HDFS_Graduate_Student_Handbook_09-10 by linxiaoqin

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									     College of

   EDUCATION & HUMAN ECOLOGY
                                                          ehe.osu.edu




Department of Human Development and Family Science




   GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK
            (2009-2010)
            Visit our website: http://hdfsgrad.osu.edu/
                                                  Table of Contents
                        This document contains multiple hypertext links for easy navigation.
                         Try out this feature by clicking on an item in this table of contents.

Preface............................................................................................................................................ iii
Department Faculty, Staff, and Research Centers/Labs ................................................................. 4
  Our Faculty ................................................................................................................................. 5
  Research Facilities, Centers and Labs in HDFS ......................................................................... 7
     Center for Early Literacy Intervention for Young Children ................................................... 7
     Center for Family Research .................................................................................................... 7
     Community Safety Institute Knowledge and Resource Center .............................................. 7
     Couple and Family Therapy Clinic ......................................................................................... 8
     Couples and Kids Lab ............................................................................................................. 8
     The Ohio Collaborative........................................................................................................... 8
     The Schoenbaum Family Center at Weinland Park ................................................................ 9
     Slesnick's Lab ......................................................................................................................... 9
     The Western Reserve Reading Project ................................................................................... 9
  Other OSU Faculty who work in Collaboration with HDFS Faculty ....................................... 10
HDFS Graduate Student Organization (GSO) .............................................................................. 11
General Information on HDFS Graduate Programs of Study ....................................................... 12
  MASTER’S DEGREE PROGRAM – GENERAL INFORMATION ..................................... 13
  DOCTORAL DEGREE PROGRAMS – GENERAL INFORMATION ................................. 14
  GENERAL CURRICULUM AT GLANCE............................................................................ 15
  CFT GENERAL CURRICULUM AT GLANCE .................................................................... 16
  Graduate Courses Offered in 2009-2010* ................................................................................ 17
  MASTER'S PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS........................................................................... 19
  STRAIGHT THROUGH DOCTORAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ............................... 27
  DOCTORAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS ........................................................................ 30
     CANDIDACY EXAMINATION (Generals) ....................................................................... 32
     CANDIDACY....................................................................................................................... 37
     DISSERTATION .................................................................................................................. 38
Nondiscrimination Policy ............................................................................................................. 43
List of Forms and Checklists to Guide Your Program of Study ................................................... 44
     Petition for Credit or Waiver of Requirements ..................................................................... 45
     Independent Study Contract Form ........................................................................................ 46
     Sample Contract for Independent Study Credits to be Counted Toward the Degree ........... 46
     M.S. Degree Program of Study Form ................................................................................... 48
     Thesis/Independent Study Master Project Approval Form ................................................... 50
     STRAIGHT THROUGH Ph.D. PROGRAM OF STUDY (POS) Form .............................. 51
     Doctoral Program of Study (POS) Form .............................................................................. 53
     Approval of Dissertation Proposal Form .............................................................................. 55
     Student Travel Policies and Procedures ................................................................................ 56
     End of the Year Report ......................................................................................................... 58
     MASTER'S PROGRAM PLAN A CHECKLIST ................................................................ 63
     MASTER'S PROGRAM PLAN B CHECKLIST ................................................................ 64
     STRAIGHT THROUGH DOCTORAL PROGRAM CHECKLIST .................................... 65

                                                                          i
    DOCTORAL PROGRAM CHECKLIST ............................................................................. 66
Appendix A: LIST OF RESEARCH METHODS AND STATISTICS COURSES .................... 67
    AGR EDUC (Agricultural Education) .................................................................................. 68
    CLASSICS (Classics) ........................................................................................................... 69
    COMM (Communication) .................................................................................................... 70
    COMP STD (Comparative Studies)...................................................................................... 72
    EDU P&L (Education: Educational Policy and Leadership) ................................................ 72
    EDU PAES (Education: Physical Activity and Educational Services) ................................ 76
    EDU T&L (Education: Teaching and Learning) .................................................................. 77
    FM RES M (Family Resource Management) ....................................................................... 77
    NURSING (Nursing) ............................................................................................................ 78
    POLIT SC (Political Science) ............................................................................................... 78
    PSYCH (Psychology) ........................................................................................................... 81
    SOC WORK (Social Work) .................................................................................................. 84
    SOCIOL (Sociology) ............................................................................................................ 85
    STAT (Statistics) .................................................................................................................. 88
    WOM STDS (Women's Studies) .......................................................................................... 95




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                                   ii
Preface

Welcome to the Department of Human Development and Family Science, in the College of
Education and Human Ecology at The Ohio State University. We are glad to have you here and
wish you success in your tenure with us. The following pages provide you with information
about how to navigate your tenure here with us. You will find the departmental requirements, as
well as the OSU Graduate School requirements.

The Graduate School provides you with the Graduate School Handbook online at
http://www.gradsch.ohio-state.edu/Depo/PDF/Handbook.pdf . You should familiarize yourself
with the Graduate School Handbook. We have copied some of the more pertinent sections for
this Handbook which you will see in italics. If in those italics another section is referred to, it is
a section in the Graduate School Handbook, so you should refer to those sections of the Graduate
School Handbook. Deadlines are also bolded for your convenience. The Graduate School also
provides dates for each quarter by which certain forms need to be filed in order to graduate that
quarter (see, http://www.gradsch.osu.edu/Depo/PDF/Calendar/Grad_deadlines.pdf).

You will also see forms that need to be filed both with the Graduate School and here in the
Department. These forms can be obtained from the Graduate School and some may be on-line,
you should look for those on the Graduate School website. The Departmental forms are also
available in electronic format online: http://hdfsgrad.osu.edu/11636.cfm .

Again, we wish success in your tenure here.

Suggestions for Success:

1. See your advisor often. Make appointments to discuss courses to be taken and progress, as
well as research interests. Being involved in your advisor’s work leads to presentations at state
and national conferences and can also lead to publications. We want you to be involved in these
projects in order to get a better grasp of the work in the field.

2. Pay attention to deadlines and announcements. Advisors don’t always know as much as you
do about what is due next etc., so you should keep track.

3. Ask questions of the Graduate Studies Chair or any other faculty member. It is important that
you have all the information you need and we can’t always anticipate what that information
might be. No question is a “silly” one.

4. Get to know your fellow graduate students. Your graduate education/experience is as much
about collegial interaction as it is about the courses you take. Get engaged in extra curricular
opportunities like the brown bag lunch series, seminars, journal clubs etc.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                 iii
Department Faculty, Staff, and Research Centers/Labs
We are a multidisciplinary faculty and have a wide variety of interests in the areas of human
development and family science. HDFS faculty and staff conduct research in a variety of
settings including various research centers and community laboratories. We also work
collaboratively with an impressive list of OSU faculty representing a diverse range of disciplines,
expertise, and interest. The information provided in the Handbook should be considered a
starting point of information on the people and activities of the department.




                       The Schoenbaum Family Center at Weinland Park




                        Couple and Family Therapy Clinic in Mount Hall




                            The Center for Family Research at COSI




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09               4
Our Faculty
   David Andrews, Ph.D.
   (Florida State University), Child Development

   Suzanne Bartle-Haring, Ph.D.
   (University of Connecticut), Family Science

   Amy Bonomi, Ph.D.
   (University of Washington) Health Services

   Cynthia Buettner, Ph.D.
   (The Ohio State University), HDFS

   Xin Feng, Ph.D.
   (University of Connecticut), HDFS

   Stephen Gavazzi, Ph.D.
   (University of Connecticut), Family Science

   Michael Glassman, Ph.D.
   (The City University of New York), Psychology

   Howard Goldstein, Ph.D.
   (Vanderbilt University), Development Psychology and Mental Retardation Research

   Claire Kamp Dush, Ph.D.
   (Penn State University), Human Development and Family Studies

   Steve Petrill, Ph.D.
   (Case Western Reserve University), Psychology

   Sarah Schoppe-Sullivan, Ph.D.
   (University of Illinois), Developmental Psychology

   Julie Serovich, Ph.D.,
   (University of Georgia), Child and Family Development/Marriage and Family Therapy

   Natasha Slesnick, Ph.D.
   (University of New Mexico), Clinical Psychology

   Tasha Snyder, Ph.D.
   (Penn State University), Human Development and Family Studies and Demography

   Deanna Wilkinson, Ph.D.
   (Rutgers University), Criminal Justice

HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                5
    Department Staff Contact Information

      Name                      Title            Office     Phone             Email



                    Office Administrative        135C
Elaine Bolton                                             292-5503   ebolton@ehe.osu.edu
                    Associate                    CM




                                                 166H
Bobbie Bowling      Grants Manager                        292-7705   bbowling@ehe.osu.edu
                                                 CM




                    Director of Academic         129B
Gene Folden                                               292-5676   efolden@ehe.osu.edu
                    Studies                      CM




                                                 135
Judith Hanson       Office Associate                      292-7705   jhanson@ehe.osu.edu
                                                 CM




                    Professor & Department       135D
Julianne Serovich                                         292-5685   jserovich@ehe.osu.edu
                    Chair                        CM




                                                 151A
Lynnette Stump      Fiscal Administrator                  292-0240   lstump@ehe.osu.edu
                                                 CM




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09            6
Research Facilities, Centers and Labs in HDFS


Center for Early Literacy Intervention for Young Children

Drs. Howard Goldstein and Robyn Ziolkowski in the Department of Human Development and
Family Science have been awarded a 5-year cooperative agreement by the Institute of
Educational Sciences National Center for Special Education Research to establish a center to
conduct research and provide national leadership on implementing Response to Intervention
(RtI) for young children in the areas of early literacy and language. Along with a team of
collaborators at the University of Kansas, the University of Minnesota, the Dynamic
Measurement Group in Oregon, as well as The Ohio State University, we will be developing new
progress monitoring measures to identify children who are not succeeding in the general pre-
kindergarten curriculum and new intervention strategies that provide these children with
increased opportunities to acquire the skills needed to enter school ready to read.
We will be developing a tiered-approach to instruction that will target skills in four areas:

   •   Vocabulary,
   •   Phonological awareness,
   •   Print awareness and alphabet knowledge, and
   •   Comprehension.

The Ohio State University site will have primary responsibility for designing and evaluating
supplemental instructional materials that will be engaging and highly independent activities for
preschoolers and will require minimal assistance from paraprofessionals to implement. We
expect that at the conclusion of this 5-year scope of work, we will have developed the essential
components that community programs need to develop response-to-intervention models
addressing early literacy.


Center for Family Research

(CFR) exists as a coalition of OSU faculty members, students, and staff -- representing the
colleges of Education and Human Ecology, Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences,
Law, Medicine, Social/Behavioral Sciences, and Social Work -- who have interest and expertise
in research, assessment, and treatment efforts as they relate to the family, with particular
emphasis on the family’s role in the development and well-being of children and adolescents.
Dr. Stephen Gavazzi is co-director.


Community Safety Institute Knowledge and Resource Center

The CSI Knowledge and Resource Center was established to enhance efforts to translate findings
from research on crime and violence prevention through a collaborative partnership with local
practitioners working in the juvenile justice, social service, and grassroots community

HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09              7
organizations. With funding from the Ohio Office to Criminal Justice Services and the OSU
Criminal Justice Resource Center, Dr. DeannaWilkinson's research team is building a web-based
resource site. She founded the OSU Youth Violence Prevention Advisory Board (YVPAB) in
2007. The CSI Knowledge and Resource Center produces a quarterly eNewsletter entitled From
Research to Practice. In June of 2009, the YVPAB hosted a first annual conference called
Promoting Community Safety and Preventing Violence. The current mission of the YVPAB is to
mobilize and challenge community members to invest in building youth capital by forging
sustainable long term partnerships among youth, community leaders, practitioners, and academic
researchers. Students are welcomed to get involved. The YVPAB meets monthly on the 3rd
Wednesday at lunchtime in East Columbus.


Couple and Family Therapy Clinic

The Couple and Family Therapy (CFT) Clinic serves students, faculty and staff of the
University, as well as the greater Columbus community. This clinic provides training for
doctoral students enrolled in the couple and family therapy program under the direct supervision
of CFT clinical faculty. Couple and family therapy is concerned with the problems and needs of
individual, relational and family relationships. Couple and family therapists believe that
difficulties are best dealt with in the context of these relationships. When it is not possible to
have all family members present in therapy sessions, services will be provided to individuals.
The CFT clinic provides an incredible learning laboratory for students in the CFT Ph.D.
program.


Couples and Kids Lab

Sarah Schoppe-Sullivan, associate professor, and Claire Kamp Dush, assistant professor, are
currently working on a study, the New Parents Project, which aims to explore the development
of family relationships for couples expecting their first child.


The Ohio Collaborative

The Ohio Collaborative is a research and policy analysis center committed to conducting and
disseminating research that can improve schools and the lives of children and families. Dr.
Cynthia Buettner is the director. Funded initially by The Ohio Board of Regents, the primary
goals of The Ohio Collaborative are guided by the policy and research questions that face major
state entities such as the Ohio Legislature and the Governor’s Office, the Ohio Department of
Education, the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services, and the Ohio Board of Regents.
Additionally, the Collaborative provides information and assistance to Ohio’s school districts,
especially those that serve lower socio-economic areas. The work of the Ohio Collaborative is
carried out in partnership with faculty and graduate associates throughout the state of Ohio
college and university system and under the administration of the Ohio State University.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09               8
The Schoenbaum Family Center at Weinland Park

At the Schoenbaum Family Center at Weinland Park, the education of young children is based on
a combination of caring relationships and the best in early childhood research. Located in
Columbus' Weinland Park neighborhood, the center opened to families in autumn 2007. Dr.
Howard Goldstein is the research director at the Schoenbaum Family Center.

The Ohio State University collaborates with the Columbus City Schools, the Child Development
Council of Franklin County Headstart/Early Head Start, and the Franklin County Board of
Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities to serve a culturally and economically
diverse community of children ages birth to five and their families. The unique A. Sophie Rogers
Laboratory School, which is within the Schoenbaum Center, overlooks the park and is co-located
with the Weinland Park Elementary School, providing opportunities for collaboration across
programs as well as sites for teacher training and research.


Slesnick's Lab

Dr. Natasha Slesnick's research and clinical focus is on families and adolescents with issues
pertaining to homelessness, substance use, childhood abuse, depression, and high risk behaviors.
Her current research projects concentrate on the development and evaluation of effective
interventions for runaway and homeless youth and their families.


The Western Reserve Reading Project

The Western Reserve Reading Project is designed to identify the genetic and environmental
influences that affect the development of reading and math skills in twin children. Hallmark to
the research study is the annual home visit. During this session, children are tested in regards to
their reading and math abilities using standardized tests associated with reading comprehension,
language comprehension, and word-level reading. Additionally, the research study uses audio
tapes to record a portion of the home visit related to speech and language. Concurrently, DNA
samples are obtained to first, assess whether or not the twins are “identical” or “fraternal” and
second, to identify genetic markers associated with reading and math ability. Newest to the
research study is the math home visit which incorporates many interactive activities that measure
the children’s math aptitude. In this way, the research is able to discover various interactions
between the genes and environment and how this connection relates to reading and math
outcomes. Dr. Stephen Petrill is the Principal Investigator on this project.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09               9
Other OSU Faculty who work in Collaboration with HDFS Faculty

   •   Ola Ahlqvist, Geography                    •   Janice Kiecolt-Glaser, Psychiatry
   •   Rene Anand, Pharmacology                   •   Chris Knoester, Sociology
       OSUMC                                      •   Lauren Krivo, Sociology
   •   Eric Anderman, Ed P&L                      •   Mei-Po Kwan, Geography
   •   Sarah Anderson, Public Health              •   Audrey Light, Economics
   •   Dawn Anderson-Butcher, Social              •   Elizabeth Menaghan, Sociology
       Work                                       •   James Moore, PAES/ Bell Center
   •   Chris Bartlett, Batelle Center for         •   Randy Olsen, Economics
       Molecular Medicine, Nationwide             •   Ruth Peterson, Sociology
       Children’s Hospital                        •   Shayne Piasta, TNL
   •   Chris Browning, Sociology                  •   jon powell, Kirwan Institute for Race
   •   David Blau, Economics                          and Ethnicity
   •   Elizabeth Cooksey, Sociology               •   Townsand Price-Spratlen, Sociology
   •   Mark Davis, CJRC                           •   Ann O’Connell, Ed P&L
   •   Tamara Davis, Social Work                  •   Zhenchao Qian, Sociology
   •   Colette Dollarhide, PAES/Counselor         •   Liana Sayer, Sociology
       Ed.                                        •   Kammi Schmeer, Sociology
   •   Doug Downey, Sociology                     •   Scott Scheer, FAES, Extension, 4-H
   •   Jodi Ford, Nursing                         •   Vladimir Sloutsky, Psychology
   •   Reanne Frank, Sociology                    •   Gary Smith, Nationwide Children’s
   •   Mary Fristad, Psychology/Psychiatry            Hospital Injury Center
   •   Dorinda Gallant, Ed P&L                    •   Elizabeth Stasny, Statistics
   •   Andrew Grant-Thomas, Kirwan                •   Kenny Steinman, Public Health
       Institute                                  •   Sandy Tanenbaum, Public Health
   •   Robert Greenbaum, Public Policy            •   Glenn Thomas, Nationwide
   •   Angela Harvey, Sociology-Newark                Children’s Hospital Mental Health
   •   Judson Jeffries, AAAS                          Services
   •   Laura Justice, TNL                         •   Mike Vasey, Psychology
   •   Anthonia Kalu, AAAS                        •   Kristi Williams, Sociology
   •   Kelichi Kalu, AAAS                         •   Ningchuan Xiao, Geography
   •   Rebecca Kantor-Martin, TNL




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09            10
HDFS Graduate Student Organization (GSO)
GSO is dedicated to…

    •     promote mutual support and cohesion between graduate students.
    •     address graduate students’ academic concerns, issues, and problems.
    •     help new students to get accustomed to the department and graduate school through mentoring
          and advising.
    •     enhance the effective communication and collaboration between the graduate students and the
          faculty.

Who are we?
  • Officers for the 2009-2010 academic year:
      • Chair: Sara Hart
      • Secretary/Treasurer: Felisha Lotspeich
      • Brown Bag/Community Service: Rikki Garren
      • Social: Mitchell Bartholomew

What do we do?

o       GSO meetings:

An opportunity to get together and share our ideas, issues and concerns about anything to the department.
Throw in some ideas for social activities or service to the community! Let us know what you want! GSO
meetings are held several times throughout the quarter and all graduate students are welcome. If you have
any issues and concerns, raise them in GSO meetings, the president will announce them to the faculty on
behalf of GSO and will represent graduate students by participating to the departmental meetings.

o       Brown Bag seminars

Monthly, informal departmental seminars to keep track of the research in the department! All HDFS
faculty members and graduate students are welcome to participate. Just grab your lunch and satisfy your
hunger with lots of knowledge!

o       Service to the Community

Many opportunities for volunteering! GSO service chair organizes voluntary activities that you can
participate to serve to Columbus community and beyond.

o       Social activities

Socialize and have fun! GSO throws several parties, and happy hours for graduate students throughout the
year. Every spring, we take the lead to organize end of year picnic for all graduate students, faculty, and
staff.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                   11
General Information on HDFS Graduate Programs of Study
We offer a Master’s of Science degree in Human Development and Family Science, a Doctorate
of Philosophy in Human Development and Family Science, and a Doctorate of Philosophy in
Couple and Family Therapy. To be admitted to our graduate program, you must have a minimum
score of 500 on the verbal and quantitative sections of the GRE, and a minimum of 4.5 on the
analytical writing section. You also need at least a 3.0/4.0 undergraduate GPA and a 3.5/4.0
graduate GPA if applying for the PH.D.

Those interested in the straight-through Ph.D. program should be exceptional students who have
well above the minimums to be considered for admission. Those interested in the CFT program
should note that this is a Ph.D.-only program. We do not have a Master’s degree in CFT. For
information about the CFT Ph.D. program please contact Program Director Dr. Suzanne Bartle-
Haring.

The Graduate School's residency requirement. Graduate School rules specify that doctoral
students must meet doctoral residency requirements. These requirements can only be met after
the first 45 hours of graduate study, usually the M.S. degree, have been completed here or
transferred from another university; they must be met before students may take the candidacy
examination. They require that students pursue a concentrated period of study, which consists of
enrolling for at least 10 graduate credit hours per quarter during three out of four consecutive
quarters and completing a minimum of an additional 45 graduate credit hours. Consult Section
VII.2 of the Graduate School Handbook.

Registration Credit Hours

Graduate Associates who are at the MS or Ph.D. Pre-Candidate level are required to register
for at least 10 graduate credit hours per quarter (except for Summer Quarter, where 7 is the
requirement), excluding Sociology 800 or 801.

Graduate Associates who are at the Ph.D. Candidate level are required to register for 3
graduate credit hours per quarter (including Summer Quarter). These hours are normally
dissertation hours.

Fellows and trainees at the MA or Ph.D. Pre-Candidate level are required to register for 15
graduate credits per quarter (including Summer Quarter). Fellows and trainees at the Ph.D.
Candidate level are required to register for 3 graduate credit hours (including Summer Quarter).

Presidential Fellows at the MA or Ph.D. Pre-Candidate level are required to register for 15
graduate credits per quarter (including Summer Quarter). Presidential Fellows at the Ph.D.
Candidate level are required to register for 3 graduate credit hours per quarter (including
Summer Quarter).

A student must register for at least 3 graduate credit hours for each quarter in which any part
(written or oral) of the candidacy examination is taken. Consult section II.2 of the Graduate
School Handbook for additional information regarding registration, scheduling, and changes in schedules.



HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                  12
         MASTER’S DEGREE PROGRAM – GENERAL INFORMATION
         (sections in italics come from The Ohio State University Graduate Handbook)
                 http://www.gradsch.ohio-state.edu/Depo/PDF/Handbook.pdf )

Purpose Master’s degree programs give students the opportunity to gain additional knowledge
and necessary skills in a field in order to engage in research and other scholarly activities, to
teach, and to become practitioners. At this university, master’s degree programs consist of a
coherent pattern of courses and other educational experiences, a Master’s Examination, and, in
many cases, a thesis or its equivalent.

Program of Study Each student selects a program of study in consultation with an advisor. The
program must include a reasonable concentration in a single area or in related academic areas,
must be approved by the advisor, and must be within the rules of the Graduate Studies
Committee.

Foreign Language Requirement None.

Credit Hours and Residence Requirements A minimum of 45 graduate credit hours is
required to earn a master’s degree. Thirty-six of those credit hours must be completed at this
university over a period of at least two quarters. A student must be registered for at least three
graduate credit hours the quarter in which graduation is expected.

A minimum of 45 graduate credit hours (including thesis, HDFS 998) is required to earn a
Master’s degree, Plan A.

For Plan B, a minimum of 50 graduate credit hours is required, including five (5) credit hours of
independent study for planning, executing, and reporting a special project (HDFS 793 or 993).

Time Limit Each Graduate Studies Committee may establish time limits for the completion of
its master’s degree programs (ref. VI.1).

Requirements for the Master's degree must be completed within three (3) calendar years.

Plan A, Plan B, and Other There are two master’s degree program plans: thesis and non-
thesis. Students may pursue either plan, subject to the rules of the Graduate Studies Committee.
Other plans for tagged master’s degrees proposed by Graduate Studies Committees require the
approval of the Council on Research and Graduate Studies.

A decision on the appropriate program option should be made by the student, considering his/her
academic and professional goals, in consultation with the advisor. With careful planning, either
program option may possibly be completed in four (4) quarters of full-time graduate enrollment
(12-15 hours/quarter), but five (5) or more quarters are usual.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                13
       DOCTORAL DEGREE PROGRAMS – GENERAL INFORMATION

Purpose Doctoral degree programs give students the opportunity to achieve a high level of
scholarly competence and to develop the capacity to contribute to the knowledge of their field. At
this University, doctoral degree programs consist of a coherent pattern of courses and other
educational experiences, a Candidacy Examination, a dissertation (Ph.D.) or document
(D.M.A.), and a Final Oral Examination.

                    RESIDENCE AND CREDIT HOUR REQUIREMENTS

Minimum Hours A minimum of 120 graduate credit hours beyond the baccalaureate degree is
required to earn a doctoral degree. If a master’s degree has been earned by the student, then a
minimum of 90 graduate credit hours beyond the master’s degree is required. If the master’s
degree was earned at another university, it must be transferred to this University (ref. VII.2). A
student must be registered for at least three graduate credit hours during the quarter(s) of the
Candidacy Examination, the quarter of the Final Oral Examination, and the quarter of
expected graduation.

Transfer of Excess Master's Credit When a doctoral student has taken a master’s degree at
this University and has earned graduate credit in excess of the minimum required for that
degree, the student’s advisor, with the approval of the Graduate Studies Committee, notifies the
Graduate School of the courses to be counted toward the 90 graduate credit hours required for
the doctoral degree. This notification must occur no later than the end of the first quarter of
enrollment beyond completion of the master’s degree. Such graduate credit hours would be those
normally earned as part of the doctoral degree program. No more than 20 hours of research
(998 or 999) may be counted.

Petition: Waiver of Credit-Hour Requirement The Graduate Studies Committee may petition
the Dean of the Graduate School to waive the 120 graduate credit-hour requirement when it
imposes an undue delay on a student’s earning a doctoral degree. The student must fulfill all
other doctoral degree requirements.

Residence The purpose of the residence requirement is to give students the opportunity to
engage in intensive, concentrated study over an extended period of time in association with
faculty members and other students in an atmosphere conducive to a high level of intellectual
and scholarly activity. The following requirements must be fulfilled after the master’s degree has
been earned or after the first 45 hours of graduate credit have been completed:

       1. a minimum of 45 graduate credit hours must be completed at this University
       2. a minimum of three out of four consecutive quarters with an enrollment of at least nine
       graduate credit hours per quarter must be completed while in residence at this University
       3. a minimum of 6 graduate credit hours over a period of at least two quarters must be
       completed after admission to candidacy (ref. VII.2)



HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09               14
GENERAL CURRICULUM AT GLANCE
              MS Requirements                                    Straight-through Ph.D Requirements                      Ph.D. Requirements (after MS)
 Course #      Title                              Credits        Course #   Title                          Credits       Course #   Title                          Credits
 701.02        Proseminar                                   1    701        Proseminar                               1   701        Proseminar                               1
                                                                 880        General Systems Theory                   4   880        General Systems Theory                   4
 764           Advanced Family                              4    764        Advanced Family                          4   764        Advanced Family                          4
 765           Advanced Child I                             4    765        Advanced Child I                         4   765        Advanced Child I                         4
                                                            3                                                        3                                                       3
               Individual Cognitive                                         Individual Cognitive                                    Individual Cognitive
  862          Development                                       862        Development                                  862        Development
 760*          Research Methods                             5    760*       Research Methods                         5
                                                                 820        Family Theory                            3   820        Family Theory                            3
                                                                            Theories in Child and                    3              Theories in Child and                    3
                                                                 825        Human Development                            825        Human Development
Total Core Course Credits                                   17                                                   27                                                      22

               Plan A (45 credits)
               Additional credits in statistics             9               Additional credits in                21                 Additional credits in                12
               and/or methods                                               statistics and/or methods                               statistics and/or methods
                                                                            (may include independent                                (may include independent
                                                                            study)                                                  study)
               Additional credits in HDFS                   10              Additional coursework                56                 Additional coursework                35
                                                                            and/or independent studies                              and/or independent studies
                                                                            Qualifying exam preparation          10
                                                                            hours (to be determined by
                                                                            committee)
               Thesis credit hours                          9               Dissertation credit hours (6             6              Dissertation credit hours (6             6
                                                                            credit minimum.)                                        credit minimum.)
 TOTAL                                                      45   TOTAL                                          120      TOTAL                                           75
               Plan B (50 credits)
               Additional credits in statistics             9
               and/or methods
               Additional credits in HDFS                   19
               Independent study credits for                 5
               project
                                                      50
*Those who come with a Master’s in HDFS or related field can petition Graduate Studies Committee to waive some required courses after a review of syllabi.


HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                                             15
 CFT GENERAL CURRICULUM AT GLANCE
Ph.D. Requirements (with Master’s degree but    Ph.D. Requirements (after MS in CFT from an
without M.S. in CFT from an accredited program) accredited program)
HDFS Core Requirements for Ph.D. Program*       HDFS Core Requirements Ph.D. Program*
Course #    Title                                   Credits        Course #     Title                                  Credits
701         Proseminar                                        1    701          Proseminar                                       1
880         General Systems Theory                            4    880          General Systems Theory                           4
764         Advanced Family                                   4    764          Advanced Family                                  4
765         Advanced Child I                                  4    765          Advanced Child I                                 4
862         Individual Cognitive Development                  3    862          Ind. Cognitive Development                       3
820         Family Theory                                     3    820          Family Theory                                    3
825         Theories in Child and Human                            825          Theories in Child and Human                      3
            Development                                     3                   Development
 subtotal                                                  22                                                                22

CFT Requirements                                                       CFT Requirements
650          Foundations in Marital and Family                4    878          Family Therapy Supervision                       4
             Therapy
874          Family Therapy Theory I                          4    881          Research in Marital and Family                   4
                                                                                Therapy
875          Family Therapy Theory II                         4    Choose 2 Seminars in Couple and Family Therapy
876          Marital Therapy Theory                           4
870          Family Systems Assessment                        4    880.02       Diversity in Families and Family Therapy         4
670.02       Human Sexuality                                  3    880.03       Critical Incidents in Family Therapy             4
770          Professional and Ethical Issues in               4    880          Adolescents in Family Therapy                    4
             Marriage and Family Therapy
                                                                   880          Other                                            4
Choose 1 of the following:
PAES          Diagnosis and Assessment of                   3
926.01        Individuals
PSY 854       Diagnosis and Assessment of                   4
              Individuals
subtotal                                             30 or 31
Additional Doctoral level course requirements
878           Family Therapy Supervision                    4
881           Research in Marital and Family                4
              Therapy
Choose 2 Seminars in Couple and Family Therapy
880.02        Diversity in Families and Family              4
              Therapy
880.03        Critical Incidents in Family Therapy          4
880           Adolescents in Family Therapy                 4
880           Other                                         4
subtotal                                                   16
             Additional credits in statistics and/or                      Additional credits in statistics and/or methods
             methods (may include ind. study)              12             (may include ind. study)                           12
             Additional coursework and/or                                 Additional coursework and/or independent
             independent studies                            0             studies                                            23
             Dissertation credit hours (6 credit
             minimum.)                                      6             Dissertation credit hours (6 credit minimum.)       6
TOTAL                                                78 or 79 TOTAL                                                          75
*Those who come with a Master’s in HDFS or related field can petition Graduate Studies Committee to waive some required
courses after a review of syllabi.
                                                                  16
Graduate Courses Offered in 2009-2010*

Course          Title                          Instructor       Quarter      Day/time of
number                                                          offered      course
HDFS 650        Foundations of Couples and     Lehan            A09          T/TH
                Family Therapy                                               2:30-4:18PM
HDFS 670.02     Human Sexuality                Gangamma         A09          MW
                                                                             12:30-1:48PM
HDFS 701.02     Professional Development       Wilkinson        A09          Mondays
                Seminar                                                      4:30-5:18PM
HDFS 760        Research Analysis              Wilkinson        A09          Mondays
                                                                             12:30-2:48PM
HDFS 764        Advanced Family                Gavazzi          A09          Wednesdays
                Development                                                  1:30-4:48PM
HDFS 862        Seminar in HDFS: Secondary     Snyder           A09          Wednesdays
                data analysis                                                9:30-
                                                                             11:48AM
HDFS 862        Seminar in HDFS: Single-       Goldstein        A09          Wednesdays
                Subject Experimental                                         4:00-6:30PM
                Designs

HDFS 670.03     Courtship and Marriage         Buettner         W10          TBN
HDFS 825        Theories of Human              Glassman         W10          TBN
                Development
HDFS 862        Seminar in HDFS: Family,       Petrill          W10          TBN
                genetics and environment
HDFS 870        Family Systems Assessment      Bartle-Haring    W10          TBN
HDFS 876        Marital Therapy Theory         Lehan            W10          TBN

HDFS 670.03     Courtship and Marriage         Kamp Dush        SP10         TBN
HDFS 765        Advanced Child                 Feng             SP10         TBN
                Development (Social)
HDFS 820        Family Theory                  Bartle-Haring    SP10         TBN
HDFS 862        Seminar in HDFS: Cultural      Glassman         SP10         TBN
                and Cross-Cultural
                Development: Development
                in Context
HDFS 862        Violence and the Family        Bonomi           SP10         TBN
HDFS 871        Research Methods in CFT        Slesnick         SP10         TBN
HDFS 880        Critical Incidents in Couple   Bartle-Haring    SP10         TBN
                and Family Therapy

HDFS 880        Structural Equation Modeling   Bartle-Haring    SU10         TBN
                                                                SU10         TBN

*This schedule is subject to change and should be used as a planning guide. Information about changes will be
offered as it is available.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                        17
Historical Information on Courses offered in AY 2008-2009

Course          Title                             Instructor         Quarter
number                                                               offered
HDFS 650        Foundations of Couples and        Lehan              A08
                Family Therapy
HDFS 660        Children and their Families       Knerr              A08
                Under Stress
HDFS 665        Parenting                         Kiehl              A08
HDFS 670.02     Human Sexuality                   Gangamma           A08
HDFS 701.02     Professional Development          Bartle-Haring      A08
                Seminar
HDFS 760        Research Analysis                 Wilkinson          A08
HDFS 764        Advanced Family Development       Gavazzi            A08

HDFS 670.02     Human Sexuality                   Miller             W09
HDFS 670.03     Courtship and Marriage            Buettner           W09
HDFS 765        Advanced Child Development        Schoppe-Sullivan   W09
HDFS 770        Ethical and Professional Issues   Bartle-Haring      W09
                in Couple and Family Therapy
HDFS 825        Theories of Development Across    Glassman           W09
                the Lifespan
HDFS 874        Family Therapy Theory I           Lehan              W09

HDFS 670.03     Courtship and Marriage            Kamp Dush          SP09
HDFS 880        General Systems Theory            Gavazzi            SP09
HDFS 840.01     Adolescents and their Families    Gavazzi            SP09
HDFS 862        Seminar in HDFS: Advanced         Sloutsky           SP09
                Child Development
HDFS 862        Seminar in HDFS:                  Glassman           SP09
                Bronfenbrenner’s Bioecological
                Approach
HDFS 875        Family Therapy Theory II          Bartle-Haring      SP09
HDFS 880        Seminar in CFT                    Slesnick           SP09

HDFS 840.04     Adolescence: Risk in Context      Wilkinson          SU09
HDFS 862        Seminar in HDFS: Attachment       Schoppe-Sullivan   SU09




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                     18
                                 The Ohio State University
                         College of Education and Human Ecology
                    Department of Human Development & Family Science


                            MASTER'S PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Program Plan          Course work to comprise the student's program of study will be selected by the
                      student and advisor who will develop a program with emphasis in family science
                      and/or human development, depending on professional choice and qualifications:

Advisors Upon admission, the Graduate Studies Committee will assign an advisor to the student. If the
student's interests within his/her assigned area change, a different advisor may be sought, depending on
faculty availability and program resources. A change to another program area requires the permission of the
Graduate Studies Committee.

Credit Hour Requirement
          Plan A – 45 hours (graduate credit)
          Plan B – 50 hours (graduate credit)

Program Options, General The program of study for the Plan A option is designed to build research
understanding that culminates in a Master's thesis. The General program of study for the Plan B option is
designed to build a systematic approach to a problem that culminates in an independent study project. The
Plan B option places emphasis on course work, whereas the Plan A option places greater emphasis on the
development and demonstration of research skills.


Program Plan The student provides the program plan on Approved Program Plan for MS Degree, with
signatures obtained from the Advisory/Examination Committee members indicating approval of the
program of study, copies should be maintained by the advisor and one should go to the department office for
the student’s graduate file. The advisor and student should work closely to create this program plan early in
the student’s tenure in the program, preferably within the first year. The advisor should also verify that the
completed program is in compliance with the filed program and any approved changes, by the beginning of
the quarter that the student plans to graduate.

       Plan A Requirements Within the minimum 45 graduate credit hour program requirement for the
       Plan A program of study, course work, other than that allotted to the thesis (998), must include a
       minimum of 36 graduate credit hours completed at this University and at least nine (9) graduate
       credit hours covering research design, methodology, and statistics in addition to the required HDFS
       760. Also included must be a minimum of 12 graduate credit hours at the 700- and 800-course
       levels. At least 30 credit hours must be in letter-graded course work (A-E).

      Plan B Requirements Each Plan B program of study must complete a minimum of 50 graduate
      credit hours, including a minimum of 36 graduate credit hours completed at this University and five
      (5) credit hours of independent study for planning, executing, and reporting a special project. In
      addition, at least nine (9) graduate credit hours covering research design, methodology, and statistics
      must be taken in addition to the required HDFS 760. Also included must be a minimum of 12
      graduate credit hours at the 700- and 800-course levels. At least 35 credit hours must be in letter-
      graded course work (A-E).
HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                     19
Examination Committee Both Plan A and Plan B Master's degree students have an Examination
Committee. The Examination Committee consists of a minimum of two (2) Graduate Faculty members,
including the student's advisor. The advisor serves as chair of the Examination Committee and, with the
student, chooses other faculty to serve on the committee based on their knowledge of the subject matter and
familiarity with the student.

                      The role of the Examination Committee for each option follows:

                        Examination Committee                      Plan A      Plan B
                        (at least two (2) members)

                        Evaluates written examination               X

                        Approves thesis or project proposal         X            X
                          and draft

                        Serves on oral examination                  X

                        Signs Final Examination Form for            X            X
                          For the Master's Degree
                          (Form 5352)



Combined Bachelor's and Master's Degree Program See Graduate School Handbook (VIII.1) .
Admission procedures and details of the combined Bachelor's and Master's Degree Program are available in
the Undergraduate Student Services Office, Campbell Hall. Students admitted to this combined degree
program must meet the requirements and standards outlined in this Handbook for either the Plan A or Plan
B Master's degree program.

                                             MASTER'S EXAMINATION

Purpose The Master’s Examination is a test of the student’s knowledge of the field. It is the final
validation of performance for that degree. The Master’s Examination is taken after submitting the
Application to Graduate form and during the quarter in which the student plans to graduate. A student
must be registered for at least three graduate credit hours during the quarter this examination is taken.

Responsibility The Master’s Examination is administered under the auspices of the Graduate Studies
Committee. The responsibility for the examination rests with the student’s Master’s Examination
Committee.

Master's Examination Committee The Master’s Examination Committee is composed of at least two
Graduate Faculty members including the student’s advisor (ref. VI.2). Other Graduate Faculty members
may participate in generating, administering, or scoring parts of the examination, but the Master’s
Examination Committee is finally responsible for the conduct and evaluation of the entire examination. The
advisor of a Master’s student must hold membership at the category M level or higher in the student’s
graduate program (ref. VI.2).

Attendance If the Master’s Examination includes an oral portion, the advisor serves as chairperson. All
members of the Master’s Examination Committee must be present during the entire examination and are
expected to participate fully in questioning during the course of the examination and in the discussion and
decision on the result. Other faculty members and graduate students may attend the examination, subject to
the rules of the department.


HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                             20
Plan A The Master’s Examination for a student pursuing the thesis option must include an oral portion
and may include a written portion. The Master’s Examination need not be confined to the thesis topic. The
oral portion of the Master’s Examination must take place during announced university business hours,
Monday through Friday.

An oral final comprehensive examination is required of all candidates for the Plan A Master's degree. The
Master's Examination is up to two (2) hours in length. The oral examination consists of questions related to
the research involved in the Master's thesis and to the student's fundamental knowledge of the discipline and
course of study. The student learns about the scope and conduct of the Plan A Master's Examination from
the advisor.

Plan B The Master’s Examination for a student pursuing the non-thesis option must include a minimum
four-hour written portion and may include an oral portion. The oral portion must take place during
announced university business hours, Monday through Friday.

The Plan B Master's Examination is written after the student has met course work requirements for the
degree, including the independent study project. Before permitting a student to take the Master's
Examination, the advisor verifies that the independent study project is satisfactorily completed. The Plan B
project should be completed and approved not later than the fifth week of the quarter in which the
student expects to graduate. The Master's Examination is given on the Friday of the 7th week of the
quarter in which the student expects to graduate. The written examination is four (4) hours in length and
is designed to test the student's fundamental knowledge of the discipline and to include topics from courses
completed by the student. The student is informed in advance of general topics to be included in the
Master's Examination through the identification of courses completed in the program study and through
discussion with the advisor. At the recommendation of the student's Examination Committee, an oral
examination may be scheduled following completion of the written examination.

                            RESULT OF THE MASTER'S EXAMINATION

Decision Only the Master’s Examination Committee members are to be present for discussion of the
student’s performance and the decision about the outcome. Each examiner indicates judgment by signing
the Master’s Examination Report form that must be submitted to the Graduate School no later than
Wednesday two weeks prior to commencement. The advisor notifies the student and the Graduate Studies
Committee of the Master’s Examination Committee’s decision.

The advisor reports the result of the Master's Examination to (1) the student, (2) the Graduate School on the
Graduate School Form sent to the advisor by the Graduate School prior to the examination, and (3) the
Chair of the Graduate Studies Committee.

Satisfactory The student is considered to have completed the Master’s Examination successfully only
when the decision of the Master’s Examination Committee is unanimously affirmative.

Unsatisfactory If the examination is judged unsatisfactory, the Master’s Examination Committee must
decide whether the student will be permitted to take a second Master’s Examination in that graduate
program and must record that decision on the Master’s Examination Report form.

Second Master's Examination If a second examination is held, the Master’s Examination Committee
must be the same as the original one, unless a substitution is approved by the Dean of the Graduate School.

Repeat A student who has failed the Master’s Examination twice in one graduate program is not permitted
HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                21
to take another Master’s Examination in that program.

Review On written appeal by the student or a member of the Master’s Examination Committee, the
Graduate School Grievance Committee reviews the Master’s Examination to ensure its conformity to
Graduate School rules and to determine if it was conducted fairly and without prejudice to the student. The
Council on Research and Graduate Studies has established review procedures, printed in Appendix C of this
handbook.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                   22
   Flow Chart for M.S. Thesis Completion

   Activity                                      Deadline
   Select thesis advisor and two                At least 3 quarters
   other thesis committee members               before graduation
   in consultation with advisor
   Prepare thesis proposal and                  No later than the
   obtain committee approval for                middle of the
   thesis proposal                              quarter before
                                                graduation
   Obtain Application to Graduate               By the 2nd Friday
   from the Graduate School web                 of the quarter of
   site and submit to Graduate                  graduation
   School (requires signature of
   advisor and Graduate Studies chair)
   Submit preliminary draft to                  By the 3rd week of
   members of committee, other                  the quarter of
   than advisor, for comments                   graduation
   Schedule time and place for Oral             By the middle of
   Exam                                         the quarter of
                                                graduation
   Prepare final draft and distribute           One week before
   to committee.                                Oral Exam
   Take Oral Exam and report                    Check with
   results to the Graduate Studies Chair and    Graduate School for
   Graduate School                              the official deadline
   Submit final version of approved             Check with
   thesis to Graduate School                    Graduate School for
                                                the official deadline
   MS is awarded                                Commencement




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09              23
                                        THESIS (Plan A)

        Be sure to work closely with your advisor as you move through the thesis process. Advisors
work differently but it is advisable to start thinking about thesis ideas early on and move through the
process over at least one academic year. Thus, during autumn quarter of your second year in the
program plan to write a proposal and make sure you have all IRB approvals for the research project.
Have the proposal accepted by your committee. Then in winter quarter complete the research
project and/or analysis and write up the results and discussion. Finally, in spring quarter make
revisions and defend your thesis in a timely manner so that you can meet all required deadlines.
These deadlines are posted by the Graduate School for each quarter.


Proposal Each student pursuing a Plan A (thesis) program is responsible for developing a thesis
proposal, with the guidance of the advisor, to be presented for the Examination Committee's
approval. One (1) copy of the signed approval Form is filed with the department. The advisor will
delineate and discuss further with the student the nature of a thesis. If the approved thesis proposal
calls for the use of human subjects, an IRB Application for Initial Review of Human Subjects
Research must be submitted (http://orrp.osu.edu/humansubjects/irb/intialreview.cfm).

Thesis Format See the Graduate School Handbook
                  (http://www.gradsch.ohio-state.edu/Depo/PDF/Handbook.pdf)
Draft Approval If the student satisfactorily completes the Master’s Examination and if the student
presents an acceptable thesis, the Master’s Examination Committee members indicate approval of
the thesis by signing the Thesis Approval form. The Thesis Approval form must be submitted to the
Graduate School no later than one week before commencement. The title page of the thesis must
be signed by the student’s advisor.

A draft of the thesis is submitted to each member of the Examination Committee for review when it
is in a form satisfactory to the advisor.

Restricted Material Theses must not include material restricted from publication.

Submission The thesis must be submitted to the Graduate School no later than the Wednesday one
week before commencement. The final copy is microfilmed and then bound and deposited in the
University Libraries along with the microfilmed copy.

In addition one final, unbound copy of the thesis must also be deposited by the student with the
department's secretary.

Abstract One copy of a 200-250 word abstract must be deposited by the student in the Human
Ecology Graduate Office. Also, the student's advisor must be given a copy of the abstract.

Fees Microfilming and binding fees must be paid no later than the Wednesday one week before
commencement.



HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                 24
                          INDEPENDENT STUDY PROJECT (Plan B)

The purpose of the independent study (793 or 993) in the Plan B option is to plan, conduct, and
report on an academically-related experience. The nature of the project is to be determined by the
student in consultation with and with approval of the project supervisor of the study and the
Examination Committee. The nature of the project may differ with each student. Some may prefer a
formal, structured approach while others may select an informal, experiential approach.

The range of suitable topics for the project is purposely left broad and undefined. An appropriate
project could involve strictly library research or active participation in a field experience or
internship. Examples of types of projects are a literature review on a selected topic, an annotated
bibliography on a selected topic, development of an audio-visual presentation, the development of
course instructional materials, or a service oriented field experience or internship. The end result of
the independent study project may be in a variety of forms in relation to the nature of the project; for
example, a paper submitted for publication, instructional materials/resources, or a bulletin. If the
primary output of the project is not a formal paper, it should be presented in the context of a paper
with appropriate introduction, explanation of purpose and procedures, and citation of references.

The independent study (793 or 993) may be supervised by any Category M or P Graduate Faculty
member in the department. The faculty member with whom the student chooses to work may or
may not be the advisor but must be on the student's Examination Committee.

The independent study is planned by the student and described in a prospectus. The Approval Form
is signed by the student and the Examination Committee. The prospectus for the independent study
includes the following information:

       1.      Expected goals/outcomes to be accomplished in the project.

       2.      Method/procedures to be followed in achieving expected goals/outcomes.

       3.      Method/procedures for assessing the extent to which goals/outcomes are
               accomplished.

       The signed Prospectus Approval Form is filed in the department office.

       When the project is completed, it is reviewed by the student's Examination Committee. A
       signed copy of the Thesis/Project Draft Approval Form must be filed with the chair of the
       Graduate Studies Committee before the student takes the Master's Examination.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                  25
                       ADDITIONAL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Application to Graduate A student must submit an Application to Graduate form to the Graduate
School no later than the second Friday of the quarter in which graduation is expected. The
application is valid for that quarter only. Submitting this application indicates that the student is
expected to complete all degree requirements that quarter. The form must be signed by the student,
the advisor, and the Graduate Studies Committee Chairperson. The degree plan the student is
pursuing and the proposed Master’s Examination Committee members must be listed on the form.
.

Responsibility It is the dual responsibility of the Graduate Studies Committee and the Dean of the
Graduate School to review the student’s record and ensure that all degree requirements are
completed at the end of the expected quarter of graduation. In addition to the master’s degree
requirements described in this section, the student

       1. must have earned a cumulative point-hour ratio of at least 3.0 for all graduate credit
       hours taken at this university (ref. VI.5)
       2. must have fulfilled all additional requirements published by the Graduate Studies
       Committee
       3. must have final grades for all courses received in the University Registrar’s Office by the
       deadline published in the Master Schedule of Classes
       4. must have fulfilled all other requirements by the deadlines established by the Graduate
       School

A student who does not meet published graduation deadlines but who does complete all degree
requirements by the last business day prior to the first day of classes for the following quarter may
graduate the following quarter without registering or paying fees.

The advisor is responsible for verifying that the completed program is in compliance with the filed
program and approved changes.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                 26
                                PROGRAM OF STUDY
                                The Ohio State University
                        College of Education and Human Ecology
                        Human Development and Family Science

        STRAIGHT THROUGH DOCTORAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Program Structure The Straight Through Doctoral Program is designed for highly qualified
students who know their interests lie in research and academia. These students begin the program
after completing their undergraduate degree.

               • Straight Through Ph.D. Students complete all core requirements totaling 27 credits
                 in HDFS courses.
               • 21 additional credits in statistics/and or methods (may include independent study).
               • 10 credits to complete qualifying exam to be determined by committee.
               • 56 credits in additional course work and/or independent studies (maximum 30)
               • 6 credits for dissertation.


Advisors Upon admission, The Graduate Studies Committee will assign an advisor to the student.
If the student’s interests within his/her assigned area change, a different advisor may be sought,
depending on faculty availability and program resources. A change to another program area requires
the permission of the Graduate Studies Committee.

General Each student selects a program of study in consultation with an advisor. It must include a
reasonable concentration and breadth of study designed to foster research, scholarship, and a
knowledge of a specialty in relation to allied academic areas, must be approved by the advisor, and
is subject to the rules of the Graduate Studies Committee.

Major and Minor Areas Each Doctoral student is expected to complete course work and to
be examined in a major area in the department along with other courses across the university that
would allow the student to specialize in a unique area of concentration.

Qualifying Exams for Straight Through Ph.D. To chart progress within the program, the Straight
Through Ph.D. student takes a qualifying exam to ensure that they are ready to move forward for
advanced study. Once the student has completed all core requirements, the student, advisor and one
another Graduate Faculty Member determine the form of the qualifying exam:

       1. The “exam” can take many forms (i.e. literature review, research project, paper for
       publication).

       2. The student completes the project and has an oral defense with two committee members
(advisor and one other Graduate Faculty Member).

        3. The committee determines the adequacy of both the written and oral performance on the
project.
HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                27
       4. A form is submitted to the Graduate Studies Committee stating the satisfactory or
       unsatisfactory performance on the written and oral portion of the exam.

       5. If the committee determines that the performance on both portions was satisfactory, the
student continues in the program.

       6. If the committee determines that the performance on the written or oral portion was
       unsatisfactory, the student can be allowed a second exam. If the student passes this
       second exam, and has the required number of credits, they can be awarded a master’s
       degree but will not be able to continue in the Straight Through program. If the student
       does not pass this second exam they will be asked to leave the program and will not be
       able to register for classes in the department.

Once the qualifying exam has been successfully completed, the student continues in the program like
a regular Ph.D. student. They should continue to work closely with their advisor on their program of
study and begin to form their advisory committee for their candidacy exams and dissertation work.

Advisory Committee The Doctoral program of study is planned by the student and the
advisor in consultation with an Advisory Committee composed of the advisor and a minimum of
three (3) Graduate Faculty members with M or P Graduate Faculty status from the student's major
area and other areas of concentration. The advisor serves as chairperson of the Advisory Committee
and, with the student, chooses faculty members for the Advisory Committee based on their
knowledge of the subject matter and the familiarity with the student. The membership of the
Doctoral Advisory Committee may change during the course of a student's Doctoral program of
study. At the time of the General Examination, the Advisory Committee usually becomes the
student's Examining Committee.

Dissertation Research Area An area of interest for dissertation research should be identified
early in the student's Doctoral work so that the program of study can be planned with the dissertation
research in mind. The research should contribute knowledge to the field of study or discipline. The
student's advisor and members of the Advisory Committee serve as resource persons to help the
student select an appropriate research problem. Faculty members outside the College also may be
consulted concerning an area of research. If the dissertation research involves the use of human
subjects, an IRB Application for Initial Review of Human Subjects Research must be submitted
(http://orrp.osu.edu/irb/initialreview/index.cfm ).

Program of Review The Graduate Studies Committee has a responsibility to oversee the quality of
graduate programs offered in the Department. It is, therefore, the responsibility of the Graduate
Studies Committee to review and act upon all proposed Doctoral programs of study.

The Doctoral program of study should be discussed and formalized by the student and the Advisory
Committee early in the Doctoral study. The Approved Doctoral Program of Study form should be
submitted to the Graduate Study Committee no later than the quarter before the student begins their
candidacy examination.



HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                28
Guidelines     In reviewing Doctoral programs of study, the Graduate Studies Committee, or its
               designated subcommittee, uses the following guidelines:

               1. Congruence between the student's proposed program and departmental program
                 requirements.

               2. Congruence between the student's stated goals and the proposed program.

               3. Level and amount of course work: Majority of Graded Courses at or above the 700
                 level.

               4. Research methods and statistics: At least twenty-one (21) graduate credit hours at
                 a level beyond the introductory level.

               5. Distribution of graded (A-E)/ungraded (S-U) courses: A maximum of 30 ungraded
                 (S-U) credits can be taken to be counted toward the degree.

Action and written comments from the Graduate Studies Committee on each proposed Doctoral
program of study are sent to the student and to the advisor. In addition, a copy is retained in the
student's folder in the department office.

Straight Through Ph.D. students follow the same procedures for the general exam and dissertation as
regular doctoral students. Please follow the procedures listed in the General Exam and Dissertation
Sections that follow.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                 29
                                PROGRAM OF STUDY
                                The Ohio State University
                        College of Education and Human Ecology
                        Human Development and Family Science

                       DOCTORAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS


Program Structure: The Doctoral Program in HDFS is designed for those interested in advanced
study in an area of concentration in HDFS. It is a research intensive degree, with mentoring toward
academic careers. Students in the doctoral program will have already received a master’s degree and
complete 75 credit hours which includes the following:

   •   All core requirements as listed on page (9), 22 credits in all.
   •   12 additional credits in statistics/methods (may include independent study)
   •   35 credits in additional course work and/or independent studies (maximum 20 of 35 total)
   •   6 credits for dissertation

Those who come with a master’s in HDFS or related field can petition Graduate Studies Committee
to be exempted from some or all required courses with review of syllabi.

Those who come into the Ph.D. program with a Master’s in HDFS from The Ohio State University
must complete 75 additional hours of graduate credit beyond the 45 they obtained from the master’s
degree program. If the student has more than 45 hours, some of those hours may be counted toward
the 75 for the Ph.D. If the student has taken all of the required courses in their master’s program,
then they do not repeat those courses. The credits count only once. You cannot “double count” hours
between the Master’s and Ph.D. program.

Pre-Requisites to Doctoral Program.

               • At least 9 hours of research work including methods, design, and statistics.

               • At least 20 hours of credit in human development, family science,
                 childcare/preschool education, or related field. Students whose master's degree was
                 completed in HDFS at The Ohio State University must reapply for entry into the
                 doctoral program.

               • A Master's degree.

Advisors. Upon admission, The Graduate Studies Committee will assign an advisor to the student.
Whenever possible, the GSC will take the student's interests and preferences into account when
assigning temporary advisors. The temporary advisor will help new students select courses. All new
students are encouraged to choose regular advisors as soon as possible, but definitely by the end of
the spring quarter in their first year of graduate study. To declare an advisor or to change their
HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                   30
advisor, students should complete a change of advisor form and submit it to the GSC for approval.

Plan of Study. Students are required to prepare and submit to the Director of Graduate Studies a
Plan of Study (POS) by the end of the spring quarter of enrollment following admission to the
program (see form). The student prepares the POS in consultation with their advisor. It must include
a reasonable concentration and breadth of study designed to foster research, scholarship, and a
knowledge of a specialty in relation to allied academic areas, must be approved by the advisor, and
is subject to the rules of the Graduate Studies Committee. The Graduate Studies Committee advises
students to plan their course work with the Candidacy Examination and research interests in mind.
The POS is placed in the student's file. Modifications in the POS must receive written approval from
the advisor.

Major Areas Each Doctoral student is expected to complete course work and to be examined in a
major area in the department along with other courses across the university that would allow the
student to specialize in a unique area of concentration.

Advisory Committee The Doctoral program of study is planned by the student and the
advisor in consultation with an Advisory Committee composed of the advisor and a minimum of
three (3) Graduate Faculty members with M or P Graduate Faculty status from the student's major
area and other areas of concentration. The advisor serves as chairperson of the Advisory Committee
and, with the student, chooses faculty members for the Advisory Committee based on their
knowledge of the subject matter and the familiarity with the student. The membership of the
Doctoral Advisory Committee may change during the course of a student's Doctoral program of
study. At the time of the General Examination, the Advisory Committee usually becomes the
student's Examining Committee.

Dissertation Research Area An area of interest for dissertation research should be identified
early in the student's Doctoral work so that the program of study can be planned with the dissertation
research in mind. The research should contribute knowledge to the field of study or discipline. The
student's advisor and members of the Advisory Committee serve as resource persons to help the
student select an appropriate research problem. Faculty members outside the College also may be
consulted concerning an area of research. If the dissertation research involves the use of human
subjects, an IRB Application for Initial Review of Human Subjects Research must be submitted
(http://orrp.osu.edu/irb/initialreview/index.cfm).


Program Review The Graduate Studies Committee has a responsibility to oversee the quality of
graduate programs offered in the Department. It is, therefore, the responsibility of the Graduate
Studies Committee to review and act upon all proposed Doctoral programs of study.

The Doctoral program of study should be discussed and formalized by the student and the Advisory
Committee early in the Doctoral study. The Approved Doctoral Program of Study form should be
submitted to the Graduate Study Committee no later than the quarter before the student begins their
candidacy examination.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                31
Guidelines     In reviewing Doctoral programs of study, the Graduate Studies Committee, or its
               designated subcommittee, uses the following guidelines:

               1. Congruence between the student's proposed program and departmental program
                 requirements.

               2. Congruence between the student's stated goals and the proposed program.

               3. Level and amount of course work: Majority of Graded Courses at or above the 700
                 level.

               4. Research methods and statistics: At least twelve (12) graduate credit hours at a
                 level beyond the introductory level.

               5. Distribution of graded (A-E)/ungraded (S-U) courses: A maximum of 20 ungraded
                 (S-U) credits can be taken to be counted toward the degree.

Action and written comments from the Graduate Studies Committee on each proposed Doctoral
program of study are sent to the student and to the advisor. In addition, a copy is retained in the
student's folder in the department office.


                          CANDIDACY EXAMINATION (Generals)

Definition The Candidacy Examination is a single examination consisting of two portions, written
and oral, administered under the auspices of the Graduate Studies Committee in conjunction with
the student’s Advisory Committee (ref. VII.4) and the Graduate School.

Purpose For Ph.D. students, the Candidacy Examination is not only a test of the student’s
comprehension of the field, but also of allied areas of study, of the capacity to undertake
independent research, and of the ability to think and express ideas clearly. Doctoral programs may
emphasize these aspects of the Candidacy Examination in different manners, with some
programs stressing comprehensive knowledge of the field and other programs stressing the research
and background knowledge associated with the dissertation.

Timing The Candidacy Examination may be taken or begun at any time thought appropriate by the
student’s Advisory Committee and the Graduate Studies Committee but not later than two quarters
before graduation (ref. VII.4). The student must be in good standing in the Graduate School and
registered for at least three credit hours each quarter in which any part of the Candidacy
Examination is taken. Students who plan to take the Candidacy Examination during the Summer
Quarter are responsible for making certain that committee members are on duty in the summer (ref.
VII.4).

Advisor The advisor of a doctoral student must hold membership at the Category P level in the
graduate program of the student (ref. VII.4). Each Graduate Studies Committee decides whether the
advisor or another member of the graduate faculty serves as the chairperson of the Advisory
Committee (ref. VII.4) and the Candidacy Examination Committee
HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                 32
(ref. VII.4), and whether the advisor is a member of these committees. Once a policy on this point is
established, it must be applied uniformly to all Candidacy Examinations administered by the
graduate program until a change is reported to the Graduate School. The Chairperson of the
Advisory and Candidacy Examination Committees is responsible for coordinating the preparation
and conduct of both the written and oral portions of the Candidacy
Examination.

Advisory Committee Must include four Graduate Faculty Members including the advisor from
within or outside the department depending on the student’s area of study. The Advisory Committee
is composed of at least four authorized graduate faculty members, and may include the student’s
advisor consistent with Graduate Studies Committee policy (ref. VII.4). The responsibility for the
written portion of the Candidacy Examination rests with the Advisory Committee. Within the rules of
the Graduate Studies Committee, other graduate faculty members may participate in generating,
administering, or scoring parts of the written portion of the Candidacy Examination.

Candidacy Examination Committee. The candidacy examination committee is composed of at
least four authorized Graduate Faculty members and may include the student’s advisor consistent
with Graduate Studies Committee policy. The advisor of a doctoral student must hold membership at
the Category P level in the graduate program of the student. A Graduate Faculty Representative
may be assigned to an initial candidacy exam at the request of the student and advisor. (ref. VII.4).

                                Candidacy Exam Process for HDFS

General Examination Format: While the Graduate School does not impose a standard format, it
obliges each Graduate Studies Committee to ensure that an appropriately rigorous examination is
given. The examination must include both a written and oral portion. The student and advisor
determine the major area of concentration and format of the exam in consultation with the full
advisory committee. The advisory committee submits the candidacy exam plan including
examination questions and administration plan to the Graduate Studies Committee for approval 1
quarter prior to starting the examination process.

Candidacy Exam Written Portion: Procedures The written portion of the Candidacy
Examination may be administered within a limited time period or given sequentially over an
extended time period. Rules for the form, timing, scheduling, sequence, and conduct of the written
portion are determined by the Graduate Studies Committee. The written portion of exam will
include questions to be completed as take home or in house exams. The student will have a
maximum of two quarters to complete the examinations including the oral portion. The candidacy
exam will add up to 12 hours of in house examination administration.

Procedures for taking an In-House Portion of the Ph.D. Candidacy Examination

The following conditions should be met and any departure from these conditions must be approved
in advance by the Graduate Studies Committee:

               1. That examination is taken in a pre-arranged place in Campbell Hall;

               2. That one of the Department's or faculty's laptops is utilized;
HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                 33
               3. That the Department provides blank electronic media on which to save the
                 responses to the questions.

At the end of each examination session, the electronic media is given to a secretary or advisor, who
will subsequently print out the student's examination responses. The student is then given the same
electronic media for correcting "typos" and grammatical errors and for making the necessary copies
for his/her committee.

Preparation and Distribution of Written Answers When the written answers are completed, the
student notifies the advisor. The student immediately copies the exam responses and gives the copy
to the advisor. The student delivers to each member of the Advisory Committee, a copy of the
examination responses at least one (1) week prior to the oral examination.

Evaluation of Written Answers Before the oral portion of the General Examination, the written
portion is read and evaluated by the Advisory Committee. A written evaluation may be submitted
by each Advisory Committee member or faculty member submitting questions to the student’s
advisor. The advisor is responsible for assuring that the committee is agreement that the response is
adequate enough to proceed to the oral portion of the exam.

Candidacy Exam Oral Portion Procedures
The oral portion of the Candidacy Examination, which lasts approximately two hours, is held after
completion of the written portion.

Waiver of Oral Portion If, based on evaluating the written portion, the advisor or another
member of the Advisory Committee see no possibility for a satisfactory overall performance on the
Candidacy Examination, the student may be advised to waive the right to take the oral portion. The
Advisory Committee may not, however, deny a student the opportunity to take the oral portion. If the
student decides to waive the right to take the oral portion, a written statement requesting the waiver
must be presented to the Advisory Committee. In such a case, the Advisory Committee records an
“unsatisfactory” on the Candidacy Examination Report form and returns it with a copy of the
student’s waiver request to the Graduate School.

Oral Portion Scheduling The oral portion normally must be completed within one month of the
written portion. The Graduate School must be notified at least two weeks in advance of the oral’s
proposed time and place by the submission of a Doctoral Notification of Candidacy Exam form. The
Candidacy Examination must take place during announced university business hours, Monday
through Friday.

Report Form After the Candidacy Examination Committee has been approved by the dean of the
Graduate School, the Candidacy Examination Report form is sent to the Chairperson of the Advisory
Committee.

Attendance Attendance at the oral portion of the Candidacy Examination, which lasts
approximately two hours, is limited to the student and members of the Candidacy Examination
Committee. Except when teleconferencing is involved, all members of the Candidacy Examination
Committee must be present during the entire oral examination (ref. VII.6). Oral
HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                34
presentation of any proposal or other prepared materials must be made prior to, or after, the oral
examination. Questioning of the student should occupy the entire period of the examination. All
committee members are expected to participate fully in the questioning during the course of the
examination and in the discussion of and decision on the result of the Candidacy Examination.

From a discussion of the written portion of the General Examination with the advisor, the student
should know general topics that may be included in the oral portion. Questions in the oral portion
include general knowledge of the basic discipline and specific area of study, the written portion of
the General Examination, and course work. Plans for the dissertation research may be included.
Students are not provided with specific questions that will be asked in the oral portion. The advisor
explains the manner in which the oral portion will be conducted.

Postponement The oral portion of the Candidacy Examination is expected to be held as scheduled;
however, circumstances (other than failure to pass the written portion) may prompt the advisor to
postpone it. Before taking this action, the advisory Committee Chairperson must consult the student
and other members of the Advisory Committee, which does not include the
Graduate Faculty Representative (ref. VII.6). Prior to the examination, the Advisory Committee
Chairperson must notify the Dean of the Graduate School of the postponement. Please see Section
VII.6 regarding the student’s waiver of the oral portion when the Advisory
Committee judges the written portion to be unsatisfactory.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                 35
                                Result of the General Examination

Decision The decision about the outcome of the Candidacy Examination is reached in the absence
of the student. After discussion, the satisfactory/ unsatisfactory decision is reached by means of a
vote. Each examiner indicates judgment by signing the Candidacy Examination Report form that
must be submitted to the Graduate School.

Satisfactory The student is considered to have completed the Candidacy Examination successfully
only when the decision of the Candidacy Examination Committee is unanimously affirmative.

Unsatisfactory If the examination is judged unsatisfactory, the Candidacy Examination Committee
must decide whether the student will be permitted to take a second Candidacy Examination and must
record that decision on the Candidacy Examination Report form.

Second Candidacy Examination The nature of the second Candidacy Examination is determined
by the Candidacy Examination Committee, but it must include a written and an oral portion. If a
second examination is held, the Candidacy Examination Committee must be the same as the original
one, unless a substitution is approved by the Dean of the Graduate School. The second Candidacy
Examination must be completed no later than two quarters before graduation (ref. VII.6).

Repeat A student who fails the Candidacy Examination twice is not allowed an additional
examination. After two unsatisfactory attempts at the Candidacy Examination (including the
Supplemental Candidacy Examination, ref. VII.7), a student is not permitted to be a doctoral
candidate in the same or in any other graduate program at this University. A doctoral student in this
situation is automatically dismissed from the Graduate School and is not eligible to use the transfer-
of graduate-program procedure (ref. VII.7).

Review On written appeal by the student or a member of the Candidacy Examination Committee,
the Graduate School Grievance Committee reviews that Candidacy Examination to ensure its
conformity to Graduate School rules and to determine if it was conducted fairly and without
prejudice to the student. The Council on Research and Graduate Studies has established review
procedures, printed in Appendix C of the OSU Graduate School Handbook.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                36
                                           CANDIDACY
Provided that the student is in good standing (ref. VII.8) at the end of the quarter in which the
Candidacy Examination is completed, satisfactorily completing that examination admits the student
to candidacy for the doctoral degree at the end of that quarter. Admission to candidacy signifies that
the student is judged to be properly prepared to undertake work on the dissertation
(Ph.D.) or to meet performance and document requirements (D.M.A.). A student is normally
expected to enroll only in 999 after satisfactorily completing the Candidacy Examination.

Time Limit If a student fails to submit the final copy of the dissertation or D.M.A. document to the
Graduate School within five years of being admitted to candidacy, the candidacy is cancelled. In
such a case, with the approval of the advisor and the Graduate Studies Committee, the student may
take a Supplemental Candidacy Examination. If this Supplemental Candidacy
Examination is passed, the student is readmitted to candidacy and must then complete a dissertation
or D.M.A. document within two years.

Supplemental The nature of the Supplemental Candidacy Examination and the membership of the
Candidacy Examination Committee are determined by the student’s advisor within the rules of the
Graduate Studies Committee; however, the Supplemental Candidacy Examination must include a
written and an oral portion. The Graduate Faculty Representative is appointed in the manner
described in VII.8.

General Examination The student's original Advisory Committee will serve as the
Examination Committee. If necessary, substitutes will be selected by the advisor and student from
the same subject matter area(s) as were represented in the major and minor areas of the original
General Examination Committee. The nature of content and proportions in major and minor areas of
concentration in the program of study will be determined by the student's Advisory Committee.
Students will write for the same number of hours as they did in the original general examination.
The duration of the oral portion of the examination shall be two (2) hours.

As of Autumn 2008, Post Candidacy Ph. D. students are considered full time when they take 3
credits (HDFS 999). They receive all the benefits of being a full time student with these 3 credits.
Students are expected to be continuously enrolled during their candidacy and must accrue a
minimum of 6 credits in 999 post candidacy.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                 37
                                         DISSERTATION

Purpose The dissertation is a scholarly contribution to knowledge in the student’s area of
specialization. By researching and writing a dissertation, the student is expected to demonstrate a
high level of knowledge and the capability to function as an independent scholar.

Dissertation Committee The Dissertation Committee is composed of the advisor who must be a
Category P Graduate Faculty member and at least two other authorized Graduate Faculty members
(ref. VII.9). Additional Graduate Faculty members also may serve on the Dissertation Committee.
The advisor serves as chairperson of the Dissertation Committee. Selection of the committee
members is the responsibility of the advisor and is subject to the rules of the Graduate Studies
Committee.

When a dissertation topic has been selected, a Dissertation Committee must be chosen by the advisor
and student. The composition of the Dissertation Committee may differ from that of the General
Examination Committee, depending on the subject matter of the dissertation, the needed expertise in
consultants from outside the Department and the College and the availability of Graduate Faculty
members. The Dissertation Committee consists of a minimum of three (3) Category M and P
Graduate Faculty members, including the advisor.

Proposal Approval The Dissertation Committee advises the student in the research
investigation, is kept informed of the student's progress, approves the dissertation proposal and
approves the rough draft of the dissertation.

Timing The Dissertation Committee is established at a time thought appropriate by the student and
the advisor. Although it should be formed as early as possible in the research process, the
Dissertation Committee must be formed no later than the second Friday of the quarter in which the
student expects to graduate (ref. VII.9). Students who plan to complete the dissertation during the
Summer Quarter are responsible for making certain that committee members are on duty in the
summer.

Draft Approval The student must submit a complete, typed dissertation draft to the Dissertation
Committee for review. Approving the dissertation draft means that the Dissertation Committee
members judge it to be of sufficient merit to warrant holding the Final Oral Examination. Each
Dissertation Committee member indicates approval of the dissertation draft by signing the Draft
Approval/Notification of Final Oral Examination form that must be submitted to the Graduate
School no later than two weeks before the date of the Final Oral
Examination.

The Draft Approval/Notification of Final Examination Form is available in the Graduate School
Office.

Format Review The student must submit the complete, typed dissertation or D.M.A. document
draft to the Graduate School for format review at the time the Draft Approval form is submitted. The
dissertation must conform to Graduate School format requirements as described in the Guidelines
for Preparing Theses, Dissertations, and D.M.A. Documents (http://www.gradsch.ohio-
HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                 38
state.edu/Depo/PDF/Guidelines.pdf).


                                    FINAL ORAL EXAMINATION

Purpose The Final Oral Examination tests originality, independence of thought, the ability to
synthesize and interpret, and the quality of research presented. The Final Oral Examination
concerns principles and historic perspective as well as data. The Final Oral Examination includes
but is not limited to discussion of the dissertation. The examiners often pursue lines of thought and
argument from the data and concepts that have contributed to the research and to its critical
evaluation by the student. The Final Oral Examination lasts approximately two hours.

Registration The student must be in good standing in the Graduate School and registered for at
least three (3) graduate credit hours in the quarter in which the Final Oral Examination is taken.

Final Oral Examination Committee The Final Oral Examination Committee is composed of the
student’s Dissertation Committee, plus the Graduate Faculty Representative. Other Graduate
Faculty members may be added to the Committee, subject to the rules of the Graduate Studies
Committee. The advisor serves as chairperson of this committee. Responsibility for conducting and
evaluating the Final Oral Examination rests with the student’s Final Oral Examination Committee.
The advisor of a doctoral student must be a Category P member of the student’s graduate program
(ref. VII.10).

The student takes responsibility for checking schedules of Dissertation Committee members and the
advisor reserves a room for the examination. The Graduate School is notified of the examination on
the Draft Approval/Notification of Final Oral Examination Form, which includes space for listing
Final Oral Examination Committee members, date, place and time of the examination. The Form is
delivered to the Graduate School when the typed draft of the dissertation is presented by the student.
The Graduate Studies Committee and the Graduate School Representative receive official
notification of the composition of the Final Oral Examination Committee and date, place, and time
for the examination from the Graduate School.

Report Form After the Final Oral Examination Committee has been approved by the Dean of the
Graduate School, the Final Oral Examination Report form is sent to the student’s advisor.

Graduate School Representative Once the Final Oral Examination is scheduled, the Dean of the
Graduate School appoints the Graduate Faculty Representative. The Graduate Faculty
Representative is a Category P Graduate Faculty member who is neither a Graduate Faculty
member in the student’s graduate program nor a member of the Dissertation Committee. No less
than one week before the Final Oral Examination, a complete, typed dissertation or D.M.A.
document draft must be presented to the Graduate Faculty Representative. In addition to being a
full voting member of the Final Oral Examination Committee, the Graduate Faculty Representative
reports a judgment of the quality of the examination, of the dissertation or document, and of the
student’s performance to the Graduate School. If the examination is reviewed, the Graduate Faculty
Representative also reports on the fairness of the conduct of the examination and its conformity to
Graduate School rules to the Policy and Standards Committee of the Council on Research and
Graduate Studies (ref. VII.10).
HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                 39
Conduct of the Final Oral Examination The advisor informs the student, in advance, of the
procedure for and possible emphasis of the Final Oral Examination. During the examination, the
student makes a brief presentation of the dissertation research and responds to questions about the
research and the field of specialization. Editorial and proofreading comments should be made at
times other than during the examination period.

Negative Judgment of GSR If the Graduate Faculty Representative judges the dissertation or
D.M.A. document unsatisfactory, the student’s advisor and the Dean of the Graduate School are to
be informed no later than one day prior to the Final Oral Examination. After consulting the student
and the Dissertation Committee members, the advisor may elect to hold the examination as
scheduled or postpone it until the situation is resolved.

Postponement The Final Oral Examination is expected to be held as scheduled; however,
circumstances may prompt the advisor to postpone it. Before taking such action, the advisor must
consult the student and the other members of the Dissertation or D.M.A. Document Committee,
which does not include the Graduate Faculty Representative (ref. VII.10). Prior to
the examination, the advisor must notify the Dean of the Graduate School of the postponement.

Attendance Except when teleconferencing is involved, all members of the Final Oral Examination
Committee must be present during the entire examination (ref. VII.10). All committee members are
expected to participate fully in questioning during the course of the
examination and in the discussion of and decision on the result. Other faculty members and graduate
students may attend the examination, subject to the rules of the Graduate Studies Committee.

Other faculty members and graduate students may not attend the examination.


RESULT OF FINAL ORAL EXAMINATION:

Decision Only the Final Oral Examination Committee members are to be present for discussion of
the student’s performance and the decision about the outcome. After discussion, the
satisfactory/unsatisfactory decision is reached by means of a vote. Each examiner indicates
judgment by signing the Final Oral Examination Report form that must be submitted to the
Graduate School no later than Wednesday two weeks prior to commencement.

Satisfactory The student is considered to have completed the Final Oral Examination successfully
only when the decision of the Final Oral Examination Committee is unanimously affirmative.

Unsatisfactory If the examination is judged unsatisfactory, the Final Oral Examination Committee
must decide whether the student will be permitted to take a second Final Oral Examination and must
record that decision on the Final Oral Examination Report form. Should the Graduate Faculty
Representative cast the only negative vote or find that the examination does not meet required
standards, the examination should be halted and the matter referred to the Graduate School for
review. The examination may then be rescheduled without prejudice to the student once the issues
raised by the GFR have been satisfactorily resolved.

HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                40
Second Final Oral Examination If a second examination is held, the Final Oral Examination
Committee must be the same as the original one unless a substitution is approved by the Dean of the
Graduate School.

Review On written appeal by the student or a member of the Final Oral Examination Committee,
the Graduate School Grievance reviews that Final Oral Examination to ensure its conformity to
Graduate School rules and to determine if it was conducted fairly and without prejudice to the
student. The Council on Research and Graduate Studies has established review procedures, printed
in Appendix C of the OSU Graduate School Handbook.

Draft Approval. The student must submit a complete, word-processed dissertation draft to the
dissertation committee for review and approval or disapproval. Approving the dissertation draft
means that the dissertation committee members judge it to be of sufficient merit to warrant holding
the final oral examination. Each dissertation committee member indicates approval of the
dissertation draft by signing the Draft Approval/Notification of Final Oral Examination form that
must be submitted to the Graduate School no later than two weeks before the date of the final oral
examination (ref. VII.10).

Proposal of the Final Oral Examination Committee Members. Once the dissertation committee
has signed the Draft Approval form, the advisor proposes the names of the final oral examination
committee members to the Graduate Studies Committee and the Graduate School and informs them
of the date, time, and place of the examination. The final oral examination must take place during
announced university business hours, Monday through Friday. After the final oral examination
committee has been approved by the Dean of the Graduate School, the Final Oral Examination
Report form is sent to the student’s advisor.

DISSERTATION – FINAL COPY

Final Approval Final approval of the student’s dissertation cannot occur until the Final Oral
Examination has been completed satisfactorily. Each Dissertation Committee member indicates
approval by signing the Final Approval form that must be submitted to the Graduate School no
later than Wednesday one week before commencement. The advisor signs the title page of the final
copy of the dissertation.

Restricted Material Dissertations must not contain material restricted from publication.
Effective Autumn Quarter 2002, all doctoral dissertations must be submitted
electronically. Paper submission is no longer acceptable. Please see http://www.gradsch.ohio-
state.edu/Content.aspx?Content=27 for guidelines on electronic submission requirements).


In addition to the Graduate School requirement, the College of Education and Human Ecology
requires that one (1) approved copy of the dissertation be submitted to the Human Ecology
Graduate Office no later than one (1) week before commencement.


Abstract An external abstract of 500 words or less must be available to enter onto the OhioLink
submission screen. It must contain the principal findings of the student’s research.
HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                41
Two (2) copies of the 500-word abstract required by the Graduate School must be submitted to the
Human Ecology Graduate Office no later than one (1) week before commencement. The student's
advisor must also receive one (1) copy of the abstract.

Fees Graduation fees must be paid no later than Wednesday one week before commencement.

Publication Based on Research If appropriate, the student should make plans for the publication
of one (1) or more articles based on the research as soon as possible following completion of the
dissertation. Articles submitted for publication are co-authored by the student and advisor with
authorship agreed upon early in the preparation process. If the student has not submitted a draft of a
manuscript after a period of one (1) year, the advisor may prepare one. Manuscripts must adhere to
departmental and College review procedures.


                       ADDITIONAL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Application to Graduate A student must complete and submit the Application to Graduate form
to the Graduate School no later than the second Friday of the quarter in which graduation is
expected. The application is valid for that quarter only. Submitting this application indicates that the
student expects to complete all degree requirements by the end of that quarter. It must be signed by
the student, the advisor, and the Graduate Studies Committee Chairperson. The names of the
Dissertation Committee members must be listed on the form. In addition to the doctoral degree
requirements described in this section, the student:

               1. must have earned a cumulative point-hour ratio of at least 3.0 for all graduate
                 credit hours completed at this University (ref. VII.13)
               2. must have fulfilled all requirements published by the Graduate Studies Committee
               3. must have final grades for all courses received in the University Registrar’s Office
                 by the deadline published in the Master Schedule of Classes
               4. must have fulfilled all other requirements by the deadlines established by the
                 Graduate School

End of Quarter Completion A student who does not meet published graduation deadlines but
who does complete all degree requirements by the last business day prior to the first day of classes
for the following quarter may graduate the following quarter without registering or paying fees.

In the case of an End-of-Quarter Completion, an Application to Graduate Form for the following
quarter is submitted with the dissertation.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                 42
Nondiscrimination Policy

The Ohio State University is committed to building a diverse faculty and staff for employment and
promotion to ensure the highest quality workforce, to reflect human diversity, and to improve
opportunities for minorities and women. The university embraces human diversity and is
committed to equal employment opportunities, affirmative action, and eliminating discrimination.
This commitment is both a moral imperative consistent with an intellectual community that
celebrates individual differences and diversity, as well as a matter of law.

Discrimination against any individual based upon protected status, which is defined as age, color,
disability, gender identity or expression, national origin, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, or
veteran status, is prohibited. Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 prohibits sex
discrimination. Title I and Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 provide
equal employment opportunities and reasonable accommodation, and Section 504 of the
Rehabilitation Act of 1973 prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in education programs
and activities. Equal access to employment opportunities, admission, educational programs, and all
other university activities is extended to all persons.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                  43
List of Forms and Checklists to Guide Your Program of Study
                                                                            Who’s
     Form                       Processes and Deadlines
                                                                            Responsible
     Petition for Credit or Submit to Grad Studies Chair once all
                                                                               Student
     Waiver of Requirements signatures are obtained.
                            Completed by Friday of the 1st week, submit
     Independent Study
                            to Grad Studies Chair once all signatures are      Student
     Contract Form
                            obtained.
                            Submit to Grad Studies Chair once all
     Change of Advisor                                                         Student
                            signatures are obtained.
     Master’s POS Approval Must be submitted to Graduate Studies Chair
                                                                               Student
     Form                   Prior to Master’s Exam
     Straight Through Ph.D. Must be submitted to Graduate Studies
                                                                               Student
     POS Approval Form      Chair prior to taking candidacy exams
     Ph.D. POS Approval     Must be submitted to Graduate Studies
                                                                               Student
     Form                   Chair prior to taking candidacy exam
     Thesis or
                            Submit to Graduate Studies Chair when
     Project Proposal                                                          Student
                            completed
     Approval form
     Candidacy Exam         Submit to Grad Studies Chair the
                                                                               Advisor
     Approval Form          quarter before exam is to commence
     Dissertation Proposal  Submit to Graduate Studies Chair once
                                                                               Student
     Approval Form          completed
                            Submit to Advisor by the 5th Friday of Spring
     End of the Year report                                                    Student
                            Quarter each year.


                                                                            Who’s
     Checklists                 Processes and Deadlines
                                                                            Responsible
     Master’s Program Plan A
                             For Student Use Only                              Student
     Checklist
     Master’s Program Plan B
                             For Student Use Only                              Student
     Checklist
     Straight Through
                             For Student Use Only                              Student
     Program Checklist
     Doctoral Program
                             For Student Use Only                              Student
     Checklist




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09              44
                                    The Ohio State University
                             College of Education and Human Ecology
                             Human Development and Family Science


                        Petition for Credit or Waiver of Requirements




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09             45
                                             The Ohio State University
                                      College of Education and Human Ecology
                                      Human Development and Family Science


                                       Independent Study Contract Form


   Sample Contract for Independent Study Credits to be Counted Toward the Degree
                                               Required to be completed



Quarter: _________________________________
Instructor: ________________________________
Credit Hours: ________________________________
Course number: ________________________________
Project Title or topic:

_________________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________


1. Frequency of Meetings:
       i.e. once a week, every other week, once a month etc.

2. Agreed upon tasks to be completed:
      i.e. Literature review in a particular area
      i.e. Data analysis


3. Products expected:
       i.e. paper for publication
       i.e. proposal
       i.e. final paper with literature review



Instructor Signature: _____________________________ Date: _____________________


Student Signature: _______________________________ Date: _____________________

Independent study contract form, page 1 of 1

HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                        46
                      College of

                  EDUCATION & HUMAN ECOLOGY
                                                                   ehe.osu.edu




                            Human Development and Family Science

                                      Change of Advisor Form



Date: _____________________

Student Name: ________________________


Current Advisor: ________________________



New Advisor: ___________________________



Signature of New Advisor: _________________________

cc. graduate studies chair,
Student file, advisor




Change of Advisor Form, page 1 of 1
HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09               47
                                            The Ohio State University
                                     College of Education and Human Ecology
                                     Human Development and Family Science

                                 M.S. Degree Program of Study Form

Name: ________________________________                      Date of Entry in Program: _________________
Advisor: _______________________________
Date: __________________________________ Projected Completion Date: _______________
Circle Option:              Plan A          Plan B
Type of Course          Dept/              Title                            Credit   Quarter    Grade
                        Number                                              Hours    Completed/
                                                                                     Planned
Prerequisites if
Applicable
Core                    HDFS 701.1         Proseminar                       1
Requirements            HDFS 760           Research Methods                 5
                        HDFS 764           Advanced Family                  4
                        HDFS 765           Advanced Child I                 4
                        HDFS 862           Individual Cognitive Dev.        4

Elective Credits        HDFS_____
in Major Area of        HDFS_____
Concentration           HDFS_____
(10 credits for         HDFS_____
Plan A)
(19 credits for
Plan B)

Statistics and
Methods (9
credits required)


Thesis/Project
Hours
Plan A: 9 credits
Plan B: 5 credits



M.S. POS Form Page 1 of 2


HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                      48
TOTAL GRADUATE LEVEL COURSE CREDITS
minimum required: Plan A: 45
                  Plan B: 50


Signatures:


__________________________________        _______________________
Student                                   Date

__________________________________        _______________________

Advisor                                   Date

__________________________________        _______________________

Committee Member                          Date

__________________________________        _______________________

Committee Member                          Date



cc:     Student
        Advisor
        HDFS Office




M.S. POS Form Page 2 of 2




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09    49
                                    The Ohio State University
                             College of Education and Human Ecology
                             Human Development and Family Science


                 Thesis/Independent Study Master Project Approval Form

Name __________________________________________________________________


Field of Specialization _____________________________________________________


Proposed Thesis/Independent Study Project Title _________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________


_________________________________________________________________________

The proposed thesis/independent study project is approved with the following suggestions or
recommendations:



Disposition of completed product of independent study project (Plan B):



Date ____________________________

Signatures _______________________________________
                    Advisor (Plan A or B)

       _______________________________________
       Advisory Committee Member

       ________________________________________
       Advisory Committee Member

       ________________________________________
       Independent Study Supervisor
       [if other than advisor (Plan B)]

Cc:    Student/ HDFS GSC / Advisor


HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09               50
                                      The Ohio State University
                               College of Education and Human Ecology
                               Human Development and Family Science

           STRAIGHT THROUGH Ph.D. PROGRAM OF STUDY (POS) Form

Type of Course        Dept/         Title                           Credit   Quarter    Grade
                      Number                                        Hours    Completed/
                                                                             Planned
Core Requirements     HDFS 701.1    Proseminar                      1
                      HDFS 760      Research Methods                5
                      HDFS 764      Advanced Family                 4
                      HDFS 765      Advanced Child I                4
                      HDFS 862      Individual Cognitive Dev.       4
                      HDFS 820      Family Theory                   3
                      HDFS 825      Theories in HD                  3
                      HDFS 880      General Systems Theory          4

Qualifying Exam       HDFS_____
Independent Study     HDFS_____
Credits               HDFS_____
(up to 10)            HDFS_____

Elective Credits in   HDFS_____
Major Area of         HDFS_____
Concentration         HDFS_____
(minimum of 56        HDFS_____
hours)                HDFS_____
                      HDFS_____
                      HDFS_____




Statistics and
Methods (21 credits
required)


Dissertation Hours
(minimum of 6
credits post
candidacy)




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                 51
Graduate credit hours in major area (excluding 999)
Graduate credit hours in research courses
Total graduate credit hours (excluding 999)
Total credit hours for doctoral degree (including 999)
(Total must be at least 120 credit hours)



Date                                   Signatures
                                                    Student

                                                    Major Advisor

                                                    Advisory Committee Member

                                                    Advisory Committee Member

                                                    Advisory Committee Member


cc.      Student
         Advisor
         Student File




Straight Through Ph.D. POS Form Page 2 of 2




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                      52
                                     The Ohio State University
                              College of Education and Human Ecology
                              Human Development and Family Science


                           Doctoral Program of Study (POS) Form

Type of Course       Dept/          Title                          Credit   Quarter    Grade
                     Number                                        Hours    Completed/
                                                                            Planned
Master’s Degree Coursework
(minimum of 45 quarter hours or 34 semester hours required)
Core               HDFS 701.1 Proseminar                           1
Requirements       HDFS 764        Advanced Family                 4
                   HDFS 765        Advanced Child I                4
                   HDFS 862        Individual Cognitive Dev.       4
                   HDFS 820        Family Theory                   3
                   HDFS 825        Theories in HD                  3
                   HDFS 880        General Systems Theory          4

Qualifying Exam/     HDFS_____
Independent          HDFS_____
Study Credits        HDFS_____
(up to 10)           HDFS_____

Elective Credits     HDFS_____
in Major Area of     HDFS_____
Concentration        HDFS_____
(minimum of 35       HDFS_____
hours)               HDFS_____




Statistics and
Methods (12
credits required)


Dissertation
Hours
(min. of 6 credits
post candidacy)

HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09              53
Graduate credit hours in Master’s Program accepted for
doctoral program
Graduate credit hours in major area (excluding 999)
Graduate credit hours in research courses
Total graduate credit hours (excluding 999)
Total credit hours for doctoral degree (including 999)
(Total must be at least 75 credit hours beyond the Master’s
degree)



Date                            Signatures
                                              Student

                                              Major Advisor

                                              Advisory Committee Member

                                              Advisory Committee Member

                                              Advisory Committee Member


cc.      Student
         Advisor
         Student File




Doctoral POS Form Page 2 of 2




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                54
Department of Human Development
& Family Science                                          Approval of Dissertation Proposal
                                                          Form
College of Education and Human Ecology


Name
Field of Specialization

DISSERTATION PROPOSAL TITLE



The dissertation proposal is approved with the following suggestions or recommendations:




                                                    Advisor




Date                                                Dissertation Committee Members
cc:    Student
       Official Folder
       Advisor

HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09              55
                                     The Ohio State University
                              College of Education and Human Ecology
                              Human Development and Family Science

                            Student Travel Policies and Procedures

Student Travel Policies and Procedures
In order to receive funding for travel a number of procedures must be followed well in advance of
your event. Thus, you should initiate the requisite paperwork as soon as you become aware of the
event. Before you travel:

1) Send an e-mail to the department chair requesting funding. In that e-mail include the following:
a) name of the conference
b) dates and location
c) if you are a presenter or participant
d) if you have other sources of funding for the conference (e.g., your advisor is willing to
supplement your travel).

2) After you receive approval come to CM 135 and pick up a travel request form. These forms can
be found on top of the student mailboxes. They are also on line and downloadable at
http://ehe.osu.edu/admin/business/forms-docs.cfm.

3) Complete the document to the best of your ability. Please see Elaine Bolton or Jody Hanson for
assistance with forms. If you plan to share expenses with other students you must list the names of
the other travelers on your travel request form.

4) Bring the travel request form to Elaine Bolton in 135c. At that time also bring verification of the
conference, date and location. This can be a copy of a brochure or screen shot from the conference
website.



During the conference:

1) Please keep a copy of all receipts (hotel, transportation, cab, etc). Meals are paid by on a per diem
basis so you do not need to keep track of these receipts. If you drive to the event you do not have to
keep gas receipts, as these are paid on a flat mileage rate. If you are not sure if a receipt is required
please keep it and ask when you return! Mileage reimbursements cannot be split between travelers.
One traveler must receive the reimbursement.

2) If you co-share a room please make sure you get a receipt for your portion of the room with
YOUR name on it. This is very important.



HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                  56
3) If you want to be reimbursed for telephone or internet charges you must provide a business reason
for this usage. You may write this brief justification on the lodging receipt.

After the conference:

1) Bring all your receipts ASAP to Elaine and she will move the paperwork forward. University
Travel reserves the right to refuse reimbursements more than 90 days old. Bringing these in after 90
days causes the staff extra work so please be prompt.

A couple of things to note:

1) Some cities are more expensive than others therefore the university adjusts its per diem
accordingly. The same principle is applied to food. Per diem information – as well as other good
information - can be found on the OSU Travel office website: http://busops.osu.edu/travel.php.

2) The university does not reimburse first class travel or rental car upgrades even if it was the
cheapest to book, it was a mistakenly booked or you were upgraded for FREE. I know this sounds
silly but faculty (me included) have been upgraded to first class on airlines or to luxury cars while
traveling at no extra charge and the university will not pay for it. That said if that Corvette is worth
it to you then you just go for it!

3) Please do not wait until the last minute to complete travel forms. Your lack of planning will not
constitute a crisis for the department chair or the staff. Only the department chair can authorize
travel so you must make sure s/he is in town to sign these documents before you travel. The
university will not reimburse travel that has not been pre-approved by the department chair. The
only exception is if your travel is being supported exclusively by an OSURF grant.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                  57
                                    The Ohio State University
                             College of Education and Human Ecology
                             Human Development and Family Science



                                    End of the Year Report


Each year that you are graduate student in the Department you are expected to submit an end of the
academic year report (see the following form). This should be submitted to your advisor by the
Friday of the 5th week of Spring quarter. You and your advisor should schedule a time to meet to
discuss your progress. Once your advisor signs the form, he/she forwards it to the Graduate Studies
Chair. The Graduate Studies Committee meets and reviews all of the reports and makes a
determination of progress. You are then informed via a letter about this decision and what, if
anything, you need to do to improve your progress. Again, this is a way for us to make sure you are
successful here.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09               58
                                            The Ohio State University
                                     College of Education and Human Ecology
                                     Human Development and Family Science

                                          End of Academic Year Report Form

Please note that failure to complete and turn in this report by the deadline will result in an automatic
“unsatisfactory progress” report.


Name: ________________________                       Major Advisor:_______________________

Date: _________________________

Degree Sought: MS/              Ph.D.

Year you began in the program: ______________

In reviewing the last academic year (summer, autumn, winter and spring quarters), please report on
the following:

Courses Taken and Grade (use course number, title and grade by quarter)

Course              Title                             Autumn        Grade/Status
Number




                                                      Winter




                                                      Spring




                                                      Summer



End of the Year Report Form Page 1 of 4

HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                        59
Master’s Examination
Committee Formed: Yes/No
Scheduled:         Yes/No                 Date:____________
Completed:         Yes/No                 Date:____________

Straight Through Ph.D. Qualifying Examination:
Committee Formed: Yes/No
Scheduled:         Yes/No        Date:____________
Completed:         Yes/No        Date:____________

Ph.D. Candidacy Examination:
Committee Formed: Yes/No
Scheduled:         Yes/No                 Date:____________
Completed:         Yes/No                 Date:____________


Progress on Dissertation/Thesis:

Proposal Approved: yes/no          date:_________
IRB Approval for project with human subjects:
                     yes/no        date:________

Number of subjects planned: ___________ (use n/a if not applicable)
Number of subjects accrued: ___________ (use n/a if not applicable)



Publications: published, in press, and in preparation (use APA citation style)




Presentations at local, state or national meetings:




Conferences Attended:




End of the Year Report Form Page 2 of 4

HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                  60
For GTA’s Only:
                                     Au      Wi              Sp

Courses Taught:
Number Enrolled:
Average SEI’s:




MFT Students Only:
     Number of client contact hours accrued to date: __________
     Number of client contact hours accrued over the last 4 quarters: __________
     Number of Supervision hours accrued to date: ___________


Service: Please list any service to the department (i.e. active in GSO), college of university, as well
as any local or state presentations made that were not part of a conference.




Student’s Narrative Evaluation of progress for the academic year:




Student’s goals and plans for the next year:




End of the Year Report Form Page 3 of 4



HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                 61
Advisor’s Rating:

         Satisfactory progress            Unsatisfactory Progress

Actions Needed:
_____ make a plan to improve progress with student
_____ make a plan to improve progress and submit to Graduate Studies Committee _____
      notify Graduate School of unsatisfactory progress


Advisor’s Narrative (optional):




Advisors Signature: _________________________________

Date: ______________________________________________




Graduate Studies Chair Rating:

         Satisfactory Progress            Unsatisfactory Progress

Actions taken:
________ advisor and student informed of unsatisfactory progress
________ plan to improve progress is requested
________ Graduate School notified of unsatisfactory progress


Graduate Studies Chair Signature: ___________________________


Date: ______________________________________________




End of the Year Report Form Page 4 of 4




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                   62
For Student Use Only


                    MASTER'S PROGRAM PLAN A CHECKLIST
                                     PLAN A (THESIS)


Program Plan: Your program of study should be discussed with your advisor early on in
your program. This checklist can provide a way for you to keep track of your progress and
will translate to your program of study form which must be filed prior to scheduling your
thesis defense.

            MS Requirements Plan A (45 credits)

Course #    Title                    Credits     Quarter
                                                Completed
701         Proseminar                     1
764         Advanced Family                4
765         Advanced Child I               4
862         Individual Cognitive           3
            Development
760         Research Methods               5

Total Core Course Credits                17

            Additional credits in          9
            statistics and/or
            methods
            Additional credits in        10
            HDFS1

            Thesis credit hours            9
            (HDFS 793 or 993)
TOTAL2                                       45
1
  (this can include any 862 offered, as well as permanent
 numbered courses and the 600 level courses offered)
2
  Twelve hours of course work, excluding 998, must be at the
700 level or above. The oral defense of your thesis replaces
the comprehensive master’s exam.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09              63
For student use only

                       MASTER'S PROGRAM PLAN B CHECKLIST
                                 PLAN B (PROJECT AND EXAM)

Program Plan: Your program of study should be discussed with your advisor early on in
your program. This checklist can provide a way for you to keep track of your progress and
will translate to your program of study form which must be filed prior to scheduling the
master’s exam.

             MS Requirements Plan B (50 credits)

                                                     Quarter
 Course #    Title                       Credits    Completed
 701         Proseminar                        1
 764         Advanced Family                   4
 765         Advanced Child I                  4
             Individual Cognitive
 862         Development                      3
 760         Research Methods                 5

Total Core Course Credits                    17

             Additional credits in
             statistics and/or
             methods                          9
             Additional credits in
             HDFS1                           19
             Independent study credits
             for project                       5
         2
 TOTAL                                        50
1
  (this can include any 862 offered, as well as permanent
 numbered courses and the 600 level courses offered)
2
  Twelve hours of course work, excluding 998, must be at the
700 level or above.


A four-hour comprehensive written examination will be required of Plan B.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                  64
For Student use only

          STRAIGHT THROUGH DOCTORAL PROGRAM CHECKLIST

Program Plan: Your program of study should be discussed with your advisor early on in
your program. This checklist can provide a way for you to keep track of your progress and
will translate to your program of study form which must be filed prior to scheduling the
generals or candidacy exam. Please note that CFT students have further requirements and
should follow checklist and requirements specific to their program.

Straight-through Ph.D. Requirements
                                                              Quarter
Course #    Title                                     Credits Completed
    701     Proseminar                                      1
    880     General Systems Theory                          4
    764     Advanced Family                                 4
    765     Advanced Child I                                4

      862 Individual Cognitive Development                 3
      760 Research Methods                                 5
      820 Family Theory                                    3
          Theories in Child and Human
      825 Development                                      3
                                                          27

            Additional credits in statistics and/or
            methods (may include independent
            study)                                        21
            Additional coursework and/or
            independent studies (up to 30 can be
            independent study)                            56
            Qualifying exam preparation hours
            (taken as HDFS 993 or HDFS 851)               10
            Dissertation credit hours (HDFS 999,
            6 credit minimum. post candidacy)              6
TOTAL                                                    120


Minimum of 120 Credit hours beyond bachelor’s degree is required.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09               65
For Student use only

                         DOCTORAL PROGRAM CHECKLIST

Program Plan: Your program of study should be discussed with your advisor early on in
your program. This checklist can provide a way for you to keep track of your progress and
will translate to your program of study form which must be filed prior to scheduling the
Candidacy exam. Please note that CFT students have further requirements and should
follow checklist and requirements specific to their program.

Ph.D. Requirements (after MS)
Course                                                  Quarter
#         Title                          Credits        Completed
     701 Proseminar                                 1
     880 General Systems Theory                     4
     764 Advanced Family                            4
     765 Advanced Child I                           4
          Individual Cognitive
     862 Development                                3
     820 Family Theory                              3
          Theories in Child and
     825 Human Development                          3
                                                   22

           Additional credits in
           statistics and/or methods
           (may include independent
           study)                                  12
           Additional coursework
           and/or independent studies
           (up to 20 independent study
           credits allowed)                        35
           Dissertation credit hours
           (HDFS 999, 6 credit
           minimum.post candidacy)                  6
TOTAL                                              75


Minimum of 75 Credit hours beyond master’s degree is required.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09            66
     Appendix A: LIST OF RESEARCH METHODS AND STATISTICS
                             COURSES

                            OFFERED OUTSIDE OF HDFS




                             INFORMATION GATHERED
                                  MARCH 2007

                      Presented in alphabetical order by department




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09          67
                                  AGR EDUC (Agricultural Education)

                  208 Agricultural Administration Building, 2120 Fyffe Road, 292-6321

789 Survey Research Practicum G 5

Hands-on applications for students interested in the planning, implementation, and analysis of a scientific
sample survey.

Sp Qtr. 1 3-hr cl. Prereq: Admission to grad interdisciplinary specialization in survey research or
permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 789 in AED Econ, Bus-Mktg, Econ, Edu
P&L, Geog, J Com, Polit Sc, Psych, Pub Hlth, PubPol&M, Rurl Soc, Sociol, or Stat. Cross-listed in AED
Econ, Bus-Mktg, Econ, Edu P&L, Geog, J Com, Polit Sc, Psych, Pub Hlth, PubPol&M, Rurl Soc, Sociol,
and Stat.

795.05 * Research and Evaluation U G 2
SPSS Data Analysis Lab

Instructor: J. A. Gliem

Sp Qtr. 2 hr cl. This course is graded S/U.

885 Research Methods G 3

Instructor: L. E. Miller

Principles and techniques of research appropriate for planning, conducting, and reporting research in
vocational, technical, and extension education.

Su (1st term), 5 cl; Au, Wi Qtrs, 1 3-hr cl.

(I took the class with the same instructor and it was a waste of time-very low level and the instructor is
not good; I would not recommend it)

886 Research Design G 3
Instructor: J. A. Gliem

Development of effective design for research problems in vocational, technical, and extension education,
including theory, models, and sampling.

Su (1st term), Wi, Sp Qtrs. 2 1.5-hr cl. Prereq: 885 or equiv.

(I took that class with Dr. Gliem and liked it. It was not very advanced but worked for me and the
instructor was great)

887 Analysis and Interpretation of Data G 3
Instructor: J. A. Gliem


HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                    68
Application and interpretation of descriptive and inferential statistics for research in vocational-technical
and extension education, including the use of the computer.

Au, Sp Qtrs. 1 2.5-hr cl. Prereq: 886 or equiv

888 Instrumentation and Procedures for Data Collection G 3
Instructor: L. E. Miller

Selection, development, and analysis of various types of instruments and procedures for collecting
research data.

Wi, Sp Qtrs. 2 1.5-hr cl. Prereq: 885 or equiv.

995 Seminar in Research G 1-3
Instructor: J. A. Gliem

Further development and direction of individual studies and programs of research.

Au, Sp Qtrs. 1 2.5-hr cl. Prereq: 886. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs. This course is graded S/U.

As far as I know this class has a different topic depending on the quarter it is offered:

Au: Regression 1

Win: ?

Spring: SEM




                                           CLASSICS (Classics)

                           414 University Hall, 230 North Oval Mall, 292-2744

800 Materials and Methods of Research G 3

The materials, problems, and methods of classical research.

3 cl. Required of all grad students.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                     69
                                       COMM (Communication)

660 Communication Research Methods U G 5

Overview of major empirical methods in media research.

Au, Wi, Sp Qtrs. 2 2-hr cl. Prereq: Journal or Comm or agr comm major, grad standing, or permission of
instructor. Not open to students with credit for J Com 660.

661 Statistical Applications in Communication U G 5

Fundamental principles of statistics commonly used in communication research.

Au, Wi, Sp Qtrs. 2 2-hr cl. Prereq: Grad standing. Not open to students with credit for J Com 661.

663 Communication Industry Research Methods U G 5

Overview of major empirical methods in communication industry research.

Au, Wi, Sp Qtrs. 2 2-hr cl. Prereq: Comm or Journal major, permission of instructor or grad standing. Not
open to students with credit for J Com 663.

671 Qualitative Research in Communication Studies: Participant Observation U G 5

Intensive focus on participant observation as it is practiced in communication studies with emphasis on
methodological issues, design, and implementation.

2 2-hr cl. Prereq: Journal or Comm major, grad standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students
with credit for J Com 660 or 671.

672 Qualitative Interviewing as Communication Practice U G 5

Theories and practices of mediated and face-to-face question-asking as communicative tool for
understanding others' views of events, information, policies, systems, technologies.

2 2-hr cl. Prereq: Journal or Comm major, grad standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students
with credit for J Com 672.

673 Qualitative Research in Communication Studies: Analyzing Texts and Documents U G 5

Theory and practice of communicative analysis of social/cultural texts and documents and the records
produced by systematic observing and interviewing procedures.

2 2-hr cl. Prereq: Journal or Comm major, grad standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students
with credit for J Com 673.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                  70
760 Communication Research Methods G 5

An overview of empirical research methods in communication.

Au Qtr. 2 2-hr cl. Prereq: Grad standing or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for J
Com 760.

763 Qualitative Methodologies for Communication Research G 5

Graduate introduction to qualitative methodologies for empirical study of communication phenomena,
emphasizing ethnographic participant observation, in-depth interviewing, focus groups, life narratives,
text and discourse analysis.

Sp Qtr. 1 4-hr cl. Prereq: Grad standing. Not open to students with credit for J Com 763 or 861.

789 Survey Research Practicum G 5

Hands-on applications for students interested in the planning, implementation, and analysis of a scientific
sample survey.

Sp Qtr. 1 3-hr cl. Prereq: Admission to grad interdisciplinary specialization in survey research or
permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 789 in J Com, AED Econ, Agr Educ, Bus-
Mktg, Econ, Educ P&L, Geog, Polit Sc, Psych, Pub Hlth, PubPol&M, Sociol, or Stat. Cross-listed in
AED Econ, Agr Educ, Bus-Mktg, Econ, Educ P&L, Geog, Polit Sc, Psych, Pub Hlth, PubPol&M, Sociol,
and Stat.

790^ Statistical Applications in Communication II G 5

Survey of research methods and "hands on" experience in conducting a research project.

Prereq: Grad standing. Repeatable to a maximum of 25 cr hrs.

801 Advanced Research Methods in Communication G 5

In-depth study of particular methods in the field of communication.

Au, Wi, Sp Qtrs. 1 3-hr seminar. Prereq: 606 or J Com 606. Not open to students with credit for J Com
801. Repeatable to a maximum of 15 cr hrs. Repeatable with different methods.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                    71
                                   COMP STD (Comparative Studies)

                               451 Hagerty Hall, 1775 College Rd, 292-2559

All Religious Studies courses now listed under Comparative Studies.

770.02 Field Research G 5

Introduction to ethnographic research design, participant observation and interview methods, ethics in
human subject research, archiving of research materials, and ethnographic writing.

Prereq: Grad standing or permission of instructor. 770.01 or English 770.01 recommended. Not open to
students with credit for English 770.02.



                      EDU P&L (Education: Educational Policy and Leadership)

                                    Office of Student Services, 688-4007
                                   122 Ramseyer Hall, 29 West Woodruff

692.60 Quantitative Research, Evaluation and Measurement in Education U G 1-8

Repeatable to a maximum of 12 cr hrs. This course is graded S/U.

693.60 Quantitative Research, Evaluation and Measurement in Education U G 1-4

Repeatable to a maximum of 30 cr hrs. This course is graded S/U.

694.60 Quantitative Research, Evaluation and Measurement in Education U G 1-5

Repeatable to a maximum of 20 cr hrs.

727.60 Quantitative Research, Evaluation and Measurement in Education G 1-5

Repeatable to a maximum of 20 cr hrs. This course is graded S/U.

745 The Inquiry Process - The Classroom Teacher as an Inquirer and Consumer of Research G 2-4

Approaches to educational research with critical review of research studies and their relationship to
practice.

2 1-hr cl for 2 cr hrs, 20 hrs of clinical experience in public schools for each additional cr hr. Prereq: Grad
standing and enrollment in a teacher education program. Repeatable to a maximum of 4 cr hrs.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                     72
760 Survey of Feminist Methodologies G 5

An overview of feminist methodological issues and dilemmas and an introduction to a variety of research
methods.

Field research. Prereq: Grad standing in Edu P&L or wom stds or permission of instructor. Not open to
students with credit for Wom Stds 760. Cross-listed in Women's Studies.

765 Introduction to Educational Evaluation U G 3

Introduction to educational evaluation including history, models, theories, politics of evaluation, and
types of evaluation.

Prereq: 785 and/or permission of instructor.

785 Introduction to Inquiry, Principles, Strategies, and Techniques U G 3

Introduction to inquiry strategies and their role in educational development; emphasis is on the
conceptualization of educational problems.

Prereq: 4th year or grad standing.

786 Introduction to Inquiry: Quantitative Methods U G 5

An introduction to quantitative techniques, with emphasis on application in educational settings.

2 2-hr cl, 1.5-hr lab, arr hrs. Prereq: 4th year or grad standing.

(I took this class in Au of 2005 with Dr. D’Acosta and liked it. The instructor is great)

798 Qualitative Research for Educators G 3

An introduction to qualitative research at the Master's level, this course offers an introduction to the
history and substantive topics of educational ethnography.

800 Qualitative Research in Education G 3

Issues and problems of scientific inquiry in educational research with emphasis on field research.

807 Educational Survey Research Methods G 3

A study of the design principles, sampling, and data-gathering methods used in the conduct of educational
survey research.

Prereq: 785, and 786 or equivs with written permission of instructor.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                      73
808 Experimental Design in Education I G 5

An examination of logical and quantitative principles, especially the analysis of variance, underlying
basic experimental designs employed in educational research.

3-hr cl, 2-hr lab. Prereq: 786 or equiv. Not open to students with credit for Edu T&L 808.

809 Experimental Design in Education II G 5

An examination of intermediate quantitative principles and issues underlying experimental design in
education, especially principles and issues associated with factorial designs employing multiple response
measures.

3-hr cl, 2-hr lab. Prereq: 808.

810 Experimental Design in Education III G 5

An examination of repeated measurements, mixed, hierarchical, partial hierarchical, and quasi-
experimental designs and associated methods of univariate and multivariate statistical analyses.

3-hr cl, 2-hr lab. Prereq: 809 or equiv.

817^ Qualitative Research: The Analysis of Interaction in Educational Settings

Qualitative research and the analysis of interaction in educational studies via the history and practices of
educational ethnography, fieldwork, and analysis of discourse.

817.01 Qualitative Research: Introduction to the Analysis of Interaction in Educational Settings G
3

As the first course of the 817 sequence, this course offers an introduction to the intellectual history of
qualitative research and the analysis of interaction.

817.02 Analysis of Classroom Discourse G 3

An introduction to the analysis of the discourse structures of the classroom, this course addresses the face
to face organization of classroom order, interaction and instruction.

Prereq: 817.01 or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 817.

817.03 Advanced Topics in the Analysis of Interaction in Education G 3

An advanced course in the analysis of interaction in classroom and instructional contexts, bringing to bear
literature in analysis of discourse and situated action.

Prereq: 817.01, 817.02; or permission of instructor.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                      74
827 Analyzing Categorical Data in Educational Research G 3

An introduction to the use of log-linear models and related statistical techniques for the purpose of
analyzing multidimensional contingency tables and categorical response.

Prereq: 808.

848 Educational Inquiry Within the Affective Domain: Theory and Methods G 4

Provides theory and practice for advanced graduate students to conduct scientific inquiry within the
affective domain including attitudes, values, perceptions, opinions, orientations, and belief.

Prereq: 785 and 786.

867 Educational Experimentation G 2-5

Analysis of contribution of selected experiments to elementary, secondary, and higher education; design
of experimental method for attacking educational problems.

Prereq: 785 and 15 cr hrs of grad work in educ. Repeatable to a maximum of 5 cr hrs.

881 Applications of Regression Analysis to Educational Research G 3

An introduction to the concepts of regression analysis and their application to research in education and
behavioral sciences.

1 2.5-hr cl. Prereq: 786.

884.60 Quantitative Research, Evaluation and Measurement in Education G 1-15

Repeatable to a maximum of 15 cr hrs. This course is graded S/U.

893.60 Quantitative Research, Evaluation and Measurement in Education G 1-4

Repeatable to a maximum of 30 cr hrs. This course is graded S/U.

967 Analyzing Qualitative Data in Educational Research G 5

Focus on the interpretation of qualitative data and the writing of research reports.

1 3-hr cl, 6 hrs lab. Prereq: 800 and 966 or equivs.

971 Legal Research in Educational Administration G 3

Inquiry into the field of educational administration using legal research methodology.

Limited to doctoral students only.



HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                      75
                 EDU PAES (Education: Physical Activity and Educational Services)

                                Office of Student and Alumni Services
                          215 Pomerene Hall, 1760 Neil Avenue 614-292-6787

767 Assessment in Counseling: Instrumentation U G 3

An introduction to the concepts and techniques in the appraisal of the individual with an emphasis on
basic statistical concepts, and an overview of the instrumentation; designed for counselors who will be
working in school, mental health, and rehabilitation settings.

Prereq: 773 or permission of instructor.

865 Naturalistic Inquiry in Physical Education G 4

Consideration of design and methods of inquiry for naturalistic field studies in physical education, sport,
play, health, and dance; review of research results.

Prereq: A grad course in research methods.

871 Behavioral Research Methods in Applied Settings G 3

Methods of single subject research in educational, clinical, homes, and other applied settings; focus on
developing observational design, analysis and interpretation skills.

Prereq: 10 hrs of applied behavior analysis, behavior modification or equivs with written permission of
instructor. Open only to special education majors; others by permission of instructor.

873 Behavioral Research in Education: Strategies and Tactics G 3

This course presents advanced graduate students with knowledge of strategies and tactics for scientific
and technological experimentation with human behavior.

Prereq: 871. Open only to special education majors; others by permission of instructor.

874 Behavioral Research in Education: Critical Analysis and Thematic Extensions G 3

Completes the 3-course series on behavioral research in education. Recent methodological advances,
development of thematic lines of research, and research ethics are key topics.

Prereq: 871 and 873. Open only to special education majors; others by permission of instructor.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                    76
                            EDU T&L (Education: Teaching and Learning)

                                  Office of Academic Services, 292-2332
                                  333 Arps Hall, 1945 North High Street

842 Research in Early Childhood Education G 3

Exploration of research methods and techniques related to early childhood school programs; review of
research in the field; in-depth investigation of interest area.

Not open to students with credit for ED T&P 826.

921 A Guided Survey of Research in Reading G 3

Designed to provide acquaintance with scientific studies relating to reading, methods used, results
attained, including implications and limitations, and the problems meriting further investigation.

Prereq: 6 cr hrs in grad reading courses. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs.



                              FM RES M (Family Resource Management)

                             262 Campbell Hall, 1787 Neil Avenue, 292-4389

881^* Quantitative Methods in Family Resource Management G 5

Multivariate statistical methods are applied to research questions in family resource management. The
emphasis is on advanced topics relevant to analysis of cross-sectional data.

Au Qtr. 2 2.5-hr cl. Prereq: Basic course in statistics and permission of instructor.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                    77
                                           NURSING (Nursing)

                              120 Newton Hall, 1585 Neil Avenue, 292-4041

902 Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis in Nursing Science

Study of quantitative and qualitative methodologies used in developing and conducting holistic health
research at the individual, family, and community levels of analysis.

902.01 Qualitative Methods in Nursing Science G 5

Study of qualitative methods used in conducting nursing research; laboratory experience will include field
work; data management and analysis.

3 cl, 4-hrs lab. Prereq: 901 or permission of instructor.

912 Introduction to Methods of Nursing Science G 5

Survey of research methods used to describe, explain, predict, and manipulate phenomena relevant to the
discipline of nursing. Emphasis on systematic development of nursing knowledge.

Wi Qtr. 5 cl. Prereq: Ph.D. student in nursing or permission of instructor.

Au Qtr. 2 1.5-hr cl.



                                       POLIT SC (Political Science)

                             2140 Derby Hall, 154 North Oval Mall, 292-2880

581^ Survey Research in Political Science U G 5

The conducting of public opinion polls.

2 2-hr cl. Not open to students with credit for 605.

684 Introduction to Political Science Research Methods U G 5

Introduction to political science research with emphasis on survey and experimental designs, data
generation techniques, data processing, and computer utilization.

2 2-hr cl. Prereq: Grad standing in polit sc or permission of instructor.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                      78
685 Methods of Quantitative Analysis: Elementary U G 5

Explication, interpretation, and application of techniques for quantitative analysis of political data;
descriptive and inferential statistics, with emphasis on bivariate analysis.

5 cl. Prereq: Grad standing in polit sc or permission of instructor.

686 Methods of Quantitative Analysis: Intermediate U G 5

Descriptive and inferential statistics with emphasis on multivariate analysis; additional topics offered as
desired and possible: scaling, index construction, sampling, measurement reliability.

5 cl. Prereq: 685 and grad standing in polit sc, or permission of instructor.

747 Research Methods in International Politics U G 5

Examines a number of research techniques and approaches common in international politics such as
content analysis, simulation, mathematical modeling, and factor analysis.

2 2-hr cl. Prereq: Grad standing or permission of instructor.

800 Research Seminar in American Politics

Repeatable hrs include hrs earned in 894.

800.01 Design of Research in American Politics G 5

Development of a research design on a selected topic in American politics; consultation on substantive
and methodological problems offered by faculty.

Wi Qtr. 1 2-hr cl, arr time. Prereq: 45 cr hrs of graduate work in polit sc or permission of instructor.
Repeatable to a maximum of 10 cr hrs.

800.02 Research in American Politics G 5

Execution of a research design on a selected topic in American politics; consultation on substantive and
methodological problems offered by faculty.

Sp Qtr. 1 2-hr cl, arr time. Prereq: 800.01 or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 10 cr
hrs.

803^ Research in Public Opinion G 5

Development and execution of a research design focusing on a problem in American public opinion;
consultation on substantive and methodological problems offered by instructor.

1 2-hr cl. Prereq: 702 or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 10 cr hrs.



HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                     79
805 Experimental Research in Political Psychology G 5

Experimental methods appropriate for research in political psychology.

Wi Qtr. 2 2-hr cl. Prereq: 892 and grad standing; or permission of instructor.

846 Research in International Politics G 3-5

Research seminar in international politics.

1 2-hr cl. Repeatable to a maximum of 15 cr hrs.

853 Advanced Research in International Political Economy G 5

Advanced study and research in international political economy.

Wi Qtr. 1 3-hr cl. Prereq: 753 or permission of instructor.

866 Research in Political Theory G 5

Research seminar in political theory; intensive treatment of selected topics.

1 2-hr cl. Repeatable to a maximum of 10 cr hrs.

867 Research in Mathematical Political Science G 5

Design and examination of research focusing on a problem in mathematical political science.

2 2-hr cl. Repeatable to a maximum of 10 cr hrs.

874 Research in Mass Political Behavior G 5

Development and execution of a research design focusing on a problem in electoral or public opinion
research; consultation with instructor on substantive and methodological issues.

1 2-hr cl. Prereq: 703 or 774 or equiv. Repeatable to a maximum of 10 cr hrs.

875^ Research on American Political Parties G 5

Development and execution of a research design focusing on a problem relating to American political
parties; consultation on substantive and methodological problems offered by instructor.

1 2-hr cl. Repeatable to a maximum of 10 cr hrs.

879 Research on Public Policy G 5

Research into the process of policy making and the substance of public policy; consultation on
substantive and methodological problems offered by instructor.


HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                    80
1 2-hr cl. Repeatable to a maximum of 15 cr hrs.



                                            PSYCH (Psychology)

                             238 Townshend Hall, 1885 Neil Avenue, 292-6741

693.06 Quantitative Psychology U G 1-15

Repeatable to a maximum of 30 cr hrs. This course is graded S/U.

800 Advanced Experimental Laboratory G 3-15

Advanced training in the experimental and quantitative methods in the several areas of general
experimental psychology and comparative psychology.

Prereq: Permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 15 cr hrs.

820 Fundamentals of Factor Analysis G 4

Basic Common Factor Model and its application in psychology; model, communality estimation, factor
extraction, orthogonal and oblique rotation, factor scores, confirmatory factor analysis use of computer
programs.

Prereq: Permission of instructor.

826 Statistics in Psychology G 4

Basic concepts of descriptive and inferential statistics; includes estimation, hypothesis testing, and
introductory treatment of analysis of variance, correlation and regression, and non-parametric techniques.

2 1.5-hr cl, 2 lab hrs. Prereq: 320, or Stat 145, or equiv and grad standing in psych, or permission of
instructor.

827 Analysis of Variance G 4

Statistical inference in analysis of variance designs; basic concepts and procedures in one-way designs;
factorial, repeated measures, randomized blocks, mixed models designs; procedures for planned and post
hoc comparisons.

2 1.5-hr cl, 2 lab hrs. Prereq: 826 or equiv.

828 Correlational Analysis G 4

Correlation and regression techniques for quantitative and qualitative data analysis; simple linear
regression and correlation, multiple linear regression, nominal scales, interactions; other related
multivariate methods; use of computer programs.


HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                    81
2 1.5-hr cl, 2 lab hrs. Prereq: 827 or equiv.

830 Covariance Structure Models G 4

Theory and methods of testing models of covariance structures; general mathematical model,
identification, parameter estimation, goodness of fit, model modification, and the use of computer
programs such as LISREL.

Prereq: 820 and 828, or permission of instructor.

831^ Seminars in Psychological Statistics

Prereq: Written permission of instructor.

831.01 Analysis of Variance G 1-5

Repeatable to a maximum of 40 cr hrs.

831.02 Experimental Design G 1-5

Repeatable to a maximum of 40 cr hrs.

831.03 Factor Analysis G 1-5

Repeatable to a maximum of 40 cr hrs.

831.04 Mathematical Models and Theory G 1-5

Repeatable to a maximum of 40 cr hrs.

831.05 Non-Parametric Statistics G 1-5

Repeatable to a maximum of 40 cr hrs.

831.06 Quasi-Experimental Design G 1-5

Repeatable to a maximum of 40 cr hrs.

831.07 Advanced Multivariate Analysis G 1-5

Repeatable to a maximum of 40 cr hrs.

831.08 Current Practices and Trends G 1-5

Repeatable to a maximum of 40 cr hrs.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                   82
831.09 Computer Simulation Research G 1-5

Repeatable to a maximum of 40 cr hrs.

831.10 Special Topics G 1-5

Repeatable to a maximum of 40 cr hrs.

849 Research Methods in Developmental Psychology G 3

A critical survey and evaluation of concepts and techniques in study of developmental psychology.

3 cl. Not open to students with credit for 822.

861 Research Design and Methods in Clinical Psychology G 3

Introduction to the theory and use of clinical methods in psychology, designed for first-year graduate
students in clinical psychology.

Prereq: Permission of instructor. Open only to clinical psych grad students. Repeatable to a maximum of
6 cr hrs.

872 Social Psychology Laboratory G 3

Advanced training in methods and data collection in the areas of social psychology, laboratory, and field
experience.

2 cl, 1 lab hr. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 36 cr hrs.

876 Research Methods in Social Psychology

Laboratory research, field research, research writing, and criticism.

Prereq: Permission of instructor.

876.01 * Research Methods in Social Psychology I G 3

Introduction to methods in experimental social psychology; focus on laboratory-based procedures and on
problems and issues of scientific inference.

876.02 * Research Methods in Social Psychology II G 3

Introduction to quasi-experimental methods; focus on problems and issues in conducting non-laboratory
and field research.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                    83
876.03 Research Methods in Social Psychology III G 3

Introduction to research writing and critique; focus on preparation of reviews of theoretical and empirical
papers.



                                        SOC WORK (Social Work)

                             300 Stillman Hall, 1947 College Road, 292-6288

770 Research Methods in Social Work G P 3

Basic research methodology; the role of research in social work.

Su, Au Qtrs. 1 2.5-hr cl. Prereq: Soc work grad standing or permission of instructor.

771 Data Analysis Designs G P 3

Interpretation of social work data; quantitative techniques; designs of data analysis.

Su, Wi Qtrs. 1 2.5-hr cl. Prereq: Soc work grad standing or permission of instructor.

901 Social Work Research

Quantitatively-oriented research methods, qualitatively-oriented research methods, computer literacy, and
data processing skills.

Prereq: Ph.D. standing; completion of research proficiency requirements; and written permission of the
Director of the Ph.D. Program.

901.01 Quantitative Research Methods in Social Work G 3

Au Qtr. 1 3-hr cl.

901.02 Qualitative Research in Social Work G 3

Au Qtr. 1 3-hr cl.

901.03 Computer Literacy in Social Work G 3

Sp Qtr. 1 3-hr cl. Prereq: 901.01; grad level stat course.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                     84
                                           SOCIOL (Sociology)

                             300 Bricker Hall, 190 North Oval Mall, 292-6681


General Prerequisites for Courses Numbered 700
Unless otherwise indicated, the prerequisites for 700-level courses are grad standing or permission of
instructor.

General Prerequisites for Courses Numbered 800
Unless otherwise indicated, the prerequisites for 800-level courses are 30 qtr hrs in the same discipline at
the 600 level or higher, of which 15 hrs must be at the 700 level.

549 Quantitative Research Methods in Sociology U G 5

An introduction to the application and interpretation of quantitative analysis in sociological research;
emphasis on the description of social variables and hypothesis testing.

Su, Au, Wi, Sp Qtrs. 2 1.5-hr cl and 2 1-hr labs. H549 offered Au Qtr. H549 (honors) may be available to
students enrolled in an honors program or by permission of department or instructor. Prereq for 549: 487.
Prereq for H549: 487, Math 116 or equiv, and jr standing; or permission of instructor. Not open to
students with credit for 650. GEC data analysis course.

648 Introduction to Quantitative Research U G 5

An introduction to statistical methods in sociological research.

Au Qtr.

649 Principles of Multiple Regression U G 5

Assumptions, principles, and applications of the multiple regression model in sociological practice; basic
model, dummy variables, and special functional forms.

Wi Qtr. Prereq: 549 or 650 or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 884.09 Sp Qtr 1986.

651 Approaches to Sociological Inquiry U G 5

Theory and practice in essentials of the research process; comparison of alternative approaches and design
models; questionnaire construction, interview techniques, and related problems.

Sp Qtr. Prereq: 649 or equiv, or permission of instructor.

652 Sociological Survey Research Methods I U G 5

Design of sociological survey research: question format, questionnaire design, alternative modes of
administration, etc; hands-on practice in Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI).

HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                    85
Prereq: 10 cr hrs in sociol or grad standing.

653 Sociological Survey Research Methods II U G 5

Administration and analysis of sociological surveys; emphasis on development, administration, and
analysis of survey data.

Prereq: 652 or written permission of instructor.

671 Population Studies I: Theory, Substance, and Techniques U G 5

Survey of population studies covering sources of demographic data, mortality, and fertility.

Prereq: 487 and 488, or grad standing. Not open to students with credit for 550.

672 Population Studies II: Theory, Substance, and Techniques U G 5

Continuation of survey of population studies covering models of population growth, population theories,
migration, population estimations and projections, population problems, and policy decisions.

Prereq: 671 and Math 152 or equiv recommended. Not open to students with credit for 751.

694.09 Research Methodology U G 3-5

Repeatable to a maximum of 15 cr hrs.

703 Advanced Single Equation Techniques G 5

Techniques of analysis for examining nominally measured dependent variables, and treatment of error
structures that are heteroskedastic or correlated across cases.

Prereq: 649, grad standing, or permission of instructor.

704 Qualitative Methods in Sociology G 5

A survey of qualitative approaches to social research, including participant observation, intensive
interviewing, and archival/documentary analysis.

Prereq: Grad standing.

706 Not in the course bulletin anymore

707 Multi-Equation Quantitative Models G 5

A survey of advanced problems in the multivariate analysis of sociological data.

Prereq: 649. Repeatable to a maximum of 10 cr hrs.



HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                    86
708 Problems in Qualitative Analysis G 5

Problems and techniques of non-quantitative data analysis including case studies, participant observation,
field diary, autobiography, and historical records.

Prereq: 648 or 704.

710 Design and Analysis of Quantitative Sociological Research G 5

Problem formulation, hypothesis testing, argumentation from data, and writing for professional
audiences; research practicum leading to a research project.

Sp Qtr. Prereq: 651.

748 Comparative Methods in Sociology G 5

Basic review of methods of comparative analysis as used in the study of social change.

Prereq: 651.

752 Principles and Techniques of Scale Construction G 5

Approaches and techniques in the development and testing of social measurement instruments.

Prereq: 549 or equiv or Soc Work 540.

754 Demographic Analysis U G 5

An exposition of census data and vital statistics, demographic rates, life tables, cohort analysis, and
similar elementary techniques and data sources in demography.

5 cl. Prereq: 1 course in general statistics. Not open to students with credit for 619.

791 Sociological Methods of Community Analysis U G 5

Methods, techniques, sources of data, and objectives of community analysis.

792 Structural Sociology G 5

Key concepts, issues, recent trends in the study of social structure with special emphasis on formal social
organizations, social stratification, comparative social systems, groups and research methods.

5 cl. Prereq: Grad standing in sociol.

850 Seminar in Sociological Research Methods G 1-5

Special topic seminars in research methodology.

Repeatable to a maximum of 30 cr hrs.

HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                     87
859 Practicum in Sociological Research G 1-15

Supervised practical experience in the independent execution of sociological research, the application of
appropriate analytical techniques, and preparation of research reports.

Prereq: Written permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 15 cr hrs. This course is
graded S/U.




                                              STAT (Statistics)

                              404 Cockins Hall, 1958 Neil Avenue, 292-2866

528 Data Analysis I U G 3

Non-calculus treatment of descriptive statistics, statistical inference, goodness of fit, use of t, X2 in one
sample situation.

Su, Au, Wi Qtrs. 3 cl, lab hrs arr. Not open to students with more than 5 cr hrs in Stat. Not open to
students who have completed Stat 145 or 245.

520 Mathematical Statistics I U G 5

Probability, random variables, discrete and continuous distributions; binomial, Poisson, normal, gamma
(chi-square), t, F, distributions; change of variable and moment-generating function techniques; order
statistics; limit theorems.

Au Qtr. 5 cl. Prereq: Math 254 or written permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for
610 or 620. GEC data analysis course.

521 Mathematical Statistics II U G 5

Confidence intervals; minimum variance unbiased estimation, maximum likelihood estimation; Neyman-
Pearson theorem, uniformly most powerful tests, likelihood ratio tests, chi-square and F tests,
nonparametric tests.

Wi Qtr. 5 cl. Prereq: 520. Not open to students with credit for 621.

528 Data Analysis I U G 3

Non-calculus treatment of descriptive statistics, statistical inference, goodness of fit, use of t, X2 in one
sample situation.

Su, Au, Wi Qtrs. 3 cl, lab hrs arr. Not open to students with more than 5 cr hrs in Stat. Not open to
students who have completed Stat 145 or 245.


HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                     88
529 Data Analysis II U G 3

Two sample tests, non-parametric one and two sample procedures, regression analysis, one and two way
analysis of variance.

Wi, Sp Qtrs. 3 cl, lab hrs arr. Prereq: 528 or equiv.

530 Data Analysis III U G 4

Multiple regression models; diagnostics, inferences, and variable selection; ANOVA with several factors,
mixed models, nesting.

Sp Qtr. 3 cl. Prereq: 529 or permission of instructor.

602 Early Start in Statistics G 5

Selected mathematical topics, including geometric series, binomial expansion, integration by parts, Taylor
series; transformation of variables, linear algebra, basic concepts of probability.

Su Qtr. 5 cl. Prereq: Grad standing in stat.

610 Probability for Statistical Inference U G 5

Introduction to probability, random variables, and distribution theory intended primarily for students in
MAS degree program.

Au, Wi Qtrs. 3 cl. Prereq: Math 548 or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for Math
530.

623 Theory of Statistical Analysis U G 5

Estimation, hypothesis tests, best tests, likelihood ratio tests, confidence sets, sufficiency, efficient
estimators; intended primarily for students in the MAS degree program.

Wi, Sp Qtrs. 3 cl. Prereq: 610 or 620 or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 621
or 622.

628 Statistical Practice I G 4

Computing environment; statistical computing; scientific method; overview of statistical problem
formulation and inference; foundations of stochastic modeling; exploratory data analysis; descriptive
statistics.

Au Qtr. 4 cl. Prereq or concur: 620.

632 Applied Stochastic Processes I U G 3

Conditioning, discrete time Markov chains, Poisson processes, branching process.


HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                       89
Wi Qtr. 3 cl. Prereq: 623 or permission of instructor.

635 Statistical Analysis of Time Series U G 3

Time series models; estimation of the spectral density function; transformations of time series; prediction
theory applications.

Au Qtr. Prereq: 521 or 525 or 623 or permission of instructor.

641 Design and Analysis of Experiments U G 5

The linear model for experimental designs; analysis of variance; factorial experiments; and block designs.

Wi, Sp Qtrs. 3 cl. Prereq: 521, 645, and knowledge of elementary linear algebra; or permission of
instructor.

645 Applied Regression Analysis U G 5

Simple and multiple linear regression, diagnostics, model selection, models with categorical variables.

Au, Wi, Sp Qtrs. 3 cl. Prereq: 521 or equiv.

651 Survey Sampling Methods G 4

Sampling from finite populations, simple random, stratified, systematic, and cluster sampling designs,
ratio and regression estimates; non-sampling errors.

Wi Qtr. 2 2-hr cl. Prereq: 521 or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for PubH-Bio
651. Cross-listed in Public Health: Biometrics.

656 Applied Multivariate Analysis U G 5

Matrix computation of summary statistics, geometry of sample data; multivariate normal distribution;
MANOVA; principal components; discriminant analysis; topics may include factor analysis, cluster
analysis, canonical correlation.

Sp Qtr. 3 cl. Prereq: 645 or equiv and knowledge of linear algebra. Some experience with computers is
expected.

661 Applied Nonparametric Statistics U G 5

Noncalculus treatment of nonparametric tests, confidence intervals, estimation; topics include one- and
two-sample problems, one- and two-way analysis of variance, multiple comparisons, correlation.

Su, Sp Qtrs. 5 cl. Prereq: 521 or 529 or equiv.




HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                    90
662^* Environmental Statistics U G 3

Environmental statistical methodologies applied to case studies; topics include the role of ecology,
bioassay, risk, censoring, spatial statistics and hierarchical statistics.

Sp Qtr. 2 1.5-hr cl, 3 labs arr/qtr. Prereq: 530 or equiv.

663^* Statistical Methods in Reliability U G 5

Statistical failure models, graphical and analytic parametric estimation for censored samples, non-
parametric survival function estimation, reliability of composite and repairable systems, Bayesian
estimation and prediction.

Sp Qtr. 3 1.5-hr cl. Prereq: 521 or 623 or equiv.

664 Principles of Statistical Quality Control U G 5

Pareto diagrams; process control: Shewhart, CUSUM, empirical Bayes, multivariate and other control
charts; economic design, process capability, Taguchi's method for off-line control; acceptance sampling.

Au Qtr. 3 cl. Prereq: 521 or 623 or equiv.

665 Discrete Data Analysis U G 4

Two-by-two tables; cross-sectional, prospective, and retrospective studies; log linear model analysis of
cross-classified data; logistic regression analysis; analysis of stratified tables.

Sp Qtr. 2 cl. Prereq: 529 or 645 or permission of instructor.

673 Monte Carlo Techniques U G 3

This course covers the Monte Carlo topics of Stat 671.

Au Qtr. 3 cl. Prereq: 520 or 529 or equiv and some knowledge of computer programming, or permission
of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 671.

674 Data Management and Presentation I U G 2

Inputting data, data manipulation and calculations, handling missing data, merging data, transporting data
sets, dates and formatting, relational databases and structured query language; emphasizes use of
statistical software SAS.

Wi Qtr. 1 2-hr cl. Prereq: 673, CS&E 201, or permission of instructor. This course is graded S/U.

675 Data Management and Presentation II U G 2

Handling character data, custom reports, macro programming, graphics and multiple plots, output
delivery system, transforming output to Web pages and other formats; emphasizes use of statistical
software SAS.

HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                      91
Wi, Sp Qtrs. 1 2-hr cl. Prereq: 674 or permission of instructor. This course is graded S/U.

694 Group Studies U G 2-5

Designed to give groups of students an opportunity to pursue special studies not otherwise offered.

Su, Au, Wi, Sp Qtrs. Repeatable to a maximum of 20 cr hrs.

742 Analysis of Variance G 3

Theory of the general linear model; least square estimates and properties, especially in non-full rank
models; analysis of variance technique; factorial designs.

Au Qtr. 3 cl. Prereq: 521 or 623, and Math 471 or 601.

743 Generalized Linear Models G 3

Introduces the statistical theory and methodology to extend regresssion and analysis of variance to non-
normal data.

Wi Qtr. 3 cl. Prereq: 645 and 742.

745 * Multiple Comparisons Procedures G 3

Types and levels of multiple comparison inference, abuses, sample size computation, graphical
representation.

Sp Qtr. 3 cl. Prereq: 742 or permission of instructor.



746 Design and Analysis of Experiments G 3

A continuation of 742; various experimental designs; analysis of covariance, mixed and random models.

Wi Qtr. 2 cl. Prereq: 742.

755^* Multivariate Analysis I G 3

Geometrical representations of data; random vectors, normal distribution for random vector and random
data matrices, Wishart distribution, inferences based on normal theory.

Wi Qtr. 2 cl. Prereq: 521 or 623, and Math 471 or 601.

756^* Multivariate Analysis II G 3

Multivariate regression analysis; principal component analysis; factor analysis; canonical correlation
analysis; discriminant analysis--all from a theoretical point of view.


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Sp Qtr. 2 cl. Prereq: 755.

760 Elements of Statistical Learning G 3

Statistical and Machine Learning - Applied modern regression, pattern recognition and clustering
techniques for discovery/understanding of underlying statistical structures within large, complex and
noisy data sets.

Wi Qtr. 2 1.5-hr cl. Prereq: 610/623 or higher, or ECE 804/806; Familiarity with Matrix Algebra and
Linear Regression Analysis. Final project report and class presentation is a key component of this course.

761 * Nonparametric Statistics I G 3

Order statistics, equal in distribution technique, counting and ranking methods, distribution-free statistics,
Monte Carlo power simulation studies, asymptotic relative efficiency.

Au Qtr. 3 cl. Prereq: 622 or 623.

763 * Nonparametric Function Estimation G 3

Nonparametric function estimation with emphasis on smoothing splines, flexible model building based on
noisy multivariate data, kernel methods, additional topics in smoothing.

Sp Qtr. 3 cl. Prereq: 622, 645, and knowledge of linear algebra.

773 Statistical Computing G 3

Random number and variate generation, variance reduction, integral equations, resampling methods,
maximization, E-M algorithm and other topics.

Au Qtr. 3 cl. Prereq: 622.

789 Survey Research Practicum G 5

Hands-on applications for students interested in the planning, implementation, and analysis of a scientific
sample survey.

Sp Qtr. 1 3-hr cl. Prereq: Admission to grad interdisciplinary specialization in survey research and
permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 789 in AED Econ, Agr Educ, Bus-Mktg,
Econ, Edu P&L, Geog, J Com, Polit Sc, Psych, Pub Hlth, PubPol&M, or Sociol. Cross-listed in AED
Econ, Agr Educ, Bus-Mktg, Econ, Ed P&L, Geog, J Com, Polit Sc, Psych, Pub Hlth, PubPol&M, and
Sociol.

801 Seminar on Research Topics in Statistics G 2

Lectures on current research by each graduate faculty member in statistics.

Au Qtr. 1 2-hr cl. Prereq: 2nd yr standing in stat Ph.D. program or permission of instructor. Repeatable to
a maximum of 4 cr hrs. This course is graded S/U.

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820 Statistical Inference I G 3

Statistical decision theory, foundations of statistics, Bayesian analysis, sequential analysis, sequential
probability ratio test.

Au Qtr. 3 cl. Prereq: 622.

821 Statistical Inference II G 3

Sufficiency and invariance, unbiased and equivariant estimators, Neyman-Pearson, UMP, UMPU and
invariate tests.

Wi Qtr. 3 cl. Prereq: 722, or Math 722 and 820.

822 Statistical Inference III G 3

Asymptotic theory for estimators and tests, resampling methods and other topics in modern inference.

Sp Qtr. 3 cl. Prereq: 723 or Math 723, and 821.

825 * Advanced Bayesian Analysis G 3

Bayesian computation, nonparametric Bayes methods, semiparametric Bayes methods, robust Bayesian
analysis, complex Bayesian models.

Wi Qtr. 3 cl. Prereq: 821.

833 * Statistical Methods for Analyzing Genetic Data G 3

Basic principles of population genetics, linkage analysis, association study, genetic epidemiology, and
analysis of gene expression data.

Au Qtr. 2 2-hr cl. Prereq: 622 or equiv or permission of instructor.

847 * Advanced Design of Experiments G 3

Partially balanced designs, factorial experiments, confounding and fractional replications, response
surface designs.

Sp Qtr. Prereq: 746.

881 Advanced Topics in Mathematical Statistics I G 3

Topics to be taken from the following: multivariate analysis, stochastic processes, analysis of variance,
components of variance models, advanced test design.

Su, Au, Wi, Sp Qtrs. 3 cl. Prereq: Grad standing in stat. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs.



HDFS Graduate Handbook rev9.21.09                     94
882 Advanced Topics in Mathematical Statistics II G 3

Continuation of 881.

Su, Au, Wi, Sp Qtrs. 3 cl. Prereq: Grad standing in stat. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs.

894 Advanced Group Studies G 1-5

Designed to give groups of advanced students an opportunity to pursue special studies not otherwise
offered.

Su, Au, Wi, Sp Qtrs. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 20 cr hrs.




                                    WOM STDS (Women's Studies)

                          286 University Hall, 230 North Oval Mall, 292-1021



760 Survey of Feminist Methodologies G 5

An overview of feminist methodological issues and dilemmas and an introduction to a variety of research
methods.

Sp Qtr. 1 cl, field research. Prereq: Grad standing in wom stds or Edu P&L or permission of instructor.
Not open to students with credit for Edu P&L 760. Cross-listed in Educational Policy and Leadership.




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