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					CALIFORNIA TAX INSTITUTE                                                     EXAM 09-1
5281 Laurel View Circle                                                      TEST #____________
Yorba Linda, CA 92886
FAX (714) 777-4267
(714) 777-3289 (Help Line)

FEDERAL AND CALIFORNIA INCOME TAX COURSE                                          #1022-CE-0009
20 Hours Continuing Education Credit (16 Federal hours 4 Calif. Hours)

Instruction:            This examination contains both True or False and Multiple Choice
                        questions. Each question has only one answer. Please mark your
                        answers on the attached answer sheet.

         YOUR FEDERAL INCOME TAX FOR INDIVIDUAL 2000 PUBlication. 17

Part One The Income Tax Return Questions

1. A taxpayer is required to file Form 1040 if his/her income is $50,000 or more?
       (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

2. A fiscal year is a 12-month period that ends on the last day of any month except April
       (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

3. Generally, a taxpayer must file an Amended U.S. Individual Income Tax Return, Form 1040X,
to claim a credit or refund within 3 years after the date the taxpayer filed their original return or
within 2 years after the date the tax was paid, whichever is later.
        (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

4. If a taxpayer does not include his/her social security number (SSN) or the SSN of another
person where required on a return, statement, or other document, the taxpayer will be subject to a
penalty of $50 for each failure. The taxpayer will not have to pay the penalty if he/she is able to
show that the failure was due to reasonable cause and not willful neglect.
        (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

5. If your spouse died during the year, you are considered married for the whole year for filing
status purposes. If you did not remarry before the end of the tax year, you can file a joint return for
yourself and your deceased spouse.
        (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

6. You may be able to file as head of household if you meet all of the following requirements:
      You are unmarried or considered unmarried on the last day of the year
      You paid more than 25% of the cost of keeping up a home for the year
      A qualifying person must live with you in the home for more than half the year (except for
      temporary absences, such as school). However, your dependent parent does not have to
      live with you.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE



                                                     1
7.   The final return of a decedent is due 90 days after the decedent’s death.
       (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

8. A tax return for a decedent cannot be electronically filed under the e-file or On-Line Filing
Program. A paper tax return must be filed for the decedent.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

9. Medical expenses paid before death by the decedent are deductible, subject to limits, on the
final income tax return if deductions are itemized.
        (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

10. A taxpayer may claim a credit for excess social security or tier 1 railroad retirement tax
withholding for 2000 only if the taxpayer’s wages from two or more employers were more than
$672,600.
       (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

11. Estimated tax is the method used to pay tax on income that is not subject to withholding.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

12. A taxpayer must make estimated tax payments for 2001 if he/she expects to owe at least
$2,000 in tax for 2001 after subtracting withholding and credits, and the taxpayer expects their
withholding and credits to be less than the smaller of:
       1) 90% of the tax to be shown on the 2001 tax return
       2) 100% of the tax shown on the taxpayer’s 2000 tax return.
       The 2000 tax return must cover all 12 months.
       (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

13. Normally, estimated tax payments are due on April 15, June 15, September 15 of the current
year, and January 15 of the following year.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

14. In general, a taxpayer may owe a penalty for 2000 if the total of the taxpayer’s withholding
and estimated tax payments did not equal at least the smaller of:
        1) 90% of the taxpayer’s 2000 tax, or
        2) 100% of the taxpayer’s 1999 tax. (The 1999 tax return must cover a 12-month period)
     (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

15. Generally a taxpayer will not owe an underpayment penalty if the total tax shown on the
taxpayer’s return minus the amount paid through withholding is less than $1,500.
     (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

Part Two Income Questions

16. If a taxpayer receives advance commissions or other amounts for services to be performed in
the future, and the taxpayer is a cash method taxpayer, the taxpayer must include these amounts in




                                                  2
their income in the year the amounts are received.
       (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

17.   A taxpayer must include in his/her income all unemployment compensation received.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

18. Benefits paid to a taxpayer by a union as strike or lockout benefits, including both cash and
the fair market value of other property, are usually not included in a taxpayer’s income as
compensation.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

19. Generally, the cost of up to $75,000 of group-term life insurance coverage that is provided by
the taxpayer’s employer is not included in the taxpayer’s income.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

20. A taxpayer that is a U.S. citizen, who works for a foreign government, an international
organization, a foreign embassy, or any foreign employer, must include their salary as income.
     (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

21. Living allowances for housing, utilities, household supplies, food, and clothing for a Peace
Corps volunteer or volunteer leader are includible as income.
     (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

22. If a taxpayer does not report tips to his/her employer as required, the taxpayer may be subject
to a penalty equal to 50% of the social security and Medicare tax owed on the unreported tips.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

23.   A taxpayer must report tips to their employer by the 12th day of the next month.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

24. Part of a child’s 2000 investment income may be taxed at the parent’s tax rate. This may
happen if all the following are true:
     1) The child was under age 14 on January 1, 2001
     2) The child had more than $1,400 of investment income (such as taxable interest and
dividends) and has to file a tax return
     3) Either parent was alive at the end of 2000
     (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

25. A taxpayer earned $30 interest from a savings account. The taxpayer also received a toaster
worth $25 from the same bank for opening this account. The taxpayer’s reported interest on their
Form 1099-INT will show $55.00.
     (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

26. If a taxpayer sells a bond between payment dates, part of the sales price represents interest
accrued to the date of sale. The taxpayer must report that part of the sale price as interest income




                                                  3
for the year of sale.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

27. Life insurance proceeds paid to a taxpayer as beneficiary of the insured person are usually
taxable.
     (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

28. A taxpayer that uses the cash method of accounting generally reports interest income in the
year in which he/she actually or constructively receives it.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

29. A taxpayer that received $450 of interest income is allowed to report this interest income on
Schedule B of Form 1040EZ.
     (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

30. A taxpayer that uses the accrual method of accounting will report interest income when
earned, whether or not received. Interest is earned over the term of the debt instrument.
     (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

31. A taxpayer’s basis in stock or stock rights received in a taxable distribution is their fair
market value when distributed.
    (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

32. John owns rental property. A tenant signed a 10-year lease agreement with John with the
yearly rent as $9,000. The tenant paid John $9,000 for the first years’ rent and $9,000 for the 10th
years’ rent. John must include $18,000 in his income as rent in the first year.
     (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

33. Putting a recreation room in an unfinished basement of rental property is an improvement to
the property and the cost of the improvement must be capitalized. This capitalized cost can
generally be depreciated.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

34.If a taxpayer does not rent his/her property to make a profit, the taxpayer can deduct rental
expenses only up to the amount of rental income.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

35. Mary purchased residential rental property on March 1, 2000. Determine first year
depreciation based on 27.5 year MACRS. The cost of the rental unit was $233,000 excluding land.
     (1) $6,708 (2) $8,120 (3) $7,414 (4) $6,002

36. Mary purchased residential rental property on March 1, 1999. Determine second year
depreciation based on 27.5 years MACRS. The cost of the rental unit was $233,000 excluding
land.
      (1) $6,708 (2) $8,120 (3) 46,002 (4) $8,472




                                                  4
37. Mary purchased residential rental property on April 1, 2000. Determine first year
depreciation based on 27.5 year MACRS. The cost of the rental unit was $233,000 excluding land.
     (1) $6,708 (2) $6,002 (3) $7,414 (4) $8,120
38. Mary purchased residential rental property on July 1, 1996. Determine depreciation for 2000
based on 27.5 years MACRS. The cost of the rental unit was $233,000 excluding land.
     (1) $6,708 (2) $6,002 (3) $8,120 (4) $8,471

39. Tamara owns residential rental property and she actively participated in a passive rental real
estate activity. Her loss from this activity for 2000 was $6,985. Her modified AGI was $76,542.
Tamara is allowed to take the following rental loss:
      (1) $-0- (2) -$6,985 (3) -$3,492 (4) -$5,239

40. Accelerated depreciation includes MACRS and ACRS and any other method that allows a
taxpayer to deduct more depreciation than he/she could deduct using a straight line method.
     (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

41. Jason owns a residential rental unit that he purchased on December 1, 1999. The purchase
price excluding land was $175,999. He received $900 monthly in 2000. The unit was rented for 12
months of 2000. His rental expenses were as follows:
                Insurance             $760
                Mortgage interest     $5,603
                Repairs               $562
                Taxes                 $1,230
                Utilities             $644
      Determine Jason’s rental expenses.(excluding depreciation)
        (1) $8,799 (2) $8,237 (3) $8,039 (4) $7,458

42. Determine Jason’s depreciation from question #41.
    (1) $6,200 (2) $6,399 (3) $4,562 (4) $3,322

43. Determine Jason’s profit or loss from this rental activity (question #41).
      (1) $4,458 (2) -$3,764 (3) -$4,398 (4)-$4,498

44. Distributions that a taxpayer receives from his/her qualified retirement plan or deferred
annuity contract before the taxpayer reaches age 59 ½ (and amounts the taxpayer receives when
he/she cash in retirement bonds before reaching age 59 ½) are usually subject to an additional tax
of 15%. The tax applies to the taxable part of the distribution.
     (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

45. The early distribution tax does not apply to qualified retirement plan or deferred annuity
contract distributions made because the taxpayer is totally and permanently disabled.
     (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

46. The early distribution tax does not apply to distributions made from an IRA only to pay for
qualified higher education expenses for yourself, your spouse, your children, or grandchildren to
the extent that the distribution does not exceed the qualified higher education expenses for the



                                                 5
taxable year.
     (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

47. David is single, retired and received social security benefits during 2000 of $8,600. He also
received $1,450 interest income. How much of his social security benefits is taxable?
      (1) $8,600 (2) $4,300 (3) $-0- (4) $2,150
48. Steven is single, retired and received social security benefits during 2000 of $9,400. He also
received a taxable pension of $23,500 and $2,300 interest from savings. How much of his social
security benefits are taxable?
      (1) $9,400 (2) $-0- (3) $4,700 (4) $2,750

49.   Janice is required to report child support payments received in 2000 as income.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

50. Awards of compensatory damages for personal physical injury or physical sickness are to be
included on a taxpayer’s tax return as income.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

51.   Losses of estates and trusts generally are deductible by the beneficiaries on Schedule E.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

52. Generally, if a debt a taxpayer owes is cancelled or forgiven, other than as a gift or bequest,
the taxpayer must include the cancelled amount in their gross income.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

53. Fees received as an executor or administrator of an estate must be included in a taxpayer’s
gross income.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

54. Sandy received a free tour from a travel agency for organizing a group of tourists. Sandy
must include the fair market value of the tour as income on her tax return.
     (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

55. Cancelled debt in a bankruptcy case under title 11 of the U.S. Code must be included in a
taxpayer’s gross income.
     (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

56. In general, an S corporation does not pay tax on its income. Instead, the income, losses,
deductions, and credits of the corporation are “passed through” to the shareholders.
     (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

57. A recovery is a return of an amount a taxpayer took as a deduction or as a credit in an earlier
year. The amount of the recovery must be included in a taxpayer’s income in the year received to
the extent that the deduction or credit taken reduced the taxpayer’s tax in an earlier year.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE




                                                  6
58. Royalties from copyrights, patents, and oil, gas, and mineral properties are taxable as
ordinary income.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE
59. Generally, a taxpayer should not report all of the following items as income on his/her tax
return:       Accident and health insurance proceeds
              Child support payments
              Welfare Benefits
              Workers’ Compensation
              Veteran’s Benefits
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

60. Life insurance proceeds paid to a taxpayer because of the death of the insured person are
taxable.
     (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

Part Three Gains and Losses Questions

61.   The basis of property a taxpayer buys is usually its fair market value on the date of purchase.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

62. Fire insurance premiums and fees for refinancing a mortgage may be included in determining
the basis of property.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

63. A nontaxable exchange is an exchange in which a taxpayer is not taxed on any gain and is
not able to deduct any loss.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

64. The basis of property a taxpayer’s spouse transfers to the taxpayer in trust for the taxpayer’s
benefit is the same as the taxpayer’s spouse’s adjusted basis.
     (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

65. The basis of stocks or bonds a taxpayer buys is generally the purchase price plus any costs of
purchase, such as commissions and recording or transfer fees.
     (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

66. A taxpayer can exchange common stock for common stock or preferred stock for preferred
stock in the same corporation without having a recognized gain or loss.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

67. If a taxpayer transfers property to a corporation solely in exchange for stock in that
corporation, and immediately after the trade, the taxpayer is in control of the corporation, the
taxpayer ordinarily will not recognize a gain or loss.
     (T) TRUE (F) FALSE




                                                  7
68. Generally, a gain or loss is recognized on a transfer of property from an individual to a
spouse, or if incident to a divorce, a former spouse.
     (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

69.   Capital assets include all of the following:
                        Stocks or bonds held in the taxpayer’s personal account
                        A car used for pleasure or commuting
                        Coin or stamp collections
                        Real property used in the taxpayer’s trade or business
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

70. Property held for personal use is a capital asset. Gain from a sale or trade of that property is
a capital gain. Loss from the sale or trade of that property is deductible.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

71. If a taxpayer holds investment property more than one year, any capital gain or loss is a long-
term capital gain or loss.
     (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

72. Donna bought investment property on September 29, 1999 and sold it on September 29,
2000. Donna’s sale will be qualified as long-term capital gain or loss.
     (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

73. For securities traded on an established securities market, a taxpayer’s holding period begins
the day after the purchase trade date and ends on the sold trade date.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

74. Usually, the home a taxpayer lives in most of the time is the taxpayer’s main home and can
be a:               House
                    Houseboat
                    Mobile home
                    Condominium
                    Cooperative apartment
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

75.   A taxpayer can exclude the entire gain on the sale of their main home up to:
                      1) $250,000
                      2) $500,000 if all of the following are true
                             a) The taxpayer is married and files a joint return for the year
                             b) Either the taxpayer or the taxpayer’s spouse meets the ownership
                                 test
                             c) Both the taxpayer and the taxpayer’s spouse meet the use test
                             d) During the 2-year period ending on the date of sale, neither the
                                 taxpayer or the taxpayer’s spouse excluded gain from the sale of
                                 another home (not counting any sales before May 7, 1997.)
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE



                                                  8
76.   A taxpayer cannot deduct a loss on the sale of his/her home.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

77. If a taxpayer’s capital losses are more than his/her capital gains, the taxpayer can claim a
capital loss deduction. A taxpayer’s allowable capital loss deduction is the lesser of:
                       1) $4,000 ($2,000 if married filing a separate return)
                       2) Your total net loss as shown on Schedule D
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

78. Jennifer and Robert file jointly and sold securities in 2000. They have short-term capital
losses of $5,000 and long-term capital losses of $2,000. Their capital loss deduction for 2000 is:
      (1) $3,000 (2) $2,000 (3) $5,000 (4) $-0-

79. From question #78, how much short-term capital loss carryover will Jennifer and Robert
have for 2001 tax year?
     (1) $3,000 (2) $1,000 (3) $2,000 (4) $-0-

80. From question #78, how much long-term capital loss carryover will Jennifer and Robert have
for 2001 tax year?
      (1) $2,000 (2) $5,000 (3) $1,000 (4) $-0-

81.   Long-term capital losses are normally taken prior to short-term capital losses.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

Part Four Adjustments to Income Questions

82. Interest earned on a taxpayer’s IRA is not taxed in the year earned and is reported as tax-
exempt interest on the taxpayer’s tax return.
    (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

83. The most that can be contributed for any year to a taxpayer’s traditional IRA is the smaller of
the following amounts:     1) Taxpayer’s compensation
                           2) $2,000
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

84. David is single and is covered by an employer retirement plan. His 2000 modified AGI is
$43,000 and he contributed $2,000 to his IRA account. David is able to take the following IRA
deduction:
     (1) $2,000 (2) $1,000 (3) $-0- (4) $5,000

85. David is single and is not covered by an employer retirement plan. His 2000 modified AGI
is $43,000 and he contributed $2,000 to his IRA account. David is able to take the following IRA
deduction:
      (1) $2,000 (2) $1,000 (3) $-0- (4) $500




                                                  9
86.   Excess contributions to a traditional IRA are subject to a 6% tax.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

87. The total of all contributions to all educational IRAs set up for the benefit of any one
designated beneficiary (child) cannot be more $750 for a tax year.
     (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

88. The distance test to be able to claim moving expenses will be met if the taxpayer’s new main
job location is at least 35 miles farther from his/her former home than his/her old main job location
was from his/her former home.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

89.   Deductible moving expenses include all of the following:
                            Moving your household goods and personal effects
                            Traveling expenses for lodging
                            Meals
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

90. If a taxpayer uses his/her car to transport his/her family or household effects, he/she can
figure deductible moving expenses by using actual car expenses, such as gas and oil or take $.325
for each mile driven.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

91.   A taxpayer cannot deduct the following items as moving expenses:
                             Car tags
                             Driver’s license
                             Loss on the sale of his/her home
                             Meal expenses
                             Refitting carpets and draperies
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

92.   Alimony does not include child support payments.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

93.   Alimony paid by a taxpayer can be deducted on Form 1040, Form 1040A, or Form 1040EZ.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

Part Five Standard Deduction and Itemized Deductions Questions

94. The amount a taxpayer can deduct for itemized deductions is limited if the taxpayer’s AGI is
more than $128,950 ($64,475 if married filing separately) for 1999.
       (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

95. Earned income is salaries, wages, tips, professional fees, and other amounts received as pay
for work the taxpayer actually performed.




                                                 10
       (T) TRUE (F) FALSE


96.   For tax year 2000, the standard deduction for a single person age 65 and blind is:
       (1) $4,525 (2) $8,200 (3) $5,500 (4) $6,600

97. For tax year 2000, the standard deduction for a married couple filing jointly that are both 65
is:
      (1) $9,050 (2) $9,900 (3) $10,750 (4) $7,300

98. For tax year 2000, the standard deduction for head of household is:
      (1) $4,400 (2) $7,350 (3) $3,675 (4) 6,450

99.   All of the following are deductible medical and dental expenses.
                               Expenses of an organ transplant
                               Stop-smoking programs
                               Dental examinations
                               Weight loss program
       (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

100. Taxes and fees that are generally deducted on Schedule A, Form 1040 include the following:
                             Fines
                             Gift taxes
                             Social Security
                             Inheritance tax
                             Estate tax
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE


                 CALIFORNIA PERSONAL INCOME TAX BOOKLET 2000
                       CALIFORNIA INCOME TAX QUESTIONS

101. Angela’s filing status is qualifying widow with one dependent child. Her 2000 California
Gross Income is $19,336 and her California AGI is $18,965. Angela is under 65 and she is
required to file a California tax return.
       (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

102. Brian’s filing status is head of household with one dependent child. His taxable income is
less than $50,000. Brian will be able to file Form 540 2EZ.
        (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

103. Donald is self-employed and his net profit from self-employment was $45,767 for 2000.
Donald will be able to file Form 540A because his income is less than $100,000.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE




                                                 11
104. Jose’s filing status is single and he was a resident of California for the entire 2000 year.
Jose paid rent for 12 months and is not claimed as a dependent by another taxpayer. Jose’s
California AGI is $45,050 and he qualifies for Renter’s Credit.
       (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

105. The Renter’s Credit for a married couple that qualify in 2000 is $120.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

106. Bonnie may file as married filing jointly for 2000, even though her husband died in 2000
and she did not remarry in 2000.
       (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

107. Bob’s spouse died in 1997 and he has not remarried. He has a dependent child that lived in
his house throughout 2000. He also pays over one-half the cost of keeping up his home. Bob may
file as qualifying widower with dependent child in 2000.
         (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

108. A taxpayer must attach a doctor’s statement to the California income tax form indicating that
the taxpayer or the taxpayer’s spouse is visually impaired the first year that a taxpayer or the
taxpayer’s spouse claims an exemption for blindness. Visually impaired means that the taxpayer
cannot see better than 20/200 while wearing glasses or contact lens.
        (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

109. California does not tax interest from United Sates savings bonds or United States Treasury
bills or notes.
         (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

110. California does not tax interest from municipal or state bonds from a state other than
California.
       (T) TRUE (F) FALSE
111. A taxpayer may claim a credit for excess SDI if he/she had two or more employers in 2000.
       (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

112. A paid preparer must give the taxpayer two copies of the tax return. One copy of the return
is to be filed with the California Franchise Tax Board and one copy for the taxpayer’s records.
        (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

113. The standard deduction for filing status qualifying widow(er) in 2000 is $5,422.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

114. The maximum credit for child adoption costs on the California tax return for 2000 is $2,500.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

115. The maximum late filing total penalty is 35% of the tax not paid if the 2000 California tax
return is filed after October 15, 2001. The minimum penalty for filing a return more than 60 days




                                                 12
late is $100 or 100% of the balance due, whichever is less.
         (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

116. The late payment of tax penalty is 5% of the tax not paid when due plus ½% for each month,
or part of a month, the tax remains unpaid.
        (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

117. California Lottery losses are not deductible for California income tax. If California Lottery
losses were claimed as gambling losses on Form 1040 Schedule A you will need to make an
adjustment on Schedule CA (540).
        (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

118. If a taxpayer’s Federal income tax return is examined and changed by IRS and the taxpayer
owes additional tax, the taxpayer must report these changes to the FTB within nine months of the
date of the final federal determination.
        (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

119. If a taxpayer is unable to pay monies owed to the Franchise Tax Board, he/she should
request to make monthly payments by filing out Form FTB 3567.
       (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

120. Your California income tax client can check on the status of his/her tax refund over the
Internet by using www.ftb.ca.gov.
        (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

121. California Form 540X is used to correct an error to a filed California income tax return.
      (T) TRUE (F) FALSE

122.California motor vehicle license fees such as registration fee, weight fee, and county fees are
deductible on federal Schedule A.
        (T) TRUE (F) FALSE
123. Mr. & Mrs. Thompson file married filing jointly. Their California taxable income for 2000
is $82, 375. The California tax on this amount is:
        (1) $5,971 (2) $      (3) $5,008 (4) $5,962

124. Jennie Morris file single. Her California taxable income for 2000 is $40, 174. The
California tax on this amount is:
       (1) $1,984 (2) $1,020 (3) $1,172 (4) $2,065

125. Gordon Wheeler files as head of household. His California taxable income for 2000 is
$53,542. The California tax on this amount is:
       (1) $3,284 (2) $1,818 (3) $2,222 (4) $3,321

126. Mr. & Mrs. Rivas file married filing jointly. Their California taxable income for 2000 is
$132,867. The California tax on this amount is:
       (1) $7,876 (2) $8,543 (3) $8,776 (4) $8,848



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