAE heating factor applies to perimeter
                              zoneheat, therefore it must be adjusted to account for lighting in core zones. It
                              is assumed that 70% is the typical square footage of commercial buildings
                              within 15 feet of exterior wall. The assumed aspect ratio for residential
                              buildings is 100%.
         HF                 = ASHRAE heating factor for lighting waste heat for Burlington, Vermont 524
         0.75               = average heating system efficiency
         Oil heating is assumed typical for commercial.


Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an interior incandescent light.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is an interior fluorescent fixture.

Operating Hours
Residential Applications: 949 hours / year
Commercial Applications: 3500525 hours / year

Loadshape
Residential:, Loadshape, #1: Residential Indoor Lighting
Commercial:, Loadshape #63: Commercial Indoor Lighting with cooling bonus. This is a combined
lighting and cooling loadshape

521
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993
522
    Waste heat factor differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for WHFe in each application.
523
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.
524
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993. Heating factor
differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HF in each application.
525
    Usage rates for commercial applications reflect agreement made between Efficiency Vermont and the VT
Department of Public Service during program year 2001.



                                                         229
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.


Freeridership/Spillover Factors

 Measure Category                             Light Bulb/Lamps
 Measure Code                                    LBLFLOOR
                                                 Floor Lamp,
                                                   Compact
 Product Description                              Fluorescent
 Track Name                 Track No.        Freerider Spillover
 Act250 NC                  6014A250            n/a         n/a
 Cust Equip Rpl             6013CUST            n/a         n/a
 Farm NC                    6014FARM            n/a         n/a
 Farm Equip Rpl             6013FARM            n/a         n/a
 Non Act 250 NC             6014NANC            n/a         n/a
 Pres Equip Rpl             6013PRES            n/a         n/a
 C&I Retro                  6012CNIR            n/a         n/a
 MF Mkt Retro               6012MFMR            n/a         n/a
 Efficient Products         6032EPEP           0.92        1.04
 LISF Retrofit              6034LISF            n/a         n/a
 LIMF Retrofit              6017RETR            n/a         n/a
 LIMF NC                    6018LINC            n/a         n/a
 LIMF Rehab                 6018LIRH            n/a         n/a
 RES Retrofit               6036RETR            n/a         n/a
 RNC VESH                   6038VESH            n/a         n/a
 MF Mkt NC                  6019MFNC            n/a         n/a
 Customer Credit            6015CC              n/a         n/a

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
10 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $20

Incentive Level
The incentive for this measure is $15

O&M Cost Adjustments
              Annual O&M Savings526
Residential                       $2.70
Commercial                        $8.43

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
See Heating Increased Usage above.


526
      From VT State screening tool for Torchieres.



                                                        230
Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.


Reference Tables

  Hours of Use, In Use Rates, and Waste Heat Factors by Customer Type
                  Average
                                   Average
                Annual Hours                     WHFd       WHFe                   AR           HF
                                In ServiceRate
                    of Use
 Residential        949527          0.95528       1.0         1.0                   1.0          0.0
                         529
 Commercial        3,500             0.9530       1.2        1.06                   0.7         0.39


Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential Applications
               Efficient Measures            Baseline Measures
Component             Cost         Life531          Cost                        Life
Lamp                  $7.50          6.6            $6.00                       1.61

Commercial Applications
             Efficient Measures                       Baseline Measures
Component           Cost                 Life532             Cost               Life
Lamp               $6.00                  3.42               $6.00              0.57


Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time   Lamp Lifetime     Lamp Lifetime          Ballast Lifetime        Ballast
                       Hours           Years                    Hours          Lifetime Years
       1               3,000            8.22                   12,000               32.88
       2               5,000            6.85                   20,000               27.40
       3               7,000            6.39                   28,000               25.57
       4               9,000            6.16                   36,000               24.66
       5               9,500            5.21                   38,000               20.82
       6              10,000            4.57                   40,000               18.26
       8              12,000            4.11                   48,000               16.44
       10             12,000            3.29                   48,000               13.15
       12             12,000            2.74                   48,000               10.96
       24             12,000            1.37                   48,000                5.48




528
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
529
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
530
    2005 TAG agreement
531
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
532
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                     231
Interior Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: IV-E-5-a (EPP, Lighting End Use)
Version Date & Revision History

Draft date: 2/15/02
Effective date:

Referenced Documents: 1) Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential
Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New
England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000; 2) 2001_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls
Description
An existing lighting fixture with incandescent bulbs is replaced by a lighting fixture wired for exclusive use
with compact fluorescent lamps in a interior setting. This measure does not include table lamps and
exterior fixtures.

Estimated Measure Impacts

                           Average Annual MWH               Average number of          Average Annual MWH
                           Savings per unit                 measures per year          savings per year
      Residential          .0795                            73412                      5836.3
      Commercial           .2360                            8160                       1925.8


Algorithms

Energy Savings
kWh = 0.0674  HOURS  ISR

kWh (Residential)           = 79.5
kWh (Commercial)            = 236

Demand Savings
kW = (kWh /HOURS)

kW(Residential)              = .0641
kW(Commercial)               = .0674

Where:
           0.0674533                  = average kilowattage reduction
           HOURS534          = average hours of use per year
           ISR535            = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used
           kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
           kW536            = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an interior incandescent light.

533
    Assumed difference in wattage between installed Interior Florescent Fixture and the baseline product it replaces.
67.4 watts based on EVT analysis of Interior Florescent Fixtures rebated through Efficient Products Program during
2001 (see 2001_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls).
534
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.
535
    ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR at each application.
536
    Demand savings calculated based on assumed energy savings using Vermont State Cost Effectiveness Screening
Tool.



                                                         232
   High Efficiency
   High efficiency is a interior fluorescent fixture.
   Operating Hours
   Residential Applications: 1241537 hours / year
   Commercial Applications: 3500538 hours / year

Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                                                                  Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                               (CF)
                Winter Winter Summer Summer                        Winter   Summer Fall/Spring
                Peak Off-Peak Peak   Off-Peak
Residential
                  28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%              23%          12%           22%
(#1)
Commercial
                  27.7%     5.4%     42.1%       24.8%              55%          56%           55%
(#12)
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool.

   Freeridership
   2%.539
   Spillover
   7%.540
   Persistence
   The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
   Lifetimes
   20 years.
   Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.
   Measure Cost
   The incremental cost for this measure is $20

   Incentive Level
   The incentive for this measure is $15
   O&M Cost Adjustments
                      Annual O&M Savings541
   Residential                  $0.35
   Commercial                   $1.74
   Fossil Fuel Descriptions
   There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.
   Water Descriptions
   There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.




   537
       Usage rates for residential program taken from analysis of study of nearly identical program in southern New
   England (Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared
   for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23,
   2000). Note, hourly usage rates from various interior setting averaged. See page 4-9 of cited study.
   538
       Usage rates for commercial applications reflect agreement made between Efficiency Vermont and the VT
   Department of Public Service during program year 2001.
   539
       Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
   540
       Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS
   541
       From VT State screening tool



                                                            233
Reference Tables
Fluorescent Fixture Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                          Average            Average
                        Annual Hours       In Use Rate
                           of Use
      Residential           1241              0.95542
      Commercial            3500             1.000543

Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential Applications

                    Efficient Measures                   Baseline Measures
Component           Cost               Life544           Cost                    Life
Lamp                $6.00              6.45              $1.00                   1
Ballast             $14.00             25.82             N/A                     N/A

Commercial Applications

                    Efficient Measures                   Baseline Measures
Component           Cost               Life545           Cost                    Life
Lamp                $6.00              3.43              $1.00                   0.3
Ballast             $14.00             13.71             N/A                     N/A

Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time        Lamp Lifetime      Lamp Lifetime       Ballast Lifetime         Ballast
                          Hours              Years                 Hours           Lifetime Years
          1               3,000               8.22                12,000                32.88
          2               5,000               6.85                20,000                27.40
          3               7,000               6.39                28,000                25.57
          4               9,000               6.16                36,000                24.66
          5               9,500               5.21                38,000                20.82
          6               10,000              4.57                40,000                18.26
          8               12,000              4.11                48,000                16.44
          10              12,000              3.29                48,000                13.15
          12              12,000              2.74                48,000                10.96
          24              12,000              1.37                48,000                 5.48




542
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
543
    Ibid.
544
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
545
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                        234
Interior Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: IV-E-5-b (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)
Version Date & Revision History

Draft date:           Portfolio 19
Effective date:       1/1/03
End date:             TBD

Referenced Documents: 1) Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential
Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New
England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000; 2) 2003_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls

Description
An existing lighting fixture with incandescent bulbs is replaced by a lighting fixture wired for exclusive use
with compact fluorescent lamps in an interior setting. This measure does not include table lamps and
exterior fixtures.

Estimated Measure Impacts

                              Average Annual MWH              Average number of           Average Annual MWH
                              Savings per unit                measures per year           savings per year
      Residential                      0.0794                        7,180                          570.1
      Commercial                         0.2198                       362                            79.6


Algorithms

Demand Savings
kW                             = ((WattsBASE – WattsEE) /1000)* ISR
kW(Residential)                = ((99-31.6 / 1000) * 0.95) = 0.0640
kW(Commercial)                 = ((100.4-37.6) / 1000) * 1.0 )= 0.0628

Energy Savings
kWh                            = kW  HOURS
kWh (Residential)              = (0.0640 * 1241) = 79.4
kWh (Commercial)               = ( 0.0628 * 3500) = 219.8


Where:
            kW                 = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
            WattsBASE           = Baseline connected kW
            WattsEE             = Energy efficient connected kW
            kWh                = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            ISR                 = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used 546
            HOURS               = average hours of use per year547




Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an interior incandescent light.
546
      ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR at each application.
547
      Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.



                                                           235
   High Efficiency
   High efficiency is a interior fluorescent fixture.

   Operating Hours
   Residential Applications: 1241548 hours / year
   Commercial Applications: 3500549 hours / year

Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                                                                 Peak as % of calculated kW savings
                              % of annual kWh
                                                                                (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer              Summer         Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
                 Peak Off-Peak  Peak               Off-Peak
Residential
                  28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%             23%           12%           22%
(#1)
Commercial
                  27.7%     5.4%     42.1%       24.8%             55%           56%           55%
(#12)
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool.

   Freeridership
   2%.550

   Spillover
   7%.551

   Persistence
   The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

   Lifetimes
   20 years.
   Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

   Measure Cost
   The incremental cost for this measure is $20

   Incentive Level
   The incentive for this measure is $15

   O&M Cost Adjustments
                 Annual O&M Savings552
   Residential                    $0.35
   Commercial                     $1.74

   Fossil Fuel Descriptions
   There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

   548
       Usage rates for residential program taken from analysis of study of nearly identical program in southern New
   England (Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared
   for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23,
   2000). Note, hourly usage rates from various interior setting averaged. See page 4-9 of cited study.
   549
       Usage rates for commercial applications reflect agreement made between Efficiency Vermont and the VT
   Department of Public Service during program year 2001.
   550
       Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
   551
       Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS
   552
       From VT State screening tool



                                                           236
Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.

Fluorescent Fixture Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                        Average             Average
                      Annual Hours        In Use Rate
                         of Use
   Residential            1241               0.95553
  Commercial              3500              1.000554
Reference Tables

Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential Applications
               Efficient Measures                      Baseline Measures
Component             Cost               Life555              Cost               Life
Lamp                  $6.00               6.45                $1.00               1
Ballast              $14.00              25.82                 N/A               N/A



Commercial Applications
             Efficient Measures                        Baseline Measures
Component           Cost                 Life556              Cost               Life
Lamp               $6.00                  3.43                $1.00              0.3
Ballast            $14.00                13.71                 N/A               N/A

Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time      Lamp Lifetime       Lamp Lifetime       Ballast Lifetime       Ballast
                        Hours               Years                 Hours         Lifetime Years
       1                3,000                8.22                12,000              32.88
       2                5,000                6.85                20,000              27.40
       3                7,000                6.39                28,000              25.57
       4                9,000                6.16                36,000              24.66
       5                9,500                5.21                38,000              20.82
       6                10,000               4.57                40,000              18.26
       8                12,000               4.11                48,000              16.44
       10               12,000               3.29                48,000              13.15
       12               12,000               2.74                48,000              10.96
       24               12,000               1.37                48,000               5.48




553
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
554
    Ibid.
555
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
556
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                       237
Interior Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: IV-E-5-c (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)
Version Date & Revision History

Draft date:           Portfolio 24
Effective date:       1/1/04
End date:             6/30/04

Referenced Documents: 1) Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential
Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New
England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000; 2) 2004_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls

Description
An existing lighting fixture with incandescent bulbs is replaced by an ENERGY STAR lighting fixture
wired for exclusive use with pin-based compact fluorescent lamps in an interior setting.
Estimated Measure Impacts

                              Average Annual MWH              Average number of           Average Annual MWH
                              Savings per unit                measures per year           savings per year
      Residential                      0.0655                        7,180                          470.3
      Commercial                         0.1887                       362                            68.3


Algorithms

Demand Savings
kW                             = ((WattsBASE – WattsEE) /1000)* ISR
kW(Residential)                = ((80.7-25.1 / 1000) * 0.95) = 0.0528
kW(Commercial)                 = ((78.8-24.9) / 1000) * 1.0 )= 0.0539

Energy Savings
kWh                            = kW  HOURS
kWh (Residential)              = (0.0528 * 1241) = 65.5
kWh (Commercial)               = (0.0539 * 3500) = 188.7


Where:
            kW                 = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
            WattsBASE           = Baseline connected kW
            WattsEE             = Energy efficient connected kW
            kWh                = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            ISR                 = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used 557
            HOURS               = average hours of use per year558




Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an interior incandescent light.


557
      ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR at each application.
558
      Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.



                                                           238
High Efficiency
High efficiency is a interior fluorescent fixture.

Operating Hours
Residential Applications: 1241559 hours / year
Commercial Applications: 3500560 hours / year

Loadshape
Residential Indoor Lighting, #1
Commercial Indoor Lighting ,#12
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.

Freeridership
2%.561

Spillover
7%.562

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
20 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $20

Incentive Level
The incentive for this measure is $15

O&M Cost Adjustments
              Annual O&M Savings563
Residential                    $0.35
Commercial                     $1.74

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.

Reference Tables




559
    Usage rates for residential program taken from analysis of study of nearly identical program in southern New
England (Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared
for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23,
2000). Note, hourly usage rates from various interior setting averaged. See page 4-9 of cited study.
560
    Usage rates for commercial applications reflect agreement made between Efficiency Vermont and the VT
Department of Public Service during program year 2001.
561
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
562
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS
563
    From VT State screening tool



                                                        239
Fluorescent Fixture Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type

                        Average             Average
                      Annual Hours        In Use Rate
                         of Use
      Residential         1241               0.95564
      Commercial          3500              1.000565

Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential Applications
               Efficient Measures            Baseline Measures
Component             Cost         Life566          Cost                         Life
Lamp                  $6.00         6.45            $1.00                         1
Ballast              $14.00        25.82             N/A                         N/A

Commercial Applications
             Efficient Measures                        Baseline Measures
Component           Cost                 Life567              Cost               Life
Lamp               $6.00                  3.43                $1.00              0.3
Ballast            $14.00                13.71                 N/A               N/A

Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time   Lamp Lifetime     Lamp Lifetime            Ballast Lifetime       Ballast
                       Hours           Years                      Hours         Lifetime Years
       1               3,000            8.22                     12,000              32.88
       2               5,000            6.85                     20,000              27.40
       3               7,000            6.39                     28,000              25.57
       4               9,000            6.16                     36,000              24.66
       5               9,500            5.21                     38,000              20.82
       6              10,000            4.57                     40,000              18.26
       8              12,000            4.11                     48,000              16.44
       10             12,000            3.29                     48,000              13.15
       12             12,000            2.74                     48,000              10.96
       24             12,000            1.37                     48,000               5.48




564
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
565
    Ibid.
566
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
567
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                       240
Interior Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: IV-E-5-d (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)
Version Date & Revision History

Draft date:           Portfolio 28
Effective date:       7/1/04
End date:             Superceded by later version- effective 1/1/04 ended 12/31/04

Referenced Documents: 1) Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential
Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New
England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000; 2) 2004_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls

Description
An existing lighting fixture with incandescent bulbs is replaced by an ENERGY STAR lighting fixture
wired for exclusive use with pin-based compact fluorescent lamps in an interior setting.
1.          Estimated Measure Impacts

                              Average Annual MWH                Average number of           Average Annual MWH
                              Savings per unit                  measures per year           savings per year
      Residential                      0.0655                          7,180                          470.3
      Commercial                         0.2114                         362                            76.5


Algorithms

Demand Savings
kW                             = ((WattsBASE – WattsEE) /1000)  ISR  WHFd
kW(Residential)                = ((80.7-25.1 / 1000)  0.95)  1.0 = 0.0528
kW(Commercial)                 = ((78.8-24.9) / 1000)  1.0 )  1.4 = 0.0755

Energy Savings
kWh                            = kW  HOURS  WHFe / WHFd
kWh (Residential)              = (0.0528  1241)  1.0 / 1.0 = 65.5
kWh (Commercial)               = (0.0755  3500)  1.12 / 1.4 = 211.4


Where:
            kW                 = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
            WattsBASE           = Baseline connected kW
            WattsEE             = Energy efficient connected kW
            kWh                = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            ISR                 = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used 568
            WHFd                = Waste heat factor for demand to account for cooling savings from efficient lighting.
                                  For a cooled space, the value is 1.40 (calculated as 1 + 1 / 2.5). Based on 2.5 COP
                                  cooling system efficiency. For an uncooled space, the value is one. The Winter and
                                  Fall/Spring coincident factors in loadshape #63 have been decreased to offset the




568
      ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR at each application.



                                                            241
                                increase in the kW due to the WHFd. Therefore, the cooling savings are only added
                                to the summer peak savings. 569
         WHFe                 = Waste heat factor for energy to account for cooling savings from efficient lighting. For
                                a cooled space, the value is 1.12 (calculated as 1 + 0.29 / 2.5). Based on 0.29
                                ASHRAE Lighting waste heat cooling factor for Vermont 570 and 2.5 C.O.P. typical
                                cooling system efficiency. For an uncooled space, the value is one.571

         HOURS                = average hours of use per year572

Waste Heat Adjustment
Cooling savings are incorporated into the electric savings algorithm with the waste heat factor (WHF). See
above.

Heating Increased Usage
MMBTUWH                = (kWh / WHFe)  0.003413  HF / 0.75
MMBTUWH (Residential) = (65.5 / 1)  0.003413  0.00 / 0.75 = 0.0
MMBTUWH (Commercial) = (211.4 / 1.12)  0.003413  0.39 / 0.75 = 0.335

Where:
         MMBTUWH             = gross customer annual heating MMBTU fuel increased usage for the measure
                              from the reduction in lighting heat.
         0.003413           = conversion from kWh to MMBTU
         HF                 = ASHRAE heating factor for lighting waste heat for Burlington, Vermont 573
         0.75               = average heating system efficiency
         Oil heating is assumed typical for commercial.


Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an interior incandescent light.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a interior fluorescent fixture.

Operating Hours
Residential Applications: 1241574 hours / year
Commercial Applications: 3500575 hours / year

Loadshape
Residential: Loadshape, #1 - Residential Indoor Lighting
Commercial: Loadshape #63 - Commercial Indoor Lighting with cooling bonus. This is a combined
lighting and cooling loadshape
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.



569
    Waste heat factor differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for WHF d in each
application.
570
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993
571
    Waste heat factor differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for WHFe in each application.
572
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.
573
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993. Heating factor
differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HF in each application.
574
    Usage rates for residential program taken from analysis of study of nearly identical program in southern New
England (Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared
for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23,
2000). Note, hourly usage rates from various interior setting averaged. See page 4-9 of cited study.
575
    Usage rates for commercial applications reflect agreement made between Efficiency Vermont and the VT
Department of Public Service during program year 2001.



                                                          242
243
Freeridership/Spillover Factors

                                         Lighting Hardwired
 Measure Category                              Fixture
                                            LFHCNFIX
 Measure Code
                                               Compact
                                         Fluorescent Interior
 Product Description                            Fixture
 Track Name                Track No.     Freerider Spillover
 Act250 NC                 6014A250         n/a          n/a
 Cust Equip Rpl            6013CUST         n/a          n/a
 Farm NC                   6014FARM         n/a          n/a
 Farm Equip Rpl            6013FARM         n/a          n/a
 Non Act 250 NC            6014NANC         n/a          n/a
 Pres Equip Rpl            6013PRES         n/a          n/a
 C&I Retro                 6012CNIR         n/a          n/a
 MF Mkt Retro              6012MFMR         n/a          n/a
 Efficient Products        6032EPEP        0.98         1.07
 LISF Retrofit             6034LISF         n/a          n/a
 LIMF Retrofit             6017RETR         n/a          n/a
 LIMF NC                   6018LINC         n/a          n/a
 LIMF Rehab                6018LIRH         n/a          n/a
 RES Retrofit              6036RETR         n/a          n/a
 RNC VESH                  6038VESH         n/a          n/a
 MF Mkt NC                 6019MFNC         n/a          n/a
 Customer Credit           6015CC           n/a          n/a

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
Residential: 20 years.
Commercial: 15 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $20

Incentive Level
The incentive for this measure is $15

O&M Cost Adjustments
              Annual O&M Savings576
Residential                      $0.35
Commercial                       $1.74

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
See Heating Increased Usage above.



576
      From VT State screening tool



                                                    244
Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.

Reference Tables


Hours of Use, In Use Rates, and Waste Heat Factors by Customer Type
                     Average
                                      Average
                  Annual Hours                         WHFd                             WHFe                 HF
                                    In Use Rate
                      of Use
  Residential        1,241577          0.95578          1.0                               1.0                0.0
                           579
 Commercial          3,500              1.0580          1.4                              1.12               0.39



Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential Applications
               Efficient Measures            Baseline Measures
Component             Cost         Life581          Cost                               Life
Lamp                  $6.00         6.45            $1.00                               1
Ballast              $14.00        25.82             N/A                               N/A

Commercial Applications
             Efficient Measures                           Baseline Measures
Component           Cost                    Life582              Cost                  Life
Lamp               $6.00                     3.43                $1.00                 0.3
Ballast            $14.00                   13.71                 N/A                  N/A


Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time   Lamp Lifetime     Lamp Lifetime               Ballast Lifetime         Ballast
                       Hours           Years                         Hours           Lifetime Years
       1               3,000            8.22                        12,000                32.88
       2               5,000            6.85                        20,000                27.40
       3               7,000            6.39                        28,000                25.57
       4               9,000            6.16                        36,000                24.66
       5               9,500            5.21                        38,000                20.82
       6              10,000            4.57                        40,000                18.26
       8              12,000            4.11                        48,000                16.44
       10             12,000            3.29                        48,000                13.15
       12             12,000            2.74                        48,000                10.96
       24             12,000            1.37                        48,000                 5.48




577
    Evaluation of nearly identical southern New England program suggests average daily hours of use of 3.4 (Xenergy,
Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison,
Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000).
578
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
579
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
580
    Ibid.
581
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
582
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                         245
Interior Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: IV-E-5-e (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)
Version Date & Revision History

Draft date:         Portfolio 31
Effective date:     1/1/04
End date:           TBD

Referenced Documents: 1) 2005_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls

Description
An existing lighting fixture with incandescent bulbs is replaced by an ENERGY STAR lighting fixture
wired for exclusive use with pin-based compact fluorescent lamps in an interior setting.
2.         Estimated Measure Impacts

                           Average Annual MWH               Average number of           Average Annual MWH
                           Savings per unit                 measures per year           savings per year
      Residential                   0.0438                         7,180                          314.5
      Commercial                      0.2114                        362                            76.5


Algorithms

Demand Savings
kW                          = ((Watts) /1000)  ISR  WHFd
kW(Residential)             = ((48.7/ 1000)  0.95)  1.0 = 0.0462
kW(Commercial)              = ((78.8-24.9) / 1000)  1.0 )  1.4 = 0.0755

Energy Savings
kWh                         = kW  HOURS  WHFe / WHFd
kWh (Residential)           = (0.0462  949)  1.0 / 1.0 = 43.8
kWh (Commercial)            = (0.0755  3500)  1.12 / 1.4 = 211.4


Where:
           Watts            = EVT and DPS October 2004 negotiated delta watts from WattsBASE – WattsEE
           kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
           WattsBASE         = Baseline connected kW
           WattsEE           = Energy efficient connected kW
           kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
           ISR               = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used 583
           WHFd              = Waste heat factor for demand to account for cooling savings from efficient lighting.
                               For a cooled space, the value is 1.40 (calculated as 1 + 1 / 2.5). Based on 2.5 COP
                               cooling system efficiency. For an uncooled space, the value is one. The Winter and
                               Fall/Spring coincident factors in loadshape #63 have been decreased to offset the
                               increase in the kW due to the WHFd. Therefore, the cooling savings are only added
                               to the summer peak savings. 584
           WHFe              = Waste heat factor for energy to account for cooling savings from efficient lighting. For



583
   ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR at each application.
584
   Waste heat factor differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for WHF d in each
application.



                                                         246
                                a cooled space, the value is 1.12 (calculated as 1 + 0.29 / 2.5). Based on 0.29
                                ASHRAE Lighting waste heat cooling factor for Vermont 585 and 2.5 C.O.P. typical
                                cooling system efficiency. For an uncooled space, the value is one.586

         HOURS                = average hours of use per year587

Waste Heat Adjustment
Cooling savings are incorporated into the electric savings algorithm with the waste heat factor (WHF). See
above.

Heating Increased Usage
MMBTUWH                = (kWh / WHFe)  0.003413  HF / 0.75
MMBTUWH (Residential) = (43.8 / 1)  0.003413  0.00 / 0.75 = 0.0
MMBTUWH (Commercial) = (211.4 / 1.12)  0.003413  0.39 / 0.75 = 0.335

Where:
         MMBTUWH             = gross customer annual heating MMBTU fuel increased usage for the measure
                              from the reduction in lighting heat.
         0.003413           = conversion from kWh to MMBTU
         HF                 = ASHRAE heating factor for lighting waste heat for Burlington, Vermont588
         0.75               = average heating system efficiency
         Oil heating is assumed typical for commercial.


Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an interior incandescent light.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a interior fluorescent fixture.

Operating Hours
Residential Applications: 949 hours / year
Commercial Applications: 3500589 hours / year

Loadshape
Residential: Loadshape, #1 - Residential Indoor Lighting
Commercial: Loadshape #63 - Commercial Indoor Lighting with cooling bonus. This is a combined
lighting and cooling loadshape
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.




585
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993
586
    Waste heat factor differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for WHFe in each application.
587
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.
588
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993. Heating factor
differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HF in each application.
589
    Usage rates for commercial applications reflect agreement made between Efficiency Vermont and the VT
Department of Public Service during program year 2001.



                                                         247
Freeridership/Spillover Factors

                                         Lighting Hardwired
 Measure Category                              Fixture
                                            LFHCNFIX
 Measure Code
                                               Compact
                                         Fluorescent Interior
 Product Description                            Fixture
 Track Name                Track No.     Freerider Spillover
 Act250 NC                 6014A250         n/a          n/a
 Cust Equip Rpl            6013CUST         n/a          n/a
 Farm NC                   6014FARM         n/a          n/a
 Farm Equip Rpl            6013FARM         n/a          n/a
 Non Act 250 NC            6014NANC         n/a          n/a
 Pres Equip Rpl            6013PRES         n/a          n/a
 C&I Retro                 6012CNIR         n/a          n/a
 MF Mkt Retro              6012MFMR         n/a          n/a
 Efficient Products        6032EPEP        0.92         1.04
 LISF Retrofit             6034LISF         n/a          n/a
 LIMF Retrofit             6017RETR         n/a          n/a
 LIMF NC                   6018LINC         n/a          n/a
 LIMF Rehab                6018LIRH         n/a          n/a
 RES Retrofit              6036RETR         n/a          n/a
 RNC VESH                  6038VESH         n/a          n/a
 MF Mkt NC                 6019MFNC         n/a          n/a
 Customer Credit           6015CC           n/a          n/a

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
Residential: 20 years.
Commercial: 15 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $20

Incentive Level
The incentive for this measure is $15

O&M Cost Adjustments
              Annual O&M Savings590
Residential                      $0.35
Commercial                       $1.74

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
See Heating Increased Usage above.



590
      From VT State screening tool



                                                    248
Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.

Reference Tables


Hours of Use, In Use Rates, and Waste Heat Factors by Customer Type
                     Average
                                      Average
                  Annual Hours                         WHFd                      WHFe                HF
                                    In Use Rate
                      of Use
  Residential          949             0.95591          1.0                        1.0               0.0
                           592
 Commercial          3,500              1.0593          1.4                       1.12              0.39



Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential Applications
               Efficient Measures            Baseline Measures
Component             Cost         Life594          Cost                        Life
Lamp                  $6.00          6.6            $1.00                        1
Ballast              $14.00         26.3             N/A                        N/A

Commercial Applications
             Efficient Measures                       Baseline Measures
Component           Cost                 Life595             Cost               Life
Lamp               $6.00                  3.43               $1.00              0.3
Ballast            $14.00                13.71                N/A               N/A


Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time   Lamp Lifetime     Lamp Lifetime          Ballast Lifetime        Ballast
                       Hours           Years                    Hours          Lifetime Years
       1               3,000            8.22                   12,000               32.88
       2               5,000            6.85                   20,000               27.40
       3               7,000            6.39                   28,000               25.57
       4               9,000            6.16                   36,000               24.66
       5               9,500            5.21                   38,000               20.82
       6              10,000            4.57                   40,000               18.26
       8              12,000            4.11                   48,000               16.44
       10             12,000            3.29                   48,000               13.15
       12             12,000            2.74                   48,000               10.96
       24             12,000            1.37                   48,000                5.48




591
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
592
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
593
    Ibid.
594
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
595
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                     249
Interior Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: IV-E-5-f (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)
Version Date & Revision History

Draft date:           Portfolio 37
Effective date:       1/1/05
End date:             TBD

Referenced Documents: 1) 2005_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls

Description
An existing lighting fixture with incandescent bulbs is replaced by an ENERGY STAR lighting fixture
wired for exclusive use with pin-based compact fluorescent lamps in an interior setting.
3.          Estimated Measure Impacts

                              Average Annual MWH                Average number of           Average Annual MWH
                              Savings per unit                  measures per year           savings per year
      Residential                      0.0438                          7,180                          314.5
      Commercial                       0.1626                           362                            58.9


Algorithms

Demand Savings
kW                             = ((Watts) /1000)  ISR  WHFd
kW(Residential)                = ((48.7/ 1000)  0.95)  1.0 = 0.0462
kW(Commercial)                 = ((48.7) / 1000)  0.9 )  1.2 = 0.0526

Energy Savings
kWh                            = kW  HOURS  WHFe / WHFd
kWh (Residential)              = (0.0462  949)  1.0 / 1.0 = 43.8
kWh (Commercial)               = (0.0526  3500)  1.06 / 1.2 = 162.6



Where:
            Watts              = EVT and DPS October 2004 negotiated delta watts from WattsBASE – WattsEE
            kW                 = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
            WattsBASE           = Baseline connected kW
            WattsEE             = Energy efficient connected kW
            kWh                = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            ISR                 = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used 596
            WHFd                = Waste heat factor for demand to account for cooling savings from efficient
                                  lighting. For a cooled space, the value is 1.2 (calculated as 1 + (0.50*(0.85) /
                                  2.5)). Based on 2.5 COP cooling system efficiency and assuming 50% of
                                  spaces that are cooled and 85% of lighting heat that needs to be mechanically
                                  cooled at time of summer peak. (From 1993 ASHRAE Journal: Calculating
                                  Lighting and HVAC interactions which assumes that 80% of lighting heat
                                  offsets heating requirements, and 90% of lighting heat needs to be
                                  mechanically cooled.) For an uncooled space, the value is one. The Winter
                                  and Fall/Spring coincident factors in loadshape #63 have been decreased to

596
      ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR at each application.



                                                            250
                                offset the increase in the kW due to the WHFd. Therefore, the cooling
                                savings are only added to the summer peak savings.
         WHFe                 = Waste heat factor for energy to account for cooling savings from efficient
                                lighting. For a cooled space, the value is 1.06 (calculated as 1 + (0.50*(0.29) /
                                2.5)). Based on 0.29 ASHRAE Lighting waste heat cooling factor for
                                Vermont 597 and 50% of spaces that are cooled and 2.5 C.O.P. typical cooling
                                system efficiency. For an uncooled space, the value is one. 598
         HOURS                = average hours of use per year599

Waste Heat Adjustment
Cooling savings are incorporated into the electric savings algorithm with the waste heat factor (WHF). See
above.

Heating Increased Usage
MMBTUWH                = (kWh / WHFe)  0.003413  AR  HF / 0.75
MMBTUWH (Residential) = (43.8 / 1)  0.003413  1.00  0.00 / 0.75 = 0.0
MMBTUWH (Commercial) = (162.6 / 1.06)  0.003413  0.70  0.39 / 0.75 = 0.191

Where:
         MMBTUWH           = gross customer annual heating MMBTU fuel increased usage for the measure
                              from the reduction in lighting heat.
         0.003413           = conversion from kWh to MMBTU
         AR                 = Typical aspect ratio factor. ASHRAE heating factor applies to perimeter
                              zoneheat, therefore it must be adjusted to account for lighting in core zones. It
                              is assumed that 70% is the typical square footage of commercial buildings
                              within 15 feet of exterior wall. The assumed aspect ratio for residential
                              buildings is 100%.
         HF                 = ASHRAE heating factor for lighting waste heat for Burlington, Vermont 600
         0.75               = average heating system efficiency
         Oil heating is assumed typical for commercial.


Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an interior incandescent light.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a interior fluorescent fixture.

Operating Hours
Residential Applications: 949 hours / year
Commercial Applications: 3500601 hours / year

Loadshape
Residential: Loadshape, #1 - Residential Indoor Lighting
Commercial: Loadshape #63 - Commercial Indoor Lighting with cooling bonus. This is a combined
lighting and cooling loadshape



597
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993
598
    Waste heat factor differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for WHFe in each application.
599
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.
600
    From “Calculating lighting and HVAC interactions”, Table 1, ASHRAE Journal November 1993. Heating factor
differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HF in each application.
601
    Usage rates for commercial applications reflect agreement made between Efficiency Vermont and the VT
Department of Public Service during program year 2001.



                                                         251
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.
Freeridership/Spillover Factors

                                         Lighting Hardwired
 Measure Category                              Fixture
                                            LFHCNFIX
 Measure Code
                                               Compact
                                         Fluorescent Interior
 Product Description                            Fixture
 Track Name                Track No.     Freerider Spillover
 Act250 NC                 6014A250         n/a          n/a
 Cust Equip Rpl            6013CUST         n/a          n/a
 Farm NC                   6014FARM         n/a          n/a
 Farm Equip Rpl            6013FARM         n/a          n/a
 Non Act 250 NC            6014NANC         n/a          n/a
 Pres Equip Rpl            6013PRES         n/a          n/a
 C&I Retro                 6012CNIR         n/a          n/a
 MF Mkt Retro              6012MFMR         n/a          n/a
 Efficient Products        6032EPEP        0.92         1.04
 LISF Retrofit             6034LISF         n/a          n/a
 LIMF Retrofit             6017RETR         n/a          n/a
 LIMF NC                   6018LINC         n/a          n/a
 LIMF Rehab                6018LIRH         n/a          n/a
 RES Retrofit              6036RETR         n/a          n/a
 RNC VESH                  6038VESH         n/a          n/a
 MF Mkt NC                 6019MFNC         n/a          n/a
 Customer Credit           6015CC           n/a          n/a

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
Residential: 20 years.
Commercial: 15 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $20

Incentive Level
The incentive for this measure is $15

O&M Cost Adjustments
              Annual O&M Savings602
Residential                      $0.35
Commercial                       $1.74

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
See Heating Increased Usage above.


602
      From VT State screening tool



                                                    252
Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.

Reference Tables


Hours of Use, In Use Rates, and Waste Heat Factors by Customer Type
                   Average         Average
                 Annual Hours     In Service      WHFd      WHFe                   AR           HF
                    of Use           Rate
 Residential         949            0.95603        1.0        1.0                   1.0          0.0
                         604
Commercial         3,500             0.9605        1.2       1.06                   0.7         0.39



Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential Applications
               Efficient Measures            Baseline Measures
Component             Cost         Life606          Cost                        Life
Lamp                  $6.00          6.6            $1.00                        1
Ballast              $14.00         26.3             N/A                        N/A

Commercial Applications
             Efficient Measures                       Baseline Measures
Component           Cost                 Life607             Cost               Life
Lamp               $6.00                  3.43               $1.00              0.3
Ballast            $14.00                13.71                N/A               N/A


Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time   Lamp Lifetime     Lamp Lifetime          Ballast Lifetime        Ballast
                       Hours           Years                    Hours          Lifetime Years
       1               3,000            8.22                   12,000               32.88
       2               5,000            6.85                   20,000               27.40
       3               7,000            6.39                   28,000               25.57
       4               9,000            6.16                   36,000               24.66
       5               9,500            5.21                   38,000               20.82
       6              10,000            4.57                   40,000               18.26
       8              12,000            4.11                   48,000               16.44
       10             12,000            3.29                   48,000               13.15
       12             12,000            2.74                   48,000               10.96
       24             12,000            1.37                   48,000                5.48




603
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
604
    Same as in original DPS screening of Efficiency Utility program.
605
    2005 TAG agreement
606
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
607
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                     253
Exterior Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: IV-E-6-a (EPP, Lighting End Use)
Version Date & Revision History

Draft date: 2/10/02
Effective date:

Referenced Documents: a) 2001_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls; b) Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of
Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth
Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000
Description
An existing lighting fixture with incandescent bulbs is replaced by a lighting fixture wired for exclusive use
with compact fluorescent lamps in a exterior residential setting.

Estimated Measure Impacts

                           Average Annual MWH               Average number of          Average Annual MWH
                           Savings per unit                 measures per year          savings per year
      Residential          .1635                            230                        37.6
      Commercial           .2404                            26                         6.3

Algorithms

Energy Savings
kWh = 0.0786  HOURS  ISR

kWh (Residential)           = 163.5
kWh (Commercial)            = 240.4

Demand Savings
kW = (kWh /HOURS)

kW(Residential)              = .0756
kW(Commercial)               = .0786

Where:
           0.0786608                  = average kilowattage reduction
           HOURS609          = average hours of use per year
           ISR610            = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used
           kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
           kW611            = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure



608
    Assumed difference in wattage between installed Exterior Florescent Fixture and the baseline product it replaces.
78.6 watts based on EVT analysis of Exterior Florescent Fixtures rebated through Efficient Products Program during
2001 (see 2001_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls).
609
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.
610
    ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR at each application.
611
    Demand savings calculated based on assumed energy savings using Vermont State Cost Effectiveness Screening
Tool.



                                                         254
   Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
   The baseline condition is an exterior incandescent light fixture.

   High Efficiency
   High efficiency is a exterior fluorescent fixture.
   Operating Hours
   Residential Applications: 2190612 hours / year
   Commercial Applications: 3059613 hours / year

Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                                                                 Peak as % of connected load kW
                            % of annual kWh
                                                                              (CF)
                Winter Winter Summer Summer                       Winter   Summer Fall/Spring
                Peak Off-Peak Peak   Off-Peak
Commercial
Outdoor              20%        13%        30%         37%           35%      15%           35%
Lighting (#13)
Residential
Outdoor
                   19.8%     13.0% 28.9%             38.3%         11.4%     5.5%         11.2%
Lighting
(#2)
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool.
    Freeridership
    2%.614
    Spillover
    7%.615
    Persistence
    The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
    Lifetimes
    20 years.
    Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.
    Measure Cost
    The incremental cost for this measure is $20
    Incentive Level
    The incentive for this measure is $15
    O&M Cost Adjustments
    The annual savings related to reductions in operation and maintenance costs is $1.75.
    Fossil Fuel Descriptions
    There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.
    Water Descriptions
    There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.




   612
       Residential Usage rate based on 6 hours daily burn time. Agreed on as default assumption by Residential TAG
   February 2002.
   613
       Commercial Usage rate based on 8.4 hours daily burn time consistent with load profile for commercial outdoor
   lighting in Vermont State Cost Effectiveness Screening tool.
   614
       Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
   615
       Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS



                                                           255
Reference Tables

Fluorescent Fixture Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                          Average            Average
                        Annual Hours       In Use Rate
                           of Use
      Residential           2190              0.95616
      Commercial            3059             1.000617

Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential

                    Efficient Measures                   Baseline Measures
Component           Cost618            Life619           Cost                    Life
Lamp                $6.00              4.56              $1.00                   0.28
Ballast             $14.00             18.23             N/A                     N/A

Commercial

                    Efficient Measures                   Baseline Measures
Component           Cost620            Life621           Cost                    Life
Lamp                $6.00              3.92              $1.00                   0.28
Ballast             $14.00             15.65             N/A                     N/A

Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time        Lamp Lifetime      Lamp Lifetime       Ballast Lifetime         Ballast
                          Hours              Years                 Hours           Lifetime Years
          1               3,000               8.22                12,000                32.88
          2               5,000               6.85                20,000                27.40
          3               7,000               6.39                28,000                25.57
          4               9,000               6.16                36,000                24.66
          5               9,500               5.21                38,000                20.82
          6               10,000              4.57                40,000                18.26
          8               12,000              4.11                48,000                16.44
          10              12,000              3.29                48,000                13.15
          12              12,000              2.74                48,000                10.96
          24              12,000              1.37                48,000                 5.48




616
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
617
    Ibid.
618
    Costs do not include labor rates as homeowner is expected to carry out maintenance.
619
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
620
    Costs do not include labor rates as homeowner is expected to carry out maintenance.
621
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                        256
Exterior Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: IV-E-6-b (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     Portfolio No. 15
Effective date: 1/1/03
End date:       TBD

Referenced Documents: a) 2001_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls; b) Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of
Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth
Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000

Description
An existing lighting fixture with incandescent bulbs is replaced by a lighting fixture wired for exclusive use
with ENERGY STAR qualified compact fluorescent lamps in an exterior residential setting.

Estimated Measure Impacts

                           Average Annual MWH               Average number of          Average Annual MWH
                           Savings per unit                 measures per year          savings per year
      Residential                   0.1634                          230                           37.6
      Commercial                    0.2404                           26                            6.3

Algorithms

Demand Savings622
kW                          = ((WattsBASE – WattsEE) /1000)* ISR
kW(Residential)             = ((109.90-31.34) / 1000) * 0.95 = 0.0746
kW(Commercial)              = ((109.90-31.34) / 1000) * 1.0 = 0.0786

Energy Savings
kWh                         = kW  HOURS
kWh (Residential)           = (0.0746 * 2190) = 163.4
kWh (Commercial)            = (0.0786 * 3059) = 240.4

Where:
           kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
           WattsBASE         = Baseline connected kW
           WattsEE           = Energy efficient connected kW
           kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
           ISR               = In service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used 623
           HOURS             = average hours of use per year624




622
    Based on EVT analysis of Exterior Florescent Fixtures rebated through Efficient Products Program during 2001.
Base and energy efficient watts for residential and commercial are equivalent and detailed in the following referenced
document: 2001_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls.
623
    ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR at each application.
624
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.



                                                         257
    Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
    The baseline condition is an exterior incandescent light fixture.

    High Efficiency
    High efficiency is an ENERGY STAR qualified exterior fluorescent fixture.

    Operating Hours
    Residential Applications: 2,190 hours / year 625
    Commercial Applications: 3,059 hours / year 626

Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                                                                  Peak as % of connected load kW
                              % of annual kWh
                                                                               (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer              Summer         Winter     Summer Fall/Spring
                 Peak Off-Peak  Peak               Off-Peak
Commercial
Outdoor        19.9%        13.2%       30.3%        36.6%         35%          15.2%          35%
Lighting (#13)
Residential
Outdoor
               19.8%        13.0%       28.9%        38.3%        11.4%          5.5%         11.2%
Lighting
(#2)
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.

    Freeridership
    2%627

    Spillover
    7%628

    Persistence
    The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

    Lifetimes
    20 years.
    Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

    Measure Cost
    The incremental cost for this measure is $20

    Incentive Level
    The incentive for this measure is $15

    O&M Cost Adjustments
    The annual savings related to reductions in operation and maintenance costs is $1.75.

    Fossil Fuel Descriptions
    There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.


    625
        Residential Usage rate based on 6 hours daily burn time. Usage rate is based on EVT estimate after reviewing
    numerous lighting evaluation studies across the country.
    626
        Commercial Usage rate based on 8.4 hours daily burn time consistent with load profile for commercial outdoor
    lighting in Vermont State Cost Effectiveness Screening tool.
    627
        Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
    628
        Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS



                                                            258
Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.

Reference Tables

Fluorescent Fixture Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                          Average             Average
                        Annual Hours        In Use Rate
                           of Use
      Residential          2,190               0.95629
      Commercial           3,059              1.000630

Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential
                    Efficient Measures                    Baseline Measures
 Component               Cost631            Life632              Cost               Life633
Lamp                      $6.00              4.56                $1.00               0.46
Ballast                   $14.00            18.23                 N/A                N/A

Commercial
                    Efficient Measures                    Baseline Measures
 Component               Cost634            Life635              Cost               Life636
Lamp                      $6.00              3.92                $1.00               0.33
Ballast                   $14.00            15.65                 N/A                N/A

Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time        Lamp Lifetime       Lamp Lifetime       Ballast Lifetime         Ballast
                          Hours               Years                 Hours           Lifetime Years
          1               3,000                8.22                12,000                32.88
          2               5,000                6.85                20,000                27.40
          3               7,000                6.39                28,000                25.57
          4               9,000                6.16                36,000                24.66
          5               9,500                5.21                38,000                20.82
          6               10,000               4.57                40,000                18.26
          8               12,000               4.11                48,000                16.44
          10              12,000               3.29                48,000                13.15
          12              12,000               2.74                48,000                10.96
          24              12,000               1.37                48,000                 5.48




629
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
630
    Ibid.
631
    Costs do not include labor rates as homeowner is expected to carry out maintenance.
632
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
633
    Residential baseline measure lamp life is based on 1,000 hours of lamp life expectancy with 2,190 average annual
hours of use (1,000 / 2,190=0.46 years
634
    Costs do not include labor rates as homeowner is expected to carry out maintenance.
635
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
636
    Commercial baseline measure lamp life is based on 1,000 hours of lamp life expectancy with 3,059 average annual
hours of use (1,000 / 3,059=0.33 years



                                                         259
Exterior Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: IV-E-6-c (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     Portfolio No. 19
Effective date: 1/1/03
End date:       TBD

Referenced Documents: a) 2003_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls; b) Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of
Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth
Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000

Description
An existing lighting fixture with incandescent bulbs is replaced by a lighting fixture wired for exclusive use
with ENERGY STAR qualified compact fluorescent lamps in an exterior residential setting.

Estimated Measure Impacts

                           Average Annual MWH               Average number of          Average Annual MWH
                           Savings per unit                 measures per year          savings per year
      Residential                   0.1137                         1,971                         224.1
      Commercial                    0.1738                          103                           17.9

Algorithms

Demand Savings637
kW                          = ((WattsBASE – WattsEE) /1000)* ISR
kW(Residential)             = ((78.3-23.7)     / 1000) * 0.95 = 0.0519
kW(Commercial)              = ((82.7-25.9) / 1000) * 1.0 = 0.0568

Energy Savings
kWh                         = kW  HOURS
kWh (Residential)           = (0.0519 * 2190) = 113.7
kWh (Commercial)            = (0.0568 * 3059) = 173.8

Where:
           kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
           WattsBASE         = Baseline connected kW
           WattsEE           = Energy efficient connected kW
           kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
           ISR               = In service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used 638
           HOURS             = average hours of use per year639




Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an exterior incandescent light fixture.

637
    Based on EVT analysis of Exterior Residential and Commercial Florescent Fixtures rebated through Efficient
Products Program during 2002. (See:2003_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls.)
638
    ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR at each application.
639
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.



                                                         260
    High Efficiency
    High efficiency is an ENERGY STAR qualified exterior fluorescent fixture.

    Operating Hours
    Residential Applications: 2,190 hours / year 640
    Commercial Applications: 3,059 hours / year 641

Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                                                                  Peak as % of connected load kW
                              % of annual kWh
                                                                               (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer              Summer         Winter     Summer Fall/Spring
                 Peak Off-Peak  Peak               Off-Peak
Commercial
Outdoor        19.9%        13.2%       30.3%        36.6%         35%          15.2%          35%
Lighting (#13)
Residential
Outdoor
               19.8%        13.0%       28.9%        38.3%        11.4%         5.5%          11.2%
Lighting
(#2)
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.

    Freeridership
    2%642

    Spillover
    7%643

    Persistence
    The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

    Lifetimes
    20 years.
    Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

    Measure Cost
    The incremental cost for this measure is $20

    Incentive Level
    The incentive for this measure is $15

    O&M Cost Adjustments
    The annual savings related to reductions in operation and maintenance costs is $1.75.

    Fossil Fuel Descriptions
    There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

    Water Descriptions
    There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.

    640
        Residential Usage rate based on 6 hours daily burn time. Usage rate is based on EVT estimate after reviewing
    numerous lighting evaluation studies across the country.
    641
        Commercial Usage rate based on 8.4 hours daily burn time consistent with load profile for commercial outdoor
    lighting in Vermont State Cost Effectiveness Screening tool.
    642
        Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
    643
        Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS



                                                            261
Reference Tables

Fluorescent Fixture Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                          Average             Average
                        Annual Hours        In Use Rate
                           of Use
      Residential          2,190               0.95644
      Commercial           3,059              1.000645

Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential
                    Efficient Measures                    Baseline Measures
Component                Cost646            Life647              Cost               Life648
Lamp                      $6.00              4.56                $1.00               0.46
Ballast                   $14.00            18.23                 N/A                N/A

Commercial
                    Efficient Measures                    Baseline Measures
Component                Cost649            Life650              Cost               Life651
Lamp                      $6.00              3.92                $1.00               0.33
Ballast                   $14.00            15.65                 N/A                N/A




Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time        Lamp Lifetime       Lamp Lifetime       Ballast Lifetime         Ballast
                          Hours               Years                 Hours           Lifetime Years

644
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
645
    Ibid.
646
    Costs do not include labor rates as homeowner is expected to carry out maintenance.
647
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
648
    Residential baseline measure lamp life is based on 1,000 hours of lamp life expectancy with 2,190 average annual
hours of use (1,000 / 2,190=0.46 years
649
    Costs do not include labor rates as homeowner is expected to carry out maintenance.
650
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
651
    Commercial baseline measure lamp life is based on 1,000 hours of lamp life expectancy with 3,059 average annual
hours of use (1,000 / 3,059=0.33 years



                                                         262
1    3,000    8.22         12,000   32.88
2    5,000    6.85         20,000   27.40
3    7,000    6.39         28,000   25.57
4    9,000    6.16         36,000   24.66
5    9,500    5.21         38,000   20.82
6    10,000   4.57         40,000   18.26
8    12,000   4.11         48,000   16.44
10   12,000   3.29         48,000   13.15
12   12,000   2.74         48,000   10.96
24   12,000   1.37         48,000    5.48




                     263
Exterior Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: IV-E-6-d (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     Portfolio No. 24
Effective date: 1/1/04
End date:       6/30/04

Referenced Documents: a) 2004_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls; b) Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of
Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth
Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000

Description
An existing lighting fixture with incandescent bulbs is replaced by an ENERGY STAR lighting fixture
wired for exclusive use with pin-based compact fluorescent lamps in an exterior setting.


Estimated Measure Impacts

                           Average Annual MWH               Average number of          Average Annual MWH
                           Savings per unit                 measures per year          savings per year
      Residential                   0.1209                         1,971                         238.3
      Commercial                    0.1790                          103                           18.4

Algorithms

Demand Savings652
kW                          = ((WattsBASE – WattsEE) /1000)* ISR
kW(Residential)             = ((83.2-25.1)     / 1000) * 0.95 = 0.0552
kW(Commercial)              = ((82.1-23.6) / 1000) * 1.0 = 0.0585

Energy Savings
kWh                         = kW  HOURS
kWh (Residential)           = (0.0552 * 2190) = 120.9
kWh (Commercial)            = (0.0585 * 3059) = 179.0

Where:
           kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
           WattsBASE         = Baseline connected kW
           WattsEE           = Energy efficient connected kW
           kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
           ISR               = In service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used 653
           HOURS             = average hours of use per year654




652
    Based on EVT analysis of Exterior Residential and Commercial Florescent Fixtures rebated through Efficient
Products Program
653
    ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR at each application.
654
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.



                                                         264
Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an exterior incandescent light fixture.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is an ENERGY STAR qualified exterior fluorescent fixture.

Operating Hours
Residential Applications: 2,190 hours / year 655
Commercial Applications: 3,059 hours / year 656

Loadshape
Residential Outdoor Lighting, #2
Commercial Outdoor Lighting, #13Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.

Freeridership
2%657

Spillover
7%658

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
20 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $20

Incentive Level
The incentive for this measure is $15

O&M Cost Adjustments
The annual savings related to reductions in operation and maintenance costs is $1.75.

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.

Reference Tables
Fluorescent Fixture Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                      Average           Average
                    Annual Hours      In Use Rate
                       of Use
   Residential         2,190             0.95659

655
    Residential Usage rate based on 6 hours daily burn time. Usage rate is based on EVT estimate after reviewing
numerous lighting evaluation studies across the country.
656
    Commercial Usage rate based on 8.4 hours daily burn time consistent with load profile for commercial outdoor
lighting in Vermont State Cost Effectiveness Screening tool.
657
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
658
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS
659
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.



                                                        265
      Commercial            3,059             1.000660

Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential
             Efficient Measures              Baseline Measures
Component         Cost661          Life662          Cost                            Life663
Lamp               $6.00            4.56            $1.00                            0.46
Ballast            $14.00          18.23             N/A                             N/A

Commercial
                   Efficient Measures                    Baseline Measures
Component               Cost664             Life665             Cost                Life666
Lamp                     $6.00               3.92               $1.00                0.33
Ballast                  $14.00             15.65                N/A                 N/A

Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time   Lamp Lifetime     Lamp Lifetime              Ballast Lifetime         Ballast
                       Hours           Years                        Hours           Lifetime Years
       1               3,000            8.22                       12,000                32.88
       2               5,000            6.85                       20,000                27.40
       3               7,000            6.39                       28,000                25.57
       4               9,000            6.16                       36,000                24.66
       5               9,500            5.21                       38,000                20.82
       6              10,000            4.57                       40,000                18.26
       8              12,000            4.11                       48,000                16.44
       10             12,000            3.29                       48,000                13.15
       12             12,000            2.74                       48,000                10.96
       24             12,000            1.37                       48,000                 5.48




660
    Ibid.
661
    Costs do not include labor rates as homeowner is expected to carry out maintenance.
662
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
663
    Residential baseline measure lamp life is based on 1,000 hours of lamp life expectancy with 2,190 average annual
hours of use (1,000 / 2,190=0.46 years
664
    Costs do not include labor rates as homeowner is expected to carry out maintenance.
665
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
666
    Commercial baseline measure lamp life is based on 1,000 hours of lamp life expectancy with 3,059 average annual
hours of use (1,000 / 3,059=0.33 years



                                                         266
Exterior Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: IV-E-6-e (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     Portfolio No. 28
Effective date: 7/1/04
End date:       TBD

Referenced Documents: a) 2004_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls; b) Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of
Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth
Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000

Description
An existing lighting fixture with incandescent bulbs is replaced by an ENERGY STAR lighting fixture
wired for exclusive use with pin-based compact fluorescent lamps in an exterior setting.


Estimated Measure Impacts

                           Average Annual MWH               Average number of          Average Annual MWH
                           Savings per unit                 measures per year          savings per year
      Residential                   0.1209                         1,971                         238.3
      Commercial                    0.1790                          103                           18.4

Algorithms

Demand Savings667
kW                          = ((WattsBASE – WattsEE) /1000)* ISR
kW(Residential)             = ((83.2-25.1)     / 1000) * 0.95 = 0.0552
kW(Commercial)              = ((82.1-23.6) / 1000) * 1.0 = 0.0585

Energy Savings
kWh                         = kW  HOURS
kWh (Residential)           = (0.0552 * 2190) = 120.9
kWh (Commercial)            = (0.0585 * 3059) = 179.0

Where:
           kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
           WattsBASE         = Baseline connected kW
           WattsEE           = Energy efficient connected kW
           kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
           ISR               = In service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used668
           HOURS             = average hours of use per year669

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an exterior incandescent light fixture.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is an ENERGY STAR qualified exterior fluorescent fixture.

667
    Based on EVT analysis of Exterior Residential and Commercial Florescent Fixtures rebated through Efficient
Products Program
668
    ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR at each application.
669
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.



                                                         267
Operating Hours
Residential Applications: 2,190 hours / year 670
Commercial Applications: 3,059 hours / year 671

Loadshape
Residential: Loadshape #2 - Residential Outdoor Lighting
Commercial: Loadshape #13 - Commercial Outdoor Lighting,
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.

Freeridership/Spillover Factors

                                          Lighting Hardwired
 Measure Category                                Fixture
 Measure Code                                 LFHCEFIX
                                          Compact fluorescent
 Product Description                         exterior fixture
 Track Name              Track No.        Freerider Spillover
 Act250 NC               6014A250            n/a          n/a
 Cust Equip Rpl          6013CUST            n/a          n/a
 Farm NC                 6014FARM            n/a          n/a
 Farm Equip Rpl          6013FARM            n/a          n/a
 Non Act 250 NC          6014NANC            n/a          n/a
 Pres Equip Rpl          6013PRES            n/a          n/a
 C&I Retro               6012CNIR            n/a          n/a
 MF Mkt Retro            6012MFMR            n/a          n/a
 Efficient Products      6032EPEP           0.98         1.07
 LISF Retrofit           6034LISF            n/a          n/a
 LIMF Retrofit           6017RETR            n/a          n/a
 LIMF NC                 6018LINC            n/a          n/a
 LIMF Rehab              6018LIRH            n/a          n/a
 RES Retrofit            6036RETR            n/a          n/a
 RNC VESH                6038VESH            n/a          n/a
 MF Mkt NC               6019MFNC            n/a          n/a

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
Residential: 20 years.
Commercial: 15 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $20


Incentive Level

670
    Residential Usage rate based on 6 hours daily burn time. Usage rate is based on EVT estimate after reviewing
numerous lighting evaluation studies across the country.
671
    Commercial Usage rate based on 8.4 hours daily burn time consistent with load profile for commercial outdoor
lighting in Vermont State Cost Effectiveness Screening tool.



                                                        268
The incentive for this measure is $15

O&M Cost Adjustments
The annual savings related to reductions in operation and maintenance costs is $1.75.

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.

Reference Tables
Fluorescent Fixture Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                      Average           Average
                    Annual Hours      In Use Rate
                       of Use
   Residential         2,190             0.95672
  Commercial           3,059            1.000673

Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential
             Efficient Measures              Baseline Measures
Component         Cost674          Life675          Cost                            Life676
Lamp               $6.00            4.56            $1.00                            0.46
Ballast            $14.00          18.23             N/A                             N/A

Commercial
                  Efficient Measures                     Baseline Measures
Component              Cost677              Life678             Cost                Life679
Lamp                    $6.00                3.92               $1.00                0.33
Ballast                 $14.00              15.65                N/A                 N/A




Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time   Lamp Lifetime     Lamp Lifetime              Ballast Lifetime         Ballast
                       Hours           Years                        Hours           Lifetime Years
       1               3,000            8.22                       12,000                32.88
       2               5,000            6.85                       20,000                27.40
       3               7,000            6.39                       28,000                25.57
       4               9,000            6.16                       36,000                24.66
       5               9,500            5.21                       38,000                20.82
       6              10,000            4.57                       40,000                18.26

672
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
673
    Ibid.
674
    Costs do not include labor rates as homeowner is expected to carry out maintenance.
675
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
676
    Residential baseline measure lamp life is based on 1,000 hours of lamp life expectancy with 2,190 average annual
hours of use (1,000 / 2,190=0.46 years
677
    Costs do not include labor rates as homeowner is expected to carry out maintenance.
678
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
679
    Commercial baseline measure lamp life is based on 1,000 hours of lamp life expectancy with 3,059 average annual
hours of use (1,000 / 3,059=0.33 years



                                                        269
8    12,000   4.11         48,000   16.44
10   12,000   3.29         48,000   13.15
12   12,000   2.74         48,000   10.96
24   12,000   1.37         48,000    5.48




                     270
Exterior Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: IV-E-6-f (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     Portfolio No. 31
Effective date: 1/1/04
End date:       TBD

Referenced Documents: a) 2005_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls
Description
An existing lighting fixture with incandescent bulbs is replaced by an ENERGY STAR lighting fixture
wired for exclusive use with pin-based compact fluorescent lamps in an exterior setting.


Estimated Measure Impacts

                           Average Annual MWH               Average number of          Average Annual MWH
                           Savings per unit                 measures per year          savings per year
      Residential                   0.1353                         1,971                         266.7
      Commercial                    0.1790                          103                           18.4

Algorithms

Demand Savings680
kW                          = ((Watts) /1000)* ISR
kW(Residential)             = ((94.7)/ 1000) * 0.87 = 0.0824
kW(Commercial)              = ((82.1-23.6) / 1000) * 1.0 = 0.0585

Energy Savings
kWh                         = kW  HOURS
kWh (Residential)           = (0.0824 * 1642.5) = 135.3
kWh (Commercial)            = (0.0585 * 3059) = 179.0

Where:
           Watts            = EVT and DPS October 2004 negotiated delta watts from WattsBASE – WattsEE
           kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
           WattsBASE         = Baseline connected kW
           WattsEE           = Energy efficient connected kW
           kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
           ISR               = In service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used681
           HOURS             = average hours of use per year682

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an exterior incandescent light fixture.

High Efficiency

680
    Based on EVT analysis of Exterior Residential and Commercial Florescent Fixtures rebated through Efficient
Products Program
681
    ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR at each application.
682
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.



                                                         271
High efficiency is an ENERGY STAR qualified exterior fluorescent fixture.

Operating Hours
Residential Applications: 1642.5 hours / yearCommercial Applications: 3,059 hours / year 683

Loadshape
Residential: Loadshape #2 - Residential Outdoor Lighting
Commercial: Loadshape #13 - Commercial Outdoor Lighting,
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.

Freeridership/Spillover Factors

                                          Lighting Hardwired
 Measure Category                                Fixture
 Measure Code                                 LFHCEFIX
                                          Compact fluorescent
 Product Description                         exterior fixture
 Track Name              Track No.        Freerider Spillover
 Act250 NC               6014A250            n/a          n/a
 Cust Equip Rpl          6013CUST            n/a          n/a
 Farm NC                 6014FARM            n/a          n/a
 Farm Equip Rpl          6013FARM            n/a          n/a
 Non Act 250 NC          6014NANC            n/a          n/a
 Pres Equip Rpl          6013PRES            n/a          n/a
 C&I Retro               6012CNIR            n/a          n/a
 MF Mkt Retro            6012MFMR            n/a          n/a
 Efficient Products      6032EPEP           0.88         1.07
 LISF Retrofit           6034LISF            n/a          n/a
 LIMF Retrofit           6017RETR            n/a          n/a
 LIMF NC                 6018LINC            n/a          n/a
 LIMF Rehab              6018LIRH            n/a          n/a
 RES Retrofit            6036RETR            n/a          n/a
 RNC VESH                6038VESH            n/a          n/a
 MF Mkt NC               6019MFNC            n/a          n/a

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
Residential: 20 years.
Commercial: 15 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $20


Incentive Level
The incentive for this measure is $15


683
   Commercial Usage rate based on 8.4 hours daily burn time consistent with load profile for commercial outdoor
lighting in Vermont State Cost Effectiveness Screening tool.



                                                        272
O&M Cost Adjustments
The annual savings related to reductions in operation and maintenance costs is $1.75.

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.

Reference Tables
Fluorescent Fixture Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                      Average           Average
                    Annual Hours      In Use Rate
                       of Use
   Residential        1642.5              0.87
  Commercial           3,059             1.000

Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential
             Efficient Measures              Baseline Measures
Component         Cost684          Life685          Cost                            Life686
Lamp               $6.00            5.69            $1.00                            0.46
Ballast            $14.00          22.74             N/A                             N/A

Commercial
                  Efficient Measures                     Baseline Measures
Component              Cost687              Life688             Cost                Life689
Lamp                    $6.00                3.92               $1.00                0.33
Ballast                 $14.00              15.65                N/A                 N/A



Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time   Lamp Lifetime     Lamp Lifetime              Ballast Lifetime         Ballast
                       Hours           Years                        Hours           Lifetime Years
       1               3,000            8.22                       12,000                32.88
       2               5,000            6.85                       20,000                27.40
       3               7,000            6.39                       28,000                25.57
       4               9,000            6.16                       36,000                24.66
       5               9,500            5.21                       38,000                20.82
       6              10,000            4.57                       40,000                18.26
       8              12,000            4.11                       48,000                16.44
       10             12,000            3.29                       48,000                13.15
       12             12,000            2.74                       48,000                10.96
       24             12,000            1.37                       48,000                 5.48



684
    Costs do not include labor rates as homeowner is expected to carry out maintenance.
685
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
686
    Residential baseline measure lamp life is based on 1,000 hours of lamp life expectancy with 2,190 average annual
hours of use (1,000 / 2,190=0.46 years
687
    Costs do not include labor rates as homeowner is expected to carry out maintenance.
688
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
689
    Commercial baseline measure lamp life is based on 1,000 hours of lamp life expectancy with 3,059 average annual
hours of use (1,000 / 3,059=0.33 years



                                                        273
Exterior Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: IV-E-6-g (Efficient Products Program, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     Portfolio No. 37
Effective date: 1/1/05
End date:       TBD

Referenced Documents: a) 2005_lighting_wattage_EPP.xls
Description
An existing lighting fixture with incandescent bulbs is replaced by an ENERGY STAR lighting fixture
wired for exclusive use with pin-based compact fluorescent lamps in an exterior setting.


Estimated Measure Impacts

                           Average Annual MWH               Average number of          Average Annual MWH
                           Savings per unit                 measures per year          savings per year
      Residential                   0.1353                         1,971                         266.7
      Commercial                    0.2606                          103                           26.8

Algorithms

Demand Savings690
kW                          = ((Watts) /1000)* ISR
kW(Residential)             = ((94.7)/ 1000) * 0.87 = 0.0824
kW(Commercial)              = ((94.7) / 1000) * 0.9 = 0.0852

Energy Savings
kWh                         = kW  HOURS
kWh (Residential)           = (0.0824 * 1642.5) = 135.3
kWh (Commercial)            = (0.0852 * 3059) = 260.6

Where:
           Watts            = EVT and DPS October 2004 negotiated delta watts from WattsBASE – WattsEE
           kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
           WattsBASE         = Baseline connected kW
           WattsEE           = Energy efficient connected kW
           kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
           ISR               = In service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used 691
           HOURS             = average hours of use per year692

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an exterior incandescent light fixture.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is an ENERGY STAR qualified exterior fluorescent fixture.



690
    Based on EVT analysis of Exterior Residential and Commercial Florescent Fixtures rebated through Efficient
Products Program
691
    ISR differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for ISR at each application.
692
    Hours of usage differs for residential and commercial applications. See table below for HOURS at each application.



                                                         274
Operating Hours
Residential Applications: 1642.5 hours / yearCommercial Applications: 3,059 hours / year 693

Loadshape
Residential: Loadshape #2 - Residential Outdoor Lighting
Commercial: Loadshape #13 - Commercial Outdoor Lighting,
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.

Freeridership/Spillover Factors

                                          Lighting Hardwired
 Measure Category                                Fixture
 Measure Code                                 LFHCEFIX
                                          Compact fluorescent
 Product Description                         exterior fixture
 Track Name              Track No.        Freerider Spillover
 Act250 NC               6014A250            n/a          n/a
 Cust Equip Rpl          6013CUST            n/a          n/a
 Farm NC                 6014FARM            n/a          n/a
 Farm Equip Rpl          6013FARM            n/a          n/a
 Non Act 250 NC          6014NANC            n/a          n/a
 Pres Equip Rpl          6013PRES            n/a          n/a
 C&I Retro               6012CNIR            n/a          n/a
 MF Mkt Retro            6012MFMR            n/a          n/a
 Efficient Products      6032EPEP           0.88         1.07
 LISF Retrofit           6034LISF            n/a          n/a
 LIMF Retrofit           6017RETR            n/a          n/a
 LIMF NC                 6018LINC            n/a          n/a
 LIMF Rehab              6018LIRH            n/a          n/a
 RES Retrofit            6036RETR            n/a          n/a
 RNC VESH                6038VESH            n/a          n/a
 MF Mkt NC               6019MFNC            n/a          n/a

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
Residential: 20 years.
Commercial: 15 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $20


Incentive Level
The incentive for this measure is $15

O&M Cost Adjustments
The annual savings related to reductions in operation and maintenance costs is $1.75.

693
   Commercial Usage rate based on 8.4 hours daily burn time consistent with load profile for commercial outdoor
lighting in Vermont State Cost Effectiveness Screening tool.



                                                        275
Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.

Reference Tables
Fluorescent Fixture Hours of Use and In Use Rates by Customer Type
                      Average          Average
                    Annual Hours      In Service
                       of Use            Rate
   Residential        1642.5             0.87
  Commercial           3,066              0.9

Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential
             Efficient Measures              Baseline Measures
Component         Cost694          Life695          Cost                            Life696
Lamp               $6.00            5.69            $1.00                            0.46
Ballast            $14.00          22.74             N/A                             N/A

Commercial
                  Efficient Measures                     Baseline Measures
Component              Cost697              Life698             Cost                Life699
Lamp                    $6.00                3.92               $1.00                0.33
Ballast                 $14.00              15.65                N/A                 N/A



Lamp and Ballast Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time   Lamp Lifetime     Lamp Lifetime              Ballast Lifetime         Ballast
                       Hours           Years                        Hours           Lifetime Years
       1               3,000            8.22                       12,000                32.88
       2               5,000            6.85                       20,000                27.40
       3               7,000            6.39                       28,000                25.57
       4               9,000            6.16                       36,000                24.66
       5               9,500            5.21                       38,000                20.82
       6              10,000            4.57                       40,000                18.26
       8              12,000            4.11                       48,000                16.44
       10             12,000            3.29                       48,000                13.15
       12             12,000            2.74                       48,000                10.96
       24             12,000            1.37                       48,000                 5.48




694
    Costs do not include labor rates as homeowner is expected to carry out maintenance.
695
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
696
    Residential baseline measure lamp life is based on 1,000 hours of lamp life expectancy with 2,190 average annual
hours of use (1,000 / 2,190=0.46 years
697
    Costs do not include labor rates as homeowner is expected to carry out maintenance.
698
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.
699
    Commercial baseline measure lamp life is based on 1,000 hours of lamp life expectancy with 3,059 average annual
hours of use (1,000 / 3,059=0.33 years



                                                        276
Ceiling Fan End Use
Energy Star Ceiling Fans
Measure Number: IV-F-1-a (EPP, Ceiling Fan End Use)

Version Date & Revision History

Draft date: 4/1/02
Effective date:

Referenced Documents: a) ceilingfans.xls; b) Calwell and Horwitz (2001). “Ceiling Fans: Fulfilling the
Energy Efficiency Promise”. Home Energy. Jan/Feb. c) Caldwell and Horowitz. Unpublished memo
circulated through CEE.

Description
Ceiling fans meeting air flow efficiency requirements at low, medium and high speed operation. If
equipped with a light kit, then either fitted with an Energy Star rated fixture or included with Energy Star
bulbs equal to the number of light sockets, as well as have separate fan and light switching.

Estimated Measure Impacts

Average Annual MWH Savings               Average number of measures per           Average Annual MWH savings
per unit                                 year                                     per year
.187                                     500                                      93.5


Algorithms

Energy Savings700
From lighting:
kWh =180 kWh701

From fan:
kWh =7.5 kWh702




700
    Consumers will be offered separate rebates. If the ceiling fan has an Energy Star lighting kit, a rebate will be offered
as if for an Energy Star lighting fixture. Regardless, a separate rebate will be offered if the fan itself qualifies as an
Energy Star model. Since the default Energy Star lighting fixture savings will be less than typical lighting savings from
an Energy Star ceiling fan with light kit, the EVT tracking system will log the incremental savings increase through an
adjustment correlated with fan rebate coupons. In the future, a more direct way of tracking savings from Energy Star
Ceiling fans may be possible.
701
    See referenced documents: ceilingfans.xls for calculation. Data derived from review of Caldwell and Horowitz
(unpublished memo).
702
    Id.



                                                           277
Demand Savings
From lighting:
kW = 0.01968703

From fan:
kW = 0.0144704

Where:
         kWh      = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         kW       = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition for fans with light kits assumes four sockets fitted with 60 watt incandescent bulbs.
Baseline fan motors assume a 1.0 amp rating at the high-speed setting. Both conditions are based on
information from manufacturer data and the Horowitz/Calwell article in the Jan/Feb 2001 issue of Home
Energy magazine.

High Efficiency
Energy Star fans with light kits assumes 2-D or circline Energy Star lamp totaling 60 watts. Baseline fan
motors assume a 0.6 amp rating at the high-speed setting. Both conditions are based on information from
manufacturer data and the Horowitz/Calwell article in the Jan/Feb 2001 issue of Home Energy magazine.

Operating Hours
Lighting: 1241 hours / year
Fans: 200 hours / year

Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                              % of annual kWh               Peak as % of calculated kW savings
                                   (RPF)                                    (CF)
                 Winter      Winter Summer      Summer
                   Peak     Off-Peak    Peak    Off-Peak     Winter Summer Fall/Spring
Fan motors             0%         0%       50%        50%         0%         60%             0%
Lights              28.6%       7.6%     36.0%      27.7%      23.2%      12.3%          22.3%
Source: Residential A/C Loadshape form Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool (#11).
Residential Indoor Lighting Loadshape from Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool (#1).

Freeridership
10%705

Spillover
10%706

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.


Lifetimes
15 years based on EVT estimate
703
    Derived using Residential Indoor Lighting Loadshape from Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool
(Loadshape #1).
704
    Derived using Residential Air Conditioning Loadshape from Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool
(Loadshape #11).
705
    Based on EVT estimate.
706
    Id.



                                                       278
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $50707.

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $15 for an Energy Star ceiling fan without a light kit, and $30 for an
Energy Star ceiling fan with a light kit.

O&M Cost Adjustments
There is an annual savings of $12.48 related to operation and maintenance cost adjustment for this measure.

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil-fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.

Reference Tables

Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
                     Efficient Measures                     Baseline Measures
Component            Cost               Life708             Cost                Life
Lamp                 $8.00              6.26 years          $1.00               0.6 years
Ballast              $20.00             25.05 years         N/A                 N/A




707
      Estimate based on Horowitz and Calwell (unpublished memo).
708
      Life of components based on 3.4 hours average residential use per day.



                                                           279
Low Income Single Family Program

Hot Water End Use
Tank Wrap
Measure Number: V-A-1-a (LISF, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/31/00
Description
Insulation “blanket” that is wrapped around the outside of a hot water tank to reduce stand-by losses.
Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 315 kWh

Demand Savings
kW = 0.036 kW

Where:
         kWh      = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         315       = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 709
         kW       = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         0.036     = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency710

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is a hot water tank without a tank wrap.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is a hot water tank with a tank wrap.
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                            Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                            (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak            Off-Peak     Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
                  22.2% 11.0%          33.2%      33.2%       100%         100%    100%
All factors are the same as in DPS’ screening of Efficiency Utility programs.
Freeridership
0% for low income customers.
Spillover
0%.
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
6 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.


709
    Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP. Note that the WEC IRP estimate is based on an evaluation of
WEC’s 1994 Direct Install program. That evaluation suggested that hot water savings were approximately 73% of
what WEC had been assuming (prior to the evaluation,WEC had estimated that tank wraps saved an average of 431
kWh per installation).
710
    This assumes that stand-by losses are spread evenly across all hours of the year (i.e. 315 kWh divided by 8760
hours).




                                                        280
Tank Wrap
Measure Number: V-A-1-b (LISF, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                       Accepted with          Referred to
                   Accepted As Is          Edits                TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 2/2/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
Insulation “blanket” that is wrapped around the outside of a hot water tank to reduce stand-by losses.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 315

Demand Savings
kW = 0.036

Where:
         kWh      = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         315       = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 711
         kW       = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         0.037     = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency712

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is a hot water tank without a tank wrap.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a hot water tank with a tank wrap.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                  Peak as % of connected load kW
                              % of annual kWh
                                                                               (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak           Off-Peak      Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
                  22.2% 11.0%         33.2%       33.2%       100%         100%    100%
All factors are the same as in DPS’ screening of Efficiency Utility programs.



711
    Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP. Note that the WEC IRP estimate is based on an evaluation of
WEC’s 1994 Direct Install program. That evaluation suggested that hot water savings were approximately 73% of
what WEC had been assuming (prior to the evaluation,WEC had estimated that tank wraps saved an average of 431
kWh per installation).
712
    This assumes that stand-by losses are spread evenly across all hours of the year (i.e. 315 kWh divided by 8760
hours).




                                                        281
Freeridership
0% for low income customers.

Spillover
0%.




                               282
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$35

Lifetimes
6 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




                                                   283
Tank Wrap
Version Date & Revision History
                                       Accepted with          Referred to
                   Accepted As Is          Edits                TAG
EVT
DPS

Measure Number: V-A-1-c (LISF, Hot Water End Use)

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 2/2/01
Approval date:
Effective Date: 12/01/01
Superceded date

Description
Insulation “blanket” that is wrapped around the outside of a hot water tank to reduce stand-by losses.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 315

Demand Savings
kW = 0.036

Where:
         kWh      = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         315       = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 713
         kW       = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         0.037     = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency714

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is a hot water tank without a tank wrap.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a hot water tank with a tank wrap.




713
    Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP. Note that the WEC IRP estimate is based on an evaluation of
WEC’s 1994 Direct Install program. That evaluation suggested that hot water savings were approximately 73% of
what WEC had been assuming (prior to the evaluation,WEC had estimated that tank wraps saved an average of 431
kWh per installation).
714
    This assumes that stand-by losses are spread evenly across all hours of the year (i.e. 315 kWh divided by 8760
hours).




                                                        284
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors

For DHW systems not on Utility Controlled DHW program (Default):
                                                            Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                            (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak           Off-Peak      Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
                  22.2% 11.0%         33.2%       33.2%       100%         100%    100%
All factors are the same as in DPS’ screening of Efficiency Utility programs.

For DHW systems on Utility Controlled DHW program:
                                                           Peak as % of connected load kW
                            % of annual kWh
                                                                        (CF)
                Winter Winter Summer Summer
                Peak Off-Peak Peak   Off-Peak               Winter        Summer Fall/Spring
                22.3%   11.1% 33.3%      33.3%                   73%          79%       70%


Freeridership
0% for low income customers.

Spillover
0%.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$35

Lifetimes
6 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




                                                   285
Pipe Wrap
Measure Number: V-A-2-a (LISF, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/31/00
Description
Insulation is wrapped around the first 12 feet of pipe leaving the hot water heater.
Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 33 kWh

Demand Savings
kW = 0.0038 kW

Where:
            kWh      = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            33        = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 715
            0.0038    = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency716
            kW       = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is a hot water system without pipe wrap.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is a hot water system with pipe wrap.
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                            Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                            (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak           Off-Peak      Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
                  22.2% 11.0%          33.2%      33.2%       100%         100%    100%
All factors are the same as in DPS’ screening of Efficiency Utility programs.
Freeridership
0% for low income customers.
Spillover
0%.
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
13 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




715
      Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP.
716
      This assumes that stand-by losses are spread evenly across all hours of the year (i.e. 33 kWh divided by 8760 hours).




                                                            286
Pipe Wrap
Measure Number: V-A-2-b (LISF, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                           Accepted with          Referred to
                      Accepted As Is           Edits                TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 2/2/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
Insulation is wrapped around the first 12 feet of both cold and hot pipe to and from the hot water heater.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 33

Demand Savings
kW = 0.0038

Where:
            kWh      = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            33        = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency717
            0.0038    = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency718
            kW       = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is a hot water system without pipe wrap.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a hot water system with pipe wrap.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                      Peak as % of connected load kW
                                  % of annual kWh
                                                                                   (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak           Off-Peak      Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
                  22.2% 11.0%         33.2%       33.2%       100%         100%    100%
All factors are the same as in DPS’ screening of Efficiency Utility programs.

Freeridership
0% for low income customers.

Spillover
0%.
717
      Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP.
718
      This assumes that stand-by losses are spread evenly across all hours of the year (i.e. 33 kWh divided by 8760 hours).




                                                            287
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$15

Lifetimes
10 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




                                                   288
Pipe Wrap
Measure Number: V-A-2-c (LISF, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                           Accepted with          Referred to
                      Accepted As Is           Edits                TAG
EVT
DPS
Previous measure effective date: 2/2/01
Draft date: 9/15/01

Description
Insulation is wrapped around the first 12 feet of both cold and hot pipe to and from the hot water heater.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 33

Demand Savings
kW = 0.0038

Where:
            kWh      = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            33        = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 719
            0.0038    = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency720
            kW       = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is a hot water system without pipe wrap.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a hot water system with pipe wrap.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                      Peak as % of connected load kW
                                  % of annual kWh
                                                                                   (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak           Off-Peak      Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
                  22.2% 11.0%         33.2%       33.2%       100%         100%    100%
All factors are the same as in DPS’ screening of Efficiency Utility programs.

Freeridership
0% for low income customers.

Spillover
0%.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.


719
      Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP.
720
      This assumes that stand-by losses are spread evenly across all hours of the year (i.e. 33 kWh divided by 8760 hours).




                                                            289
Incremental Cost
$15
Lifetimes
10 years.




                   290
Pipe Wrap
Measure Number: V-A-2-d (LISF, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                           Accepted with          Referred to
                      Accepted As Is           Edits                TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 2/2/01
Draft date: 9/15/01
Effective Date: 12/01/01

Description
Insulation is wrapped around the first 12 feet of both cold and hot pipe to and from the hot water heater.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 33

Demand Savings
kW = 0.0038

Where:
            kWh      = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            33        = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency721
            0.0038    = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency722
            kW       = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is a hot water system without pipe wrap.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a hot water system with pipe wrap.




721
      Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP.
722
      This assumes that stand-by losses are spread evenly across all hours of the year (i.e. 33 kWh divided by 8760 hours).




                                                            291
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors

For DHW systems not on Utility Controlled DHW program (Default):
                                                            Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                            (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak           Off-Peak      Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
                  22.2% 11.0%         33.2%       33.2%       100%         100%    100%
All factors are the same as in DPS’ screening of Efficiency Utility programs.

For DHW systems on Utility Controlled DHW program:
                                                         Peak as % of connected load kW
                            % of annual kWh
                                                                      (CF)
                Winter Winter Summer Summer
                Peak Off-Peak Peak   Off-Peak             Winter     Summer Fall/Spring
                22.3%   11.1% 33.3%      33.3%                73%         79%          70%


Freeridership
0% for low income customers.

Spillover
0%.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$15
Lifetimes
10 years.




                                                 292
Tank Temperature Turn-Down
Measure Number: V-A-3-a (LISF, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/31/00
Description
The thermostat setting of a hot water tank is lowered to 120 degrees.
Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 146 kWh

Demand Savings
kW = kWh / 8760

Where:
            kWh     = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            146      = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 723
            kW      = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
            8760     = Hours per year, over which heat loss will be reduced.

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is a hot water tank with a thermostat setting that is higher than 120 degrees,
typically systems with settings of 130 degrees or higher.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is a hot water tank with the thermostat set at 120 degrees.
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                              Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                               (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak             Off-Peak      Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
DHW heat
                  22.2% 11.0%          33.2%        33.2%       100%          100%         100%
loss
All factors are the same as in DPS field screening tool for residential DHW insulation.
Freeridership
0% for low income customers.
Spillover
0%.
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
6 years, or the approximate remaining life of the average tank (assumes the average water heater has a life
of 13 years and is half way through its useful life).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




723
      Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP.



                                                        293
Tank Temperature Turn-Down
Measure Number: V-A-3-b (LISF, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                       Accepted with          Referred to
                     Accepted As Is        Edits                TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/01
Draft date: 2/2/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
The thermostat setting of a hot water tank is lowered to 120 degrees.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 146

Demand Savings
kW = kWh / 8760

Where:
            kWh     = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            146      = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 724
            kW      = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
            8760     = Hours per year, over which heat loss will be reduced.

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is a hot water tank with a thermostat setting that is higher than 120 degrees,
typically systems with settings of 130 degrees or higher.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a hot water tank with the thermostat set at 120 degrees.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                  Peak as % of connected load kW
                               % of annual kWh
                                                                               (CF)
                   Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak   Off-Peak                   Winter   Summer Fall/Spring
DHW heat
                  22.2% 11.0%          33.2%      33.2%         100%       100%         100%
loss
All factors are the same as in DPS field screening tool for residential DHW insulation.
Freeridership
0% for low income customers.

Spillover
0%.

724
      Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP.



                                                        294
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$5

Lifetimes
4 years, or the approximate remaining life of the average tank (assumes the average water heater has a life
of 13 years and is half way through its useful life).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




                                                    295
Tank Temperature Turn-Down
Measure Number: V-A-3-c (LISF, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                       Accepted with          Referred to
                     Accepted As Is        Edits                TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/01
Draft date: 2/2/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
The thermostat setting of a hot water tank is lowered to 120 degrees.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 146

Demand Savings
kW = kWh / 8760

Where:
            kWh     = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            146      = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency725
            kW      = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
            8760     = Hours per year, over which heat loss will be reduced.

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is a hot water tank with a thermostat setting that is higher than 120 degrees,
typically systems with settings of 130 degrees or higher.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a hot water tank with the thermostat set at 120 degrees.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                  Peak as % of connected load kW
                               % of annual kWh
                                                                               (CF)
                   Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak   Off-Peak                   Winter   Summer Fall/Spring
DHW heat
                  22.2% 11.0%          33.2%      33.2%         100%       100%         100%
loss
All factors are the same as in DPS field screening tool for residential DHW insulation.
Freeridership
0% for low income customers.

Spillover
0%.

725
      Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP.



                                                        296
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$5

Lifetimes
4 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




                                               297
Tank Temperature Turn-Down
Measure Number: V-A-3-d (LISF, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                       Accepted with          Referred to
                     Accepted As Is        Edits                TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/01
Draft date: 2/2/01
Approval date:
Effective Date: 12/01/01
Superceded date

Description
The thermostat setting of a hot water tank is lowered to 120 degrees.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 146

Demand Savings
kW = kWh / 8760

Where:
            kWh     = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            146      = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 726
            kW      = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
            8760     = Hours per year, over which heat loss will be reduced.




726
      Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP.



                                                        298
Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is a hot water tank with a thermostat setting that is higher than 120 degrees,
typically systems with settings of 130 degrees or higher.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a hot water tank with the thermostat set at 120 degrees.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors

For DHW systems not on Utility Controlled DHW program (Default):
                                                              Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                            (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak            Off-Peak       Winter    Summer Fall/Spring
DHW heat
                  22.2% 11.0%          33.2%      33.2%         100%       100%         100%
loss
All factors are the same as in DPS field screening tool for residential DHW insulation.

For DHW systems on Utility Controlled DHW program:
                                                             Peak as % of connected load kW
                            % of annual kWh
                                                                          (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                 Peak Off-Peak Peak   Off-Peak                 Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
DHW heat
                 22.3%       11.1%      33.3%       33.3%          73%          79%           70%
loss




Freeridership
0% for low income customers.

Spillover
0%.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$5

Lifetimes
4 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




                                                     299
Low Flow Showerhead
Measure Number: V-A-4-a (LISF, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/31/00
Description
An existing showerhead with a high flow rate is replaced with new unit that has a low flow rate.
Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 340 kWh

Demand Savings
kW = 0.0997 kW

Where:
         kWh      = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         340       = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 727
         0.0997    = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency728
         kW       = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an existing showerhead with a high flow.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is a low flow showerhead.
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                            Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                            (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak           Off-Peak      Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
                  28.4%      3.1%      46.5%      22.0%       77.5%        48.1%   64.9%
All factors are the same as in DPS’ screening of Efficiency Utility programs.
Freeridership
0% for low income customers.
Spillover
0%.
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
9 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




727
    Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP.
728
    This assumes the same ratio of connected load reduction to kWh savings that was used by the DPS in its screening
of the Efficiency Utility program.



                                                         300
Low Flow Showerhead
Measure Number: V-A-4-b (LISF, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                       Accepted with           Referred to
                   Accepted As Is          Edits                 TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 2/2/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
An existing showerhead with a high flow rate is replaced with new unit that has a low flow rate.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 340

Demand Savings
kW = 0.0997

Water Savings
CCF = 4.6729

Where:
          kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
          340               = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 730
          kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
          0.0997            = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency 731
          CCF              = customer water savings in hundreds of cubic feet for the measure
          4.6               = customer water savings from upgrading to high efficiency

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an existing showerhead with a high flow.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a low flow showerhead.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                   Peak as % of connected load kW
                              % of annual kWh
                                                                                (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak           Off-Peak      Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
                  28.4%      3.1%     46.5%       22.0%       77.5%        48.1%   64.9%
All factors are the same as in DPS’ screening of Efficiency Utility programs.

729
    Proposed by West Hill (September 2000) and used in negotiated EVT TRB goals.
730
    Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP.
731
    This assumes the same ratio of connected load reduction to kWh savings that was used by the DPS in its screening
of the Efficiency Utility program.



                                                         301
Freeridership
0% for low income customers.

Spillover
0%.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$15

Lifetimes
9 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




                                                   302
Low Flow Showerhead
Version Date & Revision History
                                       Accepted with           Referred to
                   Accepted As Is          Edits                 TAG
EVT
DPS

Measure Number: V-A-4-c (LISF, Hot Water End Use)

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 2/2/01
Approval date:
Effective Date: 12/01/01
Superceded date

Description
An existing showerhead with a high flow rate is replaced with new unit that has a low flow rate.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 340

Demand Savings
kW = 0.0997

Water Savings
CCF = 4.6732

Where:
          kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
          340               = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency733
          kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
          0.0997            = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency 734
          CCF              = customer water savings in hundreds of cubic feet for the measure
          4.6               = customer water savings from upgrading to high efficiency

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an existing showerhead with a high flow.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a low flow showerhead.




732
    Proposed by West Hill (September 2000) and used in negotiated EVT TRB goals.
733
    Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP.
734
    This assumes the same ratio of connected load reduction to kWh savings that was used by the DPS in its screening
of the Efficiency Utility program.



                                                         303
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors

For DHW systems not on Utility Controlled DHW program (Default):
                                                            Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                            (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak           Off-Peak      Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
                  28.4%      3.1%     46.5%       22.0%       77.5%        48.1%   64.9%
All factors are the same as in DPS’ screening of Efficiency Utility programs.

For DHW systems on Utility Controlled DHW program:
                                                           Peak as % of connected load kW
                            % of annual kWh
                                                                        (CF)
                Winter Winter Summer Summer
                Peak Off-Peak Peak    Off-Peak              Winter        Summer Fall/Spring
                 28.4%   3.1%   46.5%      22%                 56.6%          38%      45.4%


Freeridership
0% for low income customers.

Spillover
0%.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$15

Lifetimes
9 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




                                                   304
Low Flow Faucet Aerator
Measure Number: V-A-5-a (LISF, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/31/00
Description
An existing faucet aerator with a high flow rate is replaced with new unit that has a low flow rate.
Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWhi = 57 kWh

Demand Savings
kW = 0.0171 kW

Where:
         kWh      = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         57        = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency735
         0.0171    = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency736
         kW       = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an existing faucet aerator with a high flow rate.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is a low flow aerator.
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                              Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                              (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak            Off-Peak      Winter       Summer Fall/Spring
                  28.4%      3.1%      46.5%       22.0%       77.5%         48.1%   64.9%
All factors are the same as in DPS’ screening of Efficiency Utility programs.
Freeridership
0% for low income customers.
Spillover
0%.
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
9 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




735
    Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP.
736
    This assumes the same ratio of connected load reduction to kWh savings that was used by the DPS in its screening
of the Efficiency Utility program.



                                                         305
Low Flow Faucet Aerator
Measure Number: V-A-5-b (LISF, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                       Accepted with           Referred to
                   Accepted As Is          Edits                 TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 2/2/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
An existing faucet aerator with a high flow rate is replaced with new unit that has a low flow rate.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 57

Demand Savings
kW = 0.0171

Water Savings
CCF = 2.0737

Where:
          kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
          57                = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 738
          kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
          0.0171            = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency 739
          CCF              = customer water savings in hundreds of cubic feet for the measure
          2.0               = customer water savings from upgrading to high efficiency

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an existing faucet aerator with a high flow rate.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a low flow aerator.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                   Peak as % of connected load kW
                              % of annual kWh
                                                                                (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak           Off-Peak      Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
                  28.4%      3.1%     46.5%       22.0%       77.5%        48.1%   64.9%
All factors are the same as in DPS’ screening of Efficiency Utility programs.
737
    Proposed by West Hill (September 2000) and used in negotiated EVT TRB goals.
738
    Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP.
739
    This assumes the same ratio of connected load reduction to kWh savings that was used by the DPS in its screening
of the Efficiency Utility program.



                                                         306
Freeridership
0% for low income customers.

Spillover
0%.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$6
Lifetimes
9 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




                                                   307
Low Flow Faucet Aerator
Version Date & Revision History
                                       Accepted with           Referred to
                   Accepted As Is          Edits                 TAG
EVT
DPS

Measure Number: V-A-5-c (LISF, Hot Water End Use)

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 2/2/01
Approval date:
Effective Date: 12/01/01
Superceded date

Description
An existing faucet aerator with a high flow rate is replaced with new unit that has a low flow rate.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 57

Demand Savings
kW = 0.0171

Water Savings
CCF = 2.0740

Where:
          kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
          57                = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 741
          kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
          0.0171            = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency 742
          CCF              = customer water savings in hundreds of cubic feet for the measure
          2.0               = customer water savings from upgrading to high efficiency

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an existing faucet aerator with a high flow rate.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a low flow aerator.




740
    Proposed by West Hill (September 2000) and used in negotiated EVT TRB goals.
741
    Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP.
742
    This assumes the same ratio of connected load reduction to kWh savings that was used by the DPS in its screening
of the Efficiency Utility program.



                                                         308
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
For DHW systems not on Utility Controlled DHW program (Default):
                                                            Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                            (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak           Off-Peak      Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
                  28.4%      3.1%     46.5%       22.0%       77.5%        48.1%   64.9%
All factors are the same as in DPS’ screening of Efficiency Utility programs.

For DHW systems on Utility Controlled DHW program:
                                                           Peak as % of connected load kW
                            % of annual kWh
                                                                        (CF)
                Winter Winter Summer Summer
                Peak Off-Peak Peak    Off-Peak              Winter        Summer Fall/Spring
                 28.4%   3.1%   46.5%      22%                 56.6%          38%      45.4%

Freeridership
0% for low income customers.

Spillover
0%.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$6
Lifetimes
9 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




                                                   309
Tank Wrap for Controlled DHW
Measure Number: V-A-6a (INTEGRATED INTO V-A-1-c) (LISF, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/9/01

Description
Insulation “blanket” that is wrapped around the outside of a utility-controlled electric hot water tank to
reduce stand-by losses.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 315

Demand Savings
kW = 0.037

Where:
         kWh      = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         315       = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 743
         kW       = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         0.037     = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency744

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an electric hot water tank on a utility-controlled DHW program without a tank
wrap.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is an electric hot water tank on a utility-controlled DHW program with a tank wrap.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                 Peak as % of calculated demand
                              % of annual kWh
                                                                        savings kW (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak      Winter     Summer Fall/Spring
                  22.4% 15.3%       26.9%        35.4%      20.88%      16.69%     17.47%
All factors are based on VEIC review of three-study data from K. Bailey End Use Model, Based on 1987
Survey.

Freeridership
0% for low income customers.

Spillover
0%.

743
    Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP. Note that the WEC IRP estimate is based on an evaluation of
WEC’s 1994 Direct Install program. That evaluation suggested that hot water savings were approximately 73% of
what WEC had been assuming (prior to the evaluation, WEC had estimated that tank wraps saved an average of 431
kWh per installation).
744
    This assumes that stand-by losses are spread evenly across all hours of the year (i.e. 315 kWh divided by 8760
hours).




                                                        310
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$35


Lifetimes
6 years (as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




                                                   311
312
Pipe Wrap for Controlled DHW
Measure Number: V-A-7-a (INTEGRATED INTO V-A-2-d) (LISF, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/9/01

Description
Insulation is wrapped around the first 12 feet of both cold and hot pipe to and from the electric hot water
heater on a utility-controlled DHW program.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 33

Demand Savings
kW = 0.0038

Where:
            kWh      = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            33        = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 745
            0.0038    = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency746
            kW       = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is a utility-controlled electric hot water system without pipe wrap.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a utility-controlled electric hot water system with pipe wrap.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                      Peak as % of calculated demand
                                  % of annual kWh
                                                                             savings kW (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak      Winter     Summer Fall/Spring
                  22.4% 15.3%       26.9%        35.4%      20.88%      16.69%     17.47%
All factors are based on VEIC review of three-study data from K. Bailey End Use Model, Based on 1987
Survey.

Freeridership
0% for low income customers.

Spillover
0%.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$15


745
      Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP.
746
      This assumes that stand-by losses are spread evenly across all hours of the year (i.e. 33 kWh divided by 8760 hours).




                                                            313
Lifetimes
13 years (as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).




                                                   314
Tank Temperature Turn-Down for Controlled DHW
Measure Number: V-A-8-a (INTEGRATED INTO V-A-3-d) (LISF, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/9/01

Description
The thermostat setting of a utility-controlled electric hot water tank is lowered to 120 degrees.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 146

Demand Savings
kW = kWh / 8760

Where:
            kWh     = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            146      = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 747
            kW      = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
            8760     = Hours per year, over which heat loss will be reduced.

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is a utility-controlled electric hot water tank with a thermostat setting that is higher
than 120 degrees, typically systems with settings of 130 degrees or higher.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a utility-controlled electric hot water tank with the thermostat set at 120 degrees.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                               Peak as % of calculated demand
                               % of annual kWh
                                                                      savings kW (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak      Winter     Summer Fall/Spring
                  22.4% 15.3%       26.9%        35.4%      20.88%      16.69%     17.47%
All factors are based on VEIC review of three-study data from K. Bailey End Use Model, Based on 1987
Survey.

Freeridership
0% for low income customers.

Spillover
0%.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$5




747
      Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP.



                                                        315
Lifetimes
6 years, or the approximate remaining life of the average tank (assumes the average water heater has a life
of 13 years and is half way through its useful life).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




                                                    316
Low Flow Showerhead for Controlled DHW
Measure Number: V-A-9-a (INTEGRATED INTO V-A-4-c) (LISF, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/10/01

Description
An existing showerhead with a high flow rate is replaced with new unit that has a low flow rate connected
to a DHW system on a utility-controlled program.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 340

Demand Savings
kW = 0.0997

Water Savings
CCF = 4.6748

Where:
          kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
          340               = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 749
          kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
          0.0997            = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency 750
          CCF              = customer water savings in hundreds of cubic feet for the measure
          4.6               = customer water savings from upgrading to high efficiency

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an existing showerhead with a high flow.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a low flow showerhead.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                  Peak as % of calculated demand
                              % of annual kWh
                                                                         savings kW (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak      Winter     Summer Fall/Spring
                  22.4% 15.3%       26.9%        35.4%      20.88%      16.69%     17.47%
All factors are based on VEIC review of three-study data from K. Bailey End Use Model, Based on 1987
Survey.

Freeridership
0% for low income customers.

Spillover
0%.


748
    Proposed by West Hill (September 2000) and used in negotiated EVT TRB goals.
749
    Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP.
750
    This assumes the same ratio of connected load reduction to kWh savings that was used by the DPS in its screening
of the Efficiency Utility program.



                                                         317
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$15

Lifetimes
9 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




                                                   318
Low Flow Faucet Aerator for Controlled DHW
Measure Number: V-A-10-a (INTEGRATED INTO V-A-5-a) (LISF, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/10/01

Description
An existing faucet aerator with a high flow rate is replaced with new unit that has a low flow rate.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 57

Demand Savings
kW = 0.0171

Water Savings
CCF = 2.0751

Where:
          kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
          57                = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 752
          kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
          0.0171            = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency 753
          CCF              = customer water savings in hundreds of cubic feet for the measure
          2.0               = customer water savings from upgrading to high efficiency

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an existing faucet aerator with a high flow rate.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a low flow aerator.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                  Peak as % of calculated demand
                              % of annual kWh
                                                                         savings kW (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak      Winter     Summer Fall/Spring
                  22.4% 15.3%         26.9%      35.4%      20.88%      16.69%     17.47%
All factors are based on VEIC review of three-study data from K. Bailey End Use Model, Based on 1987
Freeridership
0% for low income customers.
Spillover
0%.
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Incremental Cost
$6


751
    Proposed by West Hill (September 2000) and used in negotiated EVT TRB goals.
752
    Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP.
753
    This assumes the same ratio of connected load reduction to kWh savings that was used by the DPS in its screening
of the Efficiency Utility program.



                                                         319
Lifetimes
9 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




                                                   320
Fuel Switch for Controlled DHW
Measure Number: V-A-11-a (CLOSED: CUSTOM MEASURE) (LISF, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/10/01

Description
An existing electric domestic hot water heating system is replaced by a system powered by other fuel.
DHW fuel switch is a custom measure.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
Custom, based on field data.

Demand Savings
Custom, based on field data.

Water Savings
Custom, based on field data.

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an existing electric domestic hot water system on a utility-controlled program.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a domestic hot water system powered by non-electric fuel.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                             Peak as % of calculated demand
                               % of annual kWh
                                                                    savings kW (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak      Winter     Summer Fall/Spring
                  22.4% 15.3%       26.9%        35.4%      20.88%      16.69%     17.47%
All factors are based on VEIC review of three-study data from K. Bailey End Use Model, Based on 1987
Survey.

Freeridership
0%

Spillover
0%.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
Custom, based on field data.


Lifetimes
Custom, based on field data.




                                                    321
Hot Water End Use (with Electric Hot Water Fuel Switch)
Pipe Wrap (with Electric Hot Water Fuel Switch)
Measure Number: V-A-12-a (Low Income Single Family Program, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History

Draft date:           Portfolio 14, July ‘02
Effective date:       10/1/02
End date:             TBD

Referenced Documents: LISF_REM_Fuel Switch(TG).xls; Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP

Description
Insulation is wrapped around the first 12 feet of both the cold and hot pipe to and from the hot water heater.
This measure description applies only for homes that have had the electric hot water system removed and
replaced with a fossil fuel based system.

Estimated Measure Impacts
Average Annual MWH Savings              Average number of measures       Average Annual MWH savings
per unit                                per year                         per year
                  0                                  25                                   0


Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is a hot water system without pipe wrap.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a hot water system with pipe wrap.

Freeridership
0% for low income customers.

Spillover
0%.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
10 years.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $15

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $15.

O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure.




                                                      322
Fossil Fuel Descriptions754
When a fuel switch occurs from electric to a different type of DHW heater fuel source, the average annual
fossil fuel savings in MMBtu’s generated by the pipe wrap measure are the following:

MMBtuoil         = 0.15
MMBtunatgas      = 0.15
MMBtuliq.propane = 0.15

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure




754
   Fuel switch savings based on efficiency factors of .62 for oil, natural gas, and liquid propane high efficiency stand
alone DHW heaters as approved by the VT- DPS and used by Efficiency Vermont. Efficiency factor of .83 is used for
electric DHW heater. All heaters have an anticipated life span of 30 years.




                                                          323
Tank Wrap (with Electric Hot Water Fuel Switch)
Measure Number: V-A-13-a (Low Income Single Family Program, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History

Draft date:       Portfolio14, July ‘02
Effective Date:   10/1/02
End Date:         TBD

Referenced Documents: LISF_REM_Fuel Switch(TG).xls; Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP.

Description
An insulation “blanket” is wrapped around the outside of a hot water tank to reduce stand-by losses. This
measure description applies only for homes that have had the electric hot water system removed and
replaced with a fossil fuel based system. Estimated electricity savings associated with the measure is for a
six week period as this represents the average lag time between measure installation and replacement of the
electric water heater.755


Estimated Measure Impacts

Average Annual MWH Savings           Average number of measures            Average Annual MWH savings
per unit (Six weeks)                 per year                              per year
              0.036                                  25                                   0.9

Algorithms

Energy Savings
kWh = 315 (if measure remains active over a 12 month period)
kWh = (kWbase – kWeffic)  HOURS

Demand Savings
kW = 0.036
kW = kWbase – kWeffic


Where:
         kWh     = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         315      = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 756
         kW      = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         0.037    = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency757



755
  Source: Jim Massie, VEIC, Efficiency VT (7/8/02).
756
  Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP. Note that the WEC IRP estimate is based on an evaluation of
WEC’s 1994 Direct Install program. That evaluation suggested that hot water savings were approximately 73% of
what WEC had been assuming (prior to the evaluation, WEC had estimated that tank wraps saved an average of 431
kWh per installation).
757
  This assumes that stand-by losses are spread evenly across all hours of the year (i.e. 315 kWh divided by
8760 hours).


                                                      324
Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is a hot water tank without a tank wrap.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a hot water tank with a tank wrap.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors

For DHW systems not on Utility Controlled DHW program (Default):
                                                                Peak as % of calculated kW
                         % of annual kWh (RPF)
                                                                        savings (CF)
 Application Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak           Off-Peak      Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
DHW               22.2% 11.0%         33.2%       33.2%       100%         100%       100%
All factors are the same as in DPS’ screening of Efficiency Utility programs.

For DHW systems on Utility Controlled DHW program:
                                                                  Peak as % of calculated kW
                            % of annual kWh
                                                                         savings (CF)
 Application     Winter Winter Summer Summer
                  Peak Off-Peak Peak  Off-Peak                 Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
DHW              22.3% 11.1%    33.3%  33.3%                      73%        79%          70%


Freeridership
0% for low income customers.

Spillover
0%.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
Six weeks of savings based on the time lag after the measure is installed and the electric water heater
system is replaced with a fossil fuel based electric water heater system.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

For tank wraps where DHW fuel switch occurs with support of Efficiency VT, estimated lifetime of tank is
one month.

Measure Cost
$35

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $35.

O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure.

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil-fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.



                                                     325
Low Flow Shower Head (with Electric Hot Water Fuel Switch)
Measure Number: V-A-14-a (Low Income Single Family Program, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft:         Portfolio14, July ‘02
Effective:     10/1/02
End Date:      TBD

Referenced Documents: LISF_REM_Fuel Switch(TG).xls; Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP;
West Hill (September 2000)

Description
An existing showerhead with a high flow rate is replaced with new unit that has a low flow rate. This
measure description applies only for homes that have had the electric hot water system removed and
replaced with a fossil fuel based system.

Estimated Measure Impacts
Average Annual MWH Savings              Average number of measures           Average Annual MWH savings
per unit                                per year                             per year
                   0                                    25                                 0


Water Savings
CCF = 4.6758

Where:
            CCF              = customer water savings in hundreds of cubic feet for the measure
            4.6               = customer water savings from upgrading to high efficiency

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an existing showerhead with a high flow.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a low flow showerhead.

Freeridership
0% for low income customers.

Spillover
0%.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
9 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $15


758
      Proposed by West Hill (September 2000) and used in negotiated EVT TRB goals.



                                                        326
Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $15.

O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure.

Fossil Fuel Descriptions759
When a fuel switch occurs from electric to a different type of DHW heater fuel source, the average annual
fossil fuel savings in MMBtu’s generated by the low flow shower head measure are the following:

MMBtuoil         = 1.15
MMBtunatgas      = 1.15
MMBtuliq.propane = 1.15

Water Descriptions
Estimated annual water savings are 4.6 CCF.




759
   Fuel switch savings based on efficiency factors of .62 for oil, natural gas, and liquid propane high efficiency stand
alone DHW heaters as approved by the VT- DPS and used by Efficiency Vermont. Efficiency factor of .83 is used for
electric DHW heater. All heaters have an anticipated lifespan of 30 years.




                                                          327
Low Flow Faucet Aerator (with Electric Hot Water Fuel
Switch)
Measure Number: V-A-15-a (Low Income Single Family Program, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft:         Portfolio14, July ‘02
Effective:     10/1/02
End:           TBD

Referenced Documents: LISF_REM_Fuel Switch(TG).xls; Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP;
West Hill (September 2000)

Description
An existing faucet aerator with a high flow rate is replaced with new unit that has a low flow rate. This
measure description applies only for homes that have had the electric hot water system removed and
replaced with a fossil fuel based system.

Estimated Measure Impacts

Average Annual MWH Savings              Average number of measures per       Average Annual MWH savings
per unit                                year                                 per year
                   0                                    25                                0


Water Savings
CCF = 2.0760

Where:
            CCF              = customer water savings in hundreds of cubic feet for the measure
            2.0               = customer water savings from upgrading to high efficiency

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an existing faucet aerator with a high flow rate.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a low flow aerator.

Freeridership
0% for low income customers.

Spillover
0%.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
9 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.


760
      Proposed by West Hill (September 2000) and used in negotiated EVT TRB goals.



                                                        328
Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $6

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $6.

O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure.

Fossil Fuel Descriptions761
When a fuel switch occurs from electric to a different type of DHW heater fuel source, the average annual
fossil fuel savings in MMBtu’s generated by the low flow faucet aerator are the following:

MMBtuoil         = 0.26
MMBtunatgas      = 0.26
MMBtuliq.propane = 0.26

Water Descriptions
Estimated annual water savings are 2.0 CCF.




761
   Fuel switch savings based on efficiency factors of .62 for oil, natural gas, and liquid propane high efficiency stand
alone DHW heaters as approved by the VT- DPS and used by Efficiency Vermont. Efficiency factor of .83 is used for
electric DHW heater. All heaters have an anticipated lifespan of 30 years.




                                                          329
Waterbed End Use
Waterbed Insulating Pad
Measure Number: V-B-1-a (LISF, Waterbed End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                      Accepted with         Referred to
                     Accepted As Is       Edits               TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: New Measure
Draft date: 2/2/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
Insulation pad placed over a waterbed mattress.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 490

Demand Savings
kW = 0.0559

Where:
            kWh     = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            490      = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 762
            kW      = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
            0.0559   = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency763

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is a waterbed without an insulating pad.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a waterbed with an insulating pad.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                Peak as % of connected load kW
                                % of annual kWh
                                                                             (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak           Off-Peak      Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
                  22.2% 11.0%         33.2%       33.2%       100%         100%    100%
All factors are the same as in DPS’ screening of Efficiency Utility programs.

Freeridership
0% for low income customers.


762
      From VT DPS 1999 screening.
763
      From VT state screening tool.




                                                      330
Spillover
0%.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$35

Lifetimes
6 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




                                                   331
Lighting End Use
CFL
Measure Number: V-C-1-a (LISF, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/31/00
Description
An existing incandescent lamp is replaced with a lower wattage compact fluorescent.
Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = kWsave  HOURS

Demand Savings
kW = kWsave

Where:
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         kWsave = lighting connected load kW saved, baseline kW minus efficient kW
         HOURS = annual lighting hours of use per year as reported by customer
         kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light bulb with sufficient usage to justify replacement.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is compact fluorescent lamp.
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                              Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                              (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak            Off-Peak      Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
                                                                5.8%         3.1%          5.6%
                                                              per hour per hour          per hour
                  19.8% 13.0%          28.9%      38.3%
                                                               of daily     of daily      of daily
                                                              burn time burn time burn time
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).
Freeridership
0% for low income customers.
Spillover
0%.
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
Lifetime is a function of the average hours of use for the lamp. Most CFLs have a rated lifetime of 10,000
hours. However, units that are turned on and off more frequently have shorter lives and those that stay on
for longer periods of time have longer lives. See the following table for details.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




                                                   332
Reference Tables
CFL Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time    Lifetime Hours   Lifetime Years
       1                3,000             8.22
       2                5,000             6.85
       3                7,000             6.39
       4                9,000             6.16
       5                9,500             5.21
       6               10,000             4.57
       8               12,000             4.11
       10              12,000             3.29
       12              12,000             2.74
       24              12,000             1.37




                                               333
CFL
Measure Number: V-C-1-b (LISF, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                     Accepted with         Referred to
                  Accepted As Is         Edits               TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 2/2/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
An existing incandescent lamp is replaced with a lower wattage compact fluorescent.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = kWsave  HOURS

Demand Savings
kW = kWsave

Where:
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         kWsave = lighting connected load kW saved, baseline kW minus efficient kW
         HOURS = annual lighting hours of use per year as reported by customer
         kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light bulb with sufficient usage to justify replacement.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is compact fluorescent lamp.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors [KT corrected load shape]
                                                             Peak as % of connected load kW
                            % of annual kWh
                                                                             (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak        Winter     Summer Fall/Spring
                                                               5.8%         3.1%          5.6%
                                                              per hour per hour        per hour
                  28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%
                                                              of daily     of daily     of daily
                                                             burn time burn time burn time
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).

Freeridership
0% for low income customers.

Spillover
0%.



                                                     334
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
Actual costs (i.e. from weatherization agencies) are used.

O&M Savings
O&M savings are a function of the average hours of use for the lamp. See reference table.

Lifetimes
Lifetime is a function of the average hours of use for the lamp. Most CFLs have a rated lifetime of 10,000
hours. However, units that are turned on and off more frequently have shorter lives and those that stay on
for longer periods of time have longer lives. See the following table for details.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.
Reference Tables
CFL Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time      Lifetime Hours     Lifetime Years
       1                  3,000               8.22
       2                  5,000               6.85
       3                  7,000               6.39
       4                  9,000               6.16
       5                  9,500               5.21
       6                 10,000               4.57
       8                 12,000               4.11
       10                12,000               3.29
       12                12,000               2.74
       24                12,000               1.37


CFL O&M Savings by Daily Burn Time


Daily Burn Time      O&M Savings
       1               $1.43
       2               $2.82
       3               $4.21
       4               $5.60
       5               $6.13
       6               $6.61
       8               $8.15
       10              $8.37
       12              $8.51
       24              $8.89




                                                    335
CFL
Measure Number: V-C-1-c (LISF, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                     Accepted with         Referred to
                  Accepted As Is         Edits               TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 2/2/01
Draft date: 9/15/01


Description
An existing incandescent lamp is replaced with a lower wattage compact fluorescent.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = kWsave  HOURS

Demand Savings
kW = kWsave

Where:
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         kWsave = lighting connected load kW saved, baseline kW minus efficient kW
         HOURS = annual lighting hours of use per year as reported by customer
         kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light bulb with sufficient usage to justify replacement.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is compact fluorescent lamp.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                               Peak as % of connected load kW
                            % of annual kWh
                                                                            (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                 Peak Off-Peak Peak   Off-Peak                  Winter    Summer Fall/Spring
                                                               5.8%         3.1%          5.6%
                                                              per hour per hour        per hour
                  28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%
                                                              of daily     of daily     of daily
                                                             burn time burn time burn time
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).

Freeridership
0% for low income customers.

Spillover
0%.




                                                     336
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
Actual costs (i.e. from weatherization agencies) are used. See Reference Table below for cost assumptions
used in screening and O&M caculations.

O&M Savings
O&M savings are a function of the average hours of use for the lamp. See reference tables.

Daily Burn Time        O&M Savings
       1                 $1.43
       2                 $2.82
       3                 $4.21
       4                 $5.60
       5                 $6.13
       6                 $6.61
       8                 $8.15
       10                $8.37
       12                $8.51
       24                $8.89


Lifetimes
Lifetime is a function of the average hours of use for the lamp. Most CFLs have a rated lifetime of 10,000
hours. However, units that are turned on and off more frequently have shorter lives and those that stay on
for longer periods of time have longer lives. See the following table for details.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Reference Tables
CFL Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time        Lifetime Hours       Lifetime Years
       1                    3,000                 8.22
       2                    5,000                 6.85
       3                    7,000                 6.39
       4                    9,000                 6.16
       5                    9,500                 5.21
       6                   10,000                 4.57
       8                   12,000                 4.11
       10                  12,000                 3.29
       12                  12,000                 2.74
       24                  12,000                 1.37
Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
                      Efficient Measures                  Baseline Measures
 Component            Cost764         Life765             Cost                     Life
Lamp                  6.26            6.26                $1.00                    0.6 years



764
    Costs do not include labor rates as homeowner is expected to carry out maintance. Cost of efficient lamp is N/A as
measure life is same as efficient lamp (no replacement).
765
    Life of components based on average residential use of 3.4 hours per day.



                                                         337
Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: V-C-2-a (LISF, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/31/00
Description
An existing incandescent lighting fixture is replaced by a fluorescent fixture (either hard-wired or
torchiere).
Algorithms

Energy Savings
kWh = kWsave  HOURS

Demand Savings
kW = kWsave

Where:
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         kWsave = lighting connected load kW saved, baseline kW minus efficient kW
         HOURS           = annual lighting hours of use per year as reported by customer
         kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light fixture with sufficient usage to justify replacement.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is a fluorescent fixture.
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                              Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                                (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak             Off-Peak      Winter       Summer Fall/Spring
                                                                5.8%           3.1%         5.6%
                                                               per hour per hour          per hour
                  19.8% 13.0%          28.9%       38.3%
                                                               of daily       of daily     of daily
                                                              burn time burn time burn time
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).
Freeridership
0% for low income customers.
Spillover
0%.
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
20 years (though it will be necessary to replace the lamp in the fixture at least once during that time period).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




                                                      338
Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: V-C-2-b (LISF, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                      Accepted with         Referred to
                  Accepted As Is          Edits               TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 2/2/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
An existing incandescent lighting fixture is replaced by a fluorescent fixture (including table lamps but
excluding torchieres).

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = kWsave  HOURS

Demand Savings
kW = kWsave

Where:
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         kWsave = lighting connected load kW saved, baseline kW minus efficient kW
         HOURS = annual lighting hours of use per year as reported by customer
         kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light fixture with sufficient usage to justify replacement.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a fluorescent fixture.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors [KT corrected load shape]
                                                             Peak as % of connected load kW
                            % of annual kWh
                                                                             (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak        Winter     Summer Fall/Spring
                                                               5.8%         3.1%          5.6%
                                                             per hour per hour         per hour
                  28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%
                                                              of daily     of daily     of daily
                                                             burn time burn time burn time
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).

Freeridership
0% for low income customers.




                                                      339
Spillover
0%.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
Actual costs (i.e. from weatherization agencies) are used.

O&M Savings
O&M savings are a function of the average hours of use for the lamp. See reference table.

Lifetimes
20 years (though it will be necessary to replace the lamp in the fixture at least once during that time period).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.


Reference Table

Fluorescent Fixture O&M Savings by Daily Burn Time


Daily Burn Time       O&M Savings
       1                ($5.78)
       2                 $4.24
       3                $10.00
       4                $16.19
       5                $20.18
       6                $23.49
       8                $33.43
       10               $38.05
       12               $42.58
       24               $69.09




                                                      340
Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: V-C-2-c (LISF, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                      Accepted with         Referred to
                  Accepted As Is          Edits               TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 2/2/01
Draft date: 9/15/01


Description
An existing incandescent lighting fixture is replaced by a fluorescent fixture (including table lamps but
excluding torchieres).

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = kWsave  HOURS

Demand Savings
kW = kWsave

Where:
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         kWsave = lighting connected load kW saved, baseline kW minus efficient kW
         HOURS = annual lighting hours of use per year as reported by customer
         kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light fixture with sufficient usage to justify replacement.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a fluorescent fixture.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                             (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                 Peak Off-Peak Peak   Off-Peak                   Winter    Summer Fall/Spring
                                                               5.8%         3.1%          5.6%
                                                              per hour per hour        per hour
                  28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%
                                                              of daily     of daily     of daily
                                                             burn time burn time burn time
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).

Freeridership
0% for low income customers.

Spillover
0%.




                                                      341
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
Actual costs (i.e. from weatherization agencies) are used.

O&M Savings
O&M savings are a function of the average hours of use for the lamp.
Daily Burn Time       O&M Savings
        1                 ($5.78)
        2                  $4.24
        3                 $10.00
        4                 $16.19
        5                 $20.18
        6                 $23.49
        8                 $33.43
        10                $38.05
        12                $42.58
        24                $69.09
See reference table below.
Lifetimes
20 years (though it will be necessary to replace the lamp in the fixture at least once during that time period).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.


Reference Table


Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
                     Efficient Measures                    Baseline Measures
Component            Cost766            Life767            Cost                   Life
Lamp                 $8.00              6.26 years         $1.00                  0.6 years
Ballast              $20.00             25.05 years        N/A                    N/A




766
      Costs do not include labor rates. Manianece assumed to be carried out by homeowner
767
      Life of components based on average residential use of 3.4 hours per day.



                                                          342
Torchiere
Measure Number: V-C-3-a (LISF, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                         Accepted with          Referred to
                      Accepted As Is         Edits                TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: New Measure
Draft date: 2/2/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
An existing halogen torchiere is replaced by a fluorescent fixture.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 0.222  HOURS

Demand Savings
kWj = (kWh /HOURS)

Where:
            kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            0.222 = average kilowattage reduction768
            HOURS = average hours of use per year as reported by customer
            kW   = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light fixture with sufficient usage to justify replacement.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a fluorescent fixture.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                    Peak as % of connected load kW
                                % of annual kWh
                                                                                 (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer                        Winter   Summer Fall/Spring
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak
Residential       28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%         23%          12%           22%
Commercial 27.7%            5.4%     42.1%       24.8%         55%          56%           55%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).

Freeridership
0% for low income customers.

Spillover
0%.

768
      Assumes 300 watt typical halogen torchiere replaced by 78 watt CFL torchiere. [edited by KT & CN]



                                                          343
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
Actual costs (i.e. from weatherization agencies) are used.

O&M Savings
O&M savings are a function of the average hours of use for the lamp. See reference table.

Lifetimes
10 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Reference Table

Torchiere O&M Savings by Daily Burn Time


Daily Burn Time      O&M Savings
       1               ($1.23)
       2                $12.50
       3                $22.76
       4                $33.37
       5                $42.18
       6                $51.21
       8                $71.49
       10               $89.02
       12              $106.53
       24              $193.22




                                                    344
Torchiere
Measure Number: V-C-3-b (LISF, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                         Accepted with          Referred to
                      Accepted As Is         Edits                TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 2/2/01
Draft date: 6/0/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
An existing halogen torchiere is replaced by a fluorescent fixture.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 0.243  HOURS

Demand Savings
kWj = (kWh /HOURS)

Where:
            kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            0.243 = average kilowattage reduction769
            HOURS = average hours of use per year as reported by customer
            kW   = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light fixture with sufficient usage to justify replacement.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a fluorescent fixture.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                    Peak as % of connected load kW
                                % of annual kWh
                                                                                 (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer                        Winter   Summer Fall/Spring
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak
Residential       28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%         23%          12%           22%
Commercial 27.7%            5.4%     42.1%       24.8%         55%          56%           55%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).

Freeridership
0% for low income customers.

Spillover
0%.

769
      Assumes 300 watt typical halogen 57.3 watt CFL torchiere. [CLF wattage determined from distribution averages]



                                                          345
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
Actual costs (i.e. from weatherization agencies) are used.

O&M Savings
O&M savings are a function of the average hours of use for the lamp. See reference table.

Lifetimes
10 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Reference Table

Torchiere O&M Savings by Daily Burn Time


Daily Burn Time      O&M Savings
       1               ($1.23)
       2                $12.50
       3                $22.76
       4                $33.37
       5                $42.18
       6                $51.21
       8                $71.49
       10               $89.02
       12              $106.53
       24              $193.22




                                                    346
Torchiere
Measure Number: V-C-3-c (LISF, Lighting End Use)
Version Date & Revision History
                                Accepted with                   Referred to
               Accepted As Is        Edits                        TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 2/2/01
Draft date: 6/0/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
An existing halogen torchiere is replaced by a fluorescent fixture.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 0.243  HOURS

Demand Savings
kWj = (kWh /HOURS)

Where:
            kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            0.243 = average kilowattage reduction770
            HOURS = average hours of use per year as reported by customer
            kW   = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light fixture with sufficient usage to justify replacement.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a fluorescent fixture.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                    Peak as % of calculated demand
                                % of annual kWh
                                                                            savings kW (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer                        Winter    Summer Fall/Spring
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak
Residential       28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%         23%          12%           22%
Commercial 27.7%            5.4%     42.1%       24.8%         55%          56%           55%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).

Freeridership
0% for low income customers.

Spillover
0%.


770
      Assumes 300 watt typical halogen 57.3 watt CFL torchiere. [CLF wattage determined from distribution averages]



                                                          347
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
Actual costs (i.e. from weatherization agencies) are used.

O&M Savings
O&M savings are a function of the average hours of use for the lamp. See reference table.

Lifetimes
10 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Reference Table

Torchiere O&M Savings by Daily Burn Time


Daily Burn Time      O&M Savings
       1               ($1.23)
       2                $12.50
       3                $22.76
       4                $33.37
       5                $42.18
       6                $51.21
       8                $71.49
       10               $89.02
       12              $106.53
       24              $193.22




                                                    348
Torchiere
Measure Number: V-C-3-d (LISF, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                          Accepted with          Referred to
                      Accepted As Is          Edits                TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 2/2/01
Draft date: 9/15/01


Description
An existing halogen torchiere is replaced by a fluorescent torchiere.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 0.243  HOURS

Demand Savings
kWj = (kWh /HOURS)

Where:
            kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            0.243 = average kilowattage reduction771
            HOURS = average hours of use per year as reported by customer
            kW   = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light fixture with sufficient usage to justify replacement.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a fluorescent fixture.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                     Peak as % of connected load kW
                                 % of annual kWh
                                                                                  (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer                         Winter   Summer Fall/Spring
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak
Residential       28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%         23%          12%           22%
Commercial 27.7%            5.4%     42.1%       24.8%         55%          56%           55%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).

Freeridership
0% for low income customers.

Spillover
0%.



771
      Assumes 300 watt typical halogen torchiere replaced by 57 watt CFL torchiere.



                                                           349
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
Actual costs (i.e. from weatherization agencies) are used.

O&M Savings
Daily Burn Time      O&M Savings
        1              ($1.23)
        2               $12.50
        3               $22.76
        4               $33.37
        5               $42.18
        6               $51.21
        8               $71.49
        10              $89.02
        12             $106.53
        24             $193.22
See reference table.

Lifetimes
10 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Reference Table

Torchiere O&M Savings by Daily Burn Time


Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
                      Efficient Measures                       Baseline Measures
Component             Cost772            Life773               Cost                      Life
Lamp                  $10.00             6.26 years            $8.00                     1.57 years
Ballast               $30.00             32.88 years           N/A                       N/A




772
      Costs include labor rates. Rates as follows: $2.67 per lamp installed; $12.50 per ballast installed.
773
      Life of components based on average residential use of 3.4 hours per day.



                                                              350
CFL by Mail
Measure Number: V-C-4-a (LISF, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History

Draft date: 4/1/02
Effective date:

Referenced Documents: Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential
Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New
England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000.

Description
A CFL lighting is offered to low-income households through a mail-in coupon circulated in a LIHEAP
mailing. Upon receipt of the customer response card, EVT will mail a 20-Watt CFL to the address of the
response card’s sender.

Estimated Measure Impacts
 Average Annual MWH Savings           Average number of measures per       Average Annual MWH savings
 per unit                             year                                 per year
 .0248                                3000                                 74.4

Algorithms

Energy Savings
kWh = 46.54774

kWh = 62.05 * .75

Demand Savings
kW = .05

Where:
         kW     = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         HOURS = annual hours of use per year
         1241775 = HOURS
         ISR     = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used
         .9      = ISR

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The Baseline efficiency is a70-Watt incandescent lamp installed in a residential application.

High Efficiency
The High efficiency is a 20-Watt CFL lamp.


774
    Annual energy savings (calculated by kW* HOURS) has been decreased by 25% to reflect savings
adjustment protocol agreed to during Savings Verification 2002.
775
    Hours of operation are based on 3.4 hours per day for residential applications. Source: Xenergy, Process
and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston
Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July 23,
2000.



                                                     351
Operating Hours
1241 hours per year,
3.4 hours per day

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                   Peak as % of connected load kW
                                 % of annual kWh
                                                                                (CF)
                    Winter Winter Summer Summer                     Winter   Summer Fall/Spring
                    Peak Off-Peak Peak   Off-Peak
Residential
Indoor           28.7%       7.6%     36.0%       27.7%        23%         12%         22%
Lighting
All factors consistent with the Residential Indoor Lighting Loadshape from the Vermont State
Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool (Loadshape #1).

Freeridership
0%

Spillover
0%

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
6.4 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime. Lifetime based on life of CFL. CFL life is rated by hours of
use per day. (See table below)

Measure Cost
The measure cost is $6776.

O&M Cost Adjustments
The annual O&M savings for the measure, both variety and bright kits, is $1.09. (See reference table
below.)

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil-fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.




776
      Cost includes data processing and product shipping handled by Efficiency Vermont contractor EFI.



                                                          352
Reference Tables

A. Lamp Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time           Lamp Lifetime        Lamp Lifetime
                             Hours                Years
           1                 3,000                 8.22
           2                 5,000                 6.85
           3                 7,000                 6.39
           4                 9,000                 6.16
           5                 9,500                 5.21
           6                 10,000                4.57
           8                 12,000                4.11
           10                12,000                3.29
           12                12,000                2.74
           24                12,000                1.37


B. Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
                     Efficient Measures                      Baseline Measures
Component            Cost               Life777              Cost                Life
Lamp                 $4.00              6.4 years            $1.00               0.8 years




777
      Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                            353
CFL by Mail
Measure Number: V-C-4-b (Low Income Single Family, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     Portfolio No. 15
Effective date: 1/1/03
End date:       2/23/05- Measure while still effective is no longer in use, as such, it is pulled from TRM
                User Manual.

Referenced Documents: Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential
Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New
England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000.

Description
A CFL lighting is offered to low-income households through a mail-in coupon circulated in a LIHEAP
mailing. Upon receipt of the customer response card, EVT will mail a 20-Watt CFL to the address of the
response card’s sender.

Estimated Measure Impacts
 Average Annual MWH Savings              Average number of measures per           Average Annual MWH savings
 per unit                                year                                     per year
             0.046                                  2,271                                    104.5

Algorithms

Demand Savings
kW = ((WattsBASE – WattsEE) /1000)* ISR * MAF
kW = (75-20) / 1000) * 0.9 * 0.75 = 0.0371

Energy Savings
kWh = kW  HOURS
kWh = 0.0371* 1241 =46.0

Where:
          kW                 = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
          WattsBASE           = Baseline connected kW778
          WattsEE             = Energy efficient connected kW
          kWh                = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
          HOURS               = annual hours of use per year779
          ISR                 = in service rate (ISR) or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used 780
          MAF                 = mail adjustment factor given some bulbs will be inoperable upon arrival or not
                              used by customer 781



778
   A 20 watt energy efficient bulb was sent out to qualifying participants that is estimated to have replaced the
baseline 75 watt incandescent bulb, for a total demand savings of 55 watts or 0.055 kW.
779
   1,241 hours of operation are based on 3.4 hours per day for residential applications. Source: Xenergy,
Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for
Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New England Power Service Company, July
23, 2000.
780
  In service rate (ISR) is estimated to be 90%..
781
  Annual energy savings are decreased by 25% to reflect savings adjustment protocol agreed to during Savings
Verification 2002.



                                                          354
Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The Baseline efficiency is a 75-Watt incandescent lamp installed in a residential application.

High Efficiency
The High efficiency is a 20-Watt CFL lamp.

Operating Hours
1,241 hours per year,
3.4 hours per day

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                    Peak as % of calculated kW savings
                                 % of annual kWh
                                                                                   (CF)
                     Winter Winter Summer             Summer         Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
                     Peak Off-Peak  Peak              Off-Peak
Residential
Indoor               28.7%      7.6%       36.0%        27.7%        23.2%         12.3%         22.3%
Lighting (#1)
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.

Freeridership
0%

Spillover
0%

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
6.4 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime. Lifetime based on life of CFL. CFL life is rated by hours of
use per day. (See table below)

Measure Cost
The measure cost is $6782.

O&M Cost Adjustments
The annual O&M savings for the measure, both variety and bright kits, is $1.09. (See reference table
below.)

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil-fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.




782
      Cost includes data processing and product shipping handled by Efficiency Vermont contractor EFI.



                                                          355
Reference Tables

A. Lamp Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time           Lamp Lifetime        Lamp Lifetime
                             Hours                Years
           1                 3,000                 8.22
           2                 5,000                 6.85
           3                 7,000                 6.39
           4                 9,000                 6.16
           5                 9,500                 5.21
           6                 10,000                4.57
           8                 12,000                4.11
           10                12,000                3.29
           12                12,000                2.74
           24                12,000                1.37


B. Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
                     Efficient Measures                      Baseline Measures
 Component                  Cost               Life783              Cost           Life
Lamp                       $4.00              6.4 years             $1.00        0.8 years




783
      Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.



                                                            356
Ventilation End Use
Ventilation Fan
Measure Number: V-D-1-a (LISF, Ventilation End Use)
Version Date & Revision History

Draft date: 8/30/01
Effective date:
Closed: 2/23/05- Measure- while still effective, is no longer installed in LISF.

Referenced Documents: N/A

Description
Efficient ventilation fan.

Estimated Measure Impacts

Gross Annual MWH Savings per         Average number of measures per       Gross MWH savings per year
unit                                 year
.169                                 99                                   16.731

Algorithms

Energy Savings
kWh = 169

kWh = (kWbase – kWeffic)  HOURS

Demand Savings
kW = 0.06

kW = kWbase – kWeffic

Where:
         kWh   = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         169    = annual kWh savings from DPS screening of RNC program
         kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         0.06kW = 0.06 kW savings from DPS screening of RNC program (20 Watt versus 80 Watt fan)

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Standard efficiency ventilation fan (80 Watts).
High Efficiency
High efficiency ventilation fan (20 Watts).
Operating Hours
2817 hours per year (from DPS screening of RNC program)
Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                                                                Peak as % of calculated kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                       savings (CF)
              Winter Winter Summer Summer
               Peak Off-Peak Peak     Off-Peak                 Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
Ventilation   22.1%       11.1% 31.8%     35.0%                   32.2%        32.2%      32.2%
Source: Vermont State Screening Tool




                                                     357
Freeridership
0%
Spillover
0%
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
10 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.
Measure Cost
$90
O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure
Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithm or default values for this measure
Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure




                                                  358
Refrigeration End Use
Energy Star Refrigerators
Measure Number: V-E-1-a (LISF, Refrigeration End Use)
Version Date & Revision History

Draft date: 9/30/01
Effective date:

Referenced Documents: ES.ref.kWh.doc

Description
A refrigerator qualifying for Energy Star Program specifications replaces a non-Energy Star model. This is
a custom, retrofit measure.

Estimated Measure Impacts

Average Annual MWH Savings              Average number of measures per        Average Annual MWH savings
per unit                                year                                  per year
Range: 0.8 – 2.5                        36                                    Range: 28.8 - 90

Algorithms

Energy Savings
Custom, based on site-specific data. (Range: 800 – 2500 kWh/year)

Demand Savings
Custom, based on site-specific data. (Range: .16 - .50 kW)

Where:
            kWh    = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            kWbase = baseline connected load kW
            kWeffic = efficient connected load kW
            HOURS = annual motor hours of use per year
            5000    = HOURS
            kW     = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The Baseline is a refrigerator metered on site to determine annual energy consumption.
High Efficiency
The High Efficiency is a refrigerator meeting Energy Star specifications for efficiency established January
1, 2001784
Operating Hours
5000 / year785




784
      See referenced document: ES.ref.kWh.doc for Energy Star qualifying models’ energy consumption.
785
      Based on residential refrigerator loadshape/full load hours from VT State Screening Tool.



                                                         359
Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                                                             Peak as % of connected load kW
                            % of annual kWh
                                                                          (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                 Peak Off-Peak  Peak  Off-Peak                Winter      Summer Fall/Spring

Interior light      23%       11%       34%           33%          62%           60%       57%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential refrigerator load shape).

Freeridership
0% for low-income customers.
Spillover
0%.
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
17 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.
Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is based on site-specific data. Range: $430 –750. An additional
$100 fee is paid for contract management.
O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure.
Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algothrithms or default values for this measure.
Water Descriptions
There are no water algothrithms or default values for this measure.




                                                    360
Residential New Construction Program

Hot Water End Use
Tank Wrap
Measure Number: VI-A-1-a (RNC, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/31/00
Description
Insulation “blanket” that is wrapped around the outside of a hot water tank to reduce stand-by losses.
Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 315 kWh

Demand Savings
kW = 0.036 kW

Where:
         kWh      = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         315       = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency786
         kW       = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         0.036     = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency787

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is a hot water tank without a tank wrap.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is a hot water tank with a tank wrap.
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                             Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                             (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak            Off-Peak      Winter     Summer Fall/Spring
DHW
                  22.2% 11.0%          33.2%      33.2%        100%        100%           100%
Insulation
All factors are the same as in DPS’ screening of Efficiency Utility programs.
Freeridership
0% for direct install measures. The tank is found without a tank wrap, so by definition, freeridership is
zero.
Spillover
0%.




786
    Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP. Note that the WEC IRP estimate is based on an evaluation of
WEC’s 1994 Direct Install program. That evaluation suggested that hot water savings were approximately 73% of
what WEC had been assuming (prior to the evaluation,WEC had estimated that tank wraps saved an average of 431
kWh per installation).
787
    This assumes that stand-by losses are spread evenly across all hours of the year (i.e. 315 kWh divided by 8760
hours).




                                                        361
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetime
13 years (average life of water heater).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




                                               362
Tank Wrap
Measure Number: VI-A-1-b (RNC, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                       Accepted with          Referred to
                   Accepted As Is          Edits                TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 2/2/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
Insulation “blanket” that is wrapped around the outside of a hot water tank to reduce stand-by losses.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 315

Demand Savings
kW = 0.036

Where:
         kWh      = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         315       = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency788
         kW       = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         0.036     = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency789

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is a hot water tank without a tank wrap.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a hot water tank with a tank wrap.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                  Peak as % of connected load kW
                              % of annual kWh
                                                                               (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                 Peak Off-Peak Peak   Off-Peak                     Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
DHW
                  22.2% 11.0%         33.2%       33.2%       100%         100%                100%
Insulation
All factors are the same as in DPS’ screening of Efficiency Utility programs.


788
    Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP. Note that the WEC IRP estimate is based on an evaluation of
WEC’s 1994 Direct Install program. That evaluation suggested that hot water savings were approximately 73% of
what WEC had been assuming (prior to the evaluation,WEC had estimated that tank wraps saved an average of 431
kWh per installation).
789
    This assumes that stand-by losses are spread evenly across all hours of the year (i.e. 315 kWh divided by 8760
hours).




                                                        363
Freeridership
0% for direct install measures. The tank is found without a tank wrap, so by definition, freeridership is
zero.

Spillover
0%.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$35

Lifetime
13 years (average life of water heater).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




                                                     364
Tank Wrap
Measure Number: VI-A-1-c (RNC, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                       Accepted with          Referred to
                   Accepted As Is          Edits                TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 2/2/01
Draft date: 9/15/01


Description
Insulation “blanket” that is wrapped around the outside of a hot water tank to reduce stand-by losses.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 250790

Demand Savings
kW = 0.036

Where:
         kWh      = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         315       = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 791
         kW       = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         0.036     = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency792

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is a hot water tank without a tank wrap.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a hot water tank with a tank wrap.
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                  Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                               (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                 Peak Off-Peak  Peak  Off-Peak                     Winter      Summer Fall/Spring

DHW
                 22.2%      11.0%       33.2%        33.2%          100%        100%          100%
Insulation
All factors are the same as in DPS’ screening of Efficiency Utility programs.
Freeridership
0% for direct install measures. The tank is found without a tank wrap, so by definition, freeridership is
zero.

790
    Savings based on negiotions with DPS and Westhill Energy considers higher baseline for RNC.
791
    Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP. Note that the WEC IRP estimate is based on an evaluation of
WEC’s 1994 Direct Install program. That evaluation suggested that hot water savings were approximately 73% of
what WEC had been assuming (prior to the evaluation,WEC had estimated that tank wraps saved an average of 431
kWh per installation).
792
    This assumes that stand-by losses are spread evenly across all hours of the year (i.e. 315 kWh divided by 8760
hours).




                                                        365
Spillover
0%.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$35

Lifetime
7 years793




793
      Lifetime based on agreement with VT DPS through TAG discussions.



                                                        366
Tank Wrap
Measure Number: VI-A-1-d (Residential New Construction Program, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     Portfolio 23
Effective date: 12/01/01
End date:       TBD

Description
Insulation “blanket” that is wrapped around the outside of a hot water tank to reduce stand-by losses.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 250794

Demand Savings
kW = 0.029

Where:
           kWh    = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
           250     = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 795
           kW     = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
           0.029   = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency796

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is a hot water tank without a tank wrap.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a hot water tank with a tank wrap.

Loadshape
      4.   Residential DHW Insulation, #7. Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool




794
    Savings based on negotiations with DPS and Westhill Energy considers higher baseline for RNC.
795
    Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP. Note that the WEC IRP estimate is based on an evaluation of
WEC’s 1994 Direct Install program. That evaluation suggested that hot water savings were approximately 73% of
what WEC had been assuming (prior to the evaluation,WEC had estimated that tank wraps saved an average of 431
kWh per installation).
796
    This assumes that stand-by losses are spread evenly across all hours of the year (i.e. 250 kWh divided by 8760
hours).




                                                        367
Freeridership
0% for direct install measures. The tank is found without a tank wrap, so by definition, freeridership is
zero.

Spillover
0%.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$35

Lifetime
7 years797




797
      Lifetime based on agreement with VT DPS through TAG discussions.



                                                       368
369
Pipe Wrap
Measure Number: VI-A-2-a (RNC, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/31/00
Description
Insulation is wrapped around the first 12 feet of pipe leaving the hot water heater.
Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 33 kWh

Demand Savings
kW = 0.0038 kW

Where:
            kWh      = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            33        = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 798
            0.0038    = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency799
            kW       = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is a hot water system without pipe wrap.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is a hot water system with pipe wrap.
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                             Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                             (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak            Off-Peak     Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
DHW
                  22.2% 11.0%          33.2%      33.2%        100%         100%          100%
Insulation
All factors are the same as in DPS’ screening of Efficiency Utility programs.
Freeridership
0% for direct install measures. The pipes are found without insulation, so by definition, freeridership is
zero.
Spillover
0%.
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetime
13 years (average life of water heater).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




798
      Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP.
799
      This assumes that stand-by losses are spread evenly across all hours of the year (i.e. 33 kWh divided by 8760 hours).




                                                            370
Pipe Wrap
Measure Number: VI-A-2-b (RNC, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                           Accepted with          Referred to
                      Accepted As Is           Edits                TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 2/2/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
Insulation is wrapped around the first 6 feet of both cold and hot pipe to and from the hot water heater.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 33

Demand Savings
kW = 0.0038

Where:
            kWh      = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            33        = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 800
            0.0038    = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency801
            kW       = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is a hot water system without pipe wrap.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a hot water system with pipe wrap.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                      Peak as % of connected load kW
                                  % of annual kWh
                                                                                   (CF)
                     Winter Winter Summer Summer
                     Peak Off-Peak Peak   Off-Peak                     Winter       Summer Fall/Spring
DHW
                  22.2% 11.0%         33.2%       33.2%        100%         100%          100%
Insulation
All factors are the same as in DPS’ screening of Efficiency Utility programs.
Freeridership
0% for direct install measures. The pipes are found without insulation, so by definition, freeridership is
zero.



800
      Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP.
801
      This assumes that stand-by losses are spread evenly across all hours of the year (i.e. 33 kWh divided by 8760 hours).




                                                            371
Spillover
0%.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$15

Lifetime
13 years (average life of water heater).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




                                               372
Tank Temperature Turn-Down
Measure Number: VI-A-3-a (RNC, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/31/00
Description
The thermostat setting of a hot water tank is lowered to 120 degrees.
Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 146 kWh

Demand Savings
kW = kWh / 8760

Where:
            kWh     = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            146      = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 802
            kW      = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
            8760     = Hours per year, over which heat loss will be reduced.

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is a hot water tank with a thermostat setting that is higher than 120 degrees,
typically systems with settings of 130 degrees or higher.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is a hot water tank with the thermostat set at 120 degrees.
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                              Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                               (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak            Off-Peak       Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
DHW heat
                  22.2% 11.0%          33.2%      33.2%         100%          100%         100%
loss
All factors are the same as in DPS field screening tool for residential DHW insulation.
Freeridership
0% for direct install measures. The tank is found set at a higher temperature, so by definition, freeridership
is zero.
Spillover
0%.
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetime
13 years (average life of water heater).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




802
      Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP.



                                                        373
Tank Temperature Turn-Down
Measure Number: VI-A-3-b (RNC, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                       Accepted with          Referred to
                     Accepted As Is        Edits                TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 2/2/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
The thermostat setting of a hot water tank is lowered to 120 degrees.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 146

Demand Savings
kW = kWh / 8760

Where:
            kWh     = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            146      = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 803
            kW      = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
            8760     = Hours per year, over which heat loss will be reduced.

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is a hot water tank with a thermostat setting that is higher than 120 degrees,
typically systems with settings of 130 degrees or higher.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a hot water tank with the thermostat set at 120 degrees.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                  Peak as % of connected load kW
                               % of annual kWh
                                                                               (CF)
                   Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak   Off-Peak                   Winter   Summer Fall/Spring
DHW heat
                  22.2% 11.0%          33.2%      33.2%         100%        100%          100%
loss
All factors are the same as in DPS field screening tool for residential DHW insulation.
Freeridership
0% for direct install measures. The tank is found set at a higher temperature, so by definition, freeridership
is zero.




803
      Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP.



                                                        374
Spillover
0%.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$5

Lifetime
7 years (average life of water heater).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




                                               375
Tank Temperature Turn-Down
Measure Number: VI-A-3-c (RNC, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                       Accepted with          Referred to
                     Accepted As Is        Edits                TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 2/2/01
Draft date: 9/15/01

Description
The thermostat setting of a hot water tank is lowered to 120 degrees.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 146
Demand Savings
kW = kWh / 8760

Where:
            kWh     = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            146      = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 804
            kW      = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
            8760     = Hours per year, over which heat loss will be reduced.

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is a hot water tank with a thermostat setting that is higher than 120 degrees,
typically systems with settings of 130 degrees or higher.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a hot water tank with the thermostat set at 120 degrees.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                  Peak as % of connected load kW
                               % of annual kWh
                                                                               (CF)
                   Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak  Peak  Off-Peak                   Winter   Summer Fall/Spring

DHW heat
                   22.2%     11.0%      33.2%       33.2%           100%      100%        100%
loss
All factors are the same as in DPS field screening tool for residential DHW insulation.

Freeridership
0% for direct install measures. The tank is found set at a higher temperature, so by definition, freeridership
is zero.

Spillover
0%.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
804
      Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP.



                                                        376
Incremental Cost
$5

Lifetime
7 years (average life of water heater).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




                                               377
Low Flow Showerhead
Measure Number: VI-A-4-a (RNC, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/31/00
Description
An existing showerhead with a high flow rate is replaced with new unit that has a low flow rate.
Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 340 kWh

Demand Savings
kW = 0.0997 kW

Where:
         kWh      = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         340       = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 805
         0.0997    = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency806
         kW       = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an existing showerhead with a high flow rate.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is a low flow showerhead.
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                            Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                            (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak           Off-Peak      Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
DHW
                  28.4%      3.1%      46.5%      22.0%       77.5%        48.1%        64.9%
conserve
All factors are the same as in DPS’ screening of Efficiency Utility programs.
Freeridership
0% for direct install measures. The existing showerhead is not low flow, so by definition, freeridership is
zero.
Spillover
0%.
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
9 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




805
    Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP.
806
    This assumes the same ratio of connected load reduction to kWh savings that was used by the DPS in its screening
of the Efficiency Utility program.



                                                         378
Low Flow Showerhead
Measure Number: VI-A-4-b (RNC, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                       Accepted with           Referred to
                   Accepted As Is          Edits                 TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 2/2/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
An existing showerhead with a high flow rate is replaced with new unit that has a low flow rate.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 340

Demand Savings
kW = 0.0997

Water Savings
CCF = 4.6807

Where:
          kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
          340               = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 808
          kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
          0.0997            = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency 809
          CCF              = customer water savings in hundreds of cubic feet for the measure
          4.6               = customer water savings from upgrading to high efficiency

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an existing showerhead with a high flow.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a low flow showerhead.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                   Peak as % of connected load kW
                              % of annual kWh
                                                                                (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak           Off-Peak      Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
                  28.4%      3.1%     46.5%       22.0%       77.5%        48.1%   64.9%
All factors are the same as in DPS’ screening of Efficiency Utility programs.

807
    Proposed by West Hill (September 2000) and used in negotiated EVT TRB goals.
808
    Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP.
809
    This assumes the same ratio of connected load reduction to kWh savings that was used by the DPS in its screening
of the Efficiency Utility program.



                                                         379
Freeridership
0% for direct install measures. The existing showerhead is not low flow, so by definition, freeridership is
zero.

Spillover
0%.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$15

Lifetimes
9 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




                                                     380
Low Flow Faucet Aerator
Measure Number: VI-A-5-a (RNC, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/31/00
Description
An existing faucet aerator with a high flow rate is replaced with new unit that has a low flow rate.
Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 57 kWh

Demand Savings
kW = 0.0171 kW

Where:
         kWh      = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         57        = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 810
         0.0171    = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency811
         kW       = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an existing faucet aerator with a high flow rate.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is a low flow aerator.
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                              Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                              (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak            Off-Peak      Winter       Summer Fall/Spring
                  28.4%      3.1%      46.5%       22.0%       77.5%         48.1%       64.9%
All factors are the same as in DPS’ screening of Efficiency Utility programs.
Freeridership
0% for direct install measures. The faucet is found without a low flow aerator, so by definition,
freeridership is zero.
Spillover
0%.
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
9 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




810
    Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP.
811
    This assumes the same ratio of connected load reduction to kWh savings that was used by the DPS in its screening
of the Efficiency Utility program.



                                                         381
Low Flow Faucet Aerator
Measure Number: VI-A-5-b (RNC, Hot Water End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                       Accepted with           Referred to
                   Accepted As Is          Edits                 TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 2/2/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date


Description
An existing faucet aerator with a high flow rate is replaced with new unit that has a low flow rate.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 57

Demand Savings
kW = 0.0171

Water Savings
CCF = 2.0812

Where:
          kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
          57                = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 813
          kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
          0.0171            = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency 814
          CCF              = customer water savings in hundreds of cubic feet for the measure
          2.0               = customer water savings from upgrading to high efficiency

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an existing faucet aerator with a high flow rate.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a low flow aerator.




812
    Proposed by West Hill (September 2000) and used in negotiated EVT TRB goals.
813
    Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) 1995 IRP.
814
    This assumes the same ratio of connected load reduction to kWh savings that was used by the DPS in its screening
of the Efficiency Utility program.



                                                         382
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                             Peak as % of connected load kW
                            % of annual kWh
                                                                          (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak           Off-Peak      Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
                  28.4%      3.1%     46.5%       22.0%       77.5%        48.1%   64.9%
All factors are the same as in DPS’ screening of Efficiency Utility programs.

Freeridership
0% for direct install measures. The faucet is found without a low flow aerator, so by definition,
freeridership is zero.

Spillover
0%.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$6

Lifetimes
9 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




                                                     383
Refrigeration End Use
Energy Star Refrigerators
Measure Number: VI-B-1-a (RNC, Refrigeration End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/31/00
Description
Refrigerators meeting minimum qualifying efficiency.
Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 156.2 kWh

Demand Savings
kW = 0.0312 kW

Where:
            kWh      = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            156.2     = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency815
            kW       = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
            0.0312    = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline efficiency is the current minimum federal efficiency standard.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is defined as any model meeting Energy Star standards – currently defined as a model
consuming at least 20% less than the minimum federal efficiency standard.
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                             Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                          (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                  Peak Off-Peak Peak            Off-Peak      Winter    Summer Fall/Spring
Refrigerator 22.5% 10.8%               33.7%     33.0%         62%        60%          57%
All factors are consistent with Vermont screening tool load shapes.

Freeridership
10% (Good and Premium home weighted freeridership assumed in the DPS core program screening)
Spillover
10%816
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetime
17 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




815
      RLW Analytics, Energy Star Market Update, Final Report for National Grid USA, June 28, 2000.
816
      Spillover reflects products purchased by non-participants as a result of the program (VEIC estimate).



                                                            384
Energy Star Refrigerators
Measure Number: VI-B-1-b (RNC, Refrigeration End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                       Accepted with         Referred to
                     Accepted As Is        Edits               TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 2/2/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
Refrigerators meeting minimum qualifying efficiency.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 156.2

Demand Savings
kW = 0.0312

Where:
            kWh     = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            156.2    = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 817
            kW      = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
            0.0312   = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline efficiency is the current minimum federal efficiency standard.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is defined as any model meeting Energy Star standards. The Energy Star standard in effect
through the end of 2000 was a 15% reduction in energy use relative to the 1992 minimum federal
efficiency standard.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                 Peak as % of connected load kW
                               % of annual kWh
                                                                              (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                  Peak Off-Peak Peak            Off-Peak      Winter         Summer Fall/Spring
Refrigerator 22.5% 10.8%             33.7%       33.0%         62%             60%          57%
All factors are consistent with Vermont screening tool load shapes.

Freeridership
10%818 (Good and Premium home weighted freeridership assumed in the DPS core program screening)



817
      RLW Analytics, Energy Star Market Update, Final Report for National Grid USA, June 28, 2000.
818
      Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.



                                                       385
Spillover
10%819

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$30

Lifetime
17 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




819
      Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.



                                                       386
Energy Star Refrigerators
Measure Number: VI-B-1-c (RNC, Refrigeration End Use)
Version Date & Revision History

Draft date: 9/26/01
Effective date:

Referenced Documents: ES.ref.kWh.b.doc for analysis summary; www.energystar.gov

Description
Energy Star qualifying refrigerator replaces a non-Energy Star model.

Estimated Measure Impacts

Average Annual MWH Savings             Average number of measures per         Average Annual MWH savings
per unit                               year                                   per year
.1537                                  56                                     8.61

Algorithms

Energy Savings
kWh = 153.7820

Demand Savings
kW = .0307

Where:
         kWh      = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         kW       = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The Baseline reflects the minimum federal efficiency standard for refrigerators (NAECA). NAECA
standard revised July 1, 2001. Old (2001) standard used as baseline from January 1, 2001 through June 30,
2001. New (2002) standard used as baseline from July 1, 2001 on. 821
High Efficiency
The efficiency reflects an average annual kWh consumption of Energy Star Refrigerators.822
Operating Hours
5000 hours / year




820
    Energy savings based on VEIC analysis of Energy Star models. See referenced document: ES.ref.kWh.doc for
analysis summary.
821
    Baseline efficiency Jan 1, 2001 through June 30, 2001 = 799.61 kWh/yr (10% more efficient than min. fed. standard
for this period as per agreement between DPS and EVT) .
Baseline efficiency July 1, 2001 through December 31, 2001 = 624.25kWh/ yr (min. fed. standard). Weighted average
of two baseline efficiencies used to establish baseline efficiency for entire year. See referenced document:
ES.ref.kWh.doc for analysis summary.
822
    See referenced document: ES.ref.kWh.b.doc for analysis summary; www.energystar.gov



                                                        387
Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                                                             Peak as % of connected load kW
                            % of annual kWh
                                                                          (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                  Peak Off-Peak Peak             Off-Peak       Winter    Summer Fall/Spring
Refrigerator 22.5% 10.8%               33.7%      33.0%          62%       60%      57%
All factors are consistent with Vermont screening tool load shapes.
Freeridership
10%823
Spillover
10%824
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
17 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.
Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $30.825
O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure.
Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algothrithms or default values for this measure.
Water Descriptions
There are no water algothrithms or default values for this measure.




823
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
824
    Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
825
    Reflects DPS screening of core Efficiency Vermont programs.



                                                     388
Energy Star Refrigerators
Measure Number: VI-B-1-d (RNC, Refrigeration End Use)
Version Date & Revision History

Draft date: 2/15/02
Effective date:

Referenced Documents: ES.ref.kWh.2002.sized.xls
Description

An Energy Star-qualifying refrigerator replaces a refrigerator of baseline efficiency.

Estimated Measure Impacts

Average Annual MWH Savings            Average number of measures per        Average Annual MWH savings
per unit                              year                                  per year
.0521                                 0                                     0

Algorithms

Energy Savings
kWh = 52.1

Demand Savings
kW = .0104

Where:
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         52.1826 = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency
         kW      = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         0.0104827         = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency
         HOURS = annual motor hours of use per year
         5000     = HOURS

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline efficiency is a refrigerator meeting the minimum federal efficiency standard for refrigerator
efficiency. The minimum NAECA standard varies by model. Generally, annual energy consumption at the
baseline falls between 440 kWh/year and 560kWh/year.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is a refrigerator meeting Energy Star specifications for energy efficiency. The Energy Star
specification varies by model but generally falls between 394kWh/year and 440 kWh/year.
Operating Hours
5000 hours / year




826
    Energy savings assumption based on EVT analysis of models meeting Energy Star specifications in 2002 (see
ES.ref.kWh.2002.sized.xls).
827
    Demand savings calculated based on assumed energy savings using Vermont State Cost Effectiveness Screening
Tool.



                                                       389
Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                             % of annual kWh                    Peak as % of calculated kW
                                   (RPF)                                savings (CF)
                Winter Winter Summer Summer
                 Peak Off-Peak Peak              Off-Peak       Winter   Summer Fall/Spring
Residential
                    23%         11%       34%          33%          62%       60%        57%
Refrigeration
Source: Loadshape #4 (Residential Refrigeration) from the Vermont State Screening Tool.
Freeridership
0%
Spillover
0%
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
17 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.
Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $30.
Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $50.
O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure.
Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.
Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.




                                                 390
Energy Star Refrigerators
Measure Number: VI-B-1-e (Residential New Construction Program, Refrigeration End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     Portfolio No. 15
Effective date: 1/1/03
End date:       TBD

Referenced Documents: ES.ref.kWh.2002.sized.xls

Description
An Energy Star-qualifying refrigerator replaces a refrigerator of baseline efficiency.

Estimated Measure Impacts

Average Annual MWH Savings           Average number of measures per        Average Annual MWH savings
per unit                             year                                  per year
           0.0521                                261                                   13.6

Algorithms

Energy Savings
kWh           = ((kWhBASE – KWhEE)
kWh           = (479.867 – 427.8097) = 52.1

Demand Savings828
kW           = kWh / HOURS
kW           = 52.1 / 5000 = 0.0104

Where:
         kW                = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         WattsBASE          = Baseline connected kW
         WattsEE            = Energy efficient connected kW
         kWh               = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measureHOURS = annual motor
                            hours of use per year

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline efficiency is a refrigerator meeting the minimum federal efficiency standard for refrigerator
efficiency. The minimum NAECA standard varies by model.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a refrigerator meeting Energy Star specifications for energy efficiency.

Operating Hours
5,000 hours / year




828
  Energy savings assumption based on EVT analysis of models meeting Energy Star specifications in 2002 (see
ES.ref.kWh.2002.sized.xls).



                                                      391
Rating Period & Coincidence Factors
                         % of annual kWh                      Peak as % of calculated kW savings
                              (RPF)                                          (CF)
               Winter Winter Summer Summer
                Peak Off-Peak     Peak   Off-Peak              Winter      Summer    Fall/Spring
Residential
Refrigeration  22.5% 10.8%       33.7%     33%                  62.3%       60%        56.8%
(#4)
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.

Freeridership
0%

Spillover
0%

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
17 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $30.

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $50.

O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure.

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.




                                                       392
Energy Star Refrigerators
Measure Number: VI-B-1-f (Residential New Construction Program, Refrigeration End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     Portfolio No. 23
Effective date: 1/1/04
End date:       TBD

Referenced Documents: ES.ref.kWh.2004.xls

Description
An Energy Star-qualifying refrigerator replaces a refrigerator of baseline efficiency.

Estimated Measure Impacts

Average Annual MWH Savings          Average number of measures per        Average Annual MWH savings
per unit                            year                                  per year
           0.0855                               250                                   21.3

Algorithms

Demand Savings
kW            = ((WattsBASE – WattsEE) /1000)* ISR
kW            = (114.3 – 97.2)/1000*1=0.0171

Energy Savings
kWh           = kW  HOURS
kWh           = 0.0171*5000=85.5

Where:
         kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         WattsBASE         = Baseline connected kW
         WattsEE           = Energy efficient connected kW
         kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         ISR               = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used
         HOURS             = average hours of use per year

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline efficiency is a refrigerator meeting the minimum federal efficiency standard for refrigerator
efficiency.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a refrigerator meeting Energy Star specifications for energy efficiency as of January 1,
2004.

Operating Hours
5,000 hours / year

Loadshape
Loadshape #4, Residential Refrigeration, Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.

Freeridership
10%




                                                     393
Spillover
0%

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
17 years

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $30.

Incentive Level
The incentive level for this measure is $50.

O&M Cost Adjustments
There are no operation and maintenance cost adjustments for this measure.

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.




                                                     394
Efficient Refrigerators
Measure Number: VI-B-2-a (RNC, Refrigeration End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                       Accepted with         Referred to
                    Accepted As Is         Edits               TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 06/01/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
Refrigerators meeting minimum qualifying efficiency (top 30% of models with regard to energy
efficiency).

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 95

Demand Savings
kW = 0.0179

Where:
           kWh     = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
           95       = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 829
           kW      = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
           0.0179   = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline efficiency is the current federal efficiency standard in effect from 1992 through mid-2001.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is defined as any model in the top 30% offered in the market for a particular style and size
with regards to energy efficiency.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                 Peak as % of connected load kW
                              % of annual kWh
                                                                              (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                  Peak Off-Peak Peak            Off-Peak      Winter        Summer Fall/Spring
Refrigerator 22.5% 10.8%             33.7%       33.0%         62%            60%          57%
All factors are consistent with Vermont screening tool load shapes.

Freeridership
10%830 (Good and Premium home weighted freeridership assumed in the DPS core program screening)


1
    See Reference Table on following page.
830
     Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.


                                                       395
Spillover
10%831

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$30

Lifetime
17 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Reference Table

                                                                     832
                                         Refrigerator Efficiency



                          Top Mounted             Size Range:              Side by Side          Size Range:
                            Freezer             20.5-21.5 sq. ft.          Arrangement           28-29 sq. ft.

                        Through the door         No external ice       Through the door        No external ice
                           ice access                access               ice access               access
Minimum
Efficiency               840 kWh / year         740 kWh / year          920 kWh / year         1040 kWh / year
70th Percentile
Efficiency               700 kWh / year         626 kWh / year          911 kWh / year         1095 kWh / year
Difference               140 kWh / year         114 kWh / year           9 kWh / year           55 kWh / year
Weighting                     10%                    65%                     15%                    10 %
Weighted Average       94.95 kWh / year




831
   Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
832
   Data related to average sizes, styles and weightings based on national averages taken from latest AHAM data
available. Data related to energy consumption taken from California Energy Commission findings available at
www.energy.ca.gov/efficiency/appliances/0.


                                                       396
Efficient Refrigerators
Measure Number: VI-B-2-b (RNC, Refrigeration End Use)
Version Date & Revision History
                                Accepted with     Referred to
               Accepted As Is       Edits            TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 06/01/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
Refrigerators meeting minimum qualifying efficiency (top 30% of models with regard to energy
efficiency).

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = 95

Demand Savings
kW = 0.0179

Where:
           kWh     = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
           95       = the average customer kWh savings from upgrading to high efficiency 833
           kW      = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
           0.0179   = the average customer kW savings from upgrading to high efficiency

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Baseline efficiency is the current federal efficiency standard in effect from 1992 through mid-2001.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is defined as any model in the top 30% offered in the market for a particular style and size
with regards to energy efficiency.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                               Peak as % of calculated demand
                              % of annual kWh
                                                                      savings kW (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                  Peak Off-Peak Peak            Off-Peak      Winter        Summer Fall/Spring
Refrigerator 22.5% 10.8%             33.7%       33.0%         62%            60%          57%
All factors are consistent with Vermont screening tool load shapes.

Freeridership
10%834 (Good and Premium home weighted freeridership assumed in the DPS core program screening)




1
    See Reference Table on following page.
834
     Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.


                                                      397
Spillover
10%835

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$30

Lifetime
17 years (same as in DPS screening of Efficiency Utility Core programs).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Reference Table

                                                                     836
                                         Refrigerator Efficiency



                          Top Mounted             Size Range:              Side by Side          Size Range:
                            Freezer             20.5-21.5 sq. ft.          Arrangement           28-29 sq. ft.

                        Through the door        No external ice        Through the door        No external ice
                           ice access               access                ice access               access
Minimum
Efficiency               840 kWh / year         740 kWh / year          920 kWh / year        1040 kWh / year
70th Percentile
Efficiency               700 kWh / year         626 kWh / year          911 kWh / year        1095 kWh / year
Difference               140 kWh / year         114 kWh / year           9 kWh / year          55 kWh / year
Weighting                     10%                    65%                     15%                   10 %
Weighted Average       94.95 kWh / year




835
   Used to establish EVT TRB goals based on a September 2000 negotiated agreement between EVT and VT DPS.
836
   Data related to average sizes, styles and weightings based on national averages taken from latest AHAM data
available. Data related to energy consumption taken from California Energy Commission findings available at
www.energy.ca.gov/efficiency/appliances/0.


                                                       398
Lighting End Use
CFL Direct Install
Measure Number: VI-C-1-a (RNC, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/31/00
Description
An existing incandescent lamp is replaced with a lower wattage compact fluorescent.
Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = kWsave  HOURS

Demand Savings
kW = kWsave

Where:
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         kWsave = lighting connected load kW saved, baseline kW minus efficient kW
         HOURS = annual lighting hours of use per year, 1460 hours 837
         kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light bulb with sufficient usage to justify replacement.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is compact fluorescent lamp.
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                               Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                               (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak            Off-Peak        Winter     Summer Fall/Spring
                  19.8% 13.0%          28.9%       38.3%           23.2%        12.3%        22.3%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).
Freeridership
0% for direct install measures. Since the existing fixture is found with an incandescent, then by definition
freeridership is zero.
Spillover
0%.
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
6.2 years based on 4 hours per day burn time. Lifetime is a function of the average hours of use for the
lamp. Most CFLs have a rated lifetime of 10,000 hours. However, units that are turned on and off more
frequently have shorter lives and those that stay on for longer periods of time have longer lives. See the
following table for details.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




837
   1460 hours per year was the assumed annual hours used in the DPS screening of the RNC core program and was
based on a CVPS survey.


                                                      399
Reference Tables
CFL Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time    Lifetime Hours   Lifetime Years
       1                3,000             8.22
       2                5,000             6.85
       3                7,000             6.39
       4                9,000             6.16
       5                9,500             5.21
       6               10,000             4.57
       8               12,000             4.11
       10              12,000             3.29
       12              12,000             2.74
       24              12,000             1.37




                                               400
CFL Direct Install
Measure Number: VI-C-1-b (RNC, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                      Accepted with         Referred to
                  Accepted As Is          Edits               TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 2/2/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
An existing incandescent lamp is replaced with a lower wattage compact fluorescent.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = kWsave  HOURS

Demand Savings
kW = kWsave

Where:
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         kWsave = lighting connected load kW saved, baseline kW minus efficient kW
         HOURS = annual lighting hours of use per year, 1460 hours838
         kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement

The baseline condition is an incandescent light bulb with sufficient usage to justify replacement.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is compact fluorescent lamp.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                             (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak        Winter     Summer Fall/Spring
                  28.7%     7.6%     36.0%       27.7%           23.2%        12.3%       22.3%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).

Freeridership
0% for direct install measures. Since the existing fixture is found with an incandescent, then by definition
freeridership is zero.




838
   1460 hours per year was the assumed annual hours used in the DPS screening of the RNC core program and was
based on a CVPS survey.


                                                      401
Spillover
0%.

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
6.2 years based on 4 hours per day burn time. Lifetime is a function of the average hours of use for the
lamp. Most CFLs have a rated lifetime of 10,000 hours. However, units that are turned on and off more
frequently have shorter lives and those that stay on for longer periods of time have longer lives. See the
following table for details.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Incremental Cost
Actual costs as supplied by Energy Rated Homes

Reference Tables

CFL Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time      Lifetime Hours     Lifetime Years
       1                  3,000               8.22
       2                  5,000               6.85
       3                  7,000               6.39
       4                  9,000               6.16
       5                  9,500               5.21
       6                 10,000               4.57
       8                 12,000               4.11
       10                12,000               3.29
       12                12,000               2.74
       24                12,000               1.37




                                                    402
CFL Direct Install
Measure Number: VI-C-1-c (RNC, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                      Accepted with         Referred to
                  Accepted As Is          Edits               TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 2/2/01
Draft date: 9/15/01


Description
An existing incandescent lamp is replaced with a lower wattage compact fluorescent.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = kWsave  HOURS

Demand Savings
kW = kWsave

Where:
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         kWsave = lighting connected load kW saved, baseline kW minus efficient kW
         HOURS = annual lighting hours of use per year, 1460 hours 839
         kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement

The baseline condition is an incandescent light bulb with sufficient usage to justify replacement.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is compact fluorescent lamp.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                             (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
                 Peak Off-Peak  Peak  Off-Peak                   Winter     Summer Fall/Spring

                 28.7%      7.6%       36.0%       27.7%           23.2%        12.3%         22.3%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).

Freeridership
0% for direct install measures. Since the existing fixture is found with an incandescent, then by definition
freeridership is zero.

Spillover
0%.



839
   1460 hours per year was the assumed annual hours used in the DPS screening of the RNC core program and was
based on a CVPS survey.


                                                      403
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
6.2 years based on 4 hours per day burn time. Lifetime is a function of the average hours of use for the
lamp. Most CFLs have a rated lifetime of 10,000 hours. However, units that are turned on and off more
frequently have shorter lives and those that stay on for longer periods of time have longer lives. See the
reference table below for details.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Incremental Cost
Actual costs as supplied by Energy Rated Homes. See reference table below for cost assumptions used in
computing O&M savings.

Reference Tables

CFL Life by Daily Burn Time
Daily Burn Time        Lifetime Hours       Lifetime Years
       1                    3,000                 8.22
       2                    5,000                 6.85
       3                    7,000                 6.39
       4                    9,000                 6.16
       5                    9,500                 5.21
       6                   10,000                 4.57
       8                   12,000                 4.11
       10                  12,000                 3.29
       12                  12,000                 2.74
       24                  12,000                 1.37

Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
                  Efficient Measures                      Baseline Measures
Component         Cost840            Life841              Cost                     Life
Lamp              6.26               6.26                 $1.00                    0.6 years




840
    Costs do not include labor rates as homeowner is expected to carry out maintance. Cost of efficient lamp is N/A as
measure life is same as efficient lamp (no replacement).
841
    Life of components based on average residential use of 3.4 hours per day.


                                                         404
Interior Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: VI-C-2-a (RNC, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/31/00
Description
An interior fluorescent fixture is installed instead of an incandescent lighting fixture.
Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = kWsave  HOURS

Demand Savings
kW = kWsave

Where:
            kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            kWsave = lighting connected load kW saved, baseline kW minus efficient kW
            HOURS = annual lighting hours of use per year, 1460 hours. 842
            kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light fixture with sufficient usage to justify substitution with a
fluorescent fixture.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is a fluorescent fixture.
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                              Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                              (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak            Off-Peak      Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
Interior light 28.7%        7.6%       36.0%      27.7%         23%          12%            22%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).

Freeridership
14% (Good and Premium home weighted freeridership assumed in the DPS core program screening)
Spillover
10%843
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
20 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




842
      Annual hour of use historically used by utilities for this program.
843
      Spillover reflects products purchased by non-participants as a result of the program (VEIC estimate).


                                                            405
Interior Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: VI-C-2-b (RNC, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                            Accepted with           Referred to
                       Accepted As Is           Edits                 TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 2/2/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
An interior fluorescent fixture is installed instead of an incandescent lighting fixture.(including table lamps
but excluding torchieres).

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = kWsave  HOURS

Demand Savings
kW = kWsave

Where:
             kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
             kWsave = lighting connected load kW saved, baseline kW minus efficient kW
             HOURS = annual lighting hours of use per year, 1460 hours. 844
             kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light fixture with sufficient usage to justify substitution with a
fluorescent fixture.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a fluorescent fixture.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                        Peak as % of connected load kW
                                  % of annual kWh
                                                                                     (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak        Winter     Summer Fall/Spring
Interior light 28.7%        7.6%     36.0%       27.7%         23%          12%           22%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).

Freeridership
14% (Good and Premium home weighted freeridership assumed in the DPS core program screening)

Spillover
10%845

844
      Annual hour of use historically used by utilities for this program.


                                                              406
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$27.00

Lifetimes
20 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




845
      Spillover reflects products purchased by non-participants as a result of the program (VEIC estimate).


                                                            407
Interior Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: VI-C-2-c (RNC, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                           Accepted with          Referred to
                      Accepted As Is           Edits                TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 2/2/01
Draft date: 9/15/01


Description
An interior fluorescent fixture is installed instead of an incandescent lighting fixture.(including table lamps
but excluding torchieres).

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = kWsave  HOURS

Demand Savings
kW = kWsave

Where:
            kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            kWsave = lighting connected load kW saved, baseline kW minus efficient kW
            HOURS = annual lighting hours of use per year, 1460 hours. 846
            kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light fixture with sufficient usage to justify substitution with a
fluorescent fixture.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a fluorescent fixture.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                      Peak as % of connected load kW
                                 % of annual kWh
                                                                                   (CF)
                     Winter Winter Summer Summer
                     Peak Off-Peak  Peak  Off-Peak                     Winter      Summer Fall/Spring

Interior light 28.7%             7.6%       36.0%        27.7%          23%           12%           22%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).

Freeridership
14% (Good and Premium home weighted freeridership assumed in the DPS core program screening)

Spillover
10%847


846
      Annual hour of use historically used by utilities for this program.
847
      Spillover reflects products purchased by non-participants as a result of the program (VEIC estimate).


                                                            408
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$27.00

Lifetimes
20 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Reference Tables

Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
                     Efficient Measures                      Baseline Measures
Component            Cost848            Life849              Cost                    Life
Lamp                 $6.00              6.45 years           $1.00                   0.6 years
Ballast              $14.00             32.23 years          N/A                     N/A




848
      Costs do not include labor rates as homeowner is expected to carry out maintance.
849
      Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.


                                                            409
Interior Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: VI-C-2-d (RNC, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History

Draft date: 1/28/02
Effective date:

Referenced Documents: 1) Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential
Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New
England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000; 2) RNC_lighting_12_21_01.xls

Description
An interior lighting fixture with fluorescent lamp(s) replaces an interior lighting fixture with incandescent
lamp(s) in a residential new construction application.

Estimated Measure Impacts

Average Annual MWH Savings             Average number of measures per         Average Annual MWH savings
per unit                               year                                   per year
.1059                                  4000                                   423.6

Algorithms

Energy Savings
kWh = kW  HOURS

kWh = 137


Demand Savings
kW = kWbase – kWeffic

Where
         HOURS = average hours of use per year
         1241850 = average annual hourly of use per year for interior applications
         kW      = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         .1104851 = average kilowattage reduction
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         137      = average annual kilowatt hour reduction

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline is a fixture with incandescent bulb(s). Analysis of interior fluorescent fixtures installed in the
Efficiency Vermont’s Residential New Construction Program between January 1, 2000 and December 1,
2001 indicate that the average baseline wattage for a replaced fixture is 144.0 watts.




850
    Operating hours based on 3.4 hours per day. Source: Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities
Starlights Residential Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and
New England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000.
851
    Wattage reduction based on analysis of products installed through the Efficiency Vermont Residential New
Construction Program between 1/1/01 and 12/1/01.


                                                        410
High Efficiency
The high efficiency is a fluorescent fixture. Analysis of interior fluorescent fixtures installed in the
Efficiency Vermont’s Residential New Construction Program between January 1, 2000 and December 1,
2001 indicate that the average wattage for an installed fixture is 33.6 watts.

Operating Hours
1241 hours / year

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors

                                % of annual kWh                      Peak as % of connected load kW
                                                                                  (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer                         Winter   Summer Fall/Spring
                  Peak Off-Peak Peak   Off-Peak
Residential
Indoor              28.7%         7.6%       36.0%          27.7%          23.2%         12.3%           22.3%
Lighting

All factors consistent with Residential Indoor Lighting Loadshape from Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness
Screening Tool.

Freeridership
14%

Spillover
10%

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
Lifetime for a fluorescent fixture is 20 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The average installed cost is $30852

O&M Cost Adjustments
O&M savings is $1.09 annually.

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.




852
   Cost represents full, installed cost and is computed with a weighted average of all direct install interior fixtures
installed under the Efficiency Vermont Residential New Construction Program between 1/1/2000 and 12/1/2001.


                                                            411
Reference Tables
Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
                     Efficient                               Baseline Measures
                     Measures
Component            Cost                  Life853           Cost                Life
Lamp                 $6.00                 6.44 years        $1.00               .08 years
Ballast              N/A                   25 years          N/A                 N/A




853
      Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.


                                                            412
Interior Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: VI-C-2-e (Residential New Construction Program, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     Portfolio 23
Effective date: 1/1/03
End date:       Closed

Referenced Documents: 1)2003 RNC Lighting 10.31.03.xls

Description
An interior lighting fixture with fluorescent lamp(s) replaces an interior lighting fixture with incandescent
lamp(s) in a residential new construction application.

Estimated Measure Impacts

Average Annual MWH Savings            Average number of measures per        Average Annual MWH savings
per unit                              year                                  per year
           0.0957                                 4000                                 382.8

Algorithms

Energy Savings
kWh = kW  HOURS
kWh = 95.7

Demand Savings
kW = kWbase – kWeffic

Where
         HOURS            = average hours of use per year
         1,102854 = average annual hourly of use per year for interior applications
         kW              = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         0.0868 = average kilowattage reduction
         kWh             = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         95.7             = average annual kilowatt hour reduction



Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline is a fixture with incandescent bulb(s).
High Efficiency
The high efficiency is an Energy Star fluorescent fixture.

Operating Hours
1,102 hours / year

Loadshape
Residential Indoor Lighting, #1, Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.




854
   Weighted average operating hours based on 3.019 hours per day for RNC lighting based on negotiated agreement
between EVT and DPS, October, 2003


                                                       413
Freeridership
14%

Spillover
10%

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
Lifetime for a fluorescent fixture is 20 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The average installed cost is $30855

O&M Cost Adjustments
O&M savings is $1.09 annually.

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.

Reference Tables
Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
                    Efficient                                 Baseline Measures
                    Measures
 Component                 Cost                Life856                Cost                  Life
Lamp                      $6.00              6.44 years               $1.00               .08 years
Ballast                    N/A                25 years                 N/A                  N/A




855
    Cost represents full, installed cost and is computed with a weighted average of all direct install interior fixtures
installed under the Efficiency Vermont Residential New Construction Program between 1/1/2000 and 12/1/2001.
856
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.


                                                            414
Interior Surface Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: VI-C-10-a (Residential New Construction Program, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     Portfolio 25
Effective date: 1/1/04
End date:       TBD

Referenced Documents: 1) 2003 RNC lighting 10.31.03.xls

Description
An ENERGY STAR interior surface lighting fixture wired for exclusive use with pin-based compact
fluorescent lamps replaces an interior surface lighting fixture with incandescent lamp(s) in a residential
new construction application. This category includes surface ceiling and surface wall fixtures.

Estimated Measure Impacts

                          Average Annual MWH               Average number of       Average Annual MWH
                          Savings per unit                 measures per year       savings per year
  Residential                      0.1044                         1500                       156.6


Algorithms

Demand Savings
kW                         = ((WattsBASE – WattsEE) /1000)* ISR
kW(Residential)            = ((127.3 - 32.6 / 1000) * 1.0) = 0.0947

Energy Savings
kWh                        = kW  HOURS
kWh (Residential)          = (0.0947 * 1,102) = 104.4

Where:
         kW                = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         WattsBASE          = Baseline connected kW
         WattsEE            = Energy efficient connected kW
         kWh               = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         ISR                = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used
         HOURS              = average hours of use per year


Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an interior surface lighting fixture with incandescent lamp(s).

High Efficiency
An ENERGY STAR interior surface lighting fixture wired for exclusive use with pin-based compact
fluorescent lamps.

Operating Hours
1,102 hours / year

Loadshape
Residential Indoor Lighting, #1
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.



                                                       415
Freeridership
14%

Spillover
10%

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
20 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $30

Incentive Level
The incentive for this measure is $15

O&M Cost Adjustments
              Annual O&M Savings857
Residential                       $1.09

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.

Reference Tables

Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential Applications
               Efficient Measures            Baseline Measures
Component             Cost         Life858          Cost                    Life
Lamp                  $6.00          6.4            $1.00                 .08 years
Ballast                N/A          25.6             N/A                    N/A




857
      From VT State screening tool
858
      Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.


                                                            416
Interior Recessed Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: VI-C-11-a (Residential New Construction Program, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     Portfolio 25
Effective date: 1/1/04
End date:       TBD

Referenced Documents: 1) 2003 RNC lighting 10.31.03.xls

Description
An ENERGY STAR interior recessed lighting fixture wired for exclusive use with pin-based compact
fluorescent lamps replaces an interior recessed lighting fixture with incandescent lamp(s) in a residential
new construction application

Estimated Measure Impacts

                          Average Annual MWH               Average number of       Average Annual MWH
                          Savings per unit                 measures per year       savings per year
  Residential                      0.0656                         1500                        98.4


Algorithms

Demand Savings
kW                         = ((WattsBASE – WattsEE) /1000)* ISR
kW(Residential)            = ((83.8 – 24.3 / 1000) * 1.0) = 0.0595

Energy Savings
kWh                        = kW  HOURS
kWh (Residential)          = (0.0595 * 1,102) = 65.6

Where:
         kW                = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         WattsBASE          = Baseline connected kW
         WattsEE            = Energy efficient connected kW
         kWh               = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         ISR                = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used
         HOURS              = average hours of use per year


Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
An interior recessed lighting fixture with incandescent lamp(s).

High Efficiency
An ENERGY STAR interior recessed lighting fixture wired for exclusive use with pin-based compact
fluorescent lamps.

Operating Hours
1,102 hours / year

Loadshape
Residential Indoor Lighting, #1
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.



                                                       417
Freeridership
14%

Spillover
10%

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
20 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $30

Incentive Level
The incentive for this measure is $15

O&M Cost Adjustments
              Annual O&M Savings859
Residential                       $1.09

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.

Reference Tables

Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential Applications
               Efficient Measures            Baseline Measures
Component             Cost         Life860          Cost                    Life
Lamp                  $6.00          6.4            $1.00                 .08 years
Ballast                N/A          25.6             N/A                    N/A




859
      From VT State screening tool
860
      Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.


                                                            418
Interior Other Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: VI-C-12-a (Residential New Construction Program, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     Portfolio 25
Effective date: 1/1/04
End date:       TBD

Referenced Documents: 1) 2003 RNC lighting 10.31.03.xls

Description
An ENERGY STAR interior lighting fixture in the “other” category, wired for exclusive use with pin-based
compact fluorescent lamps replaces an interior lighting fixture also in the “other” category with
incandescent lamp(s) in a residential new construction application The “other” category includes
chandelier/pendent, DI lamp left not installed, floor lamp, post lamp, table lamp, track light, under cabinet.

Estimated Measure Impacts
                      Average Annual MWH                   Average number of       Average Annual MWH
                      Savings per unit                     measures per year       savings per year
  Residential                  0.0508                             1500                        76.2


Algorithms

Demand Savings
kW                         = ((WattsBASE – WattsEE) /1000)* ISR
kW(Residential)            = ((70.6 – 24.5 / 1000) * 1.0) = 0.0461

Energy Savings
kWh                        = kW  HOURS
kWh (Residential)          = (0.0461 * 1,102) = 50.8

Where:
         kW                = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         WattsBASE          = Baseline connected kW
         WattsEE            = Energy efficient connected kW
         kWh               = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         ISR                = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used
         HOURS              = average hours of use per year


Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
An interior lighting fixture in the “other” category with incandescent lamp(s).

High Efficiency
An ENERGY STAR interior lighting fixture in the “other” category wired for exclusive use with pin-based
compact fluorescent lamps.

Operating Hours
1,102 hours / year

Loadshape
Residential Indoor Lighting, #1
Source: Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.




                                                       419
Freeridership
14%

Spillover
10%

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
20 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The incremental cost for this measure is $30

Incentive Level
The incentive for this measure is $15

O&M Cost Adjustments
              Annual O&M Savings861
Residential                       $1.09

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.

Reference Tables

Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
Residential Applications
               Efficient Measures            Baseline Measures
Component             Cost         Life862          Cost                    Life
Lamp                  $6.00          6.4            $1.00                 .08 years
Ballast                N/A          25.6             N/A                    N/A




861
      From VT State screening tool
862
      Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.


                                                            420
Exterior Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: VI-C-3-a (RNC, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/31/00
Description
An exterior fluorescent fixture is installed instead of an incandescent lighting fixture.
Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = kWsave  HOURS

Demand Savings
kW = kWsave

Where:
            kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            kWsave = lighting connected load kW saved, baseline kW minus efficient kW.
            HOURS = annual lighting hours of use per year, 1095 hours. 863
            kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light fixture with sufficient usage to justify substitution with a
fluorescent fixture.
High Efficiency
High efficiency is a fluorescent fixture.
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                              Peak as % of connected load kW
                             % of annual kWh
                                                                              (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak            Off-Peak      Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
Exterior light 19.7%         13.0% 28.9%             38.3%        11.4%          5.5%         11.2%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential indoor lighting load shape).

Freeridership
9% (Good and Premium home weighted freeridership assumed in the DPS core program screening)
Spillover
10%864
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
20 years (Lifetime used in DPS core program screening).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




863
      Annual hour of use historically used by utilities for this program.
864
      Spillover reflects products purchased by non-participants as a result of the program (VEIC estimate).


                                                            421
Exterior Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: VI-C-3-b (RNC, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                           Accepted with          Referred to
                      Accepted As Is           Edits                TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 2/2/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
An exterior fluorescent fixture is installed instead of an incandescent lighting fixture.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = kWsave  HOURS

Demand Savings
kW = kWsave

Where:
            kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
            kWsave = lighting connected load kW saved, baseline kW minus efficient kW.
            HOURS = annual lighting hours of use per year, 1095 hours. 865
            kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline condition is an incandescent light fixture with sufficient usage to justify substitution with a
fluorescent fixture.

High Efficiency
High efficiency is a fluorescent fixture.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                                      Peak as % of connected load kW
                                 % of annual kWh
                                                                                   (CF)
                  Winter Winter Summer Summer
                   Peak Off-Peak Peak          Off-Peak       Winter      Summer Fall/Spring
Exterior light 19.7%        13.0% 28.9%            38.3%        11.4%          5.5%        11.2%
All factors are from the Vermont Screening tool (residential outdoor lighting load shape).

Freeridership
9% (Good and Premium home weighted freeridership assumed in the DPS core program screening)

Spillover
10%866

865
      Annual hour of use historically used by utilities for this program.
866
      Spillover reflects products purchased by non-participants as a result of the program (VEIC estimate).


                                                            422
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Incremental Cost
$30.00

Lifetimes
20 years (Lifetime used in DPS core program screening).
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




                                                  423
Exterior Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: VI-C-3-c (RNC, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History

Draft date: 12/21/01
Effective date:

Referenced Documents: 1) Xenergy, Process and Impact Evaluation of Joint Utilities Starlights Residential
Lighting Program, prepared for Boston Edison, Commonwealth Electric, Eastern Utilities, and New
England Power Service Company, July 23, 2000; 2) RNC_lighting_12_21_01.xls

Description
An exterior lighting fixture with fluorescent lamp(s) replaces an exterior lighting fixture with incandescent
lamp(s) in a residential new construction application.

Estimated Measure Impacts

Average Annual MWH Savings            Average number of measures per         Average Annual MWH savings
per unit                              year                                   per year
.118                                  200                                    23.6

Algorithms

Energy Savings
kWh = kW  HOURS

kWh = 118


Demand Savings
kW = kWbase – kWeffic

Where
         HOURS = average hours of use per year
         2190867 = average annual hourly of use per year for interior applications
         kW      = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         .0539868 = average kilowatt reduction
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         118      = average annual kilowatt hour reduction

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline is a fixture with incandescent bulb(s). Analysis of exterior fluorescent fixtures installed in the
Efficiency Vermont’s Residential New Construction Program between January 1, 2000 and December 1,
2001 indicate that the average baseline wattage for a replaced fixture is 74.8 watts.

High Efficiency
The high efficiency is a fluorescent fixture. Analysis of exterior fluorescent fixtures installed in the
Efficiency Vermont’s Residential New Construction Program between January 1, 2000 and December 1,
2001 indicate that the average wattage for an installed fixture is 20.9 watts.

867
    Annual hours of used based on 6 hours / day assumed usage. 6 hours daily used based on estimate developed
through EVT communications with VT Department of Service and Residential TAG.
868
    Wattage reduction based on analysis of products installed through the Efficiency Vermont Residential New
Construction Program between 1/1/01 and 12/1/01.


                                                        424
  Operating Hours
  2190 hours / year

  Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors


                                      % of annual kWh                          Peak as % of connected load kW (CF)

                      Winter       Winter       Summer          Summer         Winter        Summer          Fall/Spring
                      Peak        Off-Peak       Peak           Off-Peak
Residential
Outdoor                 19.8%        13.0%           28.9%           38.3%        11.4%            5.5%               11.2%
Lighting

 All factors consistent with Residential Outdoor Lighting Loadshape from Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness
 Screening tool (Loadshape 2).


  Freeridership
  9%

  Spillover
  10%

  Persistence
  The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

  Lifetimes
  Lifetime for a fluorescent fixture is 20 years.
  Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

  Measure Cost
  The average installed cost is $30869

  O&M Cost Adjustments
  O&M savings is $1.31 annually.

  Fossil Fuel Descriptions
  There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

  Water Descriptions
  There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.




  869
     Cost represents full, installed cost and is computed with a weighted average of all direct install interior fixtures
  installed under the Efficiency Vermont Residential New Construction Program between 1/1/2000 and 12/1/2001.


                                                              425
Reference Tables

Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
                     Efficient                               Baseline Measures
                     Measures
Component            Cost                  Life870           Cost                Life
Lamp                 $6.00                 5.5 years         $1.00               0.5 years
Ballast              N/A                   21.9 years        N/A                 N/A




870
      Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.


                                                            426
Exterior Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: VI-C-3-d (Residential New Construction, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     Portfolio 23
Effective date: 1/1/03
End date:       TBD

Referenced Documents: 1) 2003 RNC Lighting 10.31.03

Description
An Energy Star exterior lighting fixture with fluorescent lamp(s) replaces an exterior lighting fixture with
incandescent lamp(s) in a residential new construction application.

Estimated Measure Impacts

Average Annual MWH Savings            Average number of measures per        Average Annual MWH savings
per unit                              year                                  per year
           0.0824                                 200                                   16.5

Algorithms

Energy Savings
kWh = kW  HOURS
kWh = 82.4

Demand Savings
kW = kWbase – kWeffic

Where
         HOURS = average hours of use per year
         1,102871 = average annual hourly of use per year for interior applications
         kW      = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         0.0747 = average kilowatt reduction
         kWh = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         82.4     = average annual kilowatt hour reduction

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
The baseline is a fixture with incandescent bulb(s).

High Efficiency
The high efficiency is an Energy Star fluorescent fixture.

Operating Hours
1,102 hours / year

Loadshape
Residential Outdoor Lighting, #2. Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.

Freeridership
9%


871
  . Weighted average operating hours based on 3.019 hours per day for RNC lighting based on negotiated agreement
between EVT and DPS, October, 2003


                                                       427
Spillover
10%

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
Lifetime for a fluorescent fixture is 20 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The average installed cost is $30872

O&M Cost Adjustments
O&M savings is $1.31 annually.

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.

Reference Tables




Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
                   Efficient                                  Baseline Measures
                   Measures
 Component         Cost                    Life873            Cost                      Life
Lamp               $6.00                   5.5 years          $1.00                     0.5 years
Ballast            N/A                     21.9 years         N/A                       N/A




872
    Cost represents full, installed cost and is computed with a weighted average of all direct install interior fixtures
installed under the Efficiency Vermont Residential New Construction Program between 1/1/2000 and 12/1/2001.
873
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.


                                                            428
Exterior Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Number: VI-C-3-e (Residential New Construction, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
Draft date:     Portfolio 25
Effective date: 1/1/04
End date:       TBD

Referenced Documents: 1) 2003 RNC Lighting 10.31.03

Description
An ENERGY STAR exterior lighting fixture wired for exclusive use with pin-based fluorescent lamp(s)
replaces an exterior lighting fixture with incandescent lamp(s) in a residential new construction application.
This measure characterization applies to exterior fluorescent fixtures in the following exterior locations:
post lamp, recessed ceiling, surface ceiling, and surface wall.

Estimated Measure Impacts

Average Annual MWH Savings          Average number of measures per        Average Annual MWH savings
per unit                            year                                  per year
           0.065                                200                                   13.0

Algorithms

Demand Savings
kW                        = ((WattsBASE – WattsEE) /1000)* ISR
kW(Residential)           = ((80.6 - 21.6 / 1000) * 1.0) = 0.059

Energy Savings
kWh                       = kW  HOURS
kWh (Residential)         = (0.059 * 1,102) = 65.0

Where:
         kW               = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
         WattsBASE         = Baseline connected kW
         WattsEE           = Energy efficient connected kW
         kWh              = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         ISR               = in service rate or the percentage of units rebated that actually get used
         HOURS             = average hours of use per year

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
An exterior lighting fixture with incandescent lamp(s).

High Efficiency
An ENERGY STAR exterior lighting fixture wired for exclusive use with pin-based fluorescent lamp(s)

Operating Hours
1,102 hours / year

Loadshape
Residential Outdoor Lighting, #2. Vermont State Cost-Effectiveness Screening Tool.




                                                      429
Freeridership
9%

Spillover
10%

Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.

Lifetimes
Lifetime for a fluorescent fixture is 20 years.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.

Measure Cost
The average installed cost is $30874

O&M Cost Adjustments
O&M savings is $1.31 annually.

Fossil Fuel Descriptions
There are no fossil fuel algorithms or default values for this measure.

Water Descriptions
There are no water algorithms or default values for this measure.


Reference Tables
Component Costs and Lifetimes Used in Computing O&M Savings
                    Efficient                                 Baseline Measures
                    Measures
 Component          Cost                   Life875            Cost                      Life
Lamp                $6.00                  6.4 years          $1.00                     0.5 years
Ballast             N/A                    25.6 years         N/A                       N/A




874
    Cost represents full, installed cost and is computed with a weighted average of all direct install interior fixtures
installed under the Efficiency Vermont Residential New Construction Program between 1/1/2000 and 12/1/2001.
875
    Life of components based on use patterns of specific application.


                                                            430
Exterior HID
Measure Number: VI-C-4-a (RNC, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
7/31/00
Description
Exterior metal halide (MH) or high pressure sodium (HPS) high intensity discharge (HID) fixtures.
Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = kWsave  HOURS

Demand Savings
kW = kWsave

Where:
            kWh   = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
         kWsave = lighting connected load kW saved, baseline kW minus efficient kW.
         HOURS = annual exterior lighting hours of use per year, 2920 hours. 876
         kW       = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure
Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Refer to the table titled Exterior HID Fixture Saved Wattage for lighting baseline efficiencies and savings.
High Efficiency
Refer to the table titled Exterior HID Fixture Saved Wattage for efficient lighting wattage and savings.
Operating Hours
2920 hours per year. Annual hours used in DPS RNC core program screening and the DPS field screening
tool. Based on 8 hours per day.
Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors
                                                            Peak as % of connected load kW
                              % of annual kWh
                                                                              (CF)
                 Winter Winter Summer Summer
  Application Peak Off-Peak Peak                 Off-Peak     Winter       Summer Fall/Spring
Outdoor HID 19.9%             13.3% 30.3%            36.6%       35.0%         15.2%        35.0%

Freeridership
12% (Good and Premium home weighted freeridership assumed in the DPS core program screening)
Spillover
10%877
Persistence
The persistence factor is assumed to be one.
Lifetimes
Exterior HID – 20 years. Lifetime used in DPS RNC core program screening.
Analysis period is the same as the lifetime.




876
      Annual hour of use historically used by utilities for this program.
877
      Spillover reflects products purchased by non-participants as a result of the program (VEIC estimate).


                                                            431
Reference Tables
                            Exterior HID Saved Wattage (kWsaved)
                                                                                Saved
                                                       Efficient   Baseline
                   Lighting Technology                                         Wattage
                                                       Wattage     Wattage
                                                                                kWsave

Exterior HID Fixtures
MH 100W vs MV                                                125         250        125
MH 75W vs PAR 38 flood                                       102         360        258
MH 70W vs PAR 38 flood                                        95         240        145
HPS 70W vs MV                                                 95         200        105
HPS 50W vs MV                                                 64         125         61
HPS 35W vs MV                                                 45          93         48




                                            432
Exterior HID
Measure Number: VI-C-4-b (RNC, Lighting End Use)

Version Date & Revision History
                                            Accepted with           Referred to
                       Accepted As Is           Edits                 TAG
EVT
DPS

Previous measure effective date: 7/31/00
Draft date: 2/2/01
Approval date:
Effective date:
Superceded date

Description
Exterior metal halide (MH) or high pressure sodium (HPS) high intensity discharge (HID) fixtures.

Algorithms
Energy Savings
kWh = kWsave  HOURS

Demand Savings
kW = kWsave

Where:
             kWh   = gross customer annual kWh savings for the measure
             kWsave = lighting connected load kW saved, baseline kW minus efficient kW.
             HOURS = annual exterior lighting hours of use per year, 2920 hours. 878
             kW    = gross customer connected load kW savings for the measure

Baseline Efficiencies – New or Replacement
Refer to the table titled Exterior HID Fixture Saved Wattage for lighting baseline efficiencies and savings.

High Efficiency
Refer to the table titled Exterior HID Fixture Saved Wattage for efficient lighting wattage and savings.

Operating Hours
2920 hours per year. Annual hours used in DPS RNC core program screening and the DPS field screening
tool. Based on 8 hours per day.

Energy Distribution & Coincidence Factors