FLOODING OF OTTAWA, OHIO PUTNAM COUNTY AUGUST 2007 by VTiMP5

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									FLOODING OF OTTAWA, OHIO
     PUTNAM COUNTY
      AUGUST 2007

           By: BRIAN KISSELL
        INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
     COLLEGE OF ARTS and SCIENCES
       Flood: Know Your Terms
•   Flood Watch:
    Flooding is possible. Tune in to NOAA Weather Radio, commercial radio, or television for
    information.
•   Flash Flood Watch:
    Flash flooding is possible. Be prepared to move to higher ground; listen to NOAA Weather Radio,
    commercial radio, or television for information.
•   Flood Warning:
    Flooding is occurring or will occur soon; if advised to evacuate, do so immediately.
•   Flash Flood Warning:
    A flash flood is occurring; seek higher ground on foot immediately.
•   Floods can take several hours to days to develop. Flash floods can take only a few minutes to
    hours to develop.
•   NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration): Provides timely and precise
    weather, water, and climate forecasts, as well as monitors the environment and
    examines changes in the oceans.
•   NWS (National Weather Service): Provides current official weather warnings,
    observations, and forecasts across the United States.

                              (Terms courtesy of FEMA and Ohio EMA)
NORTHWEST OHIO
  (Maps courtesy of www.answers.com)
    HISTORY OF OTTAWA, OHIO
• In the summer of 1834, Michael Row, arrived with his family. That summer the town
    was surveyed, and Row purchased the first lot, where he erected the Row Tavern.
•   The post office was established in 1837 as Buckeye, since there already was an
    Ottawa. In 1862 it officially became Ottawa. After a fiercely contested battle, which
    lasted several years, the county seat was moved to Ottawa, the geographic center of
    the county.
•   The coming of the railroads made it the transportation center of the county, also. The
    newspaper also moved to Ottawa and became known as the Putnam County
    Sentinel. It is a vigorous weekly paper today.
•   Ottawa’s main occupation would the family farms passed down from generation to
    generation. Most of the industry that was once there have closed there doors and
    shipped the jobs overseas.
•   Today, the actual Village of Ottawa is 3.9 square miles with 0.04 square miles of that
    being water.
•   The population, according to the 2000 U.S. Census Bureau is 4367 people.
•   Ottawa has one high school that shares with a neighboring town, called Ottawa-
    Glandorf High School. Two kindergarten through 8th grade schools, (1) Ottawa Public
    Schools (2) Ss. Peter and Paul Catholic School.
OTTAWA FLOODING
AUGUST 21-25, 2007
         • Pictures are of Main Street in
           downtown Ottawa. Many
           businesses were affected by
           the flooding. As you can see
           from the pictures many of
           those business needed to be
           closed for an extended period
           of time to repair the damages
           from the flood. If you look
           close enough you can see a
           plant in a pot floating in the
           middle of Main Street by the
           railroad crossing barrier arm.
         • (Pictures courtesy of
           www.accessottawa.com)
               OTTAWA FLOODING
               AUGUST 21-25, 2007
• (Top Left) Picture is of the
   Baltimore and Ohio Railroad
   tracks that cross Main Street in
   downtown Ottawa. By the
   pictures you can tell that the
   flooding even affected the
   passage of the trains.

• (Bottom Left) Some of the
  houses close to the Blanchard
  River had to be evacuated by
  helicopter when boats were
  unable to reach them.
• (Pictures courtesy of
  www.accessottawa.com)
  PUBLIC SCHOOL OFFICIALS HELP OUT FLOODED
PAROCHIAL SCHOOL STUDENTS BY SHARING SCHOOL
         CLASSROOMS AND GYMNASIUM


                      • (Top Left) Students from Ss.
                         Peter and Paul Junior High have
                         class in a makeshift classroom in
                         Ottawa-Glandorf’s High School
                         gymnasium.

                      • (Bottom Left) William Kuhlman,
                         principal of Ss. Peter and Paul,
                         said the public schools’ help has
                         been most welcome. ‘They’re our
                         neighbors,’ said Denise Phillips,
                         principal of Ottawa Elementary.
                         ( THE BLADE/DAVE ZAPOTOSKY )

                      • (Pictures courtesy of
                         www.accessottawa.com)
    FACTS OF THE FLOOD FOR
      AUGUST 21-25, 2007



• TOTAL RAINFALL
• TOTAL DAMAGES IN $$$ TO
  HOMEOWNERS AND LOCAL BUSINESSES
• FEMA AND SBA AID TO VICTIMS
   JUST 6 MONTHS LATER
MORE FLOODING FOR OTTAWA
     FEBRUARY 6-8, 2008
   (Pictures courtesy of www.accessottawa.com)
        FACTS OF THE FLOOD FOR
          FEBRUARY 6-8, 2008



• The Blanchard River in Ottawa crested Thursday at 29.34 feet, more
  than six feet above the 23-foot flood stage.
• The flood in August 2007 was much more damaging and the worst
  since 1913.




                  (Information gathered from www.cresent-news.com)
             WHAT NEXT?

• Over the next five years the United States
 Army Corps of Engineers will be
 conducting studies, designing, planning,
 and building what is needed to prevent
 future flooding. They estimate spending
 between $90-$93 million for flood
 mitigation projects.

								
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