Cycle of Change in Africa South of the Sahara by yaosaigeng

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									Cycle of Change in Africa
  South of the Sahara
               Native Populations
   African natives included tribes
    such as the Ibo, Yoruba,
    Kikuyu, Great Zimbabwe,
    Bantu, and Mali.
   These populations developed
    advanced tribal societies, some
    with large cities and empires.
   They had centers of learning
    and trade.



                                      This image was first published in 1st or 2nd edition of
                                      Nordisk familjebok (1904–1926). The copyrights for that book
                                      have expired and this image is in the public domain. Image
                                      available online at http://runeberg.org/nfba/0162.html .
       Exploration and Conquest
   European explorers conquered natives throughout the
    Africa South of the Sahara region.
   Previous contact through the slave trade had been
    limited to the coastal areas and dependent on other
    Africans bringing captured Africans TO the coast to be
    sold into slavery. Europeans did not venture into the
    interior.
Slaves being transported in Africa, 19th century engraving. Image scanned: Rednbacher, W. (1890). Lehrbuch der
Weltgeschichte oder Die Geschichte der Menschheit, by William Rednbacher. Copyright expired. Image available
online at http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikpedia/commons/1/17/AfricanSlavesTransport.jpg
        Exploration and Conquest
   Compared to the rest of the world, African exploration
    began very late.
   Details about the diverse landscape of Africa were mainly
    legend until extensive maps from early European explorers
    and Arab traders became available.
Public domain image. 'Negroland and Guinea with the European Settlements, Explaining what belongs to England, Holland, Denmark, etc'.
By H. Moll, Geographer (Printed and sold by T. Bowles next ye Chapter House in St. Paul’s Church yard, & I. Bowles at ye Black Horse in
Cornhill, 1736?). Image available at http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/maps/ALW1663L.jpg
      Exploration and Conquest
Barriers to Exploration:

    Rivers that flow away from the interior (unlike the
     topography of many other countries) and are filled with
     cataracts and other barriers.
    Hot climates, dry deserts, rugged mountains, dense rain
     forest vegetation, swamps, and other physical barriers.
    a deadly mosquito transmitted disease called malaria.
      Colonization and Imperialism

   In 1884, European leaders
    divided most of Africa into
    colonies.
   By 1910, every country in
    Africa except Ethiopia
    and Liberia was controlled
    by a foreign power.



                              Graham, D. (2006). Map showing European claims on Africa in 1914. Permission
                              is granted to copy this document under the terms of the GNU Free
                              Documentation License. Image available online at
                              http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/99/ColonialAfrica_1914.png
The Rhodes Colossus:
Caricature of Cecil
John Rhodes, after he
announced plans for a
telegraph line from
Cape Town to Cairo.
Cartoon published in
1892. Rhodes founded
the De Beers diamond
company in South
Africa and colonized
Rhodesia (present-day
Zambia and
Zimbabwe).
This image is taken from a public domain work
from Project Gutenberg which is not copyrighted
in the United States. Available online at
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Punch_Rho
des_Colossus.png
                      Revolution
   In the mid-1900s,
    African countries
    began to rebel and gain
    their independence.
   The last country to do
    so was Eritrea in 1993.
   Newly independent
    nations joined the
    Organization of African
    Unity (OAU)
   (Map shows date of
    joining OAU, with blue
    representing founding
    members.)
                              Permission is granted to copy this document under the terms of GNU
                              Free Documentation License. Image available online at
                              http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6d/Organisation_o
                              f_African_unity.PNG
             Growth of New Nations
    New nations are finding it
    difficult to flourish because of:

   differences among political and
    ethnic groups
   lack of local economic
    development
   issues in developing strong
    stable, governments
   the impact of natural disasters,
    disease, poverty, and minimal
    educational opportunities.
                                                           Life Expectancy

Permission is granted to copy this document under the terms of GNU Free Documentation License.
Image is available online at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Life_expectancy_world_map.PNG

								
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