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					                                Acknowledgements

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information contained in our Guides to Living
is accurate at the time of going to press, but the University of Sussex can take no
responsibility for any errors or omissions. Views, where expressed, are those of the
contributors, and are not necessarily those of the University.

2003, The University of Sussex, International & Study Abroad Office.
Edited and produced by International & Study Abroad Office, University of Sussex.
Printed by the University of Sussex Print Unit.

The Student’s Guide to Living in Austria
The Student’s Guide to Living in Belgium
The Student’s Guide to Living in Denmark
The Student’s Guide to Living in Finland
The Student’s Guide to Living in France
The Student’s Guide to Living in Germany
The Student’s Guide to Living in Iceland
The Student’s Guide to Living in Italy
The Student’s Guide to Living in Mexico
The Student’s Guide to Living in The Netherlands
The Student’s Guide to Living in Portugal
The Student’s Guide to Living in Romania
The Student’s Guide to Living in Spain
The Student’s Guide to Living in Sweden
The Student’s Guide to Living in Switzerland
                                                           Contents

Introduction .......................................................................................................................... 2
      Checklist ..................................................................................................................... 3
Getting There.... ................................................................................................................... 3
      UK Travel Agents ....................................................................................................... 5
      Taking a Car Abroad .................................................................................................6
      Freight ........................................................................................................................ 9
      Customs ...................................................................................................................... 9
Practical Planning ................................................................................................................ 10
       Immigration ................................................................................................................ 10
       Insurance .................................................................................................................... 10
       Voting ......................................................................................................................... 11
       Benefit Entitlements ................................................................................................... 11
Maintenance Grants and Loans on the Year Abroad ...................................................... 12
Making the Most of Your Money ....................................................................................... 13
Health and Well-Being ........................................................................................................ 15
      Stresses and Strains ................................................................................................... 16
Finding Somewhere to Stay.................................................................................................16
      Other Accommodation ............................................................................................... 17
      Benefits ....................................................................................................................... 17
      Police Registration/Residence Formalities ................................................................ 17
      University Systems ..................................................................................................... 18
      Administrative Enrolment .......................................................................................... 18
      Libraries ..................................................................................................................... 18
      Student Services ......................................................................................................... 19
      Term Dates and Holidays........................................................................................... 19
Out and About ...................................................................................................................... 20
      Cultural Differences ................................................................................................... 20
      Useful Words and Expressions................................................................................... 21
      Cafés, Bars, Restaurants and Clubs........................................................................... 21
      Shopping..................................................................................................................... 21
      Public Transport ........................................................................................................ 22
Paying Your Way ................................................................................................................. 22
      Banks .......................................................................................................................... 22
      Employment ................................................................................................................ 23
Post and Telephones ............................................................................................................ 23
Safety and Welfare............................................................................................................... 23
The British Consulate .......................................................................................................... 25
Useful Addresses in Sweden ................................................................................................ 26
Useful Addresses in the UK.................................................................................................27




                                                                     1
                                      Introduction
A period of study abroad is probably one of the most challenging opportunities that a student
undertakes during their university life. It is also one of the most demanding. This guide aims
to take the stress out of the practical planning before you go and to offer some helpful
guidelines on how to survive when you get there. Although it does not contain specific
information about the Swedish system of higher education or the particular university at
which you will be studying, it provides you with a basic framework of the essential
information you will need to live and study while you are away.

While the information contained in this booklet is applicable to students from a UK institute
of higher education, much of it will be of use to students in general. Also, whilst some of the
information may apply to everyone, the rest will vary according to individual circumstances.
Bureaucracy is probably the worst obstacle to overcome - it is important to note that the way
in which the system works varies to a certain extent at a regional level, and what is true for
one part of Sweden is not necessarily true for another. However, this booklet contains much
information, which cannot be found in any of the official guides, and will hopefully prove
very useful.

Sweden
Sweden is 1,600km long and the fifth largest country in Europe with a population a little
larger than that of London (9 million) of whom 80% live in cities. Stockholm is the capital
and has a population of about 4 million. Sweden is a beautiful country with half of its
surface covered by trees and over 1000 lakes connected by many rivers and waterfalls. As
you may already be aware Sweden has a large annual snowfall and, depending on location,
spends between 4 and 6 months covered by it. In the far north, above the Arctic circle, there
is always a snow covering. During the winter the lakes are frozen and this allows activities
such as ice-skating. The average temperature during the winter is -3C but temperatures
down to -20C are not uncommon. In summer the average temperature is 18C and up to
about 25C in July. In July it is light for almost 20 hours a day. 92% of the population in
Sweden belong to the Church of Sweden (Lutheran). Around 160,000 Catholics are
registered and Muslims are the largest non-Christian group. Not every Swede has blue eyes,
blonde hair, a long beard and wields a broad sword!

Additional reading that may be helpful can be found in the Rough Guide to Sweden (£10.99).
The ISIC handbook also provides useful information on travelling in Europe.




                                              2
                                          Checklist

Practical Matters
Over the summer you must make sure you have all of the following documents and at least 4
photocopies of each:
 Insurance
 ISIC Card (for discounts on travel, and in galleries/museums abroad)
 Birth Certificate
 Attestation of two years’ previous study at your home university
 Recent passport photographs (about 8)
 Original A level certificates (or equivalent)
 Proof that you have sufficient income to support yourself while abroad in the form of
  evidence that you receive a Maintenance Grant or a letter from your parents stating that
  they will support you financially during the year or a recent bank statement
 An E128 health insurance form
Additionally...
 Inform your bank that you are going on your year abroad and ask them to help you with
  Traveller’s Cheques/Foreign Currency
 Sort out travel arrangements and book tickets
 Arrange with your home-doctor that you have supplies of any prescription medication that
  you may need while you are abroad


                                    Getting There....
The method of travel to and from your host destination will obviously depend on where you
are going. You may wish to take a train or coach as the distance is relatively small, but the
majority of students prefer to fly out, especially at the beginning of the year, because it is
easier. It is worth investing in an ISIC card, which is internationally recognised, to guarantee
you cheap fares wherever you are. This card will cost you about £6 and more than pays for
itself with the discounts you can get with it.

By Air
With the closure of Campus Travel, the cheapest place for tickets will probably be STA
Travel. Tickets are changeable and refundable, subject to a £75 cancellation fee and £15
charge per change of reservation. Also make sure you try one of the budget airlines like
www.ryanair.com who fly one-way to Gothenberg and Stockholm for around £30. A
disadvantage with flying is that you are limited as to the amount of baggage you can take with
you. The normal limit is 20kg of luggage or 23kg if you are flying with British Airways, not
including hand baggage. If you are slightly over this limit then the airline will sometimes turn
a blind eye but heavy excess will be charged for at a rate of 1% of the full price airfare per
kilogram. At the time of going to press STA Travel were quoting the following prices :

               Heathrow               Gatwick
Stockholm      £87 + tax              £90 + tax
Gothenburg     £118 + tax                 -



                                               3
By Coach
Eurolines (who are part of National Express Coaches) run coaches from Victoria coach
station to over 250 destinations in Europe. 25s and under can get discounted tickets but even
the full fare is relatively inexpensive. There are Eurolines agents in most large towns and you
may find this a cheap way of travelling home after your initial journey. Reservations can also
be made through any National Express office. Eurolines return tickets are valid for up to six
months for all international services and open-ended return tickets are available on the
majority of services - but return journeys must be reserved at least four days in advance. If
tickets are cancelled, there is a 50% refund for cancellations made within 48 hours of
departure and an 80% refund when cancellations are made more than 48 hours before
departure. To change your ticket will cost you about £2. At the time of going to print
National Express/Eurolines quoted the following prices for return tickets:

                      Under 26       Adult
Stockholm             £165           £180
Gothenburg            £141           £156

By Train
STA Travel can advise you on the best way to get to your destination by train and will again
issue you with discounted tickets. Eurotrain specialise in youth rail travel in Europe and have
discounts for those under 26. Prices include channel crossing by ferry, with the return
journey valid for 2 months and the added option of breaking the journey and stopping off
anywhere en route. Ticket prices are usually cheaper than flying but considerably higher than
for travelling by coach.

If you have a long journey, then it is usually better to book a couchette or sleeping
compartment. These are not very expensive and you are guaranteed greater comfort. Ask the
travel agent to book one for you when you buy your ticket.

By Sea
Scandinavian Seaways sails twice weekly between Newcastle and Gothenburg. The crossing
takes 25 hours. Tickets can be purchased up to two days prior to departure. Every ticket
includes an above sea level shared cabin. Return dates can be changed at no extra cost.
Students receive 15-40% discounts for foot passengers. Train ticket connections can be
included in the price and will add around £30 to the cost for a Newcastle-Gothenburg-
Stockholm boat and train ticket.

For reservations, call Scandinavian Seaways at Harwich (0870 5333 111).

Reimbursement by the LEA
If you fall under the old regulations and have been receiving a maintenance grant from your
local authority you will usually be eligible for reimbursement of one return ticket during your
year abroad. However, most LEAs will only give money back if you have used the cheapest
means of transport available. Contact your LEA before you leave to confirm this with
them. For more information Maintenance Grants and Loans see p. 13.




                                              4
                                     UK Travel Agents

The following agents offer reasonable rates and some discounts for students:

London
STA Travel                    117, Euston Rd, NW1                    Tel: (0207) 361 6161
                                                                     Tel: (0870) 1600 599
Eurolines                     52, Grosvenor Gdns, SW1                Tel: (0870) 5143 219
National Express              52, Grosvenor Gdns, SW1                Tel: (0870) 5808 080
Eurostar                      52, Grosvenor Gdns, SW1                Tel: (0870) 5186 186

Brighton
Aossa                         65, Queens Rd, Brighton                Tel: (01273) 725553
STA Travel                    38 North Street, Brighton              Tel: (01273) 728282


Useful Internet Sites
STA Travel            www.statravel.co.uk/
Cheap Flights         www.cheapflights.co.uk/
                      www.travelocity.co.uk/
Euro Railways         www.eurorailways.com/
Travelstore           www.travelstore.com/
Rough Guides          www.roughguides.com/
Lonely Planet         www.lonelyplanet.com/

For information on any airline, simply type: www.airline name.com/co.uk

As well as these, there are many other cheap flights websites so it is always best to shop
around before you book your flight.




                                               5
                                   Taking a Car Abroad

If you intend to take a car to Sweden, then the elementary principles should be adhered to:
drive on the RIGHT-HAND SIDE of the road! You must be over 18 and hold a driving
licence. You must have your driving licence with you when you are driving. In Scandinavia it
is a legal requirement that side lights are switched on at all times. Roads in the towns can be
awkward and potentially dangerous.

The main problems occur when there is snow on the ground - which is much of the year!
Snow and residue dirt and grit can totally obscure road markings which means that a good
knowledge of how the road system works is essential. Out of town this is not such a major
problem and driving is less stressful in general. The roads usually have a single lane with a
smaller lane for vehicles to pull into to allow others to pass. The road system seems to work
well and traffic congestion is minimal. In the winter it is normal for cars to wear studded tires
outside the town and it is difficult to drive anywhere without them in the hills

If your car satisfies the construction and use regulations in its own country (MOT etc.), it can
be driven elsewhere in Europe. If the car you are intending to drive is not registered in your
name you are advised to carry a letter of authorisation with you. Please note that you are still
required to display a ‘GB’ sticker on the rear of your vehicle.

Make sure you find out about the laws and restrictions in the country you will be visiting. If
you do not respect its highway code, you may be heavily penalised, so don't be tempted to
rely on British regulations.

Speed limits at present are:
 110 kph on motorways (65 mph)
 90 kph on dual carriageways (55 mph)
 70kph on other roads (43 mph)
 50kph in built-up areas (31mph)

Driving under the influence of drink (more than 0.20 grams of alcohol per litre of blood) is
severely penalised in Sweden, resulting in the loss of your licence, and the alcohol test may be
carried out at any time! Parking offences may also be penalised and your car may be clamped
or towed away. Seat belts must be worn in the back as well as the front. Do not think that
because you are British your driving licence will not be confiscated! EU law permits police in
any country to take away the driving licence of any EU National if they break the law in the
same way as they would do in their home country. Remember that a GB sticker on your car
makes you very conspicuous and you should take extra care not to commit traffic offences.




                                               6
Driving Licences
Driving licences are now equally valid in all Member States of the EU and a shared European
format is currently being introduced. However, all existing forms of Community licence will
continue to be acceptable, including old green ‘group’ licences. A foreign driving licence can
be used for one year in Sweden. Before the end of this one-year period you can apply for a
Swedish driving licence at the County Commissioner’s Office. The other option open to
holders of the original British licence is to apply for the EU version which will cost £11.
Application forms are available from post offices.

If your British licence entitles you to drive minibuses (not for hire or reward) and medium
goods vehicles and trailers up to 8.25 tonnes, this may not be valid in Sweden and you are
advised to seek advice.

For further information, contact the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (Monday to Friday,
8.15am to 4.30pm):

Driving licence enquiries:     Tel: 0870 400009               Fax: (01792) 783 071
Vehicle licence enquiries:     Tel: 0870 400010               Fax: (01792 )782 793

Vehicle Insurance
Each European country has its own rules for motor insurance. Be aware that when you drive
outside the UK your motor insurance policy provides the minimum third party cover. This is
the legal minimum but does not insure you for anything other than third-party risks, even if
you have an ‘all risks’ policy in the UK. If you want to have comprehensive insurance
abroad, you will need to take out additional insurance.

It is no longer obligatory to obtain a green card from your insurance company (which
provides evidence that you have the legal minimum level of insurance required). This is
provided through your UK insurance certificate. However, the green card has been an
internationally accepted document for over 40 years, and you may find it useful to carry one.
Many insurers provide a European Accident Statement, a standard form that can be filled out
by both parties in the event of an accident. Accident Statements are available in all EU
languages and can be useful if you do not have a very good command of the language of the
country you are visiting. Ask for an English language version and a copy in Swedish.

Vehicles must be taxed for the duration of the stay. If the tax runs out during the year, then it
should be renewed either at home or from the country you are studying in.

Customs
If you are taking a vehicle abroad it must be for your personal use and not for the purpose of
selling or loaning it abroad. If you do intend to sell your vehicle outside the UK, then you
must first obtain the consent of the Customs Authorities. If you are a member of another
country within the EU you may keep your vehicle with you for a maximum of twelve months;
after this period it will be assumed to have been exported and should be registered locally. If
you are a member of a non-EU country, you will have to register your vehicle after it has been
in the country for 6 months.




                                                7
Tolls
Motorways in many parts of Europe are maintained by a toll system; France, Italy and Spain
all charge for the use of motorways whilst in Austria charges are levied on some of the major
routes.

Checklist
 International Motor Insurance Card, or green card: this is an internationally recognised
  certificate of motor insurance
 Valid national driving licence for EU students or valid international licence for others
 An International Driving Permit or translated licence if necessary
 Valid road tax
 Valid MOT
 Beam-benders for the headlamps
 A document showing your place of abode, if the residence permit has not yet been
  obtained
 Vehicle registration documents
 A GB sticker on the front and back of the your vehicle.
 Travel emergency kit (must include warning triangle, also recommended to contain a first
  aid kit, spare bulbs and a fire extinguisher)
 Studded winter tyres are law between 1 November and the first Monday after the Easter
  holiday

Useful Publications
The Association of British Insurers publish an information leaflet for those intending to travel
abroad, which includes a section on motor insurance. For a copy, write to them at:
51 Gresham Street
London EC2V 7HQ

Both the AA and the RAC offer help and guidelines for driving abroad to their members.

Automobile Association                       RAC Motoring Services
Fanum House                                  PO Box 700
Basingstoke                                  Bristol
Hampshire                                    BS99 1RB
RG21 4EA                                     Tel: 0800 550 550
Tel: 0800 444 500

For further information contact the Swedish Embassy (020 7917 6400) or www.swedish-
embassy.org.uk/




                                               8
                                             Freight

One of the difficulties with going to live abroad is what to take with you and how. If you
travel by ferry or coach then you can take as much luggage as you can carry; if you travel by
air the luggage limit is likely to be about 20kg, and although you may be lucky and squeeze a
few extra kilos through, the charges for excess baggage can be very high. Be practical when
you plan what to take with you, remembering that cheap items are not worth breaking your
back for and are much better bought when you get there. If however, after being ruthless you
still need to have belongings sent over, there are two main ways; the first method is simply by
post, the second is by freight either through an air line or international parcel service.

Large parcels by post
These should be carefully padded and packed and then taken to a main post office to be sent
away. Try to avoid sending breakables or valuables as these services are really best for
transporting books and other heavy but durable items. The maximum weight per parcel is
20kg. The price for sending a 20kg package through Parcelforce’s ‘Standard Service’ to any
Swedish destination (including automatic insurance of up to £250) is £70.80, the service
taking about 4 -6 days. Further information from Parcelforce on 0800 224 466 or check out
its website at www.parcelforce.com.

Although in previous years we have advised students that they could send parcels through
Red Star Parcels International and Atlas Air, the companies tell us that they are no longer able
to arrange shipment of personal effects.

Large package freight by plane can be arranged with any air company. British Airways
state a minimum cost of £33.00, plus a minimum handling charge of £22.00 for import and
£16.00 for export. Further information is available from British Airways Cargo (01332) 811
967.


                                            Customs

Customs information may vary slightly between countries but the following information
should serve as a guideline for restrictions on importing and exporting goods for personal
consumption.

Goods obtained duty and tax paid within the EU
 800 cigarettes or 400 cigarillos or 200 cigars or 1 kg of tobacco
 Spirits: 10 litres; fortified wine (such as port and sherry): 20 litres; wine 90 litres (of which
  sparkling wines no more than 60 litres); beer 110 litres. The above quantities include
  anything you have bought duty-free. You can technically bring in even more but you must
  be able to prove that the goods are for your personal use only and no other business
  purpose. Customs and Excise recommend that you keep receipts of purchases just in case
  you are stopped.


If you are planning to buy goods affected by customs limits then check the appropriate limits
for the country you are leaving/entering before you attempt to cross the border.


                                                9
                                 Practical Planning
Before you make your travel arrangements there are lots of other things to consider before
you leave the UK for your year abroad. Be prepared - it is much easier to sort out the finer
details of such things as immigration, benefits and banking before you go than to arrange
them from your host country. To secure yourself a stress-free year abroad, it is certainly
worth your while to plan ahead.

Will you need a visa to stay in your foreign country?
Will you need to insure yourself for items not already covered by the University Policy?
Do you want to be able to vote whilst you are away?
Are you entitled to any UK benefits?
How can you transfer your money abroad?

Read on to find out more...


                                       Immigration

EU Nationals and Nationals of Liechtenstein and Switzerland do not require visas to
study in Sweden.

Other nationals must apply for a permit for visiting students. Permits are issued by the
Swedish Immigration Board (Statens Invandrarverk or SIV) and must be granted before you
come to Sweden. Non-UK residents must apply through the consulate in their home
countries. If you do need a visa you must apply at least 3 months in advance.

For further Information call the Swedish Embassy's Immigration Department on (020) 7724
2101.


                                         Insurance

Insurance is vital for peace of mind. You should check with your University if they have an
arrangement with an Insurance company, which provides you with affordable cover for the
whole of your period of study abroad. For university registration you will be required to have
E128 cover, which entitles you to the same emergency medical care for illness or accidents as
nationals of that country. (NB This means that if local people have to pay for hospital stays
and obtain a refund later, so will you). The E128 form is available from the National
Insurance Contributions Office (tel. 0845 915 4811. You will need to give your full name,
UK address, date of birth, National Insurance number (if you have one), nationality, country
you'll be studying in and dates of study (e.g. Sept to Sept). You are eligible to obtain form
E128 if you are ordinarily resident in the UK and you are a national of the UK or any other
EEA country. Until recently students have taken the E111 form available from post offices;
however the National Insurance Contributions Office has now warned that overseas
authorities will refuse to accept this as it is intended for tourists only.




                                             10
You will also need to take out additional cover for medical expenses (up to £1 million),
personal baggage (up to £1,000), and public liability. It is important that you check that the
policy covers all your potential needs. Does it, for example, cover rented accommodation
abroad, personal car insurance or unusual items such as expensive musical instruments which
may require separate policies?

Endsleigh Insurance (Tel. 020 7 436 4451) offer excellent rates for students though it is
certainly worth checking out insurance companies specific to your country for policies
relating to accommodation details for example. Be prepared for the unexpected to happen - it
is always better to be over as opposed to under insured.


                                            Voting

British citizens can vote in general elections and European Parliamentary elections from
abroad by registering as Overseas Electors, and voting by proxy. Voting by proxy means that
you will assign someone at home the task of voting on your behalf in an election. Other
nationals may be able to arrange a postal vote through their consulate, however British
nationals cannot, as ballot papers may not be sent out of the country. In order to register as
an Overseas Elector you need to contact your local council for the necessary form during the
summer vacation. It is important that you return the completed form before the end of
September; failure to do so will result in you losing your right to vote next year.


                                    Benefit Entitlements

UK Benefit Entitlements
If you are receiving any form of benefit then the best idea is to inform the National Insurance
Contributions Office that you will be studying abroad for a year, and ask them how this will
affect you. At present social security protection for students who spend some time in another
Member State only covers students who are insured as a worker or self-employed person, or a
family member of a worker or self-employed person. For further advice on social security
rights abroad contact the Overseas Telephone Liaison: Tel: (0191) 218 7777 or the:

Contributions Agency, Overseas Contribution EC, Department of Social Security, Benton
Park Road, Longbenton, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE98 1YX
Tel: 0845 915 4811

                              Disabilities & Special needs

Students with disabilities or special needs have equal access to and are actively encouraged to
go on a year abroad. Please make sure you go and see your coordinators at your home
university and contact your host institution for more information as facilities vary at different
universities.




                                               11
         Maintenance Grants and Loans on the Year Abroad
Whilst the financial arrangements for your year abroad are your responsibility, you can
obviously seek advice from your local education authority (LEA) to check whether or not you
will be eligible for any extra money while you are abroad. The information listed below is
intended only as a guide and it is essential that you check with your LEA for individual
advice.

Maintenance

Loans
Since the introduction of maintenance loans in 1998, it is highly likely that you have been in
receipt of such a loan for your first two years at your home university. However, if you are
studying in another country for 8 or more weeks as part of your degree, you are eligible for a
higher rate of student loan. For more information on how much extra you can receive,
contact your LEA.

Grants
Students who still fall within the old regulations and who have been receiving maintenance
grants at their home university so far, are also eligible for a higher rate of grant than their
usual UK rate (providing you are studying in another country for 8 or more weeks as part of
your degree).

Your local education authority (LEA) will be automatically informed of your year abroad and
university destination by the Student Progress Office. Once your LEA has been informed by
your University that you will be studying abroad, they will send you details of your
entitlements and the level of your loan or grant, asking you for details of your bank or
building society account. You are responsible for making appropriate arrangements for
transferring money abroad. If you have any questions regarding your loans or grant please
contact your LEA.

Please note that it is also your responsibility to advise your LEA of your term dates at your
host institution. You will receive a ‘Term Dates Form’ in your Year Abroad Dossier from the
International & Study Abroad Office at Sussex, which you will need to complete as soon as
you get to your host institution and send straight back to your LEA.


Visa Costs and Compulsory Medical Tests
Where visa costs are incurred or medical tests required by the country to which you are going
your local authority may reimburse these if you get a maintenance award.




                                              12
                        Making the Most of Your Money
Before you leave the UK it is vital to tell your bank that you will be spending the next
academic year abroad. They will be able to advise you on managing your finances - there is a
wide range of possibilities on offer. Exchange rate inequalities between the pound and
European currency as well as bank and credit card fees (often surprisingly high) make it all
the more essential to manage your money in the most effective way possible.
Traveller's cheques, which can be exchanged for local currency, are a secure way to take
large amounts of money abroad. They are safer than cash because if you lose them, or they
are stolen, you can get replacements quickly and easily - usually within 24 hours. There are
two types of traveller’s cheques: ‘sterling’ and ‘local currency’. Sterling traveller’s cheques
are widely accepted in most European countries. You will usually be charged a small fee
when you exchange them for local currency. With currency traveller’s cheques the exchange
rate is set before you leave the UK; normally you won’t have to pay any extra charges when
you exchange them for currency, but they do cost a little more to buy than sterling traveller’s
cheques.
Traveller’s cheques can either be deposited into a bank account or cashed in a bank or bureau
de change, usually free of charge. You can now buy foreign currency traveller's cheques in
the UK from any high street bank or Bureau de Change. Thomas Cook can usually issue
them on the spot, along with larger amounts of foreign currency than banks usually stock. If
you have a student bank account you may find your bank will change money for you and sell
you traveller’s cheques without charging any commission. It is quite likely that you will need
large amounts of cash during your first few weeks abroad and traveller's cheques are safer to
carry than large wads of bank notes. Nevertheless, keep your traveller's cheques safe, only
sign them in the presence of a cashier, note the numbers, keep them in a separate place from
the cheques, and report any loss or theft immediately to the police and to your bank. You will
be given an emergency number to ring when you collect your traveller's cheques.

Individual banks all offer a range of international services. It is worthwhile shopping
around to find methods that will most suit your needs and budget. Further information is
available: HSBC (0800 520 420), Barclays (0800 400 100) or NatWest (0800 50 50 50).
World Pay is available from HSBC Bank to both customers and non-customers. It is
probably one of the most cost effective services available, allowing payments of up to £2,000
to be sent in local currency, normally within 3 to 6 working days, for a fixed charge of £9.00.
The service is available in Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Portugal,
Spain and Sweden.
International Money Order (IMO): IMOs are pre-signed drafts available in US dollars,
Sterling, Euros, French Francs and Deutschmark for any amount up to £10,000. They are
useful primarily for sending funds abroad. The commission charge varies between £5 - £8
depending on where you go. You can pay by cash or cheque and if you order one through
your own bank it can be debited from your account. It is likely that to buy a money order you
will need some form of identification such as a passport, especially if it is for a large sum of
money. The IMO can be cashed, with suitable identification at any bank in the country of the
currency. At the time of going to press, Barclays offered the best IMO service that was
available to all, with HSBC and Lloyds TSB offering a similar ‘Money Draft’ service. These
however, were only open to each banks customers.


                                              13
If money is needed urgently, HSBC offer a Priority Payment scheme. Money can be telexed
to any country and can be paid in the foreign currency. This is good for large payments
needed immediately. The tariff is £15 on amounts up to £5,000, £20 on £5-10,000 and £35
on £10,000 and above. On top of this charge there may be a fee to pay when it arrives abroad.
The handling fee at the receiving end will vary between banks, but if whoever is sending it
out to you is feeling especially generous then an additional amount of £7.50 may be paid in
Britain to cover the foreign bank charges.
Visa and MasterCard are both world-wide payment schemes. Cards can be used to pay for
goods and services and to withdraw cash wherever the Visa and/or MasterCard logos are
displayed. If you have an existing account with Barclays, Lloyds TSB, or the Royal Bank of
Scotland then you will also have a direct debit Visa card. You can also use a Visa card in
most shops and supermarkets, although some will not accept them for goods under a certain
amount (possibly as much as £20). Banks and Bureaux de Change will change money for you
with your Visa card but will charge you an extra commission; to change money in this way
you must present your passport or birth certificate with the card.
Cirrus and Maestro are both signs usually displayed on any HSBC or NatWest Debit
(Switch) Card. They operate in the same way as a Visa debit card from the above banks but
are less popularly accepted. Cirrus and Maestro allow you to withdraw cash whilst abroad
from any machine displaying the symbol and Maestro also allows you to pay for goods and
services in shops and restaurants displaying the Maestro sign. In the same way that using
your Visa debit card abroad incurs a small charge, the same is true for Cirrus or Maestro
users. The charge for each transaction is usually about £1.50.

General advice: Always read the small print in your Visa, Eurocheque, or Travellers Cheque
information. If in doubt ask your bank to clarify exactly what charges will be levied.

Further information:
Barclays Information Line:    0800 400 100
HSBC Information Line:        0800 520 420




                                             14
                                Health and Well-Being
The health-care system of your host country may well be very different from what you are
used to in the UK. Britain still remains the only European country with a free National
Health Service making it important to sort out E128 cover before you leave the UK,
providing you with automatically free medical services while you are away. It is important to
realise though that, unlike in this country, prescriptions will not in general be State-
subsidised. So it is therefore wise to make sure you get any prescription medicines you may
need for your year abroad from your UK doctor before you go.

It is also well worth investing in the basics: aspirin, plasters, antiseptic cream, etc. (which are
in general much cheaper in this country than abroad).

The E128
The E128 form entitles the bearer to receive aid in case of urgent medical necessity in any
EU/EEA country. The E128 may be obtained from the National Insurance Contributions
Office (tel. 0845 915 4811). Until recently students have taken the open-ended tourist form;
however the National Insurance Contributions Office has now warned that overseas
authorities will refuse to accept this as it is intended for tourists only. Please see the
previous section on insurance for further details on how to apply.

Although the E128 covers urgent treatment for accident or unexpected illness, the form does
not cover all medical expenses. It is a mandatory requirement of the Year Abroad to take out
extra medical insurance, through the University.

Any queries about the E128 should be made to:
National Insurance Contributions Office, International Services, Longbenton, Newcastle-
upon-Tyne NE 98 1ZZ, Tel. 0845 915 4811

Health Services in Sweden
In the case of illness you can visit a number of places. The student nations (see Student
Services) may have a health centre. You can visit the local surgery, and of course the
hospital. You should always take your insurance forms, student identification and your E128.
A doctor from the local surgery can be asked to come out to your home if the need arises.
You should get a list of the appropriate phone numbers for the place you live in shortly after
arrival. The basic fee in the doctor's surgery is between SEK 100 and 200 and you should get
away with paying just this if you have an E128. In the hospital the basic fee is about SEK
200. Tell them about your E128 before (if possible) you have any treatment.

The number for emergency services is 112 and can be dialled free of charge from payphones
but do not forget the number to dial out in an office or university building.




                                                15
                                    Stresses and Strains

The period after arrival abroad can be very disorientating, as you adjust to what is in many
ways a very different culture. Problems with enrolment and accommodation, and the
difficulty of making yourself understood and understanding others, may make matters worse.
Many students suffer high levels of stress in their first few weeks, which can result in
feelings of depression and loneliness. Fortunately, these feelings do not usually persist, at
least not in an extreme form, and the long term results of these crises are often closer
friendships with students and an improved sense of your own capabilities. Past experience
suggests that after Christmas the Study Abroad adventure just gets better and better, and that
by the end of the summer term you'll be very sorry to leave. However, if you do find you are
suffering from culture shock at first, talk to someone about it; you may well find that they
have similar feelings, and you can help each other to get through it.


                            Finding Somewhere to Stay
The standard of living in Sweden is thought to be above that of most other European
countries and hence student accommodation in Sweden is also good. Fortunately, for
students, this standard is reflected in what a student can expect at a Swedish university.
Despite the cost of living in Sweden being somewhere in the region of twice that in England,
this is not normally the case for university accommodation. The cost of a student flat is
around SEK 2,000-2,500 per month.

A university student gets a room in a corridor or flat and will often stay in that room for all or
most of their studies. Accommodation seems to be mostly university-owned. The
accommodation can be difficult to find and is usually found less formally through somebody
that you know. An exchange student coming to Sweden will normally have accommodation
prepared for them by the university. Although there is a current shortage of student
accommodation, as an International student you can have a room reserved but do not leave it
too late in applying.

Accommodation is paid for on a monthly basis and you will have to pay for the whole of the
month in which you arrive. As with many payments you will receive a post office slip which
you then take to the post office. Here you pay for your rent and receive a receipt. You can pay
by one of the major credit cards, Swedish cheque and, of course, cash, which is often the
simplest method.

The rooms themselves are similar to Britain in that you get a desk, bed, lamps, chairs,
wardrobe etc. It is not uncommon to have a shower and a toilet. At most you will have to
share with a handful of other students in your corridor. When you receive a room you will get
an inventory to check and sign. Check it carefully and mention any problems because it will
be you who suffers the consequences. Kitchens always seem to be well equipped with plenty
of space and sufficient facilities for cooking. In terms of pots, cutlery, crockery, bedding etc.,
you may have all or most of these supplied but you should check before you arrive exactly
what is to be made available. The cleaning of your own room is your responsibility, paid
cleaners clean communal areas regularly.



                                               16
Each student complex normally has a laundry area, which is either cheap or free to use. The
use of the machines is mostly self-explanatory and because everyone speaks English you can
easily ask someone. The laundry seems to be both a place for arguments (due to queue
jumping) and a way to meet people.

Although your room is your domain where you can do as you wish, it is important to consider
the other students by keeping noise levels acceptable, washing one’s dishes in the kitchen and
generally doing what would be expected of you in the UK. When you vacate your room, it
should be left utterly clean with everything as you found it to avoid a fine.



                                   Other Accommodation

Hotels or lodgings are not particularly cheap but there are some reasonable places scattered
around. It is possible to find a room in a youth hostel for around SEK 150 but you should be
aware of seasonal opening which is very common. You can get information about all types of
tourist lodgings from the Svenska Turistföreningen or tourist office (see Useful Addresses).
If you are planning to do some travelling or hiking then you have the possibility of camping
or staying in mountain huts. If you let the tourist office know of your intentions, they will
give you all the information you need.

Electrical Systems
In Sweden the current from wall outlets is 220 volts, 50Hz. The sockets are different from
British ones, so if you bring electrical items then purchase an adaptor in the UK.



                                            Benefits

If you have a residence permit for more than one year, you are entitled to medical benefits at
a reduced cost. There are two conditions for this, civil registration and registration at a social
insurance office. The former is done at the local tax authority and you need (i) a passport (ii)
a letter of admission (iii) a marriage certificate (if you are married). After about a week, you
receive a personal number consisting of ten numbers starting with your date of birth (in
reverse order in Sweden e.g. 73 27 16) and then four additional figures.


                       Police Registration/Residence Formalities

If you are going to stay in Sweden for more than three months, you will need a residence
permit. This you can obtain from the local police office and you should do so shortly after
your arrival. It is more beneficial to register in Sweden for a ‘year and a day’: that way you
are entitled to a personal number, equivalent to a NI number. Once you have this number you
have the same legal status as a Swede, the importance of which is that you will not have to
pay huge deposits for the telephone, car and TV rentals. A personal number can be applied
for through the local tax office and also entitles you to a national identity card which is as
good as a passport and costs SEK 150-180.


                                               17
                                    University Systems
The teaching/examination system in Sweden is significantly different to that in the UK in
some areas, so it is important that you get sorted out as soon as you can. Students in Sweden
study to gain “points” of which they need approximately 140 to be awarded an undergraduate
degree. A course is normally worth 10 points of which a fail (U), pass (G), or good pass (VG)
can be received. One semester of full-time study is normally equivalent to 20 points. Exams
are normally taken shortly after the end of the course and here the main difference is the
length of examination. It is not uncommon to have a six-hour exam although the exam
system is generally more relaxed than in the UK. You can normally take food and drink in
with you and you might have a break between papers. The strictness of examination
conditions varies from one department to another.

Teaching methods are comparable to what one would expect in Britain and differ between
subject and department. As an International student you have the option of taking a course in
basic Swedish, which is of course useful, but, more importantly, a way to find out about the
culture you are living in from a qualified teacher. This course is normally free.



                                Administrative Enrolment

The first thing to do when you arrive is register with your department of study. You should
ask to have a letter proving you are a registered student because you’ll need this immediately
for other things whilst waiting for a formal card to be issued. It is important that you join a
student union or “nation” as soon as possible for several reasons. You must be a member of a
“student nation” before you can take exams. The membership fee is SEK 300-400 per
semester. The nation is also the centre of the student community so the process of
acclimatisation starts there.



                                          Libraries

As in the UK the libraries vary from place to place or university to university but you’ll find
that in general there is an extensive selection of books for every subject area, many in
English, although you may have to search for them. It is normal for a university to have a
major library containing many books which can be borrowed once you have joined. Each
department will have a specific library which can vary as to its content. To join the main
library you will need proof of student status at the university and will probably be asked to
complete a form about length of stay etc. Sometimes the joining of the main library will give
you automatic use of a number of smaller libraries. The individual departments will have
their own system which is often a system based on trust. The student nation may also have a
library that can be used once you have enrolled.

Many students use the library as a quiet place to work and so most libraries have a large
number of workspaces. Later in the day these may be full.




                                              18
                                      Student Services

Student services are organised mostly within the student nations. In most Universities one
student organisation is represented and is responsible for the welfare of the students. The
student nation is very active and offers a wide variety of activities throughout the year. It is
important that you keep an eye on notice boards so that you don’t miss anything exciting for
that part of the year. The student nation may have one or more bars and restaurants offering
cheap food and drink. As well as the fun things, which will be presented to you when you
arrive, the nation normally has departments for student welfare such as counselling or advice
lines. You are usually given a list of these when you join.

Uppsala and Lund are different because it is host to 13 different nations. These nations soon
become the centre of your social life and, perhaps, one of the places to study. Each nation
represents a region of Sweden and traditionally people from that region are members of their
own nation. Most of the nations and their buildings are old, dating from as far back as the
16th century. Nowadays it is more common to choose a nation that appeals to you and as an
international student you can join whichever takes your fancy. Membership gets you in cheap
or free to your nation and you can still visit the other nations. As an International student it
does not matter so much which you join, but that you do join and get involved. In Uppsala
each nation will endeavour to tempt you to various regional delights and traditions as well as
offering cheap food and drink. Since non-student entertainment is expensive nearly all
students visit the nations in their spare time. Each nation has an international secretary to
help you settle in and they can be approached with any questions related to your stay.

To join a nation you must go to it during the day with student identification, a letter of
registration and a photograph. You will be expected to pay something in the region of SEK
300. You should note that it is compulsory to be a member of a student nation and you will
have to show your identification to take an examination.



                                Term Dates and Holidays

The year consists of two semesters, an autumn semester and a spring semester. These are
generally from the end of August/beginning of September to mid-January and from mid-
January to mid-June respectively. The undergraduate student breaks at Swedish universities
are less than in England with normally three weeks at Christmas, one week at Easter and two
months in the summer. Each department will also have its own timetable for teaching and
breaks that you’ll have to ask about when you arrive.

Students taking postgraduate courses or research take breaks as determined in their respective
departments and this is the case with other academic staff too.




                                              19
Holidays
Sweden’s national day is celebrated on June 6th in memory of King Gustav Vasa’s accession
to the throne in 1523 and the signing of the government act in 1809.
The official public holidays in Sweden are:

   New Year’s Day (Jan. 1st) (nyårsdagen)
   Epiphany (Jan. 6th) (trettondagen)
   Good Friday - around this time most students and families are staying in their family
    cottage in the mountains (Långfredagen)
   Easter Monday (annandag påsk)
   April. 31st - summer is celebrated in a big way by the student population with various
    activities, alcohol consumption and a talk by the head of the university
   May 1st (första maj)
   Ascension day (the 39th day after Easter Sunday) (Kristi himmelsfärdsdag)
   Whit Monday (annandag pingst)
   Midsummer’s day, celebrated on the Saturday between 20-26th June (midsommardagen)
   Culture Night (Oct. 6th) Kultur Natten (Shops close half day)
   All Saints’ Day (celebrated on the Saturday between Oct. 31st and Nov. 6th)
    (allhelgonadagen)
   Christmas Day (Dec. 25th) (juldagen)
   Boxing Day (Dec. 26th) (annandag Jul.)

All Sundays are marked in red on the Swedish calendar.


                                    Out and About


                                   Cultural Differences

Sweden is in many ways not so very different to England and in that respect normal social
etiquette applies. Swedish people, in general, have such an amazing grasp of English that
they understand our culture and how it differs from their own, so difficult situations are
normally avoided. The Swedish people are very friendly and helpful but are not quite so open
to others with their personal lives so it can take time to make good friends. It is therefore a
privilege to be invited to somebody’s home for a meal or social event. The following points
are a useful guide to Swedish behaviour socially:

(i) When you meet somebody new it is polite to shake their hand.
(ii) When entering somebody’s home it is normal to remove your shoes: you will often see
people wandering about in socks.
(iii) Punctuality is important in Sweden.
(iv) Smoking is not allowed in public buildings.
(v) Answer the phone with your name or number because just “hello” is considered impolite.
(vi) Most Swedes speak good English and are happy to do so but as you begin to learn the
odd word or phrase in Swedish try to use it. By saying “tack” or “god morgon”, for example,
people will have more respect for you.


                                              20
                              Useful Words and Expressions

Hello - Hej
Good Morning - God Morgon
How are you? - Hur mår du?
Good bye - Adjö
Excuse me/sorry - Förlåt mig/Ursäkta
Please/thank you - tack
Yes/no - Ja/nej
I am from England - Jag kommer från England
Do you speak English? - Pratar du engelska?
I do not understand - Jag förstår inte.
Can you help me? - Kan du hjälpa mig?
Can I have... - Kan jag få...


                           Cafés, Bars, Restaurants and Clubs

One thing you will learn in Sweden as a student is that the cheapest place to consume food or
drink is the student nation, which offers bars, cafés and restaurants with large subsidies. This
is also the best way of meeting other students. Eating out, especially at lunch time, is a
common event and people often buy a hot meal. Normally the student nations offer hot
lunches at a good price.

In Swedish cafés the normal assortment of drinks and foods are available with one or two
others not found in the UK. A common snack is the våfflor or waffle (not potato) which is
made from a batter mixture and served with a topping of cream or jam.

In Sweden you do not find pubs as in the UK, except in the student nations, but club style
bars instead. The beer is normally bottled with perhaps one or two on tap. Drinks are served
in a glass which is just under half a pint. The non-student bars, although rather trendy-
looking, are expensive and considered to be the source of trouble. You can find some
excellent restaurants that usually serve a variety of dishes at a range of prices and the student
nation normally produces cheap food.

Socialising in Sweden is often well arranged in advance, friends meet at someone’s house
before embarking on a nightclub. This is wholly different to the spontaneous drink up at your
local pub in Britain, especially the precision with which arrangements are made.
                                          Shopping

Shopping in Sweden is similar to that in the UK with one or two notable exceptions.
Government establishments, ‘Systembolaget’, are the only places that sell alcohol (above
3.5%) and are open Mon-Wed/Fri 9-6, Thursday 9-7. The age-limit for buying alcohol is 20.
In the Systembolaget, you choose your drinks from a glass cabinet and then request it at the
counter where it is brought to you. Here as in other places such as banks and post offices, it
is important to take a ticket when you enter. This is the method of queuing in many official



                                               21
places. It is useful to bring with you as many of the more expensive items as you are likely to
need during your stay in order to save money.

High street stores are open 9:30-20:00 weekdays, 9:30-14:00/15:00 Saturdays and are open
9:00-17:00 on the last week of every month (Långlordag). A local food shop or newsagent
might be open longer and also on Sundays. In most shops it is possible to pay with Visa or
Access providing you have your passport with you. In many shops this process seems to take
forever so its unwise to do it when there is likely to be a long queue. Despite what the bank
may tell you it is impossible to use the less well-known credit cards or Eurocheques in shops.


                                     Public Transport

Public transport is well organised in Sweden and straightforward to travel on. As a student
you will receive a card that can give you discounts on most of Sweden’s public transport.
Buses are regular and punctual. This is also the case for the rail network. By using your
Studentkortet card, which you will receive, some time after registration, you will get a
substantial reduction on most form of transport. Bus fares in a town are around SEK 15 and
you can buy 10 tickets (Klippkort) for a reduced rate. Trains are relatively cheap and also
offer reductions for buying 10 tickets (Klippkort). Be sure to validate your ticket in a
punching machine before each journey or you will be fined by the conductor (on trains and
buses).


                                  Paying Your Way
A year abroad is expensive and as well as finding the best way to manage your money when
you get to Sweden, it is also worth bearing in mind that you can often subsidise the year by
working while you are away. Whether or not you decide to take up a job, it is certainly worth
opening a Swedish Bank account which will of course make money-changing and bill-paying
an easier option.


                                           Banks

There are a variety of banks offering similar services such as Nordbanken, Svenska
Handelsbanken or Skandinaviska Enskilda Banken. The opening hours of these are generally
9:30-15:00 Monday to Friday and some may be open on Saturday mornings. To open an
account you will need your passport and a letter from the university in Sweden proving your
status as an exchange student based in the host town.




                                              22
                                          Employment

Students from countries within the EU and EFTA are free to take a job at any time whilst in
Sweden without a work permit. In the student nations it is possible to work for a little money.
Although this work does not pay very highly it is considered to be an excellent way of
meeting people and having a lot of fun. The student nations’ representatives can organise
work for you, usually with no problems. The sort of work you can expect to get is in catering
doing bar work, waiting, dishwashing, etc. or perhaps some general clerical work. Outside
the student organisations work is hard to find although better paid but you are more pressured
and it will be less flexible. In the student nation it is possible to work regularly, irregularly or
just once or twice if you wish for specific events.


                                  Post and Telephones
Post and Telephones
Post offices are open from 0930-1800 Monday to Friday and 1930-1300 on Saturday.

Public telephones are similar to those in the UK and take a similar coinage or more often are
card phones. You may use your Visa or Access or buy a phone card from a newsagents.

It is normal for students to have at least a telephone to share in a flat but more common to
have one each, and most people seem to have answer machines too. As an International
student it is not a problem to get a telephone connected by the telephone company. The
deposit for a telephone is SEK 5,000. Allow 3 weeks at the end of your stay to receive the
money back. It is normal, as with all bills in Sweden, that interest is charged on all overdue
and late payment of bills including domestic bills. You must go to the telephone company
office (Telia). Installation is free for students in a dormitory. The cost of making calls is
comparable to the UK and cheaper times are 1900-2200.


                                   Safety and Welfare

Safety and Emergency Numbers
When you need the emergency services dial 112 and ask for ambulance, fire brigade, police
or doctor on call.

Serious crime in Sweden has not reached the heights found in the rest of Europe and so it is
more normal to walk about alone at night. Petty crime in some areas is high. For example, in
Uppsala bike theft is huge so that most people know of friends who have had bikes stolen. In
Stockholm crime of all types is higher so extra care should be taken and some areas are worth
avoiding at night.

As a foreigner, you are usually less able to detect danger signs and therefore slightly more at
risk from crime. Follow the same precautions as you would at home. Hold on tightly to your




                                                23
bags, especially in a crowd, and keep your wallet close to your body so that it cannot be taken
without you noticing. Pick-pockets are common, especially around groups of foreigners.

In addition, it is worth remembering that the less conspicuous you look, the less interest you
will be likely to provoke. If for example you have to consult a map, it is better to do it in a
café than to advertise that you are unsure of your surroundings. If you lose any personal
belongings or documents go directly to the police and report it.

Your behaviour will also play a part in your personal safety. Young people in Europe do not
in general drink to get drunk so ensure that you check the behaviour of your peer group in
bars, cafés and discos. If one of your group is the worse for wear, do make sure that you
accompany him/her home. You will find that your dress code will also influence the way you
are treated. Young women in short skirts and bare midriffs will find themselves verbally and
physically harassed; again look to your peer group for guidelines on not causing offence to
locals and avoid making yourself unnecessarily vulnerable.

In the event of loss of documents, the police will write out a temporary form which will
cover you whilst you are in the process of obtaining new papers, which you should do via the
nearest British Consulate. If you find yourself without any access to cash, without your
passport, or in any other serious kind of trouble, the Consulate will try to help. In the unlikely
event of you being arrested for a serious offence, insist on the Consulate being informed: you
will be contacted as soon as possible by a consular officer who can advise on local
procedures, etc.

Avoiding Theft
The only way to avoid theft is to be constantly on your guard. Never take out large sums of
money unless absolutely necessary and if possible keep your documents and money in a
wallet, which you can keep on your person, rather than in a bag which can be easily snatched.
If you are robbed, you should report it to the police immediately. If you lose your credit cards
or bank cards then get in touch with your bank as soon as you can to have them stopped;
banks at home and abroad provide emergency numbers for use in the event of loss or theft, so
be sure to make a note of the numbers and keep it separate from the cards themselves.




                                               24
                               The British Consulate
If you experience any serious problems while you are away, it is worth bearing in mind that
the British Consulate is there for your assistance in Sweden.

A Consulate can provide the following services:
 Issue emergency passports;
 Contact relatives and friends and ask them to help you with money or tickets;
 Advise you how to transfer funds;
 Advance against a sterling cheque for £50 supported by a banker's card;
 Provide a list of local lawyers and doctors;
 Give some guidance on organisations experienced in tracing missing persons;
 If you are arrested on a serious offence, insist on the British Consulate being informed.
   You will be contacted as soon as possible by a consular officer who can advise on local
   procedures etc.
 If you lose your money, passport or anything else abroad, report it first to the local police
   and obtain a statement about the loss. Then contact the Consulate if you still need help.

If you need access to reading material in English it is often worth enquiring whether they
offer a lending library facility - or perhaps they may know of one.

The British Consulate in Sweden can be found at:

Skarpögatan 6-8
Box 27819
11593 Stockholm
Sweden
 08 671 3000
www.britishembassy.com




                                              25
                            Useful Addresses in Sweden

SOCIALSTYRELSEN
The National Board of Health and Welfare
Linnegatan 87,
S-106 30 STOCKHOLM.
phone: 08-783 3000.

STATENS INVANDRARVERKER (SIV)
The Swedish Immigration Board
Box 6113,
S-600 06 NORRKÖPING.
Tel: (011) 15 62 79 / 15 63 77
Website: www.hsv.se

SVENSKA INSTITUTET
The Swedish Institute,
Box 7434, Sverigehuset,
Kungsträdgården,
S-103 91 STOCKHOLM.
Tel: 08-789 20 00
Website: www.si.se

Svenska Turistföreningen,
Drottinggatan 31-38,
P.O. Box 25,
STOCKHOLM.
Phone: 08/790-31-00.

Utrikespolitiska Foreign (Association of Foreign Affairs),
Studentstaden 27,
752 33 UPPSALA.
Phone: 18/54-70-46

CULTURNET: information about Swedish culture
Website: www.kulturnat:iva.se




                                             26
                           Useful Addresses in the UK

GETTING THERE
AA                                     0800 444 500
Eurolines                             52 Grosvenor Gardens, London, SW1
                            `          08705 143219
Eurostar                               08705 186 186 or www.eurostar.com/
ISIC Help Line                         (020) 8666 9205
                                      (24-hour emergency helpline for ISIC holders)
National Express                       08705 808 080 or
                                      www.nationalexpress.co.uk/
RAC                                    0800 550 550

Rail Europe                            08705 848 848
STA Travel                            111 Euston Road, London, SW1
                                       0870 1 600599 or www.statravel.co.uk/
Youth Hostel Association              Trevelyan House, Dimple Road, Matlock,
                                      Derbyshire DE4 3YH
                                       0870 7708868 or www.yha.org.uk/


FREIGHT
British Airways Cargo                  01332 811967 or www.baworldcargo.com/
ParcelForce                           Worldwide enquiries:
                                       0800 224 466 or www.parcelforce.com/
Fedex                                 0800 123 800 or www.fedex.com/


PRACTICAL PLANNING
Swedish Embassy                          11 Montagu Place, London W1H 2AL
                                      (020) 7917 6400 or

                                      www.swedish-embassy.org.uk
Barclays Bank                         International Enquiries  0800 400 100
HSBC Bank                             International Money Line  0800 180 180
NatWest Bank                          International Enquiries  0800 50 50 50
National Insurance                     Longbenton, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE98
                                      1ZZ
Contributions Office                   (0191) 225 4811
Endsleigh Insurance                   International Student Insurance Enquiries
                                       020 7436 4451




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