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					                            GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers




     Golden Retriever Club
                       of
Greater Los Angeles Rescue, Inc.
    Guidelines for Volunteers
         May 2004/In Revision




               GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
          PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                   818-700-5200
                www.grcglarescue.org


                                                              Page 1 of 34
                                         GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers




   Golden Retriever Club of Greater Los Angeles Rescue, Inc.
                   Guidelines for Volunteers




                      This manual is the property of
                    Golden Retriever Club of
                Greater Los Angeles Rescue, Inc.
                          PO Box 1511
                     La Canada, CA 91012
                         818-700-5200
                     www.grcglarescue.org




This publication is not to be distributed outside of the GRCGLA Rescue
   volunteer corps. Thank you in advance for your work on behalf of
                       homeless golden retrievers.




                            GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                       PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                818-700-5200
                             www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                           Page 2 of 34
                                              GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers




Revision History

Rev #   Date        Section             Source                 Summary
1       7/16/2003   GRCGLA Rescue       GRCGLA Rescue          GRCGLA Rescue does not adopt
                    Territory           BOD Regular            dogs outside the organization’s
                                        Meeting Minutes        territory.


2       7/16/2003   Working With        GRCGLA Rescue          Golden mixes taken into rescue must
                    Shelters            BOD Regular            be mostly golden, golden-looking,
                                        Meeting Minutes        young, healthy and have good
                                                               dispositions.


3       7/16/2003   GRCGLA Rescue       GRCGLA Rescue          GRCGLA Rescue territory is defined
                    Territory           BOD Regular            as Los Angles, Orange, San
                                        Meeting Minutes        Bernardino, Riverside, San
                                                               Bernardino, Riverside, San Diego and
                                                               Kern Counties.

4       4/14/2OO4   Euthanasia Policy   GRCGLA Rescue          Revised text inserted.
                                        BOD Regular
                                        Meeting Minutes

5       4/14/2004   Transportation      GRCGLA Rescue          Transporters need to carry auto
                                        BOD Regular            insurance. Dogs must be crated, seat-
                                        Meeting Minutes        belted or tethered when transported in
                                                               volunteer vehicles. Dogs must be
                                                               crated when being transported in the
                                                               same vehicle as children. Volunteers
                                                               must sign volunteer form to be
                                                               covered by our insurance policy.

6       4/14/2004   Guidelines for      GRCGLA Rescue          Dogs may not be adopted to homes
                    Doing               BOD Regular            that are at or over the legal limit for
                    Homechecks          Meeting Minutes        dogs in their local area, including the
                                                               homes of volunteers.
7       4/14/2004   Guidelines for      GRCGLA Rescue          GRCGLA Rescue cannot approve a
                    Doing               BOD Regular            home for adoption which employs
                    Homechecks          Meeting Minutes        Invisible Fence as a primary
                                                               containment device for the yard.

8       8/18/2004   Adopting Dogs for   GRCGLA Rescue          GRCGLA Rescue dogs are intended
                    Service             BOD Regular            to be adopted out as family pets, and
                                        Meeting Minutes        not for service.



                                 GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                            PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                     818-700-5200
                                  www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                        Page 3 of 34
                                          GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers



9    9/22/04     Permanent Foster   GRCGLA Rescue          Permanent fosters can be designated
                                    BOD Regular            upon approval of one BOD member
                                    Meeting Minutes        and the treasurer.

10   9/22/04     Web Site           GRCGLA Rescue          Requests for link and content sharing
                                    BOD Regular            need to be approved by web site
                                    Meeting Minutes        team and BOD.

11   11/3/2004   Common             GRCGLA Rescue          Youthful volunteers who are minors
                 Courtesy &         BOD Regular            may be added to the post list on a
                 Communication      Meeting Minutes        case-by-case basis with approval of
                                                           the BOD upon sponsorship of any
                                                           BOD member

12   12/8/2004   Adoption           GRCGLA Rescue          New schedule of adoption donation
                 Donations          BOD Regular            rates posted.
                                    Meeting Minutes
13   3/2/2005    Spay/Neuter        GRCGLA Rescue          Amended spay/neuter policy. S/N
                 Policy             BOD Regular            waivers/deposits eliminated.
                                    Meeting Minutes
14   1/21/2004   GRCGLA Rescue      GRCGLA Rescue          Include the cities of Santa Barbara
                 Territory          BOD Regular            and Goleta
                                    Meeting Minutes




                             GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                        PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                 818-700-5200
                              www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                   Page 4 of 34
                                                                      GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers




Table of Contents
Revision History .............................................................................................................. 3
Who We Are .................................................................................................................... 7
GRCGLA Rescue Territory.............................................................................................. 7
What We Do .................................................................................................................... 8
  Shelter Liaison. ............................................................................................................ 8
  Transportation ............................................................................................................. 8
  Foster. ......................................................................................................................... 8
  Foster/Dog Rep ........................................................................................................... 9
  Homechecker. ............................................................................................................. 9
  Adoption Event Handler ............................................................................................... 9
  Fundraising ................................................................................................................ 10
  Administration. ........................................................................................................... 10
  Website...................................................................................................................... 10
Taking In Dogs .............................................................................................................. 10
Working With Shelters ................................................................................................... 11
Working with Veterinarians ............................................................................................ 12
Shots & Microchips........................................................................................................ 13
Paperwork ..................................................................................................................... 13
Working with Boarding Facilities ................................................................................... 14
Working with Fosters ..................................................................................................... 14
Working with Owners Who Relinquish Their Dogs ........................................................ 15
Working with Owners Who List Their Dogs ................................................................... 16
Courtesy Listing ............................................................................................................ 16
Spay/Neuter Policy ........................................................................................................ 16
Dog Bite Protocol .......................................................................................................... 17
Adopting Dogs for Service ............................................................................................. 17
Representing Dogs........................................................................................................ 17
  Dog Representative Guidelines ................................................................................. 18
  Process...................................................................................................................... 19
  Posting to the Web .................................................................................................... 19
  Evaluation Period....................................................................................................... 20
  Screening Applicants ................................................................................................. 21
  Making a Match ......................................................................................................... 22
  Adopter Factors/Related Dog Factors ....................................................................... 22
  Adopter Meetings....................................................................................................... 24
Homechecks & Interviewing Prospective Adopters ....................................................... 24
  Guidelines for Doing Homechecks............................................................................. 26
Placing Dogs With Young Children ............................................................................... 28
Adoption Events ............................................................................................................ 29
Adoption Donations ....................................................................................................... 30
                                                  GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                                             PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                                      818-700-5200
                                                   www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                                                      Page 5 of 34
                                                                    GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers


Management Structure .................................................................................................. 30
Working With Other Rescues ........................................................................................ 31
Permanent Foster.......................................................................................................... 31
Euthanasia Policy .......................................................................................................... 31
Administration ............................................................................................................... 32
Reimbursements & Submissions .................................................................................. 32
Fundraising ................................................................................................................... 33
Thank You To Contributors ........................................................................................... 33
Common Courtesy & Communication ........................................................................... 33
The Best Volunteers ...................................................................................................... 34




                                                 GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                                            PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                                     818-700-5200
                                                  www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                                                   Page 6 of 34
                                               GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers




Who We Are

The Golden Retriever Club of Greater Los Angeles, Inc. is a 501c3 non-profit
organization that is dedicated to the rescue, rehabilitation and re-homing of Golden
Retrievers in the Greater Los Angeles area. The only member of GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
is the Golden Retriever Club of Greater Los Angeles, the AKC sanctioned club for
golden retrievers in the greater Los Angeles area. There are two separate board of
directors. The GRCGLA has its own board of directors. GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. has its
own board of directors. According to the by-laws,
GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. can have between 5 and 7 Board members, with a maximum of
1/3 who are also members of the board of directors of the GRCGLA. The GRCGLA has
established a standing rule in which board members of GRCGLA, Inc. must also be
members in good standing of the GRCGLA. The GRCGLA board of directors
establishes the procedures by which the board of the GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. is chosen.

In order to be a member of the GRCGLA, you must attend two GRCGLA sponsored two
events, one of which is a meeting, be sponsored by two members and pay annual
membership dues. It is important that each volunteer of GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. keep in
mind that he and she is in essence representing two organizations – the Golden
Retriever Club of Greater Los Angeles Rescue, Inc. and the AKC sanctioned club, the
Golden Retriever Club of Greater Los Angeles. Each volunteer is asked to treat others
with courtesy and respect and conduct oneself in a professional manner. The
reputations of both organizations are judged by the action of our volunteers.



GRCGLA Rescue Territory
(rev. 1)

GRCGLA Rescue territory is defined as Los Angles, Orange, San Bernardino,
Riverside, San Bernardino, Riverside, San Diego and Kern Counties, (rev. 3) and the
cities of Santa Barbara and Goleta (rev 14).

GRCGLA Rescue does not adopt dogs out to homes outside of our defined territory.




                                  GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                             PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                      818-700-5200
                                   www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                 Page 7 of 34
                                                 GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers




What We Do

The volunteers of GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. give their time, energy and money to the
rescue of abandoned golden retrievers . The primary source is shelters and owners who
want to give up their dogs. Our rescue insures that each dog has had a veterinary
check, all shots are up to date, all dogs are neutered or spayed/neutered and that the
dogs are re-homed into pre-screened families that are suitable to the age and
disposition of our rescue dogs. This requires commitment on the part of our volunteers
because this activity is a labor intensive labor of love.


Shelter Liaison. There are more than 40 shelters in the area that are being covered.
The shelter liaison establishes a positive relationship with shelter personnel, checks the
shelter for goldens and evaluates if the dog is adoptable. Shelter liaison pulls the dog
from the shelter or makes certain someone is there on its available day to pull the dog.
Covering shelters is one of the most critical and difficult rescue jobs – and also one of
the most important. Without us, dogs are euthanized in the shelter, so we need to be
there.

Transportation. All of our dogs need to go from point A to point B. From the shelter
to the vet. From the vet to a foster. From a foster to the vet. From a foster to an
adoption event. Oftentimes, rescue gets crates donated to us, and we can often loan a
crate to someone who can transport our rescue dogs. Transporters need to carry auto
insurance. Dogs must be crated, seat-belted or tethered when transported in volunteer
vehicles. Dogs must be crated when being transported in the same vehicle as children.
Volunteers must sign volunteer form to be covered by our insurance policy. (rev. 5)


Foster. Another essential and critical volunteer position. The foster takes the dog into
his home and evaluates the dog. The foster is not responsible for veterinary bills, but is
responsible for taking the dog to the vet or making arrangements for the foster dog to
get follow up veterinary care. The foster needs to discuss with an area manager of
board member on any veterinary care the dog may need, and use a vet that is pre-
approved by the rescue. If there is an emergency, the foster needs to act in a manner
consistent with saving the life of the dog. The foster is expected to treat the dog in a
manner consistent with their own dogs – provide proper food and water, shelter and
allow the dog to sleep in the house. We highly encourage crate training, especially
overnight. If the foster needs supplies such as a crate or toys or food, the rescue group
will make every attempt to provide. The foster decides the type of home suitable for
their foster dog. The goal is to place the dog into a proper home. If the foster is also the

                                    GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                               PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                        818-700-5200
                                     www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                   Page 8 of 34
                                                 GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers


representative of the dog, they are expected to work closely with other members of the
volunteer team who do homechecks and refer homes. If another person represents the
dog for the foster, the foster is expected to work closely with that rep to find a suitable
home. The foster should attend adoption events whenever possible to maximize the
opportunity for the foster dog to get adopted. Sometimes, another volunteer may be
available to handle the foster dog at an adoption event. If a foster is not working out in a
particular foster home, the rescue will remove that dog from the foster home.


Foster/Dog Rep. The foster/dog rep is either the foster of the dog or another person
designated to screen inquiries on the dog and work with the foster.


Homechecker. The rescue receives applications from people who want to adopt
dogs. The homecheck volunteer reviews the application to determine whether it is a
suitable application. The homecheck volunteer then calls the applicant and interview s
them to further determine whether or not the family is serious about wanting to adopt
one of our dogs and whether their expectations are realistic. The homechecker then
sets up a convenient appointment to go to the home of the potential adopter to check
the safety and security of the property and further determine that the applicant can
provide a proper home for our dogs. The homechecker then reports back to the
volunteer group whether or not the applicant is approved and why. It is important that
the homechecker provide as much information as possible to provide guidelines for the
fosters to find a suitable home for their foster dogs. It is appropriate for the
homechecker to request a $20 donation from the applicant at the time of the
homecheck. We request this donation of applicants in order to weed out those
applicants who are serious and those who aren’t so we don’t waste the time of our
homecheckers, to compensate the volunteer’s time and money by collecting a donation
to the rescue, and rescue needs the money to pay for care of our rescue dogs.


Adoption Event Handler. Rescue holds adoption events and volunteers are
needed to handle dogs and show them to prospective adopters. Handlers need to be on
time and take responsibility for a dog within their means to control. Sometimes dogs are
difficult to handle at an adoption event. It is an inherently stressful environment for dogs
that are homeless and insecure. If a dog is too difficult to control, then the handler must
request that someone more experienced handle that dog. It is critical that the handler be
aware of the environment surrounding the dog at all times. The handler should not
approach other dogs or allow other dogs to get in the face of their dog. They must be
aware of children who might approach the dog in an unacceptable manner. The handler
must watch their dog carefully around other small dogs, as many retrievers are prey
aggressive. In other words, a great deal of common sense and competent handling of
the rescue dog is imperative at an adoption event so there is no incident where another

                                    GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                               PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                        818-700-5200
                                     www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                   Page 9 of 34
                                                 GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers


animal or person is injured. Handlers should spread out, keep their dog as secure and
happy as possible and be available and courteous to prospective adopters.


Fundraising. A separate fundraising committee has been created to focus on raising
money. Many of our active volunteers are simply too busy handling the rescue and
placement of dogs to dedicate time to raising funds and there are other volunteers who
cannot commit their time to their dogs but prefer to participate in more fun and creative
ways to help the rescue. This committee meets on a regular basis and has a leadership
team in place to guide the committee into profitable fundraising activities.


Administration. Administration duties in the rescue include updating our databases,
returning phone calls, tracking down paperwork on our dogs, preparation of mailings
and compiling materials


Website. Our website is maintained by two or three volunteers who update it daily.
Requests for link and content sharing with GRCGLA Rescue site and other sites should
be reviewed and approved by the web site support team and BOD before being
implemented. GRCGLA Rescue has a Petfinders account and we automatically post
most of our dogs there as a matter of good practice. (rev. 10).



Taking In Dogs
All dogs who become property of this rescue should be evaluated. Since GRCGLA
Rescue, Inc. is a breed specific rescue associated with the AKC sanctioned main club,
rescue dogs should be purebred golden retrievers or more golden retriever than any
other breed. The ideal rescue dog should be healthy and non-aggressive. We cannot
take in dogs that have a history of aggression with people. We need to evaluate and
decide whether or not the rescue has the resources to take in a dog that is known to be
aggressive with other dogs. These dogs are much more difficult to foster and place. We
need to evaluate and decide whether we have the resources to take in a dog that has
known medical problems that will cost the rescue additional money. When a dog comes
into rescue, there needs to be a plan to handle that dog –where will it go for a veterinary
check, who will be transporting that dog, who will be fostering the dog, who will be
repping the dog. We need to be aware of the logistics involved and the rescue
resources needed to handle that dog. The shelter rep should work with other volunteers
to help handle these logistics.

                                    GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                               PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                        818-700-5200
                                     www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                  Page 10 of 34
                                                 GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers




Working With Shelters
One of the most critical elements in rescue is our relationship with the shelter staff.
Each shelter operates differently with their own rules. It is imperative that the volunteers
of our rescue treat all members of the shelter staff with courtesy and respect. We must
keep our word. If we say we are coming to their shelter on a specific day and time,
Without a good reputation, we will be branded as unreliable and the shelter staff will not
work with us to save dogs.

If a volunteer has a relationship with a particular shelter, it is important that this person
be the primary contact and introduce shelter staff to one or two other volunteers who
can back up the primary contact. It is even more critical that other volunteers do not
step on these relationships. We cannot allow several people from the same rescue
calling the shelter staff regarding a particular dog, but to leave the coordination to the
one or two primary contacts for that particular shelters.

Some shelters are supportive of our efforts to evaluate a dog in the shelter. Other
shelters are less cooperative. When visiting a shelter to evaluate a dog, we should:

          Evaluate whether the dog is a golden or a golden mixed with a benevolent
           breed such as labrador, spaniel, samoyed, etc..

          If the dog is a purebred and non-aggressive, then it is a candidate for our
           rescue.

          If the dog is not a purebred, s/he should be mostly golden, golden-looking,
           young, healthy with a good temperament (considered highly adoptable). (rev
           2)

          In the shelter, the health of the dog should be determined. If the dog is ill or
           injured, a consultation with the rescue leadership team is necessary. Illnesses
           that are not considered serious include kennel cough, ear infections and skin
           problems.


Dispositon of the dog should be determined. If at all possible, the dog should be
removed from shelter run and handled. The shelter environment is extremely stressful
to a dog, so its true character is often not revealed in a shelter. But we do need to
determine its friendliness. If the dog appears to be dangerous to people, we must pass
on that dog. If the dog appears to be overtly aggressive to other dogs, we most likely

                                    GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                               PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                        818-700-5200
                                     www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                  Page 11 of 34
                                                 GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers


need to pass on that dog. When in doubt, a volunteer should consult with rescue
leadership or request that another volunteer make another evaluation.

When it is decided that we are taking a dog into our rescue from the shelter, we must
record the impound number, the date and time of availability and make sure one of our
volunteers is at the shelter at the appointed time.

Shelters have different hold systems. Whether or not a dog is pulled on the 1 st hold, 2nd
hold or 3rd hold depends on the shelter relationship which should be determined by the
primary shelter contact in conjunction with other volunteers. IT IS IMPERATIVE that the
volunteer obtain all pertinent shelter paperwork when the dog is bailed. This includes
source documentation, shot records, spay/neuter certificates and microchip information.



Working with Veterinarians

All rescue dogs from the shelter need to be seen by a veterinarian. If an owner turn in
has not been examined by a veterinarian within the past year and shots are out of date,
an OTI should also see a veterinarian.

Volunteers who rescue the dog are authorized to carry out the following veterinary care:
      An exam
      Automatic deworming, depending on the protocol established with that
        veterinarian
      Shots that are not up to date. Shelters give all or some shots. If all shots haven’t
        been given to the dog, the veterinarian should give any remaining shots such as
        DHLPP, Rabies and Bordatella..Veterinarian should have complete record of all
        shots given to the rescue dog. If a dog is an owner turn in, previous vet records
        should be obtained and any missing shots should be updated.
      Basic treatment for conditions such as ears, skin conditions or kennel cough
If the dog requires additional procedures such as blood panels, xrays or surgeries, this
must be approved by a member of the leadership team if cost estimate is under $500.

All expenditures over $500 must have the approval of the Treasurer and two board
member of GRCGLA Rescue.

It is imperative that we remain courteous and cooperative with veterinarians and their
staffs. Many veterinarians do not want to work with rescue dogs from the shelter, and
we must cherish the ones who do. One or two volunteers should be the primary contact
for a particular veterinarian and those volunteers should be notified if a rescue dog is



                                    GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                               PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                        818-700-5200
                                     www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                  Page 12 of 34
                                                GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers


going to a veterinarian office. Arrangements for prompt payment of the veterinarian
must be made.

Many veterinarians do not want to board dogs with kennel cough. If you suspect that a
dog being picked up from the shelter has kc, that dog should be taken to a veterinarian
who has isolation. If a dog comes down with kennel cough in a veterinarian office and
needs to be moved to another veterinarian’s office, that should be done promptly. We
must be good customers to the veterinarians who work with our rescue organization.


Shots & Microchips
A dog should be updated on the following shots:
    DHLPP
    Rabies (with certificate)
    Bordatella

Some veterinarians require additional shots such as corona. If particular shot is
necessary for a boarding or veterinary facility, then that shot should be included. Many
shelters microchip their dogs. If a dog has not been chipped, it is recommended that we
do have a veterinarian chip the dog, but only if it can be obtained at a reasonable cost.
Volunteers should shop around for vets who provide this service at a good price. If a
dog is not chipped upon adoption, volunteers should apprise the adopter of this and
highly recommend that they chip the dog at their own expense.


Paperwork
Upon adoption the new owner should receive the following records on each dog:
   Shot Records– DHLPP, Bordatella, Rabies (including rabies certificate)
   Spay/Neuter Certificates
   Microchipping Information of dog has been chipped
   Veterinarian tests such as blood work, ex-rays, when applicable.
When a dog is adopted, a copy of the following records need to be kept in a master file:
   Source Documentation
   Terms of Adoption
   Shot Records
   Spay/Neuter Certificate
   Microchip Information
   Tag Number

When a dog is being moved from location to location, its shot and veterinary records
should be moving with him

                                   GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                              PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                       818-700-5200
                                    www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                 Page 13 of 34
                                                 GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers




Working with Boarding Facilities
It is important for our volunteers in various areas establish good relationships with
quality boarding facilities. When the rescue takes in more dogs than foster homes
available, it is necessary to board our dogs. The volunteer should inspect the facility and
make sure it is cleaned regularly, it is accessible, and the dogs get walked or have play
time. If workers at the facility do not walk our dogs, then volunteers need to walk the
dogs daily. Even if the facility socializes and walks the dogs, our volunteers should be
there daily checking on the dog and walking it, in order to give it quality time and
evaluate it for prospective adopters. Most facilities have strict shot requirements. We
need to make sure shots are up to date, and the dog is in no danger of contracting
kennel cough. It is imperative that we cultivate quality boarding facilities and
relationships.


Working with Fosters
The best way to recruit fosters into the rescue is to ask someone to temporarily house
one of our dogs. When recruiting fosters, please keep in mind the following:
    Foster home must be approved by foster coordinators. This requires a
       homecheck and a full discussion with a foster coordinator on what the foster’s
       esponsibilities are and procedures within the rescue.
    Foster need to sign a Foster Liability Release before taking in any rescue dogs.
    The foster dog remains the property of GRCGLA Rescue while the dog is in the
    home of the foster. If the foster wishes to adopt the dog, a Terms of Adoption
    and adoption fee is required.
    Medical bills are the responsibility of the rescue, but the foster must use
       GRCGLA veterinarians and apprise their supervising volunteer that the dog
       needs medical attention so proper approval is obtained.
    Foster dogs need to be evaluated by the foster parent so our volunteers can
       determine the best adoptive home.
    Foster dogs will be moved from the foster home prior to adoption if it is too
       difficult for the foster to manage the dog or the foster needs to go out of town or
       is otherwise not able to foster.
    The foster can request a tax deduction for food and supplies and any
       expenditures on behalf of the foster dogs. If the foster needs the rescue to supply
       food and other supplies, they can be supplied with approval by supervising
       volunteer.
    Fosters should have good communication with supervising volunteer in the
       rescue and they should work together to find an appropriate home for the foster
       dog.
                                    GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                               PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                        818-700-5200
                                     www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                  Page 14 of 34
                                                 GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers




Working with Owners Who Relinquish Their Dogs

One of the most difficult tasks is taking in dogs being relinquished by their owners. We
often get requests to take in dogs that this rescue cannot take. If we need to pass on a
particular dog, we should make every effort to find another rescue to help this person.
Sometimes the family is split over whether or not to relinquish the dog to rescue, in
which case the volunteer must be very sure and very clear with the owners about our
policies and make sure the owner does indeed want to give up their dog.

Another problem is the condition of the dog. While we request that the owner spay or
neuter the dog, or update its shots, many times they won’t. So, the rescue ends up
picking up the bill. Whenever possible, we should obtain a donation from the owner to
handle these expenses.

Occasionally the dog being relinquished is in a neglected and abused state. In this
case, it is necessary to pull that dog out of the home as quickly as possible. Volunteers
who work with owners who relinquish their dogs must follow a strict protocol. This
includes:
     Explaining to the owner our process – that they are required to fill out a “Dog
       Listing” form with their signature (if it is submitted by internet, a signature still.
       must be obtained on that submission). This form requires the owner to state the
       medical condition and disposition of the dog.
     The other form is “Owner Relinquishment” which states that they are giving
       ownership of the dog to GRCGLA Rescue. It is important that the volunteer sign
       this form and provide copies of these forms to the owner who has relinquished
       their dog (unless they specifically state that they don’t want a copy).
     Make sure the owner understands how GRCLGA Rescue operates and how their
       dog will be handled.
     Make sure the owner understands that when GRCLGA retains ownership of the
       dog, we can make no promises as to the type of home the dog will go into, they
       will have no input as to where the dog is being placed, and there is no guarantee
       to any future contact regarding the dog.
     Make sure all paperwork is in order and submitted promptly to the administrator.




                                    GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                               PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                        818-700-5200
                                     www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                  Page 15 of 34
                                                 GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers



Working with Owners Who List Their Dogs

Owners who list their dogs with GRCGLA Rescue are not relinquishing ownership of
their dogs, but working with our volunteers to find a suitable home for their dog. They
still must fill out a dog listing agreement, have spay/neuter proof and up to date shots. A
listing fee is $25 and the adoption takes place through GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. At the
time of adoption, Owner Relinquishment paperwork needs to be signed.



Courtesy Listing

These are dogs posted by other rescues and private parties who have rescued a dog. It
is free to other rescuers; for private parties, a $25 donation is requested. Courtesy
listings are renewed monthly.



Spay/Neuter Policy

All dogs adopted by GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. must be spayed or neutered prior to
adoption unless there is a medical reason to forego or postpone the surgery. If spay or
neuter cannot be done for medical reasons, a certificate from a veterinarian should be
included with paperwork given to an adopter. Most dogs from shelters are spayed and
neutered. If an intact dog is brought into the rescue from an owner or a shelter,
arrangements need to be made right away for the spay/neuter of that dog before it can
be made available for adoption.

The spay/neuter waiver process has been eliminated as it is unnecessary and
complicated. No dog may be adopted out of the rescue intact without a BOD member’s
oversight and approval. All puppies need to be spayed/neutered prior to adoption. Dogs
who go to adopters intact because of health conditions may be released on a foster
basis with the adoption completed once the dog has been sterilized. (rev. 13)




                                    GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                               PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                        818-700-5200
                                     www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                  Page 16 of 34
                                                 GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers




Dog Bite Protocol
(rev. 9)

For GRCGLA Rescue dogs that are in foster or have been adopted out, if there is a bite
incident, the should be taken back into rescue, and the Board of Directors needs to be
contacted immediately. A BOD member will be named to oversee handling of the matter
going forward. Laws of the local jurisdiction regarding dog bite reporting will be followed
as to quarantine, reporting and health certs. The responsible BOD member will assume
responsibility for any further communication with the adopter/foster parent until the
matter is resolved. No further communication between the adopter/foster and any other
volunteer is to take place until the matter is resolved.



Adopting Dogs for Service
(rev. 8)

GRCGLA Rescue dogs are meant to be adopted out as family dogs, and not exclusively
for service (assistance, guide dogs, SAR, detection, etc.).



Representing Dogs

Each dog listed on the website has a representative contact. It is important that the
dogrep:

      Respond to all email inquiries
      Verify the inquiry has submitted an application and has had a homecheck. If that
       has not been done, advise the inquiry how to submit an application. If a
       homecheck has not been done and it is a good family, expedite the homecheck
      Be courteous and supportive to those people who may be disappointed they
       have missed out on a particular dog.
      Work with other reps within the rescue, by communicating that you are in touch
       with certain adopters. Sometimes the rep of a hard to place dog should advise
       the list immediately if they are in contact with a specific adopter regarding their
       dog so other reps do not pursue that home.
      Work with the foster on which is the best applicant for that particular dog, if the
       rep is not the foster.
                                    GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                               PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                        818-700-5200
                                     www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                  Page 17 of 34
                                                GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers




Dog Representative Guidelines

Dogs coming into GRCGLA Rescue from any source are our charges and our
responsibility. Our obligation to that dog is to get him safe, rehabilitate him to the
greatest degree possible according to our guidelines and then find him a safe and loving
home appropriate to his size, age, temperament, disposition and physical
needs/limitations. The dog’s representative responsibilities include:
    Coordinate boarding and placement into foster care
    Supervision of medical care (as per group guidelines)
    Coordinate transport of dog from one place to another
    Conduct and/or supervise temperament evaluation to determine the
      dog’spersonality type, identify any idiosyncrasies, habits or emotional
      issues/needs pertinent to placement (may include cat-testing, kid-testing, etc.)
    Obtain photos and write dog bio for the web site
    Review and assessment of adopter applications.
    Direct contact with adopters, including setting appointments for them to meet the
      dog
    Finalize adoptions, collect donations for the adoptions
    Ensure dog and adopter database information is kept up to date with information
      about the dog and to whom he was adopted.
    Represent dog at adoption events
    Maintaining all required paperwork, including:
          o Source documentation (where did GRCGLA get the dog from – this
               establishes our legal ownership). May be a shelter adoption receipt or an
               owner relinquishment form.
          o Vaccine records, including the DHL combo (5-1, 6 -1, 7 -1) and bordetella
          o Rabies certification, including manufacturer, lot number, type, and
               veterinarian’s certification
          o Spay/neuter certificate
          o Adoption Agreement & Release




                                   GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                              PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                       818-700-5200
                                    www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                 Page 18 of 34
                                                GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers




Process

The dog’s representative may be assigned at various points along the process.

      At acquisition by the rescue (i.e adoption fee paid at the shelter, owner
       relinquishment forms signed, etc.)
      Upon release from a shelter or vet’s office (usually post spay/neuter OR following
       treatment for health issue)
      Rescued, in boarding and awaiting foster space
      In a foster home



Posting to the Web

As soon as possible after the rescue acquires the dog, his photo and bio should be
posted to the web site to be reviewed by potential adopters.

Bios should be written in plain language with a positive slant on the dog’s description
without overselling. The details of the bio should be as factual as possible without being
negative. For instance, “No cats or kids under 12, please!” is preferable to “Eats cats
and hates children”.

The initial bio can be very generic, describing how the dog was acquired in general
terms, his physical description and anything else that’s already known, ending with
“Bobo is new to rescue and we’re learning more every day”. Avoid focusing too much on
the physical description, as many adopters fall in love with a “look” without regard for
temperament considerations.

As more is learned about the dog in foster care or temperament testing, the bio can be
modified regularly (daily if necessary) to reflect the new information. Photos should be
as flattering as possible to the dog. Initial shelter photos can be used when the dog is
first rescued, but once health-checked and groomed, photos should be updated to show
the dog to his best advantage. If the dog has been on the web site for more than a week
with little interest or no appropriate adopters interested, consider posting a different
photo.




                                   GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                              PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                       818-700-5200
                                    www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                 Page 19 of 34
                                                 GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers


Evaluation Period

From the time the dog comes into the rescue until the time he is placed, the dog is
continually being evaluated. Each day, the volunteers and other folks who interact with
the dog have the opportunity to learn more about the dog so that good decisions can be
made about placements. As the evaluation progresses, the bio should be updated to
reflect the new information.

Once the rep, the foster and any other volunteers working with the dog feel enough is
known about the dog to place him, the dog may be ready to meet adopters (providing
there are appropriate adopters available for the dog). During the evaluation period,
you’ll want to develop an objective profile of the dog in order to secure the best possible
placement. The dog’s profile should include such factors as:

      Size
      Age (puppy, juvenile, adult, middle-ager, senior)
      Physical condition (healthy, physical problems noted permanent or otherwise)
      Activity level (couch potato, moderately active, active, hyper-active)
      Sex (most often comes into play when the adopter home already has resident
      dog(s)
      Personality type (friendly, outgoing, shy, aggressive, affectionate, intelligent,
       cautious)
      Reliability of house training
      Indoor manners (quiet, active, nuts)
      Prey drive (none at all, will chase the ball a few times, ball-crazy)
      Attitude towards other dogs (ignores them, loves them, hates them)
      Attitude towards other cats (ignores them, tolerates them, loves them, hates
       them)
      Demeanor around children (ignores them, tolerates them, loves them, hates
       them).
      Level/scope of obedience training observed (demeanor on leash, basic
       commands known (“sit”, “stay”, “heel”, “down”, “come”, etc.)
      Reactivity level (doesn’t startle easily, normal startle response, heightened startle
       response, exaggerated startle response).
      Negative behaviors (jumping, barking, digging, fence-climbing, biting/nipping,
       etc.)

It’s important to take all these factors into consideration when developing your
dog’sprofile and when trying to match them to appropriate homes.




                                    GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                               PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                        818-700-5200
                                     www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                  Page 20 of 34
                                                 GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers


Screening Applicants
Once your dog bio is posted, you’ll begin looking for a good home for him. All adopters
must be GRCGLA adopters with an application and homecheck visit.
Check the Quickbase GRCGLA ADOPTORZ database file to see if the family is
homechecked. If you don’t have access to the homecheck report, send a post to the
group list requesting a copy be sent to you.
In most cases, adopters will come to you with inquiries about your dog via email. These
adopters may or may not have been home checked, and many may not even have filed
an application yet. Controlling email inquiries to the greatest degree possible will be
important to your sanity:
      For email inquiries from folks who haven’t completed an application yet, send
       back a reply that the application is required, where the application can be found
       and ask them to get back in touch when they’ve done this. Then delete their
       email.
      For email inquiries from folks who have completed an application but are not
       appropriate adopters for your dog, send back a friendly reply letting them know
       why this dog is not a good choice for them. (won’t like your cat, can’t be placed
      with toddlers, will jump your 2-foot fence, etc). If you know of or have a dog that’s
       a better choice, let them know. Then delete their email.
      For email inquiries from folks who might be good adopters for your dog, you can
       respond directly to their questions or provide additional information. One helpful
       technique is to keep a word processing document with a general update about
       your dog handy, and then you can copy and paste this update into your reply
       emails to save time. It’s helpful to organize the emails you want to keep in folders
       sorted by the dog’s name for easier reference.
Make it a habit to scan all new applications coming in to see if you can find any that
would be a good match for your dog. Many times people don’t know what to pick, what
makes sense to them, or are willing to work with the volunteers to find the right dog.
When communicating with adopters it’s also a good practice to question them about
their stated preferences or answers to the questions on their application. For instance,
many applicants will indicate a preference for a female dog and not even consider a
male due to the mistaken notion that females by their nature have better temperaments
than males, or are better with children. Some applicants may state a preference for
purebreds, with the mistaken assumption that purebreds are more consistent in look,
temperament, size, etc. Others may state a preference for mixes, mistakenly assuming
that purebreds have more health problems than mixes. Also, look for inconsistencies in
the application which may broaden the applicant’s criteria. For instance, many
applicants may state a preference for purebreds, and then go ahead to list two or three
mixes in response to the question asking which web site dogs caught their interest.
                                    GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                               PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                        818-700-5200
                                     www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                  Page 21 of 34
                                                 GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers




Making a Match

During the dog’s evaluation, you and the foster and other volunteers who know the dog
have made some determinations about the dog factors already described. As you’re
screening adopter applications for your dog, you’re also looking to determine adopter
factors, and how they correlate to the aspects of the dog’s profile:



Adopter Factors/Related Dog Factors

      Size/style of home/yard size - a huge dog may not work in a tiny apartment or
       house with a small yard
      Activity level - a highly active dog may not work with no yard or a tiny yard
      Physical condition – stairs could be a problem for senior dogs
      Family Composition (Kids) Families should be evaluated individually. Some
       children have been raised to handle, approach and relate to dogs appropriately.
       Many others have not been oriented properly to dogs, and the family may place
       unrealistic expectations on the dog (for instance, some folks expect a dog to
       accept limitless amounts of inappropriate handling without complaint.) Avoid
       placing shelter rescues with no history with children under 7, unless they’ve had
       a thorough evaluation in an experienced foster care situation. Dogs that have a
       high reactivity or hyper-reactivity level are not a good match for kids under 10.
       Large, untrained dogs are not a good choice for kids under 10. Toddler homes
       should be matched with low-reactivity owner turn-ins who have a known positive
       history with children.
      Family lifestyle/size – Does the dog fit in the house, the car, the office, on the
       sofa, the yard? Is the dog size-appropriate for all the family members in the home
       (including the frail grandma and her walker?)
      Age – Consider what the family’s expectation of the dog are, and what they will
       be. A family that’s looking for a jogging buddy might not be a good pick for a 6 or
       7 year old dog, whose best jogging days may be behind him.
      Activity-level/physical condition – match family’s activity level to the dogs. Don’t
       place high energy dogs with low-energy people, and vice versa.
      Personality type – A shy or fearful dog may not do well with an active, outdoorsy
       family. An assertive dog may not be a good choice for novice dog people.
      Indoor manners – some dogs have lived indoors and others haven't. Families will
       need to be prepared for an adjustment period with any dog.
      Attitude toward other animals – dog-aggressives should not be placed with other
       dogs and not with kids under 12.
                                    GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                               PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                        818-700-5200
                                     www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                  Page 22 of 34
                                                 GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers


      Cat-unfriendlies shouldn’t be placed with house cats (and potentially other small
       animals, including small dogs – look at each case)
      Demeanor with children – Homes with kids under 7 should only receive owner
       turn-ins with known kid history, OR shelter dogs successfully fostered in homes
       with exposure to kids. Also depends on the kids; contrary to popular belief, some
       kids should NEVER have a dog.
      Training Level – consider placing untrained dogs with families that will have
       enough time and experience for them, especially adult dogs. Untrained dogs that
       do not receive special concentration on training and socialization from the
       beginning in their new home will not improve, and can just get worse.
      Reactivity Level – Dogs with high-reactivity levels need to be placed with
       retriever-savvy adult homes with no kids under 12. An active family setting is fine,
       as long as the family is committed to training.
      Fence height – families with low fences should not adopt escape artists, fence
       jumpers or very athletic/agile dogs.
      Adopter physical limitations -- Adopter should be steered away from dogs they
       are unable to handle physically.
      Previous dog ownership experience – Challenging dogs should not be placed
       with families that don’t have a lot of dog/training experience. Families that have
       owned lots of dogs of other breeds in the past may not be prepared for a golden
       retriever.
      Size – small dog people may not be well-equipped to deal with “big dog” issues.
      Age – Adopters who have never had puppies should be carefully screened when
       interested in youngsters.

Many people who have had dogs in the past come to us interested in retrievers, but not
everyone is a “retriever person”. Retrievers tend to be needier and more demanding of
attention than other breeds. It is also a commonly mistaken belief that retrievers are
“automatic dogs” that require little or no training. Folks who have had more independent
and/or aloof breeds like shepherds or huskies may find retrievers down-right annoying.
Folks who are looking for dogs with perfect manners may find our dogs disappointing if
their expectations are not well set. Once you’ve completed your dog evaluation, review
all the adopters who have expressed an interest in the dog to see who’d be the best
match. Sort your dog’s applicants according to which makes the best home for THAT
dog. Once you’ve done this, you can begin contacting the adopters in that order to
arrange for them to meet and potentially adopt that dog. If you have questions, or are
unsure of certain aspects of an adopter’s application, a good phone interview should
clear up the ambiguity.

Occasionally, the dog is introduced to a number of qualified adopters, but not adopted
out until they’ve all been introduced (“beauty contest”). This is not a preferred approach.
Adopters who are running all over southern California to meet dogs they’re not able to
adopt get frustrated and give up quickly (especially where crying children are involved).

                                    GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                               PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                        818-700-5200
                                     www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                  Page 23 of 34
                                                GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers


Adopter Meetings
Adopters should be encouraged to bring all family members that will be living with the
dog to the introduction. Bringing along the current dog(s) should be mandatory. The
human family members should all handle the dog appropriately and respectfully.
Introductions with any other dogs should be made correctly (outside the house, no
direct confrontation, no tight leashes, etc.). Remember that you are not obliged to adopt
the dog to the family just because a meeting is taking place. Watch the interactions with
the people and animals carefully.


Do not adopt if:
    The human family members appear indifferent to your dog
    After the initial introductory ceremonies, your dog and the family’s dog do not get
      along or appear to be in conflict (this will only get worse when they get home).
    The family expresses any concern about bringing the dog home
    Your dog is indifferent to or doesn’t like the family

Don’t hard sell. If the adopter and the dog haven’t sold each other, let it go and move
onto the next adopter.

Don’t get caught up in the “love fest”. Love at first sight is frequently short-lived. If
there are factors that make you believe this is not a good match, regardless of how well
everyone seems to be getting along, do not adopt. A good example of this might be a
family with small kids who has never had a dog who is desperate to adopt your adult
male shelter dog who hasn’t been habituated with children. While they all may be
getting along at the meeting or adoption event, a good match is predicated on a lot
more. Make sure emotional factors are tempered with good sense.



Homechecks & Interviewing Prospective Adopters
Homecheckers should refrain from selling a particular dog to a family they are visiting
unless they’ve specifically discussed the situation with the dog rep first. The dog rep
knows the dog best and is actively reviewing applications looking for families that match
the dog. Once the dog has been up on the web for a few days, the dog rep is probably
already well into the screening process and may have appointments set for the dog, so
if you think your family might be a good match for the dog, please contact the dog rep
first to determine the dog’s status AND to confirm whether that dog should be discussed
with that family. This also helps to head off some disappointment the family may
experience if the homechecker appears to be encouraging the family to “go for it”, only
to find the dog’s practically adopted out elsewhere
                                   GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                              PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                       818-700-5200
                                    www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                 Page 24 of 34
                                                GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers




It’s very common for families to ask the homechecker about one dog or another, but
unless the homechecker is the dog’s foster or dog rep, specific questions about the dog
should be referred back to the dog rep. Please don’t rely on your recollection of the dog
at an adoption event or from the web site bio, the dog rep is always the best source of
information about the dog and his/her status.

It would be extremely helpful for homecheckers to spend a few minutes with the family
discussing what TYPE of dog they should be considering (age, size, temperament, etc.)
and direct them to look for web site dogs that fit the bill. For instance, first time dog
owners should probably be directed to socially mature dogs with some training, and are
probably not good placements for small puppies or dogs with problem behaviors (think
“starter dog”). Adopters who are not physically able to handle large, active, untrained
dogs should be directed to look for smaller and/or mellower dogs.

Lastly, sometimes dog reps will attempt to place dogs without doing a web listing,
usually because the dog will likely be highly desirable (to thousands of people you’d
never place the dog with!), and will circulate a message to the list requesting that the
volunteers identify good homes for those dogs. When this happens, please DO NOT
notify the families that the dog is available, but rather provide the names of the
applicants you think are worthy to the dog rep so they might evaluate the adopters
against the needs of the dog to make the best selection. Once a prospective adopter
has submitted an application, they are welcome to contact any of the reps about dogs
they feel would be a good match for their home. They do NOT have to wait for a
homecheck before contacting a dog rep, and dog reps should be willing to answer
questions about the dog based on the adopter’s application.

If you’re contacted by a prospective adopter who hasn’t completed an application,
please politely request they do so. You can do this without responding to their questions
about the dog. About half the inquiries are from applicants who haven’t yet filed
applications and never do, so you should feel comfortable deferring extra information
about the dog until they complete the application. It’s probably worthwhile waiting half a
day to respond to these messages (“have you completed your application yet?) since
they may have submitted it minutes ago and it just hasn’t made its way to you yet.

If you find yourself communicating with an applicant who hasn’t been homechecked and
they’re a good match for your dog OR they request a homecheck, send the group a
message requesting the homecheck be scheduled. If the app looks like an excellent
prospect for your “Bobo”, also put “This looks like a great home for Bobo”, so we’ll all
know it’s one to jump on. Once you’ve notified the group about the need to expedite the
homecheck, you can let the applicant know you’ve notified the group so the applicant
feels like something’s happening


                                   GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                              PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                       818-700-5200
                                    www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                 Page 25 of 34
                                                GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers


If an applicant requests a homecheck, or you think their homecheck should be
prioritized, please send a message to the team requesting this. DO NOT have the
applicant write the GP mail or call the main number; this is an extra step the applicant
will have to take which will not have as much impact as if it came from you AND it
makes more work for those of us who manage the GP interfaces (phone and mail).


Guidelines for Doing Homechecks
Applicants should be contacted either by email or by phone within 48 hours of the
posting of the application. Please let the group know if you have received a reply from
the applicant. Before contacting the applicant, please review their application and make
note of any red flags that need to be addressed.
When you speak to the applicant:
      Set up a time that is agreeable for both parties and try to make certain that all
       members of the family will be in attendance. If you will be bringing a dog, please
       inform the applicant that you will be doing so.
      If the applicant rents or leases their home, make sure they have a copy of the
       written approval for GRCGLA files.
      Dogs may not be adopted to homes that are at or over the legal limit for dogs in
       their local area, including homes of volunteers. (Rev. 6)
      Prospective adopters using Invisible Fence/Electric Fence as a primary source of
       containment for their dogs outside off-leash cannot be approved. These fences
       are not fool-proof as containment devices (several points of failure are possible),
       and are useless in protecting the dog from people and other animals coming onto
       the property. On secure structural fences can be approved. (rev. 7)
      Tell the applicant there is a suggested homecheck donation of $20.
      Make certain the applicant knows how to reach you if they need to change or
       cancel the appointment.
      When you go the home, please look for the following, some of which are spelled
       out on the homecheck form:
      Make note of the neighborhood and surrounding area – are there traffic hazards?
           o Is the backyard fenced, and if so, what is the height of the fence? Are
               there holes ore repairs that need to be made? Are there any sharp or
               dangerous objects? Are there trees for shade?
           o Any poisonous plants?
           o Is the home tidy and neat? Are there breakable or fragile items displayed?
           o Are there stairs in or around the home? Are the floors carpeted, hardwood
               or tile?
           o Are there other pets in the home? Do they appear healthy and well cared
               for?
           o Are there children in the home. If so, what are their ages?
           o How do family members respond to their pets (and to yours)?

                                   GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                              PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                       818-700-5200
                                    www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                 Page 26 of 34
                                                 GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers


          o Is there a swimming pool? Is it fenced? Explain the dangers involved and
            the importance of teaching a dog where the steps are.

Questions to ask:
   Why do they want a golden retriever and what are their expectations of the dog?
   Where will the dog spend most of its time?
   What age and gender of dog are they looking for and why?
   Do they want a calm couch potato or an energetic dog?.
   Did they have previous pets? What happened to them? How do they plan on
      exercising the dog? Walks, dog park, etc?
   How would they deal with misbehavior?
   How long will the dog be left alone and where will it be during this time?
   What will they be feeding the dog?
   What are their training plans?
   Where will the dog sleep?
   Are there any areas of the home that the dog will not be allowed?
   Is everyone enthusiastic about getting a rescued dog?
   Are they aware that goldens shed a great deal?
   Discuss any red flags from the adoption application.


At the conclusion of the home visit:
     Tell the applicant you will write a report to the rescue and that you will post it to
       the group within 48 hours
     Give the applicant a rescue business card with the homechecker’s name on it.
     Inform the applicant that they should contact reps of dogs on the website and
       attend adoption events. Give them an outline of how the adoption process works.
     If any corrections need to be made, let them know you will be back to re-check.
     Ask the applicants if they have any questions.
     If there are any questions that you cannot answer, let them know you will follow
       up with an answer. And do it.


Generally speaking, you can let the prospective adopter know that GRCGLA Rescue is
a 501c3 non-profit organization and it does not make money from its rescue dogs.
Additional donations are needed to cover our medical costs. GRCGLA rescue
volunteers will give the adopter as much information as they have on the dog. Please
tell adopters about the breed –
      Golden retrievers are happiest as part of a family and they like to be indoors.
        When bored or neglected, they can act out in destructive ways.
      make sure adopters understand that all rescue dogs come with some sort of sad
        story or baggage. A new environment may add stress and rehabilitation may take
        weeks or even months.

                                    GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                               PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                        818-700-5200
                                     www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                  Page 27 of 34
                                                 GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers


      Golden retrievers need exercise daily, whether it is leash walking or going to a
       park.
      Dogs should not be allowed to roam free or be off the property without
       supervision.
      They must not be kept on a tie-out
      They must wear an identification tag at all times. If the dog is not already
       microchipped, it should be.
      It is up to the adopter to become familiar with city, county and state laws on
       animal licensing and following regulations is the responsibility of the owner
      The adopter should be aware that dogs are an expense in time and money. Dogs
       need quality food, veterinary care and training.
      If the adopter needs referrals for training, veterinary or other services, the rescue
       will assist them.
      GRCGLA Rescue’s responsibility lies in placing the rescue dog in the best home
       for its personality, behavior and history.
      The volunteers will be following up on its dogs and the adopter is encouraged to
       ask questions so the volunteers can help the rescue dog to succeed.
      If for any reason the adopter cannot keep the dog, it MUST be returned to
       GRCGLA Rescue. It cannot be given away, transferred or sold to anyone else
       without our knowledge and approval.



Placing Dogs With Young Children

Many rescues do not place dogs with children who are younger than 8 or 10. We do not
have that strict of a policy, but we do need to follow tighter guidelines when dealing with
families with young children.

Do not place shelter dogs in homes with children under the age of 7 unless the dog has
been fostered in an environment with young children.

Owner relinquishments should come from a family with young children or have been
fostered with young children to be placed in a home with little ones.

Do not place any of our dogs in a home where you have observed young children
misbehaving, i.e., not being obedient or responsive to supervisory correction. Do not
place dogs that show any evidence of aggression into a home with children.

Before placing our dogs in a home with little ones, keep in mind the following:
    Young children do not understand how to take correction.
    Young children are rebellious and noisy

                                    GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                               PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                        818-700-5200
                                     www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                  Page 28 of 34
                                                GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers


      Young children are mouthy and like to bite (including dogs) and they carry
       around objects and hit things with them (including dogs)
      Young children sometimes taunt animals and can jump on them.
      Young children have quick movements which can startle.
      Young children have friends who visit who may be afraid of dogs and could
       exhibit any of the above undesirable traits.
      Our rescue dogs are under enormous stress and putting them into an
       environment with young kids may be more than they can handle. We need to
       protect our dogs and our rescue from liability as well as protect young children
       from unnecessary injury. This requires good judgment on our part.
      If we have a rescue dog that would thrive in an environment with children and we
       have evaluated a family as proper for one of our dogs, we should make every
       effort to put the two together and not dismiss families with young children
       automatically.




Adoption Events

Dogs that attend adoption events need to have had a veterinary clearance and be
healthy before attending adoption events. Time with an individual and an evaluation is
supposed to have been done in advance.

Each adoption event has an adoption coordinator who should be advised of any dog
that is likely to attend. Sometimes there are space restrictions and the coordinator may
have to turn down the attendance of some dogs.

Volunteers who are handling dogs must be vigilant in handling the dog so there isn’t a
mishap such as a dog bite or dog attack. All dogs should be handled on a choke chain,
head collar or harness. Snap/buckle collars are not sufficient. The dogs are in an
unfamiliar setting and are stressed and should not be allowed to get in each other’s
face. Also, since these events are usually at pet shops, the general public is walking in
with their own dogs and children which may not be particularly well behaved. Handlers
need to be aware of their surroundings and keep firm control of our rescue dogs in
public.

The event coordinator or adoption coordinator gives the final approval for any adoption
taking place at an adoption event. Sometimes there are several families interested in
the same dog. The foster or handler of that dog may seek the assistance of a
coordinator on the scene to help in the diplomatic choosing of one family over another.



                                   GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                              PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                       818-700-5200
                                    www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                 Page 29 of 34
                                                GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers




Adoption Donations
(rev. 12)

Our minimum adoption donation schedule is as follows:

Youngsters under 1 year    $400
Dogs age 1-3 years         $300
Dogs age 4-7 years          $250
Dogs age 8 and older        $200


It is appropriate to tell adopters that are fees are a donation and sometimes they offer
more money as a donation to our rescue. If the foster/rep feels the donation should be
waived due to health or disposition challenges requiring extensive training, approval
must be obtained from board members to waive to lower the requested donation.



Management Structure
GRCLGA Rescue operates regionally since the area being covered is very large.
Leadership in each region will be established for critical decisions such as which dogs
come into the rescue, handling of the rescue dog, expenses associated with the dog
and oversight of the adoption process.

These volunteers will be designated by a majority of board members and will be
selected based on their long term commitment to the rescue and the responsibility of
their decisions. Volunteers will be designated in a supervisory capacity for specific jobs
and all volunteers should work within the system established by these supervisory
volunteers for these chores.

Major decisions will be decided by majority of board members. The treasurer has the
final “say so” regarding financial matters of the rescue.




                                   GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                              PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                       818-700-5200
                                    www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                 Page 30 of 34
                                                GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers




Working With Other Rescues
There are other rescues besides GRCGLA which rescue our breed. It is important that
we have a good relationship with them and coordinate our rescue efforts whenever
possible.

There are volunteers from other breed rescues that will help GRCGLA and our
volunteers, in turn, help rescue their breed. Good relationships with other rescues
enhance everyone’s ability to rescue and should be cultivated.

There are one or two rescue organizations which will consider taking a rescue dog from
us that we can’t place. When a volunteer wants to transfer a dog from our rescue to
another rescue, it must be approved by a majority of the board of directors



Permanent Foster

Changing a dog’s status to “permanent foster” requires approval by one BOD member
and the treasurer. Came contracts and terms apply as with temporary foster home.
GRCGLA Rescue retains responsibility for all dog’s vet bills and liability as permanent
foster dogs are still ‘owned’ by the rescue. (Rev. 9)



Euthanasia Policy

In the case of a dog which is considered terminally ill and suffering, and upon
recommendation of the primary veterinarian, at least two board members should be
consulted to obtain authorization for euthanasia.

In all other cases, a majority vote of the board members is mandatory before euthanasia
is performed on any dog owned by GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. It is the policy of GRCGLA
Rescue, Inc. to euthanize a dog which:

a) is considered dangerous to people, or
b) is considered highly dog aggressive. A highly dog-aggressive case should be
evaluated by two professional trainers before a majority decision is sought by the
board. (rev. 4)

                                   GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                              PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                       818-700-5200
                                    www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                 Page 31 of 34
                                                 GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers




Administration

Volunteers are responsible for administration of the rescue. Hard copy information is
kept in a master file, but all information should be kept on a database as well.
Volunteers are responsible for keeping this information up to date on the database and
keeping hard copy paperwork in order for the master file. The database should include
accurate information that should be updated promptly.

When a dog comes into the rescue, it needs to be assigned a number which
corresponds to its tag number. The movement of this dog should be tracked on a
database and its final adoption should show completed information. All paperwork that
corresponds to this dog must include this dog number in order for the treasurer to
accurately reflect the cost per dog. The treasurer should be able to track expenses on
this dog so she can better manage our funds
Volunteers will be assigned to these various supervisors positions and are responsible
for keeping information accurate and flowing properly. Other volunteers need to
cooperate with these leaders so we can manage our information properly.




Reimbursements & Submissions

Volunteers will be reimbursed for the following:

      Shelter Fees
      Veterinarian bills that meet pre-established criteria or have been improved
      in advance by area manager or board members
      Supplies for foster dogs such as collars, flea treatments and special supplements


Reimbursements need to be itemized on a form that is sent to the Treasurer.

Submissions or checks to be deposited to the rescue account can be sent to the post
office box or sent to directly to the treasurer. If monies are being sent directly to the
treasurer, a submission form needs to accompany those checks.




                                    GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                               PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                        818-700-5200
                                     www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                  Page 32 of 34
                                                GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers




Fundraising

A fundraising committee has been established to focus strictly on the task of raising
money. This committee should meet regularly and coordinate fundraising activity for the
rescue. This committee establishes its owner leadership structure and reports directly to
the Board of Directors or the Treasurer.



Thank You To Contributors

If someone gives you a donation in the form of cash, check or property, please make
sure that person receives a tax deduction thank you acknowledgement from the proper
administrator in the rescue.



Common Courtesy & Communication

It is important that each volunteer in the rescue respect one another on everything. This
does not mean that people need to be friends or are in agreement. But it does mean
that everyone remain focused on our objective, which is to rescue, rehabilitate and
rehome as many abandoned dogs as possible with the least amount of stress. The
common good should override personality conflicts

When communicating on the general list, please keep your emails short, to the point,
informational and impersonal. It is not a forum for opinions and disagreements, nor
should it be used for political agendas.

Youthful volunteers who are minors may be added to the post list on a case-by-case
basis with approval of the BOD upon sponsorship of any BOD member. (rev. 11)

When communicating with individuals, sometimes we have to agree to disagree on a
specific matter and move on. Many times, both points of views are valid and it doesn’t
always mean that one person is right and the other person is wrong.

Please respect that each individual working in the rescue is a volunteer. No one has a
paid position and every single person has a personal life and job pressures beyond the
rescue. Sometimes, we have to quit assisting in the rescue to address personal matters,

                                   GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                              PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                       818-700-5200
                                    www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                 Page 33 of 34
                                                 GRCGLA Rescue, Inc. Guidelines for Volunteers


and other times we simply need a break. Rescue is a high stress activity and everyone
is at risk for burnout and should take steps to avoid becoming angry, depressed,
anxious or using rescue as a way to avoid facing other personal problems.

Rescue has a tendency to attract smart, overachieving, educated, opinionated and
strong willed people. Without these personality traits, nothing would get done. But this
can also lead to conflicts. So, if in a disagreement with someone, step back, count to
ten, regroup and GET OVER IT so everyone can move on and we can continue to do
our work TOGETHER.

Please do not contact other volunteers before 8 AM or after 8 PM unless it is an
emergency or unless you know the person is an early riser or night owl. As agitated as
each one of us gets, try to refrain from taking it out on each other. If you scream at
another volunteer, please tell them in advance that you are “venting” and not to take it
personally. Also, let’s all keep each other’s confidences when requested.



The Best Volunteers
GRCGLA Rescue has the best volunteers who are not thanked often enough. So, if you
are feeling that you are not appreciated, it is not true. It’s just that everyone else is too
busy to notice you need to be thanked. Besides, it’s the homeless dogs that we work or
– not each other – so your thanks should be more in the form of kisses and licks and
paws on your lap because the dogs are thanking each one of us from the bottom of their
hearts.




                                    GRCGLA Rescue, Inc.
                               PO Box 1511, La Canada, CA 91012
                                        818-700-5200
                                     www.grcglarescue.org


                                                                                  Page 34 of 34

				
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