Humanistic Therapies by ert554898

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									HUMANISTIC
THERAPIES
LAUREN KAFADARIAN
P. 534-535
HUMANISTIC
THERAPIES
• People who undergo therapy and have symptoms of low
  self-esteem, feelings of alienation, failure to achieve,
  difficult relationships and general dissatisfaction with
  their lives should usually be treated by a humanistic
  psychologist.
• They believe people are generally motivated by healthy
  needs for growth and psychological well being.
• They emphasize the concept of a whole person engaged
  in a continual process of change.
HUMANISTIC
THERAPIES
• Treatment techniques are based on the assumption that
  people have a tendency for positive growth and self
  actualization.
• This may be blocked by an unhealthy environment that
  can include negative self-evaluation and criticism from
  others.
• This conflict creates anxiety and unhappiness.
CLIENT CENTERED
THERAPY
• Carl Rogers developed a
  method of therapy called
  client-centered therapy.
• This therapy emphasizes an
  individual’s tendency for
  healthy psychological
  growth through self-
  actualization.
REFLECTION OF
FEELING
• Carl Rogers’ main technique
  is called reflection of feeling.
• This helps the client
  understand their emotions.
• Therapists paraphrase the
  clients’ words, trying to
  capture the emotional tone
  expressed and acting as sort
  of a psychological “mirror” in
  which clients can see
  themselves.
EXAMPLE OF
REFLECTION OF FEELING
Client: It probably goes all the way back into my childhood… my mother
told me I was the pet of my father. Although I never realized it. And other
people always seemed to think I was sort of a privileged one in the
family… It’s just that the family let the other kids get away with more than
they usually did me.
Therapist: You’re not so sure you were a pet in any sense, but more that
the family held you to high standards.
C: M-hm. That's just what has occurred to me; and that the other people
could sorta make mistakes, or do naughty things as children, but I wasn’t
supposed to do those things.
T: With somebody else it would be naughtiness, but with you it shouldn’t
be done.
C: That's really the idea I’ve had. I think the whole business of my
standards… is one I need to think about carefully.
T: Not sure you have any deep values which you are sure of.
C: M-hm, m-hm.
ROGERIAN THERAPY
• The therapist assumes that people have healthy motives.
• The motives can be distorted through social pressures
  and low self-esteem.
• The therapist has to remove these barriers.
• Research has shown that this type of therapy is most
  successful when the therapist provides the Rogerian
  qualities of empathy, positive regard, genuineness, and
  feedback.

								
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