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					Sport Wales - Physical Education and School Sport Project
                          Impact Review Report
                                September 2010




                              Sue Burgess Consultancy

                          Sue Burgess Consultancy




      Review of the Sport Wales PESS Programme – September 2010 - Sue Burgess Consultancy

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Contents



1.   Background                                                                             3
2.   Introduction                                                                           5
3.   Background to the review                                                               6
        Approach and methodology
4.   Establishing base line evaluation                                                      9
5.   Main findings                                                                          10
     5.1 Strengths                                                                          10
     5.2     Areas for development                                                          12
6.   Commentary                                                                             14
     6.1     Quality of leadership                                                          14
     6.2     Quality of young people’s learning and                                         28
             progress
     6.3     Quality of teaching                                                            35
     6.4     Quality of partnerships                                                        36
     6.5     Local Authority management, operation,                                         42
             delivery and impact of evaluation of PESS
     6.6     Recommendations for development                                                45
     6.7     Recommendations for national development                                       47
7.   Creating a framework for the future                                                    49
8.   Looking at the future – sustainability and legacy                                      51
9.   Case studies                                                                           52




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1. Background

The PE and School Sport Programme (PESS) was introduced in 2001 in response to the Action
Plan from the PE and School Sport Task Force. This had been set up to advise the National
Assembly for Wales on strategies to strengthen the position of physical education and school
sport in Wales.


The stated aims of the programme are to:

       Manage the subject effectively within the whole school curriculum;

       Set challenging targets for raising standards in physical education and school sport;

       Provide enough curriculum time to teach the requirements of the National Curriculum
        for physical education in all key stages;

       Develop young people's physical skills from one year to the next and improve their
        understanding of the importance of health and fitness;

       Raise standards in physical education and school sport by establishing accredited
        continuing professional development (CPD) programmes for all teachers;

       Support schools in Wales to extend opportunities for school sport beyond the school
        day by improving the quality and the breadth of after school activities for all young
        people whatever their age, ability, ethnicity, gender or geographical location;

       Establish Development Centre Partnerships and ensure they work together for the
        identification and development of good practice in PE and School Sport.

In 2001, sixteen out of the twenty two authorities in Wales were able to access the services of a
specialist physical education advisor. In 2010, there are few local authorities with a subject
specific specialist PE advisor, although many have access to general advisors with a PE
specialism or to advanced skills teachers.   The PESS programme was launched and has been
developed in a climate of diminishing subject specialist advice but not with the intention of
replacing it.

Progress against some of these outcomes has been monitored closely through reports produced
by Estyn, Her Majesty’s Inspectorate for Education and Training in Wales. More recently, in
depth reviews have been carried out internally by Development Centre Consultants of PESS
programmes within a selection of local authorities. These reports formed part of the desk
research for this review and are detailed in appendix 1




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This review was commissioned by Sport Wales in April 2010, specifically to:

      Identify the impact that PESS has had on standards of Physical Education in Wales;
      Identify good practice that has resulted from the programme;
      Make recommendations for the future direction of the programme.

The review was undertaken by Sue Burgess Consultancy with a team comprising Sue Burgess,
Yvonne Gandy and Dr Colin Lee.




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2. Introduction

PESS has much to celebrate as a programme that is very well received and highly valued by head
teachers, subject leaders, teachers and pupils – not only for the professional development
opportunities it offers, but also for the high quality teaching resources and the increased range
of opportunities in physical education and school sport it provides. There is much encouraging
evidence of the impact that PESS has had on raising standards of teaching, learning and pupil
outcomes.

The programme has a strong reputation and is much valued by local authority school
improvement teams, teachers and senior management teams. PESS resources are greatly
valued and these, together with the professional development programme, have contributed
significantly to the development of a progressive curriculum with pupil outcomes as its focus. In
many of the schools visited, teachers are extending pupil outcomes through PE to include key
skills including thinking skills, behaviour, communication, team building and evaluation.


This report sets out to provide evidence of the impact, to identify principles of effective practice
that underpin improved standards of teaching and learning and to make recommendations for
the future development of the programme across Wales. The review team is grateful to all
those who contributed to the process, and in particular the PESS Coordinators who responded
positively to the challenge of this additional work at comparatively short notice and at a very
busy time in the school year. This high level of co-operation has contributed significantly to the
completion of an in - depth review within a challenging time scale.




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 3. Background to the review – approach and methodology

Sport Wales commissioned this review in April 2010 and, with agreement from their Directors of
Education, selected six local authorities to participate in the review.

An underpinning principle of the review process was that it should support a self review model,
working with key personnel within the local authorities rather than imposing a review upon
them. It is natural for stakeholders to feel concerned and uneasy about an external review of a
programme in which they have invested time, effort and expertise. For this reason, wherever
possible, key stakeholders were kept informed and engaged at all stages of the process.

PESS Co-ordinators were central to the process and all local arrangements were made through
them, including the selection of schools to be visited and the constitution of meetings of PESS
strategic leads within the local authority.      Wherever possible, PESS Co-ordinators were
encouraged to participate in school visits.

All initial correspondence was produced bilingually and ongoing correspondence and reports
were provided in English, Welsh or both as appropriate.

The six local authorities visited were:

       Flintshire

       Gwynedd

       Newport

       Pembrokeshire

       Rhondda Cynon Taf

       Swansea

The review team conducted visits to a sample of 45 schools across these six local authorities,
during June and July 2010, including 33 primary and 12 secondary schools. Visits to each local
authority were scheduled to take place within one week. These are listed in appendix 8.

In the majority of the school visits involved, interviews were held with the head teacher, the
subject leader and a small group of pupils. Lessons were observed. PESS Co-ordinators were
encouraged to accompany visits where possible, and in some cases the reviewer was
accompanied also by an advisor or other PESS strategic leader. At every stage of the process,
schools were informed that the purpose of the visit was to seek leaders’, teachers’ and pupils’
views on the impact of the PESS programme, and not to make judgements about the school.



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The feedback reports offered to each school following the visit reinforced this. Many schools
provided documentation related to PESS implementation and this was duly scrutinised. Lesson
observations were used as indicators of pupils’ standards to supplement the schools’ own
assessments. Schools were assured of their anonymity in this report, except with their prior
permission.

In all local authorities visited, interviews were held with PESS strategic leaders from the local
authority including officers from school improvement, sport development, the Active Young
People team, and in some cases, the Development Centre Consultant and the Active Young
People Senior Officer. The constitution of these meetings was determined by the PESS Co-
ordinator, and varied from one local authority to another.

Documentation scrutinised during school visits, included
    Curriculum plans and schemes of work,

       School development plans,

       PESS Self Evaluations,

       Estyn Reports.

At a local authority level, documentation included
     PESS operational plans,

       Management reports,

       Development Centre Consultant visit reports and meeting notes,

       Course evaluations and

       Professional development databases.

Telephone interviews were conducted with two Development Centre Consultants who have
responsibility for local authorities not involved in this review process. The purpose of these
interviews was to ensure the engagement of these experienced key post holders in the review
process.

Extensive desk research was carried out, primarily to establish a base line against which impact
could be measured, and secondly to develop a clear picture of the progress and development of
the programme through its nine year history. Documents scrutinised during desk research are
detailed in appendix 1.

Research tools and objective judgement criteria (appendices 2, 4, 5 and 6) were developed to
ensure a consistent approach to each stage of the review process. In order to structure the
findings of this review in a format closer to that now commonly used in self evaluation in
schools, the seven stated outcomes of PESS were considered under the following headings:


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Quality of leadership

      Manage the subject effectively within the whole school curriculum
      Provide enough curriculum time to teach the requirements of National Curriculum for
       Physical Education (NCPE) at all key stages
      Set challenging targets for raising standards in PESS

Quality of young people’s learning and progress

      Develop young people’s physical skills from one year to next (progress)
      Improve understanding of fitness and health

Quality of teaching

      Establishing accredited CPD programmes for all teachers

Quality of partnerships

      Extend opportunities for sport beyond the school day
      Improve the quality and breadth of after school activities for all young people whatever
       age, ability, gender, location
      Identify and development of good practice in PESS
      Establish Development Centre partnerships
      Ensure effective working together to identify and develop good practice

A summary of the scored interview responses is included in the appendices, (appendix 4) and
referred to throughout the Commentary section of this report.
Against these four key areas, the enquiry model at a local authority level was based on a MODIE
model examining the management, operation, delivery and impact evaluation of the PESS
programme. This model was adopted as it provides a sharply focussed, practical tool for self
review.

Each school was offered a short written feedback report and these were centrally moderated
prior to distribution to the school. Similarly, feedback reports to the local authority went
through a review team cross-moderation process to justify judgements and recommendations
against review criteria. One local authority offered the opportunity for a face to face meeting
to discuss the report and others contacted members of the team to discuss aspects of their
reports. Templates for each report are appended (appendix 7).




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  4. Establishing base line evidence

In order to assess the impact that the PESS programme has had against each of its stated
outcomes, it was necessary to establish the situation prior to the introduction of the
programme. This has proved difficult for most of the outcomes.

During its lifetime, the progress of the PESS programme nationally has been reviewed through
Estyn reports and more recently at a local authority level, through reports produced by
Development Centre Consultants. The format and content of the Estyn reports, whilst of high
quality and detail, differs from one report to the next, making it difficult to map progress against
specific elements of the programme.

 A new format has been introduced recently for the Development Centre Consultant reports and
it is clear that this needs to be embedded into practice to ensure that reporting is objective and
consistent, enabling comparisons to be made across local authorities. This will help to identify
excellent practice to be disseminated nationally and issues that need to be addressed.

Throughout the Commentary section of the report reference is made to sources of base line
evidence, some of which has been generated during the life of the programme. Some evidence
has been gathered recently to address the lack of criteria against which to measure quality or
progress, for example, criteria and report frameworks offered to Development Centre
Consultants to support their reviews. Whilst the difficulty of establishing a robust base line
against which to measure impact has been a major challenge to this review, it has presented an
opportunity to create a base line and management framework in 2010, against which future
progress can be measured.




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5.    Main findings

5.1   Strengths

      5.1.1   PESS is universally acclaimed by participating schools as a curriculum initiative
              having significant impact on adult learning, pupil outcomes, standards of
              teaching and learning, partnership working and leadership, most significantly at
              primary level

      5.1.2   There is strong evidence to indicate that whole school implementation of the
              PESS programme strengthens continuity and progression in pupils’ learning
              experiences across the primary school. Maintenance of that continuity into
              secondary education is far more variable.

      5.1.3   Schools’ own monitoring of the quality of teaching shows significant
              improvement in the confidence and competence of non-specialist primary
              teachers once PESS has become fully embedded.

      5.1.4   PESS resources are of high quality and enhance the quality of learning
              experiences both for pupils and teachers. This quality is often highest when
              learning environments are enriched by prominent displays of visual resources.

      5.1.5   Evidence arising from observation of practice in some schools highlights the
              very important role played by PESS in promoting bilingualism. The PE lesson has
              been seen to be a very powerful learning situation in which bilingual
              communication can occur.

      5.1.6   The impact of PESS is strengthened by the consistency of the pedagogical
              principles that are integral to the professional development events and the
              curriculum materials across the areas of activity covered by the programme so
              far.

      5.1.7   Use of information and communication technology (ICT) is rapidly becoming a
              significant aid to PESS learning. Many teachers are making good use of the ICT
              based PESS resources to provide pupils with visual models of performance
              before and during lessons. Pupils are becoming increasingly skilled at processes
              such as filming each others’ performances and using this in the context of their
              self assessment of their learning.

      5.1.8   The PESS focus on the primary phase has had a significant impact on teachers’
              confidence and subject knowledge and the profile of physical education and
              school sport. Several staff referred to PESS being the ‘fulcrum of the skill-based
              curriculum’ and it is clear that the approaches promoted by professional


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        development opportunities and accompanying resources are resulting in
        improving a diverse range of pupil outcomes that in addition to physical
        education, includes thinking skills, behaviour, communication, team building
        and application of assessment for learning strategies.

5.1.9   Higher levels of pupil achievement at Key Stage 2 are challenging secondary
        teachers to review and extend the curriculum at Key Stage 3 and in some
        schools, to review their teaching methodology.

5.1.10 PESS provision for professional development in the areas of gymnastics, dance,
       outdoor and adventurous activities (OAA) and assessment for learning (AfL) is
       innovative and shares common features in its content that are aligning PESS
       with major priorities in primary school curriculum development. Currently in its
       early stages, this has the potential for PESS to contribute significantly to whole
       school improvement within and beyond physical education.

5.1.11 Through effective strategic management, some local authorities are able to
       maintain the high profile of PESS not only within education but across the Active
       Young People (AYP) family of programmes with the resulting increase in physical
       education, physical activity and sport opportunities for young people within and
       outside the curriculum.

5.1.12 Where PESS is an integral part of the school improvement programme, there is
       evidence that local authorities are able to link secondary professional
       development programmes to support pupil progression across the key stages.

5.1.13 The role of the development centre is critical to the long term sustainability of
       the programme. The best examples are becoming vibrant, professional learning
       communities. They make maximum use of initial funding to access all the
       elements of the PESS programme, address emerging collective and individual
       needs within the partnership and plan for sustainability when funding
       decreases.

5.1.14 PESS is most effective where it is an integral part of the local authority Children
       and Young People strategy and the school improvement programme.
       Integration at this level facilitates links to whole school improvement, the
       Healthy Schools programme, the key skills curriculum, the well being of young
       people and broader professional learning networks.

5.1.15 A well-structured mentoring process has been developed to support PESS
       provision. Where mentoring is fully implemented it provides high quality
       professional development opportunities for mentors and mentored teachers
       alike.



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5.2   Areas for development

      5.2.1   There is limited provision aimed specifically at secondary teachers although they
              play an important role in the Development Centre infrastructure and in
              supporting effective transition from Key Stage 2 to 3.

      5.2.2   Whilst some secondary schools are reviewing teaching and learning in response
              to the improvement in pupil outcomes at Key Stage 2, others have yet to
              recognise the need for change to maintain progress in learning.

      5.2.3   Many local authorities are still to develop a strategic approach to PESS
              management and implementation and where this is lacking, PESS tends to be
              marginalized and the full potential is not realized.


      5.2.4   The commitment of senior leaders is crucial to successful implementation of the
              PESS programme as this has emerged as the main determinant of the profile of
              PESS within a school and, in many cases, the overall effectiveness of
              Development Centres which are the key to PESS success. Those that are least
              effective are constrained by non-involvement of secondary and/or primary
              partners.

      5.2.5   Systems are in place to assure the high quality of professional development with
              the overall aim of high quality teaching and learning through physical education
              and school sport. There is limited evidence of these quality assurance and
              quality improvement systems being applied.

      5.2.6   Many local authorities are not giving sufficient consideration to the need to
              evaluate the impact of PESS professional development on pupil outcomes. The
              relationship between adult learning and pupil outcomes is not emphasized in
              delegate evaluations of professional development events, or in the recently
              introduced proforma for action planning. Arrangements for following up
              professional development in order to establish impact, or future needs, vary
              considerably between development centres and between local authorities. This
              significant weakness in the programme not only affects the strategic
              management and development of provision through PESS, but impacts more
              widely on assessment for learning and transition from one key stage to another.

      5.2.7   There is no consistent approach to measurement of pupil standards, with
              marked variation within and between partnerships in the procedures for
              assessing pupil progress and standards

      5.2.8   Whilst mentoring provides one outlet for the dissemination of effective practice,
              the whole area of sharing good practice is under-developed. This is often
              confined to within development centres and only rarely across local authorities.


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        National sources, such as the PESS4teachers web-site remain unknown to most
        schools.

5.2.9   Accreditation of PESS professional development events to enable their inclusion
        in higher education study pathways has not materialised at a local level.




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6. Commentary

6.1   Quality of leadership

6.1.1 PESS outcome: Manage the subject effectively within the whole school
      curriculum

      Pre PESS Baseline evidence

      Estyn: Standards and Quality in primary schools, 1999 – 2000 Physical Education

         PE is well co-ordinated in just under two fifths of schools. The role of subject leader
          unsatisfactory in 10% of schools.
         ‘Co-ordination is most effective in those schools is where the head teacher
          appreciates the impact that physical education can have on school improvement’.

      Standards and quality in secondary schools Physical Education and Sport (1997 OHMCI)

         The management of most departments is satisfactory or better in most schools. It is
          highly effective in about 20% of schools. Only 20% of department have set clear
          targets for the improvement of standards.

      PESS in 2010

      Overall

         Head teachers are strong advocates for the PESS programme and the impact that
          physical education can have on school improvement. Those who attend cluster
          meetings welcome the opportunity to update and review PESS progress and
          strategy at their meetings, to support effective PESS development in and across
          schools. 75% of head teachers and subject leaders reported that they were clear
          about the PESS outcomes and 89% expressed their confidence in accessing the PESS
          programme.

      The PESS programme has “done a brilliant job for us. It is a shame that other subjects
      don’t do the same.” Flintshire head teacher

         Schools rank highly the impact of the PESS programme on subject leadership. In
          several of the authorities reviewed, teachers had gained promotion to senior posts
          within school and attributed this to their increased confidence and ability to lead
          CPD within school and Development Centre networks. 89% of school interviewees
          rated the impact of PESS of subject leadership as excellent or good.




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   Visits to the schools showed PESS to have a high profile, with strong support from
    senior management. Subject leaders generally operate in environments where
    there are high expectations of them but there is variation in the time and resources
    they are given to help them aspire to those expectations. Subject leaders’
    opportunities for monitoring and evaluating provision and pupils’ attainment and
    progress are sometimes constrained by lack of funds or time for them to carry out
    these activities. Although, when asked directly about their monitoring of the
    impact of the PESS programme on staff and pupil learning standards, 64% of head
    teachers and subject leaders judged this as excellent or good.

“PESS has increased the leader’s ability to ’lead and manage better’ as she works with
and develops others.” Head teacher, commenting on a PE subject leader

   Implementation and cascading the effective use of training materials and curriculum
    planning is inconsistent, with some leaders having time to lead inset, review
    curriculum planning, revise schemes of work and devise assessment frameworks –
    other leaders are restricted to working with their own classes and phase groups.
    Over 75% of head teachers and teachers judged PESS to be either excellent or good
    in terms of meeting the professional development needs of staff.

“It has given me the ability to cascade information to staff in a range of activity areas.”
Subject leader

    Some secondary school subject leaders identify that their leadership is restricted to
    work on transition and networking with primary colleagues. There is a feeling that
    secondary school leaders involved with centre consortia put more in than they are
    getting out of the partnership working. There is limited provision to meet the
    professional learning needs of secondary teachers and take up of these
    opportunities is low.




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Where there is effective practice:

   Head teachers and the senior management team recognise the contribution that
    PESS can make to pupil outcomes across the curriculum

   Subject leaders are given professional development support and the time and
    resources needed to carry out their role

   PESS is a whole school priority

   Curriculum planning incorporates clear targets and how they will be achieved

   PESS is embedded in the school development plan




        Example of effective leadership– a Swansea school

               The school benefits from excellent subject leadership and strong
               support for the subject from senior management. Full advantage
               is taken of the opportunities created by the PESS programmes,
               both by accessing the professional development events and by
               following this up through internal mentoring by the subject leader.
               Additionally the school shows its support by releasing the subject
               leader to tutor courses and mentor in other schools. This is a
               significant contribution to a partnership where primary rather
               than secondary schools appear to be taking the lead
                 The school recognises the potential of the PESS programme as an
               initiative that can have wide-ranging impact on school
               improvement. The strong internal network in the school means
               that teachers’ professional development needs can be targeted.
               The programme has increased their subject knowledge and
               confidence in teaching physical education, it has provided relevant
               resources that have become fully integrated into the school’s
               curriculum planning and mentoring has been accepted as a key
               strategy for developing teachers’ expertise across the school.




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Where there are issues

   Subject leaders are not given sufficient time or resources to cascade professional
    development within the school, to observe and support colleagues and to monitor
    standards of teaching and learning.

   Particularly in small primary schools, subject leaders have the lead for several
    subjects and do not have the time to carry out the role effectively within PESS.

   PE subject leaders in primary schools are, more often than not, those with specialist
    training, or at least those who have followed a PE Main course during their training.
    They enjoy and are confident in teaching the subject, and their colleagues, who
    may have less PE subject knowledge and confidence are pleased to hand over
    responsibility for the subject across the school.

   There is an assumption that teachers, particularly secondary teachers, have the
    skills, knowledge and experience to take on the role of subject leader, without
    professional development support.




        Example - extract from the consultant’s feedback report to a local
        authority
        ....There has been no capacity building within the staff – the subject is
        totally dependent on the subject leader, with limited opportunities for
        colleagues to embed the physical learning environment holistically into
        the pupils’ development of key skills. The subject leader is responsible for
        the planning, delivery and monitoring of the curriculum plan for PESS.
        Other teachers have attended PESS professional development, but do not
        teach the subject.




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6.1.2 PESS Outcome:

      Provide enough curriculum time to teach the requirements of National Curriculum for
      Physical Education (NCPE) at all key stages

      Pre PESS baseline evidence

      Estyn: Standards and Quality in primary schools, 1999 – 2000 Physical Education

         However, many schools do not give the subject enough time and this limits
          teachers’ ability to deliver the statutory physical education curriculum effectively

      Sports Update Series 49 – Physical Education and Sports Provision in Primary Schools in
      Wales 2000/01

      Sports Update Series 54 – Physical Education and Sport Provision in Secondary Schools in
      Wales, 2002 – 03

                                                                  Primary               Secondary
                                                                  2000/01                2000/01
      % age schools offering 2 hours curriculum PE                  17%                Not available
      Average curriculum PE offer                                86 minutes                105


      PESS in 2010

      Overall

         From the evidence available, it appears that PESS has had little impact on the
          amount of curriculum time provided for physical education, although 63% of head
          teachers and subject leaders interviewed consider that PESS has impacted positively
          on curriculum time. This may be a result of the raised profile of PESS and head
          teachers’ awareness of the levels of PESS engagement within and across the
          curriculum.
          In each of the primary schools visited, there is an offer of two lessons each week, of
          between 40 and 45 minutes. There is no evidence that this has changed since the
          introduction of PESS, but there is evidence that extracurricular opportunities have
          increased in time and the range of activities on offer.
         Research carried out on behalf of Sport Wales in 2001, 2004, 2007 and 2008
          indicates that time allocated to PE has increased at primary level, and decreased
          slightly at secondary level, most significantly at Key Stage 4.




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                                      Primary                         Secondary
                                      2000/01            2007          2000/01           2007
% age schools offering 2                17%              38%             Not              9%
hours curriculum PE                                                    available       (47% KS3,
                                                                                      12% at KS4)
Average curriculum PE offer          86 minutes        98 minutes       105           96 minutes
                                                                       minutes

Feedback received during the review process suggested that this data might be better
collected through the PESS programme, as part of an overall school self review. This
would help ensure that the time allocated to PE is planned in relation to the curriculum
development plan and targets to achieve standards, rather than to an externally set
‘aspirational target time’ with a clear focus on quality rather than quantity.

Where there is effective practice

   A balanced curriculum is planned with sufficient time to allow high quality teaching
    and learning for pupils to achieve target standards.

   There is flexibility across the school year to allow for increased curriculum time for
    PESS in the summer term, particularly at primary level.

   Creative planning around cross curricular learning and key skills development
    affords additional time for learning through physical activity, and enhances PE
    curriculum time.

Where there are issues

   Primary schools, particularly in rural areas spend significant amounts of time
    travelling to and from swimming pools. In terms when swimming is offered, time
    for other elements of the PESS curriculum, for example gymnastics, is often
    reduced.

   There is a view that the aspiration for 2 hours of PE is an unrealistic target imposed
    on schools that does not take account of the structure of timetables which plan
    around 40 – 45 minute lessons at primary age and 50 minute lessons at secondary.

   In one primary school visited , PE is still seen as a dispensable subject - “If we
    haven’t finished our work, PE is cancelled”




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6.1.3 PESS Outcome: Set challenging targets for raising standards in PESS

       Pre PES baseline evidence

       Estyn: Standards and Quality in primary schools, 1999 – 2000 Physical Education

           Pupil standards at Primary          Good or very          Satisfactory        Unsatisfactory
                                                  good                                      or poor
       KS1                                        44%             52%                         4%
       KS2                                        49%             46%                         5%
       Teaching standards
       KS1                                    46%                 47%                 6%
       KS2                                    50%                 44%                 6%
       Links with secondary schools           25%                 50%                25%
        Assessment                            20%                 55%                25%
       Too few schools assess pupils’ progress effectively or target areas for improvement in a
                                           systematic way.


           Key skills – Good standards in key skills are often closely linked to good standards in
            physical education. However, few teachers appreciate the range of opportunities in
            physical education to develop pupils’ key skills.

           Pupils achieve good standards in physical education when they use correct
            terminology specific to the subject, listen carefully to instructions and work co-
            operatively in pairs and small groups.

       Standards and quality in secondary schools Physical Education and Sport (1997 OHMCI)

           IN KS 3 overall standards of achievement are satisfactory or better in 75% of classes
            and good or very good in 25% of these classes.

           In KS4, overall standard of achievement are satisfactory or better in 70% of classes
            and good or very good in 25% , the latter occurring mainly in GCSE examination
            groups

       Key Stage 3 assessment data (DCELLS – www.statswales.wales.gov.uk)

           In 2001 60.9% of pupils achieved level 5

       Estyn: Standards and Quality in primary schools, 1999 – 2000 Physical Education

           The best work in Key Stages 1 and 2 happens where teachers:

           Have a secure understanding of the subject which enables them to improve pupils’
            physical skills, health and fitness



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   Use a range of teaching strategies to develop pupils’ knowledge, skills and
    understanding across the full range of activities

   Have high expectations of their pupils and successfully challenge them to improve
    the quality of their performance

   Plan activities in a sequence that helps pupils to develop their knowledge, skills and
    understanding with and between key stages

   Allow sufficient time for pupils to practise and refine skills before progressing

   Make connections between a healthy lifestyle and the benefits of regular exercise’.

Standards and quality in secondary schools Physical Education and Sport (1997 OHMCI)

   Quality of teaching, learning and assessment

   Most pupils enjoy and have a positive attitude to the work.

   Quality of learning was satisfactory or better in most classes in KS3 and good in
    nearly a third.

   Overall quality of teaching was satisfactory in three quarters of classes and good in
    one class in four. The proportion of unsatisfactory teaching was higher at KS4

   Assessment practice is beginning to improve in most schools, but only about 30% of
    schools have succeeded in developing schemes which are manageable and effective.
    Assessment is rarely used as a basis for planning future work. Few departments
    have systems in place for the moderation of standards, and in only 10% of schools is
    assessment used to monitor pupils’ progress in the acquisition of particular skills,
    knowledge and understanding.

PESS in 2010

Overall

   The most immediate evidence of PESS impact is on adult learning and the increasing
    confidence and competence of non-specialist Primary teachers, even in those
    schools that have only just started accessing the programme. This has been
    repeatedly emphasised by head teachers and subject leaders who have seen these
    developments as they have monitored provision in their schools. Further
    confirmation comes from the teachers themselves. It is relevant that lessons
    observed in schools generally showed a consistency of good or better quality of
    teaching and learning and head teachers are confident that this is reflecting the
    positive impact of PESS professional development and the use of PESS resources.
    86% of head teachers and subject leaders interviewed recognised the impact of



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    PESS on the quality of teaching as excellent or good, and this increased to 90% when
    related to the standards of learning and pupil outcomes.

         “When you look at children doing PE they have smiles on their faces.”

         “When you see children doing sport you can see them concentrating.”

         Primary school teachers, commenting on levels of pupil enjoyment and
         engagement in their learning.

   The large majority of young people interviewed in the schools value PESS greatly.
    They talk enthusiastically about their PESS experiences, recognizing impact on
    healthy lifestyles and appreciating the range of activities on offer. However, they
    are not as able to explain what they learn through PE or to measure their progress
    and learning.

         “PESS gives us all a chance to shine – there’s something for everyone” – Pupil -
         RCT
         “Don’t see it as work - just having fun.” – Pupils, Flintshire
         “PE brings out the inner you” – Pupil, Gwynedd, talking about adventurous
         activities
         “.......fun, interesting activities that you are not bored with when you do it”. Year
         5 pupil

   In four out of the six local authorities reviewed, there is no evidence at a strategic
    level of a drive to raise pupils’ standards. Higher standards rarely feature as one of
    the success criteria in PESS operational planning, Development Centre planning, or
    subject leader action planning. There may be an assumption that standards will rise
    as a result of the PESS programme but, if this is so, there needs to be a clear
    statement to this effect. It may be that a lack of awareness by local authorities and
    head teachers of the national PESS outcomes has taken the focus away from raising
    standards of teaching and learning. This should be addressed through increased
    national leadership and advocacy.

“We need to ensure we look at standards and learning progress.” Subject leader

   There is little evidence of a consistent approach to measurement of standards, with
    marked variation within and between partnerships in the procedures for assessing
    pupil progress and standards. This may be because there is no statutory
    requirement for formal assessment in physical education until the end of Key Stage
    3 and so practice at primary level has not been co-ordinated. Nevertheless,
    evidence ranging from the anecdotal expressions of professional opinion to
    objective data on pupil performance is confirming that standards in physical
    education are rising throughout the primary age range, and particularly so in
    gymnastics and dance.




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   This raises the baseline for the start of the secondary phase and secondary staff are
    generally responding well to the challenge of building on this rising baseline but this
    highlights the need for further curriculum development at Key Stages 3 and 4. In
    some authorities, a similar knock on effect is emerging from rising standards in the
    Foundation Phase, which will soon need a reaction to what will become a higher
    baseline at the start of Key Stage 2.

   Primary schools have varying approaches to assessment of pupils’ standards and
    progress and there does not appear to have been a dialogue in partnerships to
    establish the essential information on pupil performance, etc. that secondary
    schools would like to be forwarded from their primary partners. The ultimate aim
    would be for the local authority to get consistency of assessment practice in all
    schools but this requires evidence of good practice from one partnership that, when
    disseminated, would provide a model to which all schools would aspire. Local
    authorities should be supported nationally to provide direction and leadership in
    this area.

   Most pupils observed are achieving at their age related expectations but few are
    extended through challenging tasks or targets. However, 68% of head teachers and
    subject leaders responded that PESS had impacted significantly on setting targets
    that challenge standards.
        “Some children like to win and see if they can do things better.”
        A pupil comment in response to a question about the level of challenge in PE
        lessons

   In five out of the six authorities reviewed, there is not, as yet, sufficient monitoring
    and evaluation of impact by PESS management. Whilst this has been constrained by
    time, systems are needed to provide a secure evidence base that shows how
    professional development is impacting not just on adult learning but, more
    importantly, on pupil outcomes. Current reliance on scrutiny of delegate evaluation
    forms following a professional development event provides insufficient information
    to quantify or qualify perceptions of impact arising from the different strands of
    provision. Similarly, there are no systems for the local authority to monitor PESS
    impact, either comparatively with professional development in other subjects, or
    against any success criteria laid down in operational planning.                  Impact
    measurement is a challenging area of work, and would benefit from national level
    leadership and support.

Failure to establish clear, specific and measureable targets to raise standards at the
outset of the programme, at national and local authority level, makes it impossible to
evidence precisely the impact that the PESS programme has had in this area. The
primary and secondary standards and quality in secondary school reports referred to in
this report, set out clearly what should be the aspiration for high quality learning and
teaching in high quality physical education, together with clear guidelines for other
elements of the programme. The national curriculum 2000 sets out clearly what pupils
should achieve, and ideally, exceed in their learning. Criteria such as these would


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support a much needed and more strategic approach for PESS nationally. They need to
be incorporated in any future strategic plans at national and local authority levels.

However there is hard evidence that the trend by 2005, which is the latest year for
which PE specific results have been found, is for an improvement in standards,
particularly in Development Centre schools. The change in categorisation adopted by
Estyn in 2004 prevents direct comparison of their reported standards.

 In its report Progress in implementing the Physical Education and School Sport Action
Plan, May 2008 Estyn makes reference to improved standards at primary level,
suggesting that 40% of primary lessons observed (in Development Centre Primary
schools) were at grade 1, compared with an overall 5% of physical education classes
across all primary schools inspected over the same period.

At secondary level, Key Stage 3 assessment data for physical education gives a much
clearer measure of changing standards in pupil achievement: (DCELLS -
statswales.wales.gov.uk)

In 2001, 60.9% of pupils achieved level 5 in physical education. By 2009, by which time
the first cohort of PESS pupils reached Year 9, 71.9% achieved level 5. Compared with
data for other non core subjects, PE shows only a similar, and in some cases, smaller
improvement. This will be an important future measurement as more ‘PESS pupils’
progress to their first formal assessment. The figures should show a marked
improvement in future years.

Where there is effective practice

   Teaching and learning is of a consistent high quality

              o Pupils are involved in their learning through planning, self assessment
                and evaluation of others

              o The pace of the lesson is brisk and there is well structured progression

              o Tasks are adapted so that pupils are challenged, whilst achieving success

              o Pupils learn as individuals and working collaboratively in groups

              o Innovative use is made of ICT to support learning. Case study two
                 provides an example of the use of ICT in PE.

              o Visual displays are used creatively to support and enhance learning.
                Case study one provides an example of the effective use of visual
                displays to enhance learning.



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The recognition of outcomes such as teamwork and cooperation, communication skills
and listening to others are seen as both important life skills and skills that transfer to
their work in other subjects.




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          Example of setting challenging standards– a school in Pembrokeshire

            A very good quality of teaching and learning was observed in all lessons
            during the visit. Where appropriate, PESS resources were used well in
            lessons that had clear learning intentions, brisk pace and well-structured
            progressions. Pupils were totally engaged and showed obvious
            enthusiasm. Levels of cooperation were high and pupils constantly
            learned from one another. Year 1 pupils impressed with their
            conscientious practice of a range of games and athletics activities, they
            showed a mature ability to work independently and sustain activity for
            long periods. High activity levels were also seen in Year 4 pupils in
            gymnastics. Here, the level of collaboration between partners was a key
            feature in their refinement of sequences. This lesson provided the first
            example during the visit of the excellent use that teachers make of the
            ICT resources that support PESS learning. Commitment to inclusion was
            exemplified by the full involvement in the lesson of a pupil from the
            nurture group. Year 6 pupils showed rapid gains in confidence and skill on
            the bouldering wall due to excellent teaching that reflected very good
            subject knowledge. Pupils’ progress was constantly monitored,
            cooperation between partners was outstanding and there was very
            obvious enjoyment of learning.




             And in a school in Rhondda Cynon Taff.......
             Assessment, in many forms, is a significant strength. In a very practical
             sense it informs planning, it involves pupils, it is motivational and by
             being a tool for target setting it is driving pupil progress. Innovative
             resources, such as talking postcards, and processes such as peer and
             self assessment, are recognised by pupils as contributing much to their
             learning, progress and achievement.

             PESS has had a broader impact on outcomes due to the emphasis on
             personal, social and learning skills that is intrinsic to PESS training and
             resources. This aligns well with the skill-based curriculum that the
             school has developed. Thus there is positive impact on pupils’ thinking
             and communication skills as well as the promotion of cooperation and
             teamwork. There is a clear transfer to learning situations in the
             classroom due to the PESS focus on peer and self assessment as key
             assessment for learning (AfL) strategies. Pupils identify peer assessment
             as one of the many sources of feedback that help them make progress.




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Where there are issues

      Teachers lack the confidence or subject knowledge to extend beyond lesson plans
       or demonstration lessons provided by mentors.

       Teacher intervention fails to challenge pupils, or to support their progress

      Teaching and assessment is teacher led, and pupils are not able to describe the
       progress they are making, or what they have learned

       There is a lack of confidence in assessment for learning through physical
       education with the result that monitoring of pupil progress against any targets set
       in the curriculum plan is poor.

      Learning through physical education is not linked to learning in other subject
       areas, particularly to key skills.




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6.2   Quality of young people’s learning and progress

6.2.1 PESS Outcome: Develop young people’s physical skills from one year to next
      (progress)

      Pre PESS Baseline evidence

      Estyn: Standards and Quality in primary schools, 1999 – 2000 Physical Education

      Curriculum

         Schemes of work are satisfactory or better in most schools but few are very good.
          The best schemes make sure that pupils progress by allocating enough time to each
          area of activity and by setting out in detail what pupils will learn in each year group.
      Standards and quality in secondary schools Physical Education and Sport (1997 OHMCI)

         Shortcoming in curriculum planning include... insufficient attention given to
          incorporating health and fitness aspects within normal class work.

         Curriculum planning is satisfactory or better in about 70% of schools, in the
          remaining 30% it is unsatisfactory mainly because of a neglect of gymnastics and
          dance. Inadequate planning within and between key stages also leads to a lack of
          progression and unchallenging work more generally.

      Partnership

      Estyn: Standards and Quality in primary schools, 1999 – 2000 Physical Education

          Links with secondary schools are good in only one in four schools and they are
           unsatisfactory in a quarter. This results in lack of continuity and progression in
           pupils’ learning’.

      Standards and quality in secondary schools Physical Education and Sport (1997 OHMCI)

         About 30% of schools have established links with their partner schools.

      PESS in 2010

      Overall

         PESS resources are greatly valued and these, together with the professional
          development programme, have contributed significantly to the development of a
          progressive curriculum with pupil outcomes as its focus. In many of the schools
          visited, teachers are extending pupil outcomes through PE to include key skills
          including thinking skills, behaviour, communication, team building and evaluation.
          78% of head teachers and subject leaders judged the impact of PESS on physical skill
          development and learning to be excellent or good.


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“I see PESS as a model of good practice that other subject areas would benefit”
 (as a professional development programme)

   In all the primary schools visited, subject leaders were able to produce curriculum
    plans and schemes of work, many of which made extensive use of PESS resources.

“The programme has opened up a greater variety of activities and broadened
expectations of primary staff”. Head teacher

“We were top heavy in terms of our games pre PESS”. Subject leader

“Everyone has the chance to do something different and enjoy it. Pupil

“Six years ago only had games, now we have a range of activities.” – Subject leader

   Resources are seen as tools that have re-engaged and motivated staff, supporting
    curriculum consistency and coherence, enhancing planning and lesson delivery.

“The dance resources have been a breath of fresh air”

   The place of PESS in Key Stage 2 to 3 transition programmes is variable. In some
    Development Centres it is the dominant activity that drives transition, often from
    early in Key Stage 2, whilst in others it plays no part. The impact of PESS in
    supporting transition from KS2 – KS3 was seen as excellent or good by 71% of head
    teachers and subject leaders. Case studies three and four provide examples of PESS
    supporting Key Stage 2 – 3 transition

   In order to maintain progression in pupils’ learning through transition, PESS
    management needs to promote dialogue in Development Centres about the sort of
    information that secondary schools will find most useful for ensuring progression.
    This may be curriculum coverage, or pupils’ standards, or both. The main objectives
    should be to establish a baseline and encourage all primary schools to work towards
    common procedures for generating the information required. An interesting aspect
    of transition is the work now starting in some Development Centres on transition
    between the Foundation Phase and Key Stage 2.

“Pupil standards are much more consistent, especially in gymnastics, so we now spend
much less time in year 7 bringing pupils up to the same level” – Secondary teacher

There is clear evidence of impact in the areas of curriculum planning and progress,
particularly through significant developments across the key stages, compared with the
state of play prior to PESS.




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Where there is effective practice

Curriculum planning

   Medium term schemes of work clearly identify learning and progress expectations
    across the age ranges within the school

   Short term lesson planning connects with planned learning expectations that are
    relevant to the experience and capability of pupils

   Time allocation and the range of programmes of activity support breadth,
    curriculum entitlement and access to learning progress and the potential for high
    standards

   Key skills and cross curricular dimensions are integrated into planning. Case study
    four provides an example of effective cross curricular work.

   Planning content, consistency and coherence is monitored within and between
    transition stages with staff planning together rather than in isolation.

Partnership

   Staff work together to identify and share effective practice - within and across
    schools

   Consultation, communication and effective partnership working with secondary
    school colleagues ensures a smooth transition and clear baselines being set for the
    next learning phase

   Work is targeted and monitored when external partners/agencies are used within
    school – ensuring equity, opportunity and access

   There are clear criteria and expectations for partnership working within and outside
    school.


        Example - a school in Rhondda Cynon Taf
        Integration of subjects has been developed successfully within the
        broader Key Stage 3 curriculum, enabling not only pupils’ physical skills
        to improve but also wide-ranging outcomes in their personal, social and
        emotional development to
          The school identifies the creation of a professional learning community
        to be one of the significant results of its commitment to the PESS
        programme. This community would be an appropriate forum for sharing
        the assessment system now in place at Cefn Hengoed so that the
        feasibility of starting the pupil profiles in primary schools could be
        considered.
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    Example – Swansea schools (see also Case study 4)
    The secondary school’s central role in the partnership is exemplified
    by the excellence of the Year6/7 transition programme. The physical
    education department is fully involved in this comprehensive
    programme and builds on PESS activities by promoting cross-
    curricular learning that, in turn, prepares the Year 6 pupils for a
    seamless transfer. The orienteering activity with instructions written
    in French typifies the thought and challenge inherent in the
    planning of activities. The transition programme is an example of
    good practice that deserves wider dissemination.




Where there are issues

    Curriculum planning is superficial and isolated from the key skills curriculum

    It fails to set clear targets and lacks progression from year to year and key stage
     to key stage

    Where teachers have not applied the development of lesson planning beyond
     the PESS resources, pupils who are taught by the same subject leader
     throughout their primary school career experience repetition, not progression.

It’s boring. We do the same shapes every lesson, every year. We want to do proper
gym, on the apparatus. - Year 6 pupils.




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6.2.2 PESS Outcome: Improve understanding of fitness and health

      Pre PESS base line evidence

      Estyn: Standards and Quality in primary schools, 1999 – 2000 Physical Education

      Standards of pupils’ knowledge and understanding of health and fitness.

         Too many pupils are overweight and make only limited gains in strength, stamina,
          speed and flexibility. Standards are good in just under half the classes and
          unsatisfactory in one in twenty. Standards are generally higher in years 5 and 6.

      Standards and quality in secondary schools Physical Education and Sport (1997 OHMCI)

         ...a significant number of pupils, especially girls at the beginning of KS4 fail to make
          substantial gains in strength, stamina, speed and flexibility. In many lessons, pupils’
          lack of physical fitness and endurance frequently constrains the scope of the work
          and adversely affects the standards they achieve.

         Shortcoming in curriculum planning include... insufficient attention given to
          incorporating health and fitness aspects within normal class work.

         Curriculum planning is satisfactory or better in about 70% of schools, in the
          remaining 30% it is unsatisfactory mainly because of a neglect of gymnastics and
          dance. Inadequate planning within and between key stages also leads to a lack of
          progression and unchallenging work more generally.

      PESS in 2010

      Overall

         All young people interviewed were able to describe well the effects of physical
          activity on their bodies and its contribution to their health, wellbeing and fitness.
          They showed that they value PESS greatly. In addition to talking enthusiastically
          about their PESS experiences, and recognizing the impact on healthy lifestyles, they
          appreciate the opportunities provided for interests and skills to be developed in
          curriculum and extra-curricular activities in schools, and in sporting provision in the
          community.

      “PE makes you healthy and stronger”

      “PE keeps you in shape and really fit” - Flintshire pupils

          Understanding health is ranked highly by staff who see health and well being as an
          integrated element of their PE teaching. Specific cross curricular work is undertaken

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    with the Healthy Schools programme. It is interesting that only 49% of head
    teachers and subject leaders rated as good or excellent the impact of PESS on pupils
    understanding of health.

In its report published in April 2009, Food and Fitness in Schools, an update, Estyn states
that

   Most schools are continuing to do well or very well in assuring the healthy
    development, safety and wellbeing of pupils. Nearly 90% of schools have been
    awarded a grade 1 or 2 for the question relating to healthy living in the common
    inspection framework and almost all schools continue to use a wide range of
    strategies to encourage pupils to be healthy.

   Most schools continue to provide pupils with access to a wide range of sporting
    activities during and outside of the school day. They also directly involve pupils in
    physical exercise of course. These activities make an important contribution to
    raising pupils’ awareness of the importance of physical exercise as part of a healthy
    lifestyle. ...

This shows significant progress when compared with statements issued in the late
1990’s demonstrating the impact of collaboration between two key Children and Young
People national strategies – PESS and the Healthy Schools Programme.

Where there is effective practice

   Links are made between PESS and the Healthy Schools programme at local
    authority, school and pupil levels

   A balanced curriculum ensures that pupils experience a range of activities to
    develop all round physical fitness

   Pupils are encouraged to monitor their fitness and to set personal targets for
    improvement




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    Example – a school in Gwynedd

        Through the PESS programme, a Gwynedd primary school has had a measured track
        marked out on the school yard and field. The running track is used year round by
        all key stage 2 pupils, who record the number of circuits they complete during Clwb
        Dal i Fynd (Keep on Going) session that take place every morning before school.
        Pupils set their personal goals for the number of circuits they will complete over the
        term and the school year. Because they can chose whether to walk, jog or run the
        circuit, all pupils are included in the activity. Older pupils rotate the role of Clwb Dal
        i Fynd monitors, organising pre-school running sessions and helping pupils to record
        their laps. Pupils clearly enjoy this introduction to a leadership role. Over the time
        that Clwb Dal i Fynd has been operating, the target set for the annual award winner
        has had to be increased significantly, as fitness levels have improved.




Where there are issues

Schools fail to maintain the initial enthusiasm for activities that help pupils to get fitter

“We all used to do Clwb Dal i Fynd, but the track isn’t used any more” “Only the fat kids
do it now”.

Primary school pupils, talking about the links between PESS and fitness.



   Lessons lack the pace, challenge and levels of activity that make demands on pupils
    stamina

   There are no links established between the healthy schools programme and PESS




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6.3   Quality of teaching

6.3.1 PESS outcome: Establishing accredited CPD programmes for all teachers

         There is no evidence of any of the professional development programmes leading to
          accreditation although some work has been undertaken at a national level to
          explore possible links between PESS professional development and chartered
          teacher status.

          There appears a strong case for PESS training having sufficient pedagogical focus to
          meet criteria for allocating a credit value on study pathways leading to additional
          qualifications and this is an opportunity that should be followed up either locally or
          nationally with HEI’s. This is reflected by responses from 92% of head teachers and
          subject leaders who rated this aspect of PESS as unsatisfactory.

         Accreditation offers the further advantage of linking and tracking the audit of
          professional development needs to performance review and career pathways
          through the teacher standards framework.




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6.4   Quality of partnerships

6.4.1 PESS Outcomes

           Extend opportunities for sport beyond the school day

           Improve the quality and breadth of after school activities for all young people
            whatever age, ability, gender, location

      Pre PESS Baseline evidence

      Estyn: Standards and Quality in primary schools, 1999 – 2000 Physical Education

           In most schools there are not enough links with sports coaches, other agencies and
            clubs

           Extracurricular activities - Most schools provide a range of extracurricular activities.
            Where it is particularly good, all pupils have access to a wide range of activities and
            there is a good balance between competition and participation for enjoyment and
            physical wellbeing.

      Standards and quality in secondary schools Physical Education and Sport (1997 OHMCI)

      Average specialist teacher time given to extracurricular sport is 10 hours. Most of the
      time has been devoted to coached and competitive sport which has increased in
      dominance over recreational extracurricular activity.

          Participation levels              Year 7                  Year 9                 Year 11

          Boys                               60%                     45%                     30%
          Girls                              50%                     30%                     15%


      Sports Update Series 49 – Physical Education and Sports Provision in Primary Schools in
      Wales 2000/01

      Sports Update Series 54 – Physical Education and Sport Provision in Secondary Schools in
      Wales, 2002 – 03

                                                              Primary – 2000/01          Secondary
                                                                                          2000/01
          % schools offering extracurricular activities             91%                     n/a
          Average provision                                     139 minutes               30 hours
          Number of staff involved in EC                            3.5                      3.7


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PESS in 2010

Overall

   The great majority of young people interviewed reported that they enjoy after
    school sport activities and a good proportion are extending their participation
    through membership of community clubs. For example, Sport Pembrokeshire
    reports the impressive statistic that 72 per cent of primary pupils are involved in
    school and/or community sports clubs. Whilst there is a strong cultural tradition of
    sports club membership, it is equally significant that PESS and 5x60 in this authority
    are fully inter-locked and 5x60 leaders are very active and making a good
    contribution to extra-curricular provision.

   This practical relationship and the strong strategic links between PESS and other
    elements of the Active Young People programme are evident in all of the authorities
    visited.

   Even the smallest school visited (23 pupils, 2 teachers) offers one after school sports
    activity each week, and this is supplemented by activities offered by the Urdd.

   Dragon Sport does feature in after school sport activities, but its profile as a
    programme is weak, and many teachers had to be reminded of the programme
    name behind the bag of equipment and activity cards they use regularly within and
    outside the curriculum.
   In most schools visited there is a view that before PESS, they already had a quality
    extended activity programme in place. In some schools PESS is contributing to an
    increasing range of opportunities because of the increased confidence of non
    specialist teachers who help with extracurricular sport activities. Judgement on this
    the impact of this aspect of PESS was split with 45% of head teachers and subject
    leaders ranking it as excellent or good, and 55% as satisfactory or low.


Evidence from surveys undertaken on behalf of Sport Wales shows a significant increase
in provision at primary level, with a slight reduction in time at secondary level. Without
any specific records, it is probable that primary subject leaders have underestimated the
impact that PESS and Dragon Sport have had on extracurricular school sport. The most
recent data available will not have picked up the impact of the 5 x 60 programme at
secondary level.

Where there is effective practice

   PESS and the AYP programme work collaboratively, making the best use of financial
    investment and resources to support opportunities for young people within an
    outside the curriculum.

    Development Centres co-ordinate extracurricular activities at secondary school
    sites, offering primary pupils access to

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         o   specialist facilities and coaching in specific sports

         o   participating with pupils from other primary schools

         o   familiarisation with the secondary school site

         o   a wider range of activities than would be available within the primary school

         o   and their teachers gain access to mentoring from more experienced
             colleagues.



    Example – a school in Flintshire

The PESS programme is being disseminated across the school through inset, meetings and
informal follow up with staff. Planning is developed in phases and different staff, including
teaching assistants are benefitting from training and school based development work using
the range of resources. This has enabled the school to extend the range of activities they offer
after school to include dance and outdoor activities.

The school has also developed extension opportunities where pupils can go at play and lunch
time, to rehearse and practise activities they have been doing as part of their PE lessons. The
school feels strongly that the increased range of opportunities in curricular and
extracurricular time and having good resources to reference has encouraged boys to take
part in after school dance and school performances. The increased range of activities is seen
as a major contribution to improved pupil behaviour and increased positive attitude in school.




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6.4.2 PESS Outcomes:

          Establish Development Centre partnerships
          Identification and development of good practice in PESS
          Ensure effective working together to identify and develop good practice

      Overall
       There is wide variation in the management and operation of Development Centres
         across the six local authorities reviewed.

         In half of these local authorities partnerships are sharply focused on consulting
          schools about their needs and PESS management successfully facilitates the meeting
          of those needs, both partnership-wide and also where school-specific needs arise.
          Schools particularly appreciate the support from PESS management where requests
          are made for whole school training.
         The Partnership Leaders of successful Development Centres arrange regular
          meetings at which there is some sharing of good practice and decision making about
          focus areas of professional development for the partnership as whole as well as
          individual schools. A common request by the schools is for there to be more
          dissemination of good practice. There is also a general lack of awareness in schools
          of web site sources of exemplary practice either locally or nationally.

         The role and expectations of Development Centre Managers/Partnership Leaders
          varies from authority to authority and centre to centre. At its least developed, the
          role has little more function that the organisation of an annual meeting. There are
          numerous examples of Partnership Leaders undertaking the role in their personal
          time, with little support. There is a need for greater clarity of roles and
          responsibilities to achieve a higher level of consistency locally and nationally.

         The regional meetings for Partnership Leaders, which once formed an accessible
          opportunity to disseminate and share effective practice, no longer take place. Time
          constraints can make inaccessible the central venue national meetings that have
          replaced these with the result that many Development Centre Managers and
          Partnership Leaders do not access any professional development to support them in
          their role. This should be addressed at a national level, with regional delivery.

         PESS4Teachers website is underutilised as a method of sharing practice within local
          authorities and nationally. Only a small minority of teachers interviewed were
          aware of the website. In July 2010, there was a total of 12 effective practice case
          studies uploaded onto the website. Of these, 9 were posted in November 2009, one
          in December 2009, one in January and one in March 2010. In only one of the local
          authorities reviewed is there evidence of extensive use of the local authority
          website for sharing and disseminating effective practice in PESS. 51% of head
          teachers and subject leaders judged that PESS has had an excellent or good impact
          on identification and sharing of good practice.




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Where there is effective practice

          The phased establishment of Development Centre partnerships has enabled later
           Development Centres to benefit from lessons learned while earlier ones evolved
           and in this way, most partnerships have become highly effective in meeting the
           professional development needs of schools and their staff.
          Development Centres produce an annual operational plan, based on an audit of
           need across the cluster of schools. They have ownership of the plan and are
           accountable for its implementation and its impact, supported by the PESS Co-
           ordinator.
          Exemplification of good practice is shared across the partnership and more widely
           throughout the authority, creating dynamic professional learning networks




      Example

      The Tenby and Pembroke Dock DCs are highly successful partnerships that have become self-
      sustaining professional learning communities. Staff enthusiasm has created these situations
      and it is no surprise that these are not only examples of very effective practice as DCs but they
      are display many examples of good professional practice within their own partner schools.
      Schools are starting to recognize and use the Pembrokeshire Grid for Learning as a source of
      good practice ideas and PESS management recognises the need to keep the momentum going
      by ensuring that appropriate material is posted on the grid and that its existence, as well as
      other relevant web-sites, is frequently publicised.




       Where there are issues

          Development Centres show marked variation in effectiveness, from some where
           there is total engagement of all schools in the partnership to others where there is
           very little involvement. The PESS coordinator has a vital advocacy role to play where
           there is either secondary or primary school disinterest.
          There is a lack of direction in the identification and sharing of effective practice
           between centres. There is evidence that work is replicated rather than shared.
           There needs to be a clearer mechanism for identifying and sharing practice, ideally
           through a nationally co-ordinated programme.
          The role of the Development Centre Manager is to administrate and plan for centre
           meetings, developing and assuring ‘ownership of plans by all DC schools’. A lack of
           commitment and time taken to engage schools in centres are impacting on
           progress, follow up and effective management. There is a need for greater clarity
           and consistency around the role and responsibilities of the Development Centre
           Manager.
          Sustaining the PESS programme, its delivery, impact on standards and ownership of
           the management process is dependent on the effective planning, coordination, and

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deployment of Development Centre Managers. Their operation function is not
supported by professional development or targeted support – this needs to be
addressed if the programme is to be sustained.




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6.5      Local Authority management, operation, delivery and impact evaluation of
         PESS

         This section of the report highlights effective practice and issues specifically at a local
         authority level.

         “We have a very supportive PESS team in the local authority and that leads to PESS being
         a huge success” – RCT head teacher.

         The work of Sport Flintshire is highly valued and the school feels communication with
         them, their support and commitment relating to the PESS programme has “been
         excellent.”

         This positive message was heard in every local authority visited.

6.5.1 Management and operations

          Where there is effective practice
      In a minority of local authorities
           PESS is embedded within the school improvement service and can demonstrate
              clearly its position within the Children and Young People’s strategy.

            PESS has a high profile within the local authority and forms part of the school
             improvement strategy

            The PESS Co-ordinator is an effective advocate for the programme at a senior
             strategic level within the local authority and with head teachers

            PESS works collaboratively with other elements of the Active Young People
             Programme, maximising the opportunities for investment through the Local
             Authority Partnership Agreement, (LAPA). .

            The PESS Management Group has clear roles and responsibilities providing strategic
             support and direction whilst facilitating links to other key strategic partners.

            There is a PESS Strategic plan, which has as its focus clear targets to raise standards
             in physical education and school sport. Reporting is focused on the plan and its
             impact in achieving targets.

            There is a strong infrastructure of Development Centres which have ownership of
             the programme.




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      Where there are issues

       In many local authorities

         The management of PESS sits outside school improvement and therefore does not
          fulfil its potential impact within local authority school improvement plans or wider
          children and young people strategies.

         There is no clear strategic overview for the PESS programme within the local
          authority, no clear strategic aims or measurable targets and strategies to raise
          standards.

         The Development Centre infrastructure is under developed and key roles are not
          being fulfilled

         PESS Co-ordinators operate at different levels and some have multiple roles and
          responsibilities. This impacts on their ability to impact strategically within the local
          authority.

          Development Centre Consultants have different and multiple roles, some of which
          could create a conflict of interest

6.5.2 Delivery (of professional development)

      Where there is effective practice

         The PESS professional development programme is planned to meet a need that has
          been properly identified through an audit process, targeting staff with the aim of
          building capacity across the whole school.

          Professional development intervention is tailored to need, deploying the method
          that offers best value for money and greatest sustainable impact on the adult
          learner

         Tutors and mentors are selected for their subject knowledge, confidence in working
          with adult learners and are accredited through the AYP Tutor and Mentor
          programme competence framework

         There is effective follow up of teachers who attend PESS courses, to support them in
          applying their learning in school.

         Mentors adhere to the principles of mentoring, working with the mentee to an
          agreed professional development plan which aims to build confidence, competence
          and subject knowledge, over a period of time.


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            Whole school professional development is encouraged to maximise impact,
            capacity building and sustainability.

           An objective and standards based quality assurance programme operates at arm’s
            length to the management and delivery of the programme, to highlight effective
            practice and contribute to quality improvement processes, to assure the highest
            quality professional development provision.

           Professional development provision supports high quality teaching and learning at
            all key stages, to enhance pupil progression

        Where there are issues:

In the majority of local authorities

           There is limited follow up to teachers’ attendance at professional development
            courses

           There is limited focus on the professional learning needs of secondary teachers,
            with the risk that pupil progress at Key Stages 1and 2 will not be maintained or
            developed

           Mentoring is under-utilised or misinterpreted as a method of professional
            development

           Responsibility for quality assurance and quality improvement of professional
            development delivery is a low priority, split across too many people, and not based
            on objective standards.

6.5.3 Impact evaluation

        Where there is effective practice

        In a small minority of local authorities

           PESS is integral to the local authority school improvement strategy and is able to
            demonstrate clearly how it contributes to school improvement targets.

           Impact evaluation is built in to the PESS strategic planning process, so that there are
            clear, measurable targets and manageable processes in place to track progress.

           Through the Development Centre infrastructure, schools are supported to develop,
            use and share a range of consistent, practical and accessible forms of measuring
            impact of adult learning on pupil outcomes




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6.6     Recommendations for development – Local Authorities

Notwithstanding the differences in resources and the geographic realities of each local authority
or the scale of their PESS programmes, there should be a consistency of approach that supports
equality of opportunity for young people and the long term sustainability of the PESS
programme. The following recommendations, grouped under the headings of Management and
Operations, Delivery and Impact Evaluation (MODIE) are based on the effective practice
demonstrated by some local authorities and the areas for development identified through the
review process

6.6.1 Management and Operations

            PESS should form an integral part of the Local Authority Children and Young People
            strategy and the school improvement programme. This should facilitate links to
            whole school improvement, the Healthy Schools programme, the key skills
            curriculum, the well being of young people and broader professional learning
            networks.

           The strategic management and positioning of PESS should be carefully managed to
            ensure that the programme retains its high profile within education, whilst
            maximising the benefits of its place within the AYP family of programmes. This may
            require a review of the role and responsibilities of the PESS Co-coordinator

           The Development Centre infrastructure should be reviewed and resources made
            available to further develop and support responsible, accountable and committed
            Development Centre Managers/Partnership Leaders to develop the centres to their
            full potential as self sufficient professional learning networks through which
            effective practice can be shared.

           PESS management should give high priority to ensuring that all Development
            Centres are operating effectively, with engagement of at least the majority of
            schools, so that the impact of the PESS programme can be maximized across the
            authority.

           Local authorities should, with support, co-ordinate a strategic planning cycle
            involving Development Centres and supported by manageable processes that
            support effective audit of needs, operational and delivery plans, follow up to
            professional development delivery and impact evaluation.

           Locally driven partnership agreements should make clear the expectations on
            partnership schools so that the senior management team is clear about the
            commitment it is making to benefit from the PESS programme.


6.6.2 Delivery



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         Through the Development Centre infrastructure, teachers should be engaged in
          professional discussion through which they can recognise high quality physical
          education and its links to the key skills curriculum and the well being of their pupils.

         Consideration should be given to extending the use of whole school professional
          development which uses the benefits of a learning network to build sustainability,
          maximise the impact of adult learning and to support progressive learning for
          pupils.
         Professional development provision should be designed to include teacher self
          evaluation, expectations of the adult learning on pupil outcomes, individual action
          planning linked to the learning expectations and follow up support in school.

         There should be robust and objective quality assurance processes in place to
          contribute to sharing of effective practice within the delivery team, and to ongoing
          quality improvement of high quality professional development delivery.

6.6.3 Impact Evaluation

         A PESS Strategic plan should define specific and measureable aims and outcomes for
          the PESS programme against which impact can be measured, evaluated and
          reported.

         Schools should be supported in establishing manageable systems for measuring the
          impact of their involvement in PESS on adult learning and pupil outcomes.

         Local Authorities should encourage Development Centres to develop consistent
          methods of assessment and to agree on the information that should be available to
          accompany a pupil on transition from one key stage to the next, to support
          progression in learning.




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6.7    Recommendations for development - at a national level

The review has shown that the PESS programme has developed a strong brand identity
as a programme that is nationally developed, nationally driven and locally delivered.
Throughout the review process, local authorities, head teachers and teachers referred
frequently to the profile of the PESS programme, the high quality resources, courses and
training programmes, leadership and direction. This national influence and more
importantly, its advocacy for physical education and school sport is critical to the
continued status an impact of the PESS programme. Whilst local authorities have been
encouraged to take ownership of the programme, national leadership, direction and
support are still needed to maintain consistency, high quality and to help avoid
duplication of effort and expenditure of limited resources.

Recommendations are made for action at a national level that will maintain the
leadership, direction and advocacy of the PESS programme and will support local
authorities to work effectively, economically and with greater consistency across Wales.
They are based primarily on the recommendations to local authorities, supported by
evidence cited throughout the report.

6.7.1 Management and operation

       There is need for a national strategic plan for the PESS programme giving leadership and
       direction through

          A vision for the future of high quality physical education and school sport in Wales

          Challenging and measureable outcomes to be achieved with and through the local
           authority infrastructure ,with sufficient flexibility to be interpreted through local
           authority PESS strategic plans to meet their local priorities and stage of
           development

       Encourage, wherever possible, embedding PESS into the local authority Children and
       Young People and school improvement strategies so that it becomes an integral part of
       other national strategies, whole school improvement and professional learning
       networks.

       As part of the strategic planning process, review key roles and responsibilities and the
       professional development support required at each stage of the infrastructure to ensure
       cost effective and high quality implementation of the strategic plan and dissemination
       of effective practice. This should include:

          A national advisory group of experts in areas relevant to the strategy
          Development Centre Consultants
          PESS Co-ordinators
          Partnership Leaders


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      Building on the strong reputation and high value placed on PESS, re focus resources to
      develop the infrastructure by building capacity, ensuring the long term sustainability of
      high quality professional development through PESS
      Create streamlined local authority reporting procedures that avoid duplication and
      multi-layered reporting and which relate to the strategic aims and outcomes of PESS.
      Reporting should be qualitative as well as quantitative.

      Co-ordinate internal and external reporting on the PESS programme so that it follows a
      consistent format is progressive year on year and relates to the strategic aims and
      outcomes.

6.7.2 Delivery

      Implement consistent and robust quality assurance procedures that will inform the need
      for local and or national quality improvement measures to support high quality
      professional development delivery at a local level.

      Review ways in which principles and examples of effective practice can, realistically, be
      captured and disseminated locally, regionally and nationally.

      Consider local, regional or national accreditation for teachers and adults supporting
      learning that is relevant to their professional development pathway

      Further develop provision include the professional development needs of secondary
      teachers. This will help to enhance their roles within the Development Centres and to
      assure continued high quality teaching and learning for pupils as they progress through
      Key Stages 3 and 4.

6.7.3 Impact Evaluation

      The national strategic plan should include a clear statement of ‘where we are now’, to
      establish a base line for each strategic aim, against which progress can be measured

      Impact evaluation should be built into the strategic plan as part of an annual review
      process through which progress against the strategic aims and outcomes can be
      measured and adjustments made.




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7       Creating a framework for the future


The framework that follows builds on the principles of effective practice identified throughout
the review. No two local authorities are alike – they vary in geography, size, infrastructure and
stages of development in PESS. All young people, however, are entitled to the same
opportunities for high quality physical education wherever they live in Wales and their teachers
are entitled to the same high quality professional development. By applying these principles,
every local authority should be able to meet its commitment to provide young people with
these opportunities, regardless of its stage of development or situation.

The MODIE (Management, Operation, Delivery and Impact Evaluation) framework translates a
plan –do-review cycle into manageable and streamlined national and local practices that will
support coherent and consistent practice across Wales, with sufficient flexibility to meet the
variations in local authorities.




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                                                                                                                                                      PESS PRACTICE
                                                                                                                                                      NATIONAL
PESS PRACTICE                                                                                                                                         o Common strategic planning
NATIONAL                                                                                                                                                  framework where improvement
o   Clear PESS connected criteria for schools to self                                                                                                     expectations for pupils and teachers
    evaluate:                                                                                                                                             can be identified
    -    Active Marc; Self Evaluation Framework & Estyn                                                                                               LOCAL
         Core Inspection Framework (CIF)                                                                                                              o Current position captured across the
    -    National teachers standards                                                                                                                      LA against the agreed learning and
o   Specific PESS expectations and outcomes of effective                                                                                                  teaching criteria used in the SE
    implementation in schools and Local Authorities                                                                                                       tool(baseline)
    (LA’s)management, operation, delivery and impact                                                                                                  o Create one LA plan for improvement
    evaluation (MODIE)                                                                                                                                o Each school to have own
o   Common collection planning framework for LA’s on                                                                                                      improvement plan to evaluate
    which to capture school based self evaluation outcomes                                                                                                programme impact effectiveness
    for improvement                                                                                                                                   o Identify relevant PESS programme
o   Clear guidelines about commitment, expectations,                                                                                                      PESSCo, DCM, DCC, mentor and LA
    roles, responsibilities and timescales                                                                                                                PE Adviser intervention strategy
                                                                                                                                                      o Identify financial viability and costs




                                    PHYSICAL EDUCATION & SCHOOL SPORT IMPROVING PUPIL OUTCOMES – STANDARDS & WELLBEING IN SCHOOLS


PESS PRACTICE
LOCAL
o Collect relevant data from learning provision practice                                                                                    PESS PRACTICE
    and use information to inform PESS future                                                                                               LOCAL
    development and direction; improvement and impact                                                                                       o Identify effective systems to implement the
    judgements                                                                                                                                  management, operation. design, delivery and
o Establish progress against baseline across the DC and                                                                                         impact evaluation of PESS provision (MODIE)
    within individual schools                                                                                                                   to meet the identified improvement needs of
o Annual report against strategic plan change                                                                                                   schools and consortia
    outcomes and impact expectations – schools and DC                                                                                       o Apply common evaluation, action plan and
    for Sport Wales and CYPS partners. Affirm roles and                                                                                         impact case study requirements as part of
    responsibilities of partners who supported change                                                                                           professional programmes and network
o Schools to evaluate the leadership effectiveness of                                                                                           opportunities - tracked to self evaluation
    change outcomes                                                                                                                             outcomes
o LA to evaluate the quality and impact of provision                                                                                        o Deploy DCC and mentors effectively to monitor
    and consider further improvement needs                                                                                                      the quality of training provision, consortia
                                                                                                                                                networks and LA MODIE

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8.      Looking to the future – sustainability and legacy


The recommendations for development at a national level have as their focus the long term
sustainability and legacy of the considerable investment that continues to be made in PESS. The
programme has strong reputation and is much valued by local authority school improvement
teams, teachers and senior management teams. Whilst schools make some commitment to
the time and resources of their staff, they currently access this programme free of charge.
Those head teachers who were asked responded, not unexpectedly, that they would have to
reconsider their priorities in relation to staff time if the programme were no longer able to
contribute to cover costs, or if course fees were to be charged.

It has to be assumed that funding at current levels will not continue in the long term. Steps need
to be taken to capitalize on the success of PESS, gradually transferring ownership and
responsibility to local authorities with infrastructures ready to sustain the programme.

Factors that have contributed to successful transition from national to locally driven
programmes in similar areas of provision in England include:

            Embedding the programme within local authority structures and strategies

            Demonstrable links between the programme and other national children and young
             people strategies and across the curriculum

            Ability to demonstrate the impact on whole school improvement

            Development of local professional learning networks

            Establishing a credible reputation for professional development THROUGH physical
             education and school sport , for example, assessment for learning, pedagogy

            A gradual move from financial subsidy to contribution




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9.      Case Studies


As part of the self-evaluation approach to this review PESS Co-ordinators were invited to
identify effective practice and to develop a case study for inclusion in this report. Not only do
these case studies exemplify some of their excellent and innovative work, but they identify key
principles that can be applied by others, regardless of their resources, geography or stages of
development. PESS Co-ordinators were offered a standard template within which to develop
the case study which has been verified and quality assured by the review team.

            Case study 1 - Rhondda Cynon Taf - The enrichment of the learning environment
             for Physical Education through visual displays

            Case study 2 – Pembrokeshire – Use of ICT in assessment for learning

            Case study 3 – Gwynedd – Adventurous Activities – broader impact of professional
             development programmes

            Case study 4 – Swansea - Transition and cross curricular co-operation




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IMPACT CASE STUDY 1 - Rhondda Cynon Taf

What is the improvement area of work/ programme provision?
The enrichment of the learning environment for Physical Education through visual displays in
order to enhance learning


  Why was there a focus for change and improvement in this area? (background and
  rationale)
  Whilst the importance of a dynamic learning environment was recognised amongst
  teaching staff in order to support the AfL agenda and ensure good quality learning and
  teaching in the classroom, it became apparent that this did not extend to the delivery of
  Physical Education. Working with colleagues within PESS development centres, discussions
  and observations indicated that learning outcomes and success criteria were not explicit
  or shared within PE lessons and targeting setting by both teacher and pupils minimal. This
  was reinforced via completed PESS self evaluations which showed there was a need for
  training on how AfL could be used consistently during PE lessons.
  What were you setting out to improve and/or change within this improvement area?
  (impact and difference expected to be achieved)
  It was expected that by creating interactive visual learning environments within the PE
  settings, both staff and pupils had the opportunity to further develop strategies for
  assessment for learning which previously had remained within the confines of the
  classroom. Within the 4 part lesson structure, the interactive learning environment
  became a focal point; it allowed pupils to share learning outcomes and success criteria;
  stimulate effective questioning and feedback; provide opportunities to model good
  practice and target set, thereby creating a greater independence for the learner to learn
  and improve.
  What was the starting (baseline) position for the improvement areas identified?
  The PESS self-evaluation process determined the creation of each development centre
  plan. The 3-year strategic plans, operational plans and termly breakdowns for each
  development centre prioritise developing the learning environment and teaching
  resources within all partner schools to support the delivery of high quality PE.
  Which significant actions/activities have been undertaken?
  A number of opportunities have been provided for staff.
  1.   The termly PESS Development Centre cluster meetings allow staff to disseminate
       and share good practice. Information is also shared across Development centres to
       allow staff to recognise the impact that the visual learning environment has on
       learning.
  2.   An ICT in PE course recently facilitated by PESS Coordinators demonstrated to staff
       the importance of developing effective learning environments that will not only
       enhance teaching and learning but also provide both a stimulating and educational
       area for all. Feedback from the course was that staff were very keen to develop
       their own interactive learning environments after the ‘sharing good practice’
       section of the course. Staff were impressed with the photographs of the creative

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          and stimulating learning environments that were shown. A number of staff
          subsequently developed their own when they returned to school.
    3.    An ‘AfL In Action’ DVD has been created, produced and disseminated intra and inter
          local authority to support teachers and coordinators who are striving to embed
          assessment for learning within the delivery of PE. This provides clips, interviews,
          resources and practical examples that can be easily replicated.
    4.    A High Quality PE course has been developed in conjunction with the Advisory
          service (ESIS) for all PESS schools. A major component of the course is the
          identification of AfL characteristics and how they can permeate learning and
          teaching in Physical Education. The interactive learning environment is identified as
          an integral part of this.
    5.    Time has also been allocated to a number of curriculum leaders to visit a range of
          schools and to develop learning environments within their own schools to be
          utilised by both staff and pupils to aid teaching and learning within Physical
          Education.
    6.   Mentors have been encouraged to develop, use and share effective learning
          environments whilst involved in the mentoring process.
    What change and impact has come about because of these action(s)? Has there been
    any unplanned impact?
    Since embedding this priority within PESS development centre planning there has been a
    marked increase in the quantity and quality of effective learning environment dedicated
    to Physical Education. Practitioners are more structured in their delivery of PE, using the
    learning environment to recap, set the scene, reinforce learning and identify targets.
    Secondary colleagues have noted there is greater continuity of PE delivery between KS 2
    and 3 since the use of the learning environment and 4 part lesson structure has been
    introduced. Primary head teachers have identified a greater continuity across curriculum
    areas. One head teacher stated: ‘PESS has had a broader impact on outcomes due, to the
    focus placed on the integration of AfL strategies that is transferable to pupils’ learning
    across the curriculum.’
    On recent monitoring visits by the local advisory service the following quotes support the
    impact of enriched learning environments:
   ‘Learning walls …..provide a stimulating and supportive environment serving as a focal
    point for the consolidation and reinforcement of learning.’
   ‘The use of ICT, visual and linguistic prompts and readily available accessible learning
    resources all contribute to significantly to high quality provision in many schools. There
    are some outstanding examples in the cluster’.
   ‘In the majority of schools visited, a stimulating and informative learning environment for
    physical education is established. Pupils benefit greatly in these schools from having
    access to a range of resources to help them work independently as individuals, in pairs
    and in groups.
   ‘All schools have secured a designated area in the hall or classroom where teachers can
    ‘set the scene’ using a range of visual and linguistic resources or review what has been
    achieved’.
   ‘In the best practice, pupils utilise these ‘learning zones’ well as a means of reinforcing and


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    supporting their learning.
    Supporting quotes from primary practitioners as to the impact of a positive learning
    environment:
   ‘The words and pictures (within the learning environment) help reinforce key objectives
    throughout the lessons. It allows the pupils to work more independently – they don’t
    have to ask the teacher – they can find out for themselves’
   ‘It allows the pupils to take much more responsibility for their own learning and progress.
    They develop their own strategies and it inspires them to progress further as they
    challenge themselves’
   ‘ The learning boards promotes independent thinking’
   ‘Target boards are fantastic as they develop the pupils’ enthusiasm for communication
    within their work and have created more focused discussions. They have enhanced and
    refined the pupils learning allowing them more ownership and responsibility.’
    How do you know that the actions/activities had the impact that was identified? What
    evidence is there?
    The feedback from monitoring visits by the advisory service has reported improvements in
    the learning environment which in turn is supporting good learning and teaching.
    Anecdotal accounts from primary practitioners (see quotes above) indicate the use of the
    learning environment is developing more independent learning within Physical Education.
    Head teachers are reporting there is greater continuity of learning and teaching across
    curriculum areas.       Information submitted via the Progress reporting structure
    demonstrates there has been improvements in the standards of teaching and learning
    with the introduction of effective visual learning environments e.g. During a recent post
    mentoring discussion, a member of staff commented on how they had seen ‘improvements
    in the pupils ability to give effective feedback to their peers by using the newly created
    interactive learning environment during the evaluation process’.
    What still needs to change to bring about further improvement and development?
    Creating consistency within the school setting and across schools within the local authority
    is of paramount importance. Furthermore, the sharing of good practice within and
    beyond the local authority is high on the agenda.           This will ensure the learning
    environment is an effective and dynamic component in the delivery of high quality
    Physical Education.
    What are the key fundamental principles that contributed to success, progress and
    impact on the improvement area?
    1.    The strong emphasis on AfL within the LA and the contribution the learning
          environment has to play has ensured schools continue to develop and embed this
          priority area.
    2.    The CPD opportunities and the ‘AfL In action’ DVD has increased both staff
          awareness and confidence in how to develop and use the learning environment in
          an effective manner.
    3.    The mentoring process has had a significant impact on the success of the
          development of the visual learning environment. The assessment for learning
          characteristics targeted during the sessions allow staff to understand the


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importance of the pupils having the correct tools in order to set appropriate targets;
provide effective feedback and model good practice. Dissemination during cluster
meetings and informal networking allow staff to share good practice on a regular
basis. Staff are also encouraged to visit other schools to enhance their own
knowledge and understanding of the importance of creating both a purposeful and
stimulating interactive visual display.




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IMPACT CASE STUDY 2 - Pembrokeshire

What is the improvement area of work/programme provision?
To develop the use of ICT in Gymnastics in order to support pupil self assessment

  Why was there a focus for change and improvement in this area? (background and rationale)
  Pembroke Dock Community School (PDCS) was at the forefront of pupil skills assessment using
  ICT software in Pembrokeshire. The Head teacher had developed an excel spreadsheet that
  identified skills that started from baseline figures, so that each child could have a rough National
  Curriculum level as they progressed through the school.
  The aim of this project was to :
      develop cross curricular links using ICT
      increase the opportunities for Assessment for Learning by using ICT skills to promote self
       and peer assessment in pupils
      facilitate teacher assessment.
  What were you setting out to improve and/or change within this improvement area? (impact
  and difference expected to be achieved)
  The project set out to improve assessment opportunities for both teachers and pupils.
  Gymnastics had been identified as an area of need through the PESS project. The use of ICT was
  introduced to help staff become more confident in the planning, delivery and assessment of this
  targeted area.
  What was the starting (baseline) position for the improvement areas identified?
  Pupil profiles were designed and set up and key words from the PESS Module 1Gymnastics
  resource were utilised. We wanted to develop a link provided by the PESS resource and relate
  this to something that the school staff could achieve.

  Which significant actions/activities have been undertaken?
      Delivery of Module 1 PESS Gymnastics training and resources
      Sourcing a GTCW grant to develop pupil profiles for assessment involving staff from 8
       different schools across three clusters in Pembrokeshire.
      GTCW schools compiled film clips of pupils for each unit of work in gymnastics.
      Anne Mear, PE coordinator and partnership leader at Pembroke Dock Community School
       (PDCS) identified units that the teachers wanted to cover for age related groups, and ICT /
       PE skills for children to cover as they progressed through the school.
      Twilight   sessions were delivered by Anne at PDCS to further develop staff skills in ICT to
       include:
             o     the use of the digi blue cameras / moviemaker,
             o     how to film and edit clips and
             o     guidance on classroom management when using ICT.
      Further training included the use of audacity for pupil verbal analysis and assessment.
      Learning Support Assistants in the Foundation Phase at PDCS were trained by Anne, to


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                                                  Page 57 of 64
     support teachers with the filming process and pupil evaluation of their own and peer’s
     work in language development and observation skills etc….
    PESS funding was utilized to arrange training opportunities with Jan Gadd, National Trainer,
     Gymnastic Modules, to identify characteristics of levels in gymnastics (Pembroke
     Development Centre).
    Examples of ICT clips placed on the Pembrokeshire County Council e portal to share good
     practice.
What change and impact has come about because of these action(s)? Has there been any
unplanned impact?
As a result of the project:
    Teachers have increased their knowledge and understanding of the value of ICT to enhance
     learning and support assessment for learning.
    Teachers are more confident to include the use of ICT in lesson planning, delivery and
     review, particularly as a tool for developing a wide variety of assessment for learning
     strategies.
    Use of ICT in gym lessons has proved to be a motivational tool to encourage increased
     participation of disengaged pupils.
    Pupils’ use of Key Skills including skills of observation and analysis has greatly improved
     across PDCS.
    This project has been identified as an example of good practice and Mrs Mear has delivered
     a project workshop at the PESS South West regional conference and at PESS national
     training.
    Due to the extent of information generated by filming pupils in PE, the school has set up a
     separate drive on the internal computer network, specifically to store the pupil profiles.
     This drive allows teachers and pupils access to their file from any point within the school.
How do you know that the actions/activities had the impact that was identified? What
evidence is there?
The impact is evident through ongoing pupil assessment profiles demonstrating progression and
improvement in pupil outcomes across the year groups.
Anne Mear has delivered ICT workshops to schools within and external to the Pembroke cluster
to share good practice. Examples of pupil profiles are included on the Pembrokeshire County
Council e portal.
What still needs to change to bring about further improvement and development?
The next steps for further development would be to:
    Develop pupil profiles to include other aspects of PE and /or other areas across the
     curriculum.
    Secure provision to continue to update the profiles on a regular basis.
What are the key fundamental principles that contributed to success, progress and impact on
the improvement area?
Key principles for success have been:



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                                                Page 58 of 64
   The support of the head teacher and senior management.
         o The project adopted as a whole school approach, with staff supportive of the
             initiative.
         o Funding from PESS.
         o Availability of funding from the GTCW which enabled the project to be extended.
   Establishing links to professional development modules and resources available as part of
    the PESS programme, e.g. PESS Module 1 Gymnastics resource.
   Establishing strong links to other curriculum areas - Key Skills and to Assessment for
    Learning has added greater importance and value to the work.




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IMPACT CASE STUDY 3 – Gwynedd
Using adventurous activities to support the key skills curriculum - to increase the use of AA
within PE and key skills curriculum and raise teacher confidence
 Why was there a focus for change and improvement in this area? (background and
rationale)
       The introduction of Adventurous Activities as a statutory component of the national
        curriculum in 2008 resulted in a number of schools identifying this as an area for
        development within their PE Self Evaluations
       This was seen as a good potential area of activity to support KS 2 – 3 transition.
What were you setting out to improve and/or change within this improvement area?
(impact and difference expected to be achieved)
       Standards of teaching and learning in AA Teachers’ confidence in using adventurous
        activities to support the key skills curriculum and to work with pupils in the outdoor
        environment, using activities that were seen by some as ‘higher risk’
What was the starting (baseline) position for the improvement areas identified?
       Low baseline – with very few primary and secondary schools delivering AA within the
        curriculum
       Very few primary and secondary teachers with relevant qualifications
Which significant actions/activities have been undertaken?
       Mentoring of teachers – 6 week sessions – orienteering, problem solving, team
        building activities (on and off school site)
       Creation of KS2/KS3 scheme of work for AA
       Outdoor learning cards- training and resources provided for schools
       Mapping of all primary and secondary school grounds with a professional coloured
        orienteering map
       Orienteering Level 1 course provided
What change and impact has come about because of these action(s)? Has there been any
unplanned impact?
       Upskilling of teachers with the confidence to teach the AA component of the
        curriculum
       A current scheme of work which emphasized the teaching and learning of the key
        skills, that is communication, numeracy, thinking and I.T skills
       Improvement of pupils understanding of the AA curriculum culminating in a better
        understanding of the extended skills, for example, working with others
       Unplanned impact – Mentor was faced with teaching and training teachers and staff –
        feedback from the Mentor suggested that it was a factor in him gaining a senior
        Management Post at his Secondary School
       Unplanned impact – it has been noted within the Authority that the AA PESS initiative
        was the one most successful transition projects in all subjects during the past few
        years


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                                              Page 60 of 64
       Links to the County Council’s major initiative to use the natural environment of
       Gwynedd to support economic and social wellbeing for its population.
How do you know that the actions/activities had the impact that was identified? What
evidence is there?
      Feedback from courses by teaching staff was excellent
      High participation levels of pupils taking part in orienteering festivals(1150) and
       completing 3 or 4 maps/routes instead of 1 or 2 in previous years
      Anecdotal evidence from primary head teachers praising the AA programme
What still needs to change to bring about further improvement and development?
      Dissemination of the project to other catchment areas within the authority
      The database shows that we need to attract teaching staff from particular areas on to
       our AA INSET programme
What are the key fundamental principles that contributed to success, progress and impact
on the improvement area?
      Senior Management Team support – releasing secondary teachers to work as mentors
       with primary colleagues
      Effective recruitment - a mentor who was committed to learning through
       adventurous activities and with the skills, knowledge and experience to motivate
       primary colleagues
      Meeting an identified professional development need – primary teachers with a real
       need to develop their skills in this area
      Partnership working – bringing together PESS and AYP in partnership with the school
       improvement team (Cynnal). Pooling of resources and expertise had a significant
       impact on the scope of the project and the facilities that could be provided.
      Linking the project to KS2 – 3 transition.




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   Impact case study 5 – Swansea
What is the improvement area of work/programme provision?
To increase cross curricular working in the KS 3 curriculum and build primary secondary
relationships to support KS 2 – 3 transition
   Background and rationale

  The transition programme at Gowerton Comprehensive School is fundamentally based on an
  established working relationship with its six partner primary schools. A great emphasis is
  placed on a smooth transition, and an on-going commitment to development is evident
  throughout the programme. This commitment reflects the priority placed on transition by
  senior management and a member of the senior management team took on the
  responsibility for maximising the effectiveness of the programme.

  What were you setting out to improve and/or change within this improvement area?
  (impact and difference expected to be achieved)

  Whilst the PE department has historically been a significant contributor to the programme,
  an opportunity was recognised for developing a broader range of activities, involving more
  secondary departments, and a gradual move towards cross curricular activities that reflected
  the evolving integration of subjects in the primary curriculum. The challenge of cross
  curricular working across secondary subject departments is being met successfully,
  developing a spirit of cooperation that is fostering an interest in developing more integration
  in the Key Stage 3 curriculum.. The relationship with partner primary schools has
  strengthened still further over time and a very diverse, stimulating programme has been
  established.

  What was the starting (baseline) position for the improvement areas identified?

  PE remains a key element of the transition programme, both through subject specific and
  cross curricular activities. There is a culture of sharing equipment, facilities and resources.
  PE/Sports kit is loaned out to partner primary schools, and schools are invited and
  encouraged to make use of the sports facilities and athletics track. Within the programme,
  the PE department organises athletics, dance and outdoor and adventurous activities. Other
  departments currently contributing to the programme include music (singing festival), food
  technology (a Ready, Steady Cook event) and French (Bastille Day project)

  Which significant actions/activities have been undertaken?

  The transition programme starts in October with a road show at Pembrey Country Park. Off
  site, Year 6 pupils take part in orienteering and team building activities organised by
  Secondary school teachers.

  Team building is seen as an important element as it links to the key skills core of the
  curriculum delivered in all the partner primary schools.


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In January, lessons are organised for Year 6 pupils to take part in ‘real’ Gowerton lessons.
This gives pupils the chance to meet many of their future teachers and become familiar with
the school grounds, the structure of the school day and expectations of pupils.

There are three official designated days for transition at the school. The first day involves
pupils working in their own year 6 classes. They then split up, meet and work in their Year 7
groups. The Bastille Day arranged for day two is a good example of departmental
cooperation - by the French and PE departments. Pupils take part in an orienteering activity
in which instructions are written in French. On the third day pupils take part in a day’s
lessons in their new year 7 groups.

A transition booklet is produced. This includes a photo diary to illustrate events and
activities that primary school pupils have been involved in. This highlights pupils’ interests,
hobbies and sporting achievements. There is a pastoral element in transition insofar as Year
6 pupils are encouraged to travel on the secondary school buses to one of their transition
days during the secondary exam period when fewer secondary pupils are using the buses



A DVD is also produced for Year 6 pupils. It gives them an impression of school life at
Gowerton and is updated on an annual basis. The content includes many subject areas,
including PE, 5x60 activities and school trips, e.g. ski trips. The head boy/girl take
responsibility for the production of the DVD and are included in the feature, along with year
7 pupils talking about their experiences at the school. Particular emphasis is given to 5x60
activities e.g. surfing, bouldering and dance.

What change and impact has come about because of these action(s)? Has there been any
unplanned impact?

As a result of these activities, a close relationship with teachers, resulting in ongoing support
has been firmly established. Incidental support and guidance has been provided by the
school on a number of occasions. This is in addition to the PESS support and mentoring
project that is also in place.

How do you know that the actions/activities had the impact that was identified? What
evidence is there?

Primary school teachers feel that they can contact the PE Department at Gowerton for
support and advice. A questionnaire is completed by Year 7 pupils to establish their views
based on their own experiences starting out in comprehensive school. The responses
indicate the vital part played by the transition programme in providing a seamless transition
for pupils as they move from Year 6 to Year 7.

What still needs to change to bring about further improvement and development?



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                                                Page 63 of 64
The whole school approach and vision for transition will be further improved and developed
as part of an on-going review process. The transition activities are flexible, and will be
adapted when necessary, in order to continue to create a welcoming environment for all
Year 6 pupils.

What are the key fundamental principles that contributed to success, progress and impact
on the improvement area?

The working relationship with all partner primary schools has been a crucial factor in
developing a successful transition programme. This relationship has been nurtured over
time, and a mutual level of trust and respect has transpired. A willingness to be flexible and
adapt the programme has ensured that the impact on Year 6 pupils is highly effective. The
aim is for more ownership of the transition programme to be passed to the primary schools
as primary teachers become increasingly involved in the planning of existing and new
activities.




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                                               Page 64 of 64

				
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