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     Introducing E-learning:
  Using Technology in Literacy,
Language and Numeracy Teaching
              (5.2)
Introduction
The Quality Improvement Agency (QIA) Skills for Life Quality Initiative is an essential
aspect of the Government’s commitment to improving the literacy, language and numeracy
skills of adults.

The specific aims of the Skills for Life Quality Initiative are:
    professionalising the workforce; and
    building a whole organisation approach to Skills for Life development.

The Skills for Life Quality Initiative continues to be delivered through three key aspects: the
development of a regional infrastructure, a range of professional development activities
and a network of facilitators. Activities of the Skills for Life Quality Initiative offer the
opportunity to support the aims and, with the regional approach, to develop infrastructures
to ensure future quality and sustainability.

All activities of the Skills for Life Quality Initiative are in line with the eight priorities outlined
by the LSC National Office:
           1. supporting the development of whole organisation approaches
           2. embedding Skills for Life
           3. training in Skills for Life leadership and management
           4. extending the facilitator network to include coaching and mentoring
           5. promoting the e-learning agenda
           6. supporting the interface between key skills and Skills for Life
           7. developing a continuous professional development framework and
              information, advice and guidance
           8. disseminating good practice.


The key agencies involved in the Skills for Life Quality Initiative are:
    CfBT Education Trust
    London South Bank University
    National Institute of Adult Continuing Education
    Learning and Skills Network
    Cambridge Training and Development Ltd
    University of Wolverhampton
    National Research and Development Centre for Adult Literacy and Numeracy.

Further information on the Skills for Life Quality Initiative can be found on its website
www.sflqi.org.uk where you can also register to receive updates through an eBulletin.




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                                 2
Introducing E-learning: Using Technology in Literacy,
Language and Numeracy Teaching (5.2)

Course          One day (10.00–16.00)
information

Target group    Job role
                Skills for Life, information and communication technologies (ICT) or other
                vocational practitioners who would like an introduction to simple ways in
                which e-learning can enhance literacy, language and/or numeracy provision
                Subject specialism
                Literacy numeracy ESOL ICT other vocational
                Sector
                Any

What will the   The programme will offer participants:
session be          an introduction to e-learning: definitions, current initiatives and
like?                 research
                    engagement in practical tasks and activities that translate into
                      teaching and learning strategies in the classroom
                    an opportunity to share practice and ideas with colleagues.

Rationale       The programme will demonstrate how to:
                    use simple e-learning strategies and activities to support literacy,
                      language and numeracy learning.

Aim             The programme aims to:
                    raise teachers’ awareness of the potential of e-learning to enhance
                      teaching and learning in Skills for Life provision.

Outcomes        Through the programme participants will:
                    become familiar with current definitions of e-learning
                    have considered the benefits of using e-learning within their Skills
                      for Life programmes
                    become aware of a range of different ways in which e-learning
                      can enhance literacy, language and numeracy learning
                    acquire some practical e-learning skills that can be directly applied
                      to their own practice
                    be able to identify some strategies to further develop their practice
                      in the effective use of e-learning.


This course
maps to these
professional
standards (as
appropriate):



sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                       3
Entry criteria     The programme is open to staff with full teaching qualifications or part-
                   qualified teaching staff.

How is the
course
assessed?


Accreditation


Progression        Exploring E-learning for Literacy, Numeracy and ESOL Teachers (5.3)


Course
overview
Activity           Content
Introduction          a   Ice-breaker: What can the ‘e’ in e-learning stand for?

E-learning –          a   Introducing the range of ways that e-learning impacts on
E-living                  teachers and learners – in everyday life and in educational
                          contexts

The benefits of       a   Identifying the potential benefits of e-learning to both teachers
e-learning                and learners


Harnessing            a   Highlighting important issues in the Government’s e-learning
Technology                strategy for the post-16 sector


How do teachers       a   Introducing the idea that teachers should not be daunted by
get started with          scope – start small
e-learning?           b   Highlighting points from research by the National Research and
                          Development Centre for Adult Literacy and Numeracy into
                          current practice: these form the rationale for the practical
                          sessions

Practical             a   Demonstration of simple strategies applied in Skills for Life
session 1:                contexts
Harnessing the        b   Hands-on session when participants can:
creativity of              explore examples
Microsoft®                 re-create examples
Word®                      create their own examples
                           share with others




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                          4
Practical           a   Demonstration of simple strategies applied in Skills for Life
session 2:              contexts
                    b   Hands-on session when participants can:
Transforming
learning with            explore examples
digital                  re-create examples
technologies             create their own examples
                         share with others

Introducing
WebQuests           a   Introducing the concept and structure of WebQuests


What next?          a   Identifying possible avenues for taking ideas from the
                        session forward


Conclusions         a   Key learning points
                    b   Action points




Notes on
equality of
opportunity and
inclusiveness




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                   5
Trainer          Trainers must have:
experience or        at least two years’ experience of using e-learning in a range
qualifications         of teaching and training situations
required             at least three years’ experience of teaching adult literacy,
                       language and/or numeracy in Learning and Skills Council-
                       funded provision
                     at least one year’s experience of training
                     a Certificate in Education or equivalent, together with
                       specialist qualifications in teaching adult literacy, language
                       and/or numeracy, or in working with learners with learning
                       difficulties and/or disabilities
                     undertaken the core curriculum training in literacy, numeracy,
                       ESOL, the pre-entry curriculum and/or the Access for All
                       guidance document, or other appropriate training
                     familiarity with the range of sectors providing Skills for Life
                       delivery.

Pre-course             DfES (2005) Harnessing Technology: Transforming Learning
reading for             and Children’s Services, Department for Education and Skills.
trainers               DfES (2005) Raising Standards: A Contextual Guide to
                        Support Success in Literacy, Numeracy and ESOL Provision
                        – E-learning, Department for Education and Skills.
                       Mellar, H., Kambouri, M., Sanderson, M., Pavlou, V. (2004)
                        ICT and Adult Literacy, Numeracy and ESOL, National
                        Research and Development Centre for Adult Literacy and
                        Numeracy.




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                               6
Resources
Resources to           DfES (2001) Adult ESOL Core Curriculum, Department for
be available for        Education and Skills.
delegates at the       DfES (2001) Adult Literacy Core Curriculum, Department for
session                 Education and Skills.
                       DfES (2001) Adult Numeracy Core Curriculum, Department
                        for Education and Skills.
                       DfES (2002) Access for All, Department for Education and
                        Skills.
                       DfES (2002) Success in Adult Literacy, Numeracy and ESOL
                        Provision: A Guide to Support the Common Inspection
                        Framework, Department for Education and Skills.
                       DfES (2004-05) Materials for Embedded Learning,
                        Department for Education and Skills.
                       DfES (2005) Raising Standards: A Contextual Guide to
                        Support Success in Literacy, Numeracy and ESOL Provision
                        – Embedded Learning, Department for Education and Skills.
                       DfES (2005) Skills for Life Resources Supporting Quality and
                        Achievement, Department for Education and Skills.
                       Petty, G. (2004) Teaching Today: A Practical Guide, 3rd
                        edition, Nelson Thornes.
                    Contents of the delegate pack:
                     HO 1 Agenda
                     HO 2 Definitions of e-learning
                     HO 3 Harnessing Technology
                     HG 1 Drag and drop text boxes
                     HG 2 Microsoft® Word® drop-down forms
                     HG 3 Microsoft® Word® pop-up comments
                     HG 4 Create and insert a sound file
                     HO 4 Harnessing the creativity of Microsoft® Word® – activity
                              grid
                     HG 5 Insert digital images into Microsoft® Word®
                     HG 6 Drag and drop with images
                     HG 7 Microsoft® PowerPoint ® text entry boxes
                     HG 8 Adding video to Microsoft® PowerPoint® presentations
                     HO 5 Personal action plan
                     HO 6 Transforming learning with digital technologies – activity
                              grid
                     HO 7 About WebQuests
                     HO 8 URLs
                     Evaluation form
                     Introducing E-learning delegate CD-ROM




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                              7
Resources for          CD-ROM containing all the materials used on the day plus
delegates to            additional publications for background information (see
take away after         below)
the session            Delegate pack
                       Attewell, J. and Savill-Smith, C. (2004) Learning with Mobile
                        Devices: Research and Development, Learning and Skills
                        Development Agency
                       DfES (2005) Raising Standards: Contextual Guides to
                        Support Success in Literacy, Numeracy and ESOL Provision
                        – CD-ROM, Department for Education and Skills
                       LSDA (2004) ITQ Resource Pack – CD-ROM, Learning and
                        Skills Development Agency




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                   8
Contents of the Introducing E-learning CD-ROM

Examples folder                    Handouts folder                    ‘How to’ guides folder            Background information
                                                                                                        folder
File names                         File names                         File names                        File names
EG 1 Transport vocabulary          HO 1 Agenda                        HG 1 Drag and drop text boxes     BI 1 NRDC report in ICT & adult
EG 2 Shape drops                   HO 2 Definitions of                HG 2 Microsoft® Word® drop-             literacy numeracy ESOL –
EG 3 Simple continuous                    e-learning                         down forms                       Mellar, H., Kambouri, M.,
EG 4 Insert commas in lists        HO 3 Harnessing Technology         HG 3 Microsoft® Word® pop-up            Sanderson, M., Pavlou, V.
EG 5 Sentence scramble             HO 4 Harnessing the creativity            comments                         (2004) ICT and Adult
EG 6 Missing numbers                      of Microsoft® Word® –       HG 4 Create and insert a sound          Literacy, Numeracy and
EG 7 Dominoes                             activity grid                      file                             ESOL, National Research
EG 8 Formulae                      HO 5 Personal action plan          HG 5 Insert digital images into         and Development Centre for
EG 9 Drop shun                     HO 6 Transforming learning                Microsoft® Word®                 Adult Literacy and
EG 10 In on at                            with digital technologies   HG 6 Drag and drop with images          Numeracy
EG 11 Comments – sentence          HO 7 About WebQuests               HG 7 Microsoft® PowerPoint®       BI 2 Using laptop computers to
       parts                       HO 8 URLs                                 text entry boxes                 develop basic skills – a
EG 12 Comments – triangles                                            HG 8 Adding video to Microsoft®         report published by the
EG 13 Very big numbers                                                       PowerPoint®                      National Research and
EG 14 Presenting digital imaging                                                                              Development Centre (2004)
EG 15 National Trust Enterprises
EG 16 Stately home
EG 17 Insert images PowerPoint
       demo
EG 18 Body language
EG 19 Understanding sentences
EG 20 Fruit & veg & prepositions
EG 21 Scaffold clips
EG 22 Scaffold sequence
EG 23 Story from video
EG 24 Unwrapping present video
       clip
EG 25 World pollution PowerPoint
       presentation




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                                                                  9
Equipment         The following equipment is required for the trainer(s):
required            a a laptop computer that has Windows® XP®, a CD-ROM and
                          a floppy disk drive, is sound enabled, connected to the
                          internet and networked to delegates’ PCs or with a USB port
                    b Microsoft® PowerPoint® and Word® software, an internet
                          browser and a media player or similar (for playing video clips,
                          sound files and music)
                    c a data projector, screen and appropriate connecting cables to
                          the presenter’s PC
                    d powered speakers (and a microphone if required)
                    e a mobile phone
                    f     Verbatim 5 in 1 or:
                          a digital camera and accessories to connect to a PC in
                              order to download images
                          a video camera (or combined with a digital camera)
                    g Introducing E-learning trainer materials CD-ROM
                    h a printer connected to the trainer’s PC with appropriate
                          cables, and spare ink cartridges
                    i     floppy disks
                    j     a ream of paper
                    k a flip chart and pens
                    l     a CD of appropriate music for the digital imaging
                          presentation.
                  The following equipment is required for the delegates:
                      one or two computers per table with Windows® XP®,
                         Microsoft® Word® and PowerPoint® software; the computers
                         must be sound enabled, have a video player, be connected to
                         the internet, be networked with a shared printer and feature
                         CD-ROM and floppy drives
                      one microphone per table or per laptop.

                  NB It is usual for a technician from a professional hire company
                  to set up the equipment and provide technical support
                  throughout the day.

Pre-course        It would be of benefit to the participants if they bring along to the event:
activity for           a memory stick
participants           learning resources that would be used for delivering literacy,
                         numeracy or ESOL, for example texts, handouts, worksheets
                         and instructions.

Useful websites      See HO 8 (in the Handouts folder).




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                       10
Reference              DfES (2005) Harnessing Technology: Transforming Learning
material                and Children’s Services, Department for Education and Skills.
                       JISC (2004) Effective Practice with e-Learning, Joint
                        Information Systems Committee.

Further reading




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                              11
  Session Plan and Resources for Introducing
  E-learning: Using Technology in Literacy, Language
  and Numeracy Teaching (5.2)
  Aim
  The programme aims to:
      raise teachers’ awareness of the potential of e-learning to enhance teaching and
        learning in Skills for Life provision.
  Outcomes
  Through the programme participants will:
      become familiar with current definitions of e-learning
      have considered the benefits of using e-learning within their Skills for Life
        programmes
      become aware of a range of different ways in which e-learning can enhance literacy,
        language and numeracy learning
      acquire some practical e-learning skills which can be directly applied to their own
        practice
      identify some strategies to further develop their practice in effective use of e-
        learning.

                                             Resources
Time     Content
                                             Number Style               Title
Allow    Preparatory tasks for trainers      TN 1      Trainer notes    Preparatory tasks for
1 hour                                                                  trainers

30      Introduction                         HO 1      Handout          Agenda
minutes Welcome, housekeeping and            TN 2      Trainer notes    Introduction and
                                                                        ice-breaker
        introductions
                                             PP 1–3    PowerPoint®      Title, aim and
(30)                                                   slides           outcomes
         Aim and outcomes for the day
                                             PP 4      PowerPoint®      Ice-breaker: What
                                                       slide            can the ‘e’ in
         Ice-breaker: what can the ‘e’ in
                                                                        e-learning stand for?
         e-learning stand for?
                                             HO 2      Handout          Definitions of
                                                                        e-learning
         Take feedback

10      E-learning – E-living                TN 3      Trainer notes    E-learning – E-living
minutes Introducing the range of ways        PP 5      PowerPoint®      E-learning – E-living
                                                       slide
        that e-learning impacts on
        teachers and learners – in
(40)                                                   f
        everyday life and in educational
        contexts



  sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                 12
30      The benefits of e-learning              TN 4         Trainer notes   The benefits of
minutes Identifying the potential benefits                                   e-learning
                                                PP 6         PowerPoint®     The benefits of
        of e-learning to both teachers
                                                             slide           e-learning
        and learners
(70)                                            DF 1         Desktop file    The benefits of
                                                                             e-learning

10      Harnessing Technology                   TN 5         Trainer         Harnessing
minutes Highlighting important issues in                     notes           Technology
                                                PP 7         PowerPoint®     Harnessing
        the Government’s e-learning
                                                             slide           Technology
        strategy for the post-16 sector
(80)                                            HO 3         Handout         Harnessing
                                                                             Technology

10      How do teachers get started             TN 6         Trainer notes   How do teachers
minutes with e-learning?                                                     get started with
                                                                             e-learning?
          Introducing the idea that teachers
                                             PP 8–10         PowerPoint®     How do teachers
          should not be daunted by scope
(90)                                                         slides          get started with
          – start small
                                                                             e-learning?
          Highlighting points from research
          by the National Research and
          Development Centre for Adult
          Literacy and Numeracy into
          current practice: these form the
          rationale for the practical
          sessions

5       Introduction to the practical           TN 7         Trainer notes   Introduction to the
minutes sessions                                                             practical sessions
                                                PP 11–13     PowerPoint®     Introduction to the
          Introduction to, and rationale for,
                                                             slides          practical sessions
          the practical sessions
(95)

70      Practical session 1:                    TN 8         Trainer notes   Practical session 1:
minutes Harnessing the creativity of                                         Harnessing the
        Microsoft® Word®                                                     creativity of
                                                                             Microsoft® Word®
          Demonstration of simple
(165)     strategies applied in Skills for Life PP 14        PowerPoint®     Practical session 1:
                                                hyperlinks   slide           Harnessing the
          contexts
                                                to:                          creativity of
          Hands-on session when                                              Microsoft® Word®
          participants can:                     EG 1         Example         Transport
           explore examples                                                 vocabulary
           re-create examples                  EG 2         Example         Shape drops
           create their own examples           EG 3         Example         Simple continuous
           share with others                   EG 4         Example         Insert commas in
                                                                             lists


  sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                    13
                                              HG 1          ‘How to’         Drag and drop text
                                                            guide            boxes
                                              HG 2          ‘How to’         Microsoft® Word®
                                                            guide            drop-down forms
                                              HG 3          ‘How to’         Microsoft® Word®
                                                            guide            pop-up comments
                                              HG 4          ‘How to’         Create and insert a
                                                            guide            sound file
                                              EG 1–         Examples         See Examples
                                              EG 13                          folder on CD-ROM
                                              HO 4          Handout          Harnessing the
                                              (DF 2)        (Desktop file)   creativity of
                                                                             Microsoft® Word® –
                                                                             activity grid
                                              HO 5          Handout          Personal action
                                              (DF 3)        (Desktop file)   plan

20      Lunch break trainer activities        TN 9          Trainer notes    Lunch break trainer
minutes                                                                      activities

65      Practical session 2:                  TN 10         Trainer notes    Practical session 2:
minutes Transforming learning with                                           Transforming
        digital technologies                                                 learning with digital
                                                                             technologies
         Demonstration of simple
(230)    strategies applied in Skills for Life EG 14        Example          Presenting digital
                                                                             imaging
         contexts
                                               PP 15–16     PowerPoint®      Practical session 2:
                                               In PP 16     slides           Transforming
         Hands-on session when
                                               hyperlinks                    learning with digital
         participants can:
                                               to:                           technologies
                  explore examples
                                               EG 15        Example          National Trust
                  re-create examples
                                                                             Enterprises
                  create their own            EG 16        Example          Stately home
                    examples                   EG 17        Example          Insert images
                  share with others                                         PowerPoint® demo
                                              EG 25         Example          World pollution
                                                                             PowerPoint
                                                                             presentation
                                              HG 5          ‘How to’         Insert digital images
                                                            guide            into Microsoft®
                                                                             Word®
                                              HG 6          ‘How to’         Drag and drop with
                                                            guide            images
                                              HG 7          ‘How to’         Microsoft®
                                                            guide            PowerPoint® text
                                                                             entry boxes




  sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                    14
                                           HG 8         ‘How to’         Adding video to
                                                        guide            Microsoft®
                                                                         PowerPoint®
                                                                         presentations
                                           EG 18–       Examples         See Examples
                                           EG 25                         folder on CD-ROM

15      Practical session 2:               TN 11        Trainer notes    Practical session 2:
minutes Conclusion                                                       Conclusion
                                           PP 17        PowerPoint®      Creating
                                                        slide            participative
(245)                                                                    learning activities
                                                                         with digital
                                                                         technologies
                                           HO 6         Handout          Transforming
                                           (DF 4)       (Desktop file)   learning with digital
                                                                         technologies –
                                                                         activity grid
                                           HO 5         Handout          Personal action
                                           (DF 3)       (Desktop file)   plan

25      Introducing WebQuests              TN 12        Trainer notes    Introducing
minutes Introducing the concept and                                      WebQuests
                                           PP 18        PowerPoint®      Introducing
        structure of WebQuests
                                                        slide            WebQuests
(270)                                      HO 7         Handout          About WebQuests

20      Identifying possible avenues for   TN 13        Trainer notes    What next?
minutes taking ideas from the session      PP 19–20     PowerPoint®      What next?
        forward                                         slides
                                           TN 14        Trainer notes    Action planning and
            Key learning points
(290)                                                                    evaluation
Excludes    Action points                  PP 21–22     PowerPoint®      Action planning and
two 10-                                                 slides           evaluation
minute
breaks
                                           HO 5         Handout          Personal action
and 45                                     (DF 3)       (Desktop file)   plan
minutes                                    HO 8         Handout          URLs
for lunch                                  Evaluation
                                           form




  sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                 15
Resource        Resource style        Title
number


TN 1            Trainer               Preparatory tasks for
                notes                 trainers


NB It is usual for a technician from a professional hire company to set up the
equipment and provide technical support throughout the day. However, prior to
the start of the event, the trainer mentor(s) need to perform several tasks.

      Check the set up of the room and equipment.
      Check that laptops, digital cameras and video cameras are fully charged and that
       the necessary software has been downloaded and connections made.
      Copy the desktop files from the trainer materials CD-ROM onto the desktops of
       delegates’ laptops.
      Set comments to ‘show balloons never’. (The default setting in Windows XP® is
       to show comments as ‘balloons’ in the right-hand margin.)
      Check mobile phone signals.
      Put the mobile phone number of one of the presenters on the flip chart.
      Check that the trainers’ materials are ready on the presentation laptop: check
       that the hyperlinks in the PowerPoint® presentation work.
      Check that speakers are working and that sound is audible.
      Ensure that the WebQuest URLs are saved in the ‘favourites’ file of delegates’
       browsers.
      Check that the internet can be accessed.
      Check that a shared folder has been set up on the presentation and delegates’
       laptops.




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                16
Resource         Resource style          Title
number


HO 1             Handout                 Agenda


09.30–10.00      Coffee and registration
10.00–10.10      Introduction: Welcome, housekeeping, aim and objectives of the day
10.10–10.30      Ice-breaker: What can the ‘e’ in e-learning stand for?
10.30–10.40      E-learning – E-living
10.40–11.10      Activity: The benefits of e-learning
11.10–11.20      Harnessing Technology
11.20–11.30      How do teachers get started with e-learning?
11.30–11.45      Coffee break
11.45–11.50      Introduction to the practical sessions
11.50–13.00      Practical session 1: Harnessing the creativity of Microsoft® Word®
13.00–13.45      Lunch
13.45–14.50      Practical session 2: Transforming learning with digital technologies
14.50–15.00      Tea break
15.00–15.15      Practical session 2: Conclusion
15.15–15.40      Activity: Introducing WebQuests
15.40–16.00      Action planning, evaluation and close

Purpose of the day
The programme aims to raise teachers’ awareness of the potential of e-learning to
enhance teaching and learning in Skills for Life provision.
Objectives
By the end of the day teachers will:
    be familiar with current definitions of e-learning
    have considered the benefits of using e-learning within their Skills for Life
       programmes
    be aware of a range of different ways in which e-learning can enhance literacy,
       language and numeracy learning
    have acquired some practical e-learning skills that can be directly applied to their
       own practice
    have identified some strategies to further develop their practice in the effective
       use of e-learning.



sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                   17
Resource         Resource style         Title
number


TN 2             Trainer                Introduction and
                 notes                  ice-breaker


PP 1
Welcome the participants, deal with matters of housekeeping and explain the focus of
the day. Display PP 1.

Introduce the ‘buddy trainers’.
PP 2–3
Refer to PP 2–3, which state the purpose of, and learning outcomes for, the day.

Ask permission to take photographs of participants during the course of the day.
(Explain that the photographs are to be used during the afternoon’s practical session
and will be deleted at the end of the day. Respect the wishes of anyone who does not
wish to be photographed.)
(10 minutes)
Ice-breaker: What can the ‘e’ in e-learning stand for?
Ask participants what information and communication technologies they have brought
with them or commonly use. Ask them to get out any technology that they have with
them (for example, mobile phones and memory sticks) and show others on their table.
Make the point that most of us use some form of technology as an essential, everyday
tool.
(20 minutes)
PP 4
Refer to PP 4. Ask participants to work in small groups to come up with three or four
appropriate words beginning with ‘e’. Ask one member of the group to text the agreed
words to the mobile phone number written on the flip chart.

One of the trainers receives the text message and scribes responses into the text entry
box in the PowerPoint® slide.

Facilitate group discussion and summarise. The trainer may wish to add some more
‘negative’ words, such as ‘expensive’ or ‘exasperating’, to show empathy with the view
that there can be challenges when introducing e-learning.

Draw participants’ attention to HO 2.

During the morning, or at lunch time, print out a copy of the completed PowerPoint®
slide for everyone as a handout.

sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                   18
Resource                     Resource style                               Title
number


PP 1–3                       PowerPoint® Title, aim and outcomes
                             slides




        Introducing E-learning

               Using Technology in
             Literacy, Language and
               Numeracy Teaching
                                                                  1




                  Purpose of the day

  • To raise teachers’ awareness of the potential
    of e-learning to enhance teaching and
    learning in Skills for Life provision



                                                                      2




                       Objectives
  • become familiar with current definitions of e-learning
  • consider the benefits of using e-learning within Skills for
    Life programmes
  • review a range of different ways in which e-learning can
    enhance literacy, language and numeracy learning
  • acquire some e-learning skills to use in your own
    practice
  • identify some strategies to further develop your effective
    use of e-learning
                                                             3




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                             19
Resource      Resource style   Title
number


PP 4          PowerPoint®      Ice-breaker: What can the ‘e’ in
              slide            e-learning stand for?




    What can the ‘e’ in e-learning stand for?




                                                4




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                      20
Resource         Resource style        Title
number


HO 2             Handout               Definitions of e-learning


Definitions: E-learning or ILT?
In post-16 education, technology is becoming widely used to promote learning, enrich
the learning environment and enhance the effectiveness of learning. At the same time,
the vocabulary is developing with the following abbreviations being widely used:




                   I.L.T
                                  I.C.T
                                                      I.T.




   IT      Information technology     The computer infrastructure, hardware and
                                      software used to process data and deliver
                                      information
   ICT     Information and            The combination of computing and
           communication              communication technologies (including
           technologies               computer networks and telephone systems)
                                      that connects and enables some of today’s
                                      most exciting systems, for example, the
                                      internet
   ILT     Information and learning   This term is used, in post-16 education, to refer
           technologies               to the use of information and communication
                                      technologies to support the core business of
                                      colleges: the delivery and management of
                                      learning



sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                     21
Unfortunately, these terms are often used interchangeably, which causes confusion,
and the matter is compounded by different use in other sectors: for example, schools
use the term ICT to refer to what the post-16 sector would call ILT.
What is e-learning?
Where does e-learning fit into this terminology? There isn’t a universally accepted
definition of e-learning, but the European Union definition of e-learning is: “The use of
computer technology, including the internet, to teach and learn.”

There seems to be a trend towards convergence now where ILT and e-learning
effectively mean the same thing, although some would argue that e-learning should be
reserved for online learning.

This raises an important issue: how are managers in the sector expected to understand
concepts and write and implement their e-learning strategy when even the terminology
remains formally undefined? Some work in defining the term e-learning was carried out
by Geoff Foot in Wales as part of work carried out for ELWa as a first stage in it
developing an e-learning strategy.
A working definition of e-learning
ELWa defines e-learning as: “The use of electronic technology to deliver, support and
enhance teaching and learning.”
E-learning can be applied in a variety of inter-related ways, each one of which will have
implications for the role of the learner, the role of the teacher or mentor, the resource
materials developed and the learning experience. As such, e-learning has the potential
to open up all kinds of learning experiences (whether learners are learning individually
or in groups), as well as ultimately to transform learning.
The potential of e-learning to enhance and transform an individual’s learning experience
is great and will be effective at a number of different modes of delivery – a number of
which are highlighted below:

   learning in the presence of a teacher, trainer or lecturer, whose delivery method is
    supported and enhanced by electronic media and materials
   learning from a remote location through direct interaction with a mentor or teacher
    via electronic media (such as videoconferencing, e-mail, telephone, interactive
    television and so on)
   independent learning via an electronic medium with access to online support.

In all cases, there is scope for peer support to underpin the learning process, which will
rely increasingly on electronic technology the more physically remote the learner is.




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                       22
Resource         Resource style         Title
number


TN 3             Trainer                E-learning – E-living
                 notes

Ask participants to quickly brainstorm ways in which e-learning impacts on the everyday
lives or learning experiences of learners. For example, the internet may be used for
shopping, planning holidays, managing finance, researching for an assignment and so
on. Record responses on the flip chart.
PP 5
Display PP 5 and make the following points.
    The use of technology empowers learning: it extends opportunities and enables
      learning to take place in ways that suit the needs of individual learners.

      Using technology as part of everyday culture is a skill many learners bring with
       them into their formal learning. Skills for e-living can inform and broaden the skills
       used in e-learning and should be seen as an essential part of the 21st-century
       learner’s toolkit.
(10 minutes)

The model shown in PP 5 starts from ‘Traditional teaching tool’ on the left and illustrates
how e-learning can support teaching, training and learning in a formal, managed
learning context. The degree of learner autonomy increases as you move to the right,
increasing reliance upon the resources to work effectively without external support.

The lower semi-circle illustrates how activities undertaken autonomously by learners
can support and underpin their learning in any formal, managed learning environment
and could be used to good effect in the delivery of teaching, training and learning in a
formal context. The degree of learner autonomy decreases from the right to the left as
the use of technology by individuals engaged in their own self-directed activities
becomes more closely channelled into particular directions.

It should not be assumed that any segment or half of the model represents better
methods or modes of learning, nor that learning only takes place in the upper part of the
circle. The many forms of e-learning should be seen as a set of opportunities to meet
the differing needs of individual learners in different contexts. Each segment of the
circular model of e-living and e-learning lends itself to high-quality, effective learning
when it is appropriate to the needs of the learner and the context in which the learning
takes place.

More detail on each section can be found at
http://ferl.becta.org.uk/subsite/fpp6/html/whatiselearning/model.htm



sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                      23
Resource      Resource style   Title
number


PP 5          PowerPoint® E-learning – E-living
              slide




                 E-learning / E-living




                                         5




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                             24
Resource         Resource style         Title
number


TN 4             Trainer                The benefits of e-learning
                 notes


PP 6
Display PP 6, which outlines the activity.
Activity
Following straight on from the previous discussion, ask participants to work in small
groups to consider the benefits of e-learning to either teachers or learners (the trainer to
assign groups to ensure an even spread).

Direct participants to the Desktop Files folder on the desktop of their laptops. Help them
to find and open DF 1.

Ask each group to record a summary of their discussion on the appropriate slide –
suggest no more than five bullet points.
(5 minutes)

While the discussions are taking place the trainers circulate, taking digital photographs
and video clips to be used in the second practical session.

Ask participants to save their PowerPoint® presentations in the shared folder on the
desktop. They should put an identifier at the end of the file name to differentiate it from
the other groups’ presentations and then close the file.
(10 minutes)

Ask a representative from each group to present their summary: the ‘learner’ groups,
followed by the ‘teacher’ groups.

Trainers facilitate and support summary discussions and ensure timing is adhered to. It
is important to make the point that this activity has demonstrated the power of e-learning
to support discussion and collaborative activities. There is often a perception that
introducing e-learning requires a suite of computers, with each learner working
individually on a computer-based task. However, small-group work – using technology
to support decision making and/or recording – can be as, if not more, effective.
(15 minutes)

During the lunch break the trainers should combine all the presentations and print them
out in handout format for distribution. Participants may wish to save the combined
presentation on a memory stick, or floppy disks can be provided for this purpose.


sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                     25
Resource           Resource style               Title
number


PP 6               PowerPoint® The benefits of e-learning
                   slide




             The benefits of e-learning
      In your groups
      consider the benefits
      of e-learning to either
                learners
                   or
                teachers.
  Record your thoughts in file DF1 ‘The benefits of e-learning’ on your desktop
                                                                            6




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                             26
Resource          Resource style        Title
number


TN 5              Trainer               Harnessing Technology
                  notes


PP 7
Display PP 7 to introduce the Government’s e-learning strategy document, Harnessing
Technology (2005). Trainers can show the reference copy.

The strategy has a section specifically on 14–19 year olds in schools and colleges and
the broader post-16 sector. This section includes six priorities for the sector, broken
down into actions and milestones.

Trainers should draw participants’ attention to priority 4 and priority 5 to stress the
importance laid on:
    upskilling staff to take advantage of technology in teaching and learning; and
    promoting quality improvement in e-learning.
(10 minutes)
Priority 4: Provide a good quality ICT training and support package for
practitioners
Action
        Enhance practitioner e-learning pedagogical skills
Milestones
        Core, optional and elective units of training and development, based on LLUK’s
         [Lifelong Learning UK’s] e-learning and e-leadership sector standards, available
         by 2007-08 and embedded in Initial Teacher Training (ITT) and professional
         development programmes
        ICT personal competency, based on the e-Skills standards, required as part of
         the ‘common core’ of all ITT in the sector by 2007-08
        Provider level three-year development plans agreed with local LSCs [Learning
         and Skills Councils] by 2006
        NIACE to train practitioners to LLUK standards, to mentor their peers in e-
         learning, with initial training programme complete by 2006.
Priority 5: Provide leadership and development package for organisational
capability in ICT
Action
        Promote effective use of ICT through existing monitoring mechanisms




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                     27
Milestones
      E-learning explicit in ALI [Adult Learning Inspectorate] and Ofsted inspection for
       all institutions by 2006
      E-learning in Regional Development Plans for 2006
      Benchmarking tools available 2006.

The full details of the section on 14–19 and post-16 education are given in HO 3.

The model of e-learning and e-living that was shown earlier (PP 5) is part of the Ferl
Demonstrating Transformation resource, designed to support those taking a leading role
in the preparation for inspection. Draw participants’ attention to HO 8 because it lists the
web address where the resource can be found. HO 8 also contains the web address for
the electronic versions of the Contextual Guides to Support Success in Literacy,
Numeracy and ESOL Provision. These guides are all useful in helping organisations
prepare for quality improvement and inspection. The e-learning guide is particularly
relevant to this training session.




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                    28
Resource      Resource style           Title
number


PP 7          PowerPoint® Harnessing Technology
              slide




            Harnessing Technology

                               • DfES e-strategy includes
                                 six priorities for post-16
                                 education and training
                               • Focuses on integrating e-
                                 learning into all aspects of
                                 education and training

                                                           7




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                           29
Resource      Resource style   Title
number


HO 3          Handout          Harnessing Technology




Extract:

11. What this means for 14-19 and the post-16 sector




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                  30
Greater flexibility and easier progression in further education
140. This section is about how we make the most of technology for 14-19 year olds in
schools and colleges; for those in further education; and for learners in adult and
community institutions, work-based learning providers, specialist institutions and the
prison education services. These institutions have different levels of ICT [information
and communication technologies] provision. All colleges have broadband and are
connected to the JANET network; most have student and staff intranets, and a few offer
online courses.
141. Most teachers and lecturers now feel confident in using ICT effectively in
teaching and learning. In some institutions, e-learning is becoming an important part of
course delivery and learning support.
142. Within adult learning, we have a network of 7000 learndirect and UK online
centres. These are embedded in the learning and skills sector, located within public
libraries, FE colleges, work-based learning providers, private training providers and the
voluntary and community sector. In adult learning generally, there are significant
developments underway but there is still a long way to go. The same is true for
specialist colleges and work-based learning.
Seamless provision and progression
143. Our main focus will be to support the Skills Strategy and the 14-19 Strategy,
including vocational routes. We want to improve access, flexibility, coherence and
continuity for learners from age fourteen throughout life, whether they learn at school,
college, work or at home. This means making sure that classes, courses and advice
services are flexible to meet the needs of learners and employees, especially those in
small businesses where in-house training is difficult to manage. We will provide expert
online services and resources to support practitioners and leaders through initial training
and professional development. We will also offer extensive access to online digital
resources, services and networks.
144. We will establish new programmes and strengthen support services so that
leaders can assess their own institution’s level of technological development, and make
full use of ICT in planning, management and partnerships. E-learning will also be critical
to Strategic Area Reviews (StARs), development plans, self-assessment and the Ofsted
and ALI [Adult Learning Inspectorate] inspection processes.
14-19 learners
145. Learners in the 14-19 age group will increasingly be able to direct and manage
aspects of their own learning. This will give them access to a broader curriculum, with
greater choice and more vocational options. They could, for example, create a
programme that mixes school and college-based modules with experience in the
workplace. They could access learning resources and feedback, and monitor their
progress from every location.
Lifelong learning and adults
146. We are aiming to provide for learners over the age of sixteen, and in the longer
term from the age of fourteen, a personal lifelong learning record, detailing the courses
they have taken and qualifications they have achieved. This ‘personalised learning
record’ will make it easier for them to take short courses and accumulate credits for
sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                  31
sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH   32
what they learn; it will allow people to move between courses more easily; and will make
it easier for people to improve their skills after a period away from learning, or while at
home, such as long-term care providers. The learning record will enable learning to be
picked up at any time of life, in any location, including prisons.
147. Adult learners will have more choice of courses and learning programmes,
including Skills for Life and ‘first rung’ access courses for those from disadvantaged
groups. They could choose a college or a community setting, such as a public library, or
study at home online with tutor support. Many institutions will mix formal classes with
online teaching. Some people will use ICT to manage their own learning at their own
pace, using e-assessment to monitor their own progress.


  GCSE Online at Sheffield College
  Situation
  Five years ago the Sheffield College developed their first English GCSE online
  course. The course was designed to improve retention rates for students.
  Key Actions
  The course includes online material, weekly emails explaining tasks, and online web
  boards for tutor-learner interaction.
  With email, learners and tutors can converse individually, more than in a typical
  classroom discussion.
  Tutors have more one-to-one time with students so can address their individual
  needs.
  Impact
  200 students enrolled on the one-year course including soldiers, an oil rig worker,
  and students with ME.
  Retention and pass rates were higher than average.
  As a result of its success, an English A-level pilot with 50 students was put in place.
Work-based learning
148. Employers and employees can benefit from e-learning in the workplace. We will
work with the Sector Skills Councils and trade unions to maximise these benefits, and
embed e-learning to support vocational routes, through skills academies, Centres of
Vocational Education [Excellence] (CoVEs) and specialist institutions. The principle of
flexibility will apply, allowing employees to mix learning in the workplace with learning at
home or in local colleges, public libraries, and community centres. E-learning can
benefit employers too by helping them to improve business efficiency and effectiveness.




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                    33
Post-16 sector priority actions
149. Many of the above actions are included at system-level in earlier chapters, for
example in relation to personalised support through development of e-portfolios.
The table below shows additional sector-based actions:
Priority 1
Provide an integrated online information service for all citizens
Action
        Ensure that information and services for young people and their parents, and for
         lifelong learning, are well represented within Directgov.
Milestones
        Transition of existing material from Way to Learn portal to Directgov 2005.
Action
        Develop a workforce web portal for information, advice and guidance on e-
         learning.
Milestones
        Scoping study to build on existing practitioner services in the sector, complete in
         2005.
Priority 2
Ensure integrated online personal support for learners
Action
        Develop better opportunities for extending access from socially-excluded groups.
Milestones
        Measurable increase in take-up of e-skills passports and follow through by UfI, by
         2007
        Sustainable model for UK online centres for 2005
        National Institute for Adult Continuing Education (NIACE) to develop e-learning
         mentors (e-guides) in training ACL [adult and community learning] tutors who
         work in community settings, or 2005.
Action
        Promote portability of assessment to support personalised progression.
Milestones
        Road map for e-assessment developed by 2006.
Action
        Provide a personalised online learning space for every learner that can
         encompass a personal portfolio.
Milestones


sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                      34
                                                A personalised learning space, with the
      potential to support e-portfolios available within every college by 2007-08.




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                 35
Priority 3
A collaborative approach to personalised learning activities
Action
        Ensure that the post-16 sector implements a content strategy consistent with the
         system-level aims.
Milestones
        E-learning embedded in Success for All materials by 2005
        Funding and business models for post-16 providers to purchase high quality
         commercial content by 2006
        Content strategy aligned with teaching and learning developments through
         Pedagogy Advisory Group by 2005
        National Learning Network (NLN) / Success for All skills and dissemination
         strategies to include Information and Learning Technologies (ILT) subject
         mentors and champions and ACL e-guides through RSCs [Regional Support
         Centres], and explore extension to ACL by 2006.
Action
        Embed e-learning in workplace and work-based learning.
Milestones
        The use of e-assessment and e-learning built into sector academies and National
         Employer Training Programme by 2007.
Priority 4
Provide a good quality ICT training and support package for practitioners
Action
        Enhance practitioner e-learning pedagogical skills.
Milestones
        Core, optional and elective units of training and development, based on LLUK’s
         [Lifelong Learning UK’s] e-learning and e-leadership sector standards, available
         by 2007-08 and embedded in Initial Teacher Training (ITT) and professional
         development programmes
        ICT personal competency, based on the e-Skills standards, required as part of
         the ‘common core’ of all ITT in the sector by 2007-08
        Provider level three-year development plans agreed with local LSCs [Learning
         and Skills Councils] by 2006
        NIACE to train practitioners to LLUK standards, to mentor their peers in e-
         learning, with initial training programme complete by 2006.
Action
        Ensure ICT access for every practitioner and provide an online service for e-
         learning.
Milestones
    NLN [National Learning Network] Online will be available from 2006
    Success for All materials available through NLN Online.
sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                    36
Action
        Exploit the potential of e-learning for workplace and work-based learning.
Milestones
        E-Skills e-learning champion working with Skills for Business Network from 2005
        Support for Union Learning Representatives from 2005
        learndirect to develop offer for small businesses, by 2006
        Embed e-learning to support vocational routes through skills academies, COVEs
         [CoVEs] and specialist institutions by 2007.
Priority 5
Provide leadership and development package for organisational capability in ICT
Action
        Promote effective use of ICT through existing monitoring mechanisms.
Milestones
        E-learning explicit in ALI and Ofsted inspection for all institutions by 2006
        E-learning in Regional Development Plans for 2006
        Benchmarking tools available 2006.
Action
        Ensure leaders are equipped to lead the adoption and effective use of ICT.
Milestones
        E-learning embedded in CEL [Centre for Excellence in Leadership] programmes
         by 2006
        Develop the concept of the Provider for the Future by 2006
        NIACE and CEL to develop short training modules for managers, for 2006.
Action
        Support leadership collaboration on the strategic role of e-learning.
Milestones
        NLN Online developed as gateway to CEL, for 2006
        E-learning embedded in StAR process, by 2005.
Priority 6
Build a common digital infrastructure to support transformation and reform
Action
        All post-16 sectors with relevant access to broadband.
Milestones
        Best value frameworks available by 2007
        ACL providers and specialist institutions have plans to work towards appropriate
         technologies by 2007.




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                    37
Action
        Ensure work-based learning and ACL is not disadvantaged by comparison with
         institution-based learning.
Milestones
        Strategy for appropriate support for publicly-funded programmes of private
         providers in place by 2006.
Action
        Strengthen regional support for embedded e-learning for ACL and workplace
         learning.
Milestones
        Deliver a more coherent and effective regional and local support service to ACL,
         work-based learning and school sixth forms from 2006.




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                   38
Resource         Resource style           Title
number


TN 6             Trainer                  How do teachers get
                 notes                    started with e-learning?

The next three slides are designed to give a context for the practical sessions that
follow.
PP 8
It is important to stress that the introduction of e-learning should not be led by
technology. As in all good teaching and learning, instructional design should be led by
the learners – their objectives, contexts, interests and preferences. Teachers should
then choose appropriate tools and techniques. The introduction of e-learning extends
the range of tools and techniques available. E-learning should be used to enhance, not
replace, effective teaching and learning strategies.
PP 9
It is likely that participants will have a range of skills and confidence in using e-learning
– ranging from ‘nervous beginners’ to ‘IT experts’.

Emphasise the following points to delegates.

      If you are a beginner, you should not be daunted by the wide range of
       technologies available. Start small. Choose one e-learning tool or strategy that
       meets the needs of your learners and appropriate objectives. Gain confidence in
       using this tool or strategy, evaluate its effectiveness using feedback from your
       learners and their learning. Then you can start to build up your repertoire.

      If you are an ‘IT expert’ it is worth considering the impact that relatively ‘low-tech’
       strategies might have on teaching and learning. It is vital to have an ongoing
       dialogue with Skills for Life practitioners so that your expertise can better support
       them, their learners and their learning.
PP 10
This slide reinforces the above points.

These messages are drawn from the National Research and Development Centre for
Adult Literacy and Numeracy research into current practice. See BI 1 (ICT in Adult
Literacy, Numeracy and ESOL) and the Joint Information Systems Committee
publication, Effective Practice in E-learning (there is a link to it given on HO 8).
(10 minutes)

Inform participants that there will be a 15-minute break.



sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                       39
Resource                    Resource style            Title
number


PP 8–10                     PowerPoint® How do teachers get
                            slides      started with e-learning?




      How do teachers get started with
                e-learning?
  • They start with their learners’ objectives
  • They relate e-learning to their learners’
    contexts, interests and preferences
  • They identify appropriate techniques and
    tools to deliver the objectives
                                                 8




    How do teachers get started with
              e-learning?
  E-learning offers a range
    of tools for teachers and
    learners to use.
    • Learn how to use one tool
      at a time.
    • Then learn how to choose
      which one is appropriate.
                                             9




     Small changes can have a
                           BIG
     effect on your teaching and
            your learners.
                                                 10




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                              40
Resource         Resource style         Title
number


TN 7             Trainer                Introduction to the
                 notes                  practical sessions

PP 11
This training programme developed out of the two-year ‘Exploring e-learning’ project
managed by the Learning and Skills Development Agency, which evolved into two
organisations in April 2006: the Quality Improvement Agency and the Learning and
Skills Network. This project offered training to teams of Skills for Life tutors on their
premises, using the technology within their organisation.

The experience from this project highlighted a number of key messages for the
successful introduction of e-learning. Two of these are worth sharing with delegates.

      Teachers wanted to use their existing resources (for example, Microsoft®
       Word®) more effectively to support teaching and learning.

      Teachers were keen to exploit the use of digital imaging to create more visual
       learning materials and activities.

The practical sessions in this training programme have been developed in response to
these findings.
PP 12–13
These slides provide an introduction to the first practical session – Harnessing the
creativity of Microsoft® Word®.
(5 minutes)




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                       41
Resource                        Resource style                        Title
number


PP 11–                          PowerPoint® Introduction to the
13                              slides      practical sessions



            Lessons learned from the
          ‘Exploring E-learning’ project
  Teachers require two things:
  • To see how they can          • To appreciate how
    use their existing skills      multimedia
    and resources more             technologies, for
    creatively, for example        example digital
    Microsoft® Word®               imaging, can create
                                   new and different
                                   learning opportunities   11




                Practical session 1

             Harnessing the creativity of
                 Microsoft® Word®



                                                            12




   Do you know what Microsoft® Word®
                can do?
                                   Text Boxes




                                                                 13




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                         42
Resource         Resource style         Title
number


TN 8             Trainer                Practical session 1:
                 notes                  Harnessing the creativity
                                        of Microsoft® Word®

PP 14
Follow each of the hyperlinks to the examples that show and demonstrate the following
interactive features and techniques within Microsoft® Word®:
     drag and drop text boxes
     drop-down forms
     comments
     sound files.

The purpose is to demonstrate features of Microsoft® Word® (a package that many
may know only as a tool for typing assignments or creating paper-based worksheets)
that can add interactivity to Skills for Life teaching and learning, so do not go through
the techniques step by step at this stage.
(10 minutes)
Activity
Ask participants to work in groups of two or three at a laptop. Ask them to get out their
training programme CD-ROMs and direct them to the Examples folder. Focus during
this activity on files EG 1–EG 13. Point out the relevant ‘How to’ guides in the delegate
pack: HG 1–HG 4. These are also available in electronic format in the ‘How to’ guides
folder on the programme CD-ROM.

During this hands-on session participants will have the opportunity to:
    explore the examples
    follow the ‘How to’ guides to re-create an example
    follow the ‘How to’ guides to create their own example.

The choice of activity may depend on individual skills and confidence. Here are some
suggested facilitation activities for trainers.
    Pair up less confident participants with someone more experienced.
    Go through some of the techniques step by step – either by using the data
      projector for the whole group or at a laptop for a small group, as appropriate.
    Provide suggestions for application of the techniques to a variety of Skills for Life
      contexts.
    Provide technical advice.
    As the session draws to a close, ask participants to save any examples they
      have created into the shared folder on the desktop.
(45 minutes)


sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                       43
Present the examples that have been created during the session to the whole group.
Invite the participants who have created them to comment on how and why they might
use them. Ask all participants to discuss how the examples might be used with learners
and how they might enhance teaching and learning. As they do this ask participants to
complete HO 4.
(10 minutes)

Ask participants to complete the first section of HO 5.
(5 minutes)

NB Participants may complete these forms electronically by accessing the
relevant files in the Handouts folder on the CD-ROM.
Inform participants that there will be a 45-minute break for lunch.




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                               44
Resource        Resource style     Title
number


PP 14           PowerPoint® Creating interactive
                slide       learning materials




    Creating interactive learning materials
    • Literacy – reading, vocabulary
      Text boxes – drag and drop
    • Numeracy – shapes
      Drop down forms
    • ESOL – simple and continuous present
      Comments
    • ESOL/literacy – insert commas in lists
      Sound files
                                               14




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                               45
Resource         Resource style         Title
number


HG 1             ‘How to’               Drag and drop text boxes
                 guide

Software – Microsoft® Word®
Functionality – Drag and drop with text boxes
Why do it?
Pedagogical advantages
Drag and drop involves decision-making – where to move different elements of the
page. It is an excellent tool for encouraging debate and discussion or for encouraging
the higher thinking skills such as analysis, evaluation and prioritisation. Tutors can add
‘red-herring’ elements to the exercises. This is particularly valuable if there are typical
mistakes that learners make which tutors want to tackle head-on. Drag and drop
exercises are easy for learners to produce themselves, requiring minimal IT skills – this
can make a good group activity and introduce a nice blend of collaboration and light-
hearted competition to a class.
Literacy and/or ESOL
Dragging and dropping words and phrases into sentences and paragraphs can provide
enormous potential for creativity and humour. Alternatively, drag and drop punctuation
into a sentence.
Numeracy
Drag and drop offers plenty of scope for work on formulae and algebra. Using the draw
tools in Microsoft® Word® to produce simple shapes would allow for a range of drag
and drop exercises on the measurement of areas.
How to do it

      Use the menu bar to click on Insert > Text box. When
       the cursor changes to a fine cross-hair, click and drag
       to create a rectangle of the required size. Release the
       mouse button, click in the text box and type your text.
       Repeat as required.
      Alternatively, make sure the drawing toolbar is showing (if it isn’t, click on View >
       Toolbars > Drawing). Click on the Text box button. When the cursor changes to a
       fine cross-hair, click and drag to
       create a rectangle of the
       required size. Release the
       mouse button, click in the text
       box and type your text. Repeat as required.




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                    46
Tips for inclusiveness
Drag and drop works well with learners who have strong visual and kinaesthetic learning
styles. Although visually impaired learners can increase the page magnification (View >
Zoom) large magnification causes problems when trying to move the boxes around the
screen. Similarly, motor impaired students can find the mouse control required to select
the text box difficult (the narrow border of the text box has to be clicked and dragged).
Visually impaired students may be better with photocopied enlargements cut out for use
on a desk. Motor impaired students can use the arrow keys to move a selected text box.
The difficulty is first selecting the text box – a task for which a mouse emulator is
needed.
Points to note
   a Sometimes moving text boxes produces unexpected behaviour – other text
     boxes may jump away. This can be changed by altering the wrapping properties
     of the text box. Select the text box (click on the border, not the contents – see
     below) then right click the mouse. Choose Format autoshape > Layout and then
     choose In front of text.
   b Users may experience problems when selecting text boxes for later editing. This
     is because there are two selection modes. The two modes are distinguishable by
     the appearance of the text box border.
          Clicking on the inside of the text box allows you to alter the characteristics
              of the contents, for example font style or colour.
          Clicking on the border of the text box allows you to alter the overall
              character, for example wrapping or order. Either selection allows the fill
              and line colours to be adjusted.
   c Microsoft® Word XP® handles
     text boxes in a clumsy way by
     creating a ‘drawing canvas’ to
     keep the text boxes together.
     Fortunately it is easy to disable
     this irritating feature by clicking
     on Tools > Options. Select the
     General tab and uncheck the
     Automatically create drawing
     canvas when inserting
     AutoShapes option.




                        Screen shots reprinted by permission from Microsoft Corporation



sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                  47
Resource         Resource style        Title
number


HG 2             ‘How to’              Microsoft® Word®
                 guide                 drop-down forms

Software – Microsoft® Word®
Functionality – Drop-down boxes
Why do it?
Pedagogical advantages
Drop-down boxes are very good for exercises that consolidate the learner’s
understanding. They allow tutors to create simple multiple-choice exercises. By carefully
selecting the alternative options in the drop-down menu, the tutor can:
    force the learner to discriminate between easily confused concepts
    reinforce the key vocabulary in a topic
    make the learner evaluate alternative explanations or descriptions
    reduce the number of ways of getting something wrong (for example, a normal
       gap-fill exercise has a huge number of possible wrong answers including wrong
       spellings of the right answer).
Literacy and/or ESOL
Ideal for sentence construction. Learners can select appropriate verbs, adjectives and
so on to make the sentence sensible. Use drop-down boxes for practice with homonyms
or apostrophes, or within traditional multiple-choice exercises.
Numeracy
Provide recognition exercises with different shapes (the shapes can be drawn using the
draw tools in Microsoft® Word®). Provide simple mental arithmetic tasks with multiple-
choice, drop-down alternatives. Mix and match definitions to glossary terms or formulae
to key measurements (volume of a sphere; area of a circle and so on).
How to do it
   Make the Forms toolbar visible (View > Toolbars >
    Forms).
   Click in the text where you want a drop-down list to
    appear.
   Click the Drop-down form field icon on the toolbar.
   A grey rectangle appears in your document.
   Select the rectangle by dragging over it with the cursor.
   Right click over the selected rectangle and choose Properties.




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                 48
   Fill the list by typing in the Drop-down
    item box and clicking Add. If required,
    change the order using the Move
    buttons. Repeat as many times as
    required.
   Click OK when finished.
   Where appropriate, you can copy and
    paste the list to as many locations in
    the document as you wish (this saves
    you creating each drop-down
    individually – but the nature of your
    tasks will determine whether you can
    mass produce drop-down menus in this way).
   When ready to test the document, click on the padlock icon on the Forms toolbar.
    The sheet is now protected and the forms will work when you click on them.

To edit the document again, click
Tools > Unprotect document.
Tips for inclusiveness
This technique is very good for a visual learner and,
by restricting the options for failure, it is also good for learners with low self-esteem.
Visually impaired learners can struggle with the font size because the font in the menu
options remains the same however much the document is zoomed. Visually impaired
users need to use magnification software to make the most of pop-ups and screen tips.
Windows XP® has a built-in magnifier, which is adequate for basic use. (Click Start >
Programs > Accessories > Accessibility > Magnifier to access the built-in magnifier.)
Motor impaired learners can easily access the drop-down menus. The left and right
arrow keys take them from one drop-down menu to the next while clicking Alt, and down
arrow opens up the menu items. These can then be selected using the up and down
arrow keys and Enter to confirm the choice. Be aware that these key strokes might vary
when using assistive technologies, for example, screen readers can ‘grab’ the normal
keys for their own functionality.
Points to note
The drop-down menus only work on a protected document. The document can be
protected either by clicking on the padlock icon on the Forms toolbar or by clicking Tools
> Protect document. Since the document needs to be protected for drop-down menus to
work, this technique does not combine with any drag and drop techniques. Neither does
it combine with hyperlinks or screen tips. It does, however, combine with pop-up
comments.

When working with these menus it is easy to forget that the document needs
unprotecting in order to edit it further. To unprotect the document for editing, click on the
padlock icon on the Forms toolbar or click Tools > Unprotect document.




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                     49
It is not possible to get the software to feedback on whether or not the ‘right’ choice has
been made, but if you want this to be a self-marking exercise you can hide the answers
at the bottom of the document as a series of pop-up comments.


                        Screen shots reprinted by permission from Microsoft Corporation




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                    50
Resource        Resource style        Title
number


HG 3            ‘How to’              Microsoft® Word® pop-up
                guide                 comments

Software – Microsoft® Word®
Functionality – Pop-up comments and screen tips
Why do it?
Pedagogical advantages
Pop-up comments offer an additional layer of information, explanation or questioning.
This can be excellent for making a resource accessible to a wider range of abilities, for
supporting weaker learners or for stretching more able learners. Since the process of
adding comments and screen tips is quick to teach, active learning exercises can be set
where the learners themselves – individually or collaboratively – add layers of
information or interpretation to an existing resource.
Literacy and/or ESOL
Pop-up glossary information can explain difficult words: audio comments can help with
non-phonetic pronunciations. Pop-up comments can also give additional linguistic help,
for example, by identifying grammatical features. Screen tips popping up over an image
can provide visually reinforced vocabulary from which writing tasks can be set (for
example, tasks that require learners to summarise a scene or explain an action).
Numeracy
Pop-up hints can be provided to either support less confident learners or to help
confident learners make new conceptual links. Screen tips over images allow complex
graphs or worked examples to be ‘unpacked’ without becoming text-heavy and
cluttered.
How to do it
Pop-up comments over words
Pop-up comments include a ‘heading’ which is taken from the user information stored in
the set-up details. This can be changed to reflect your needs, so the heading can read
‘Hints’ or ‘Further information’ and so on.
     First, change the comment heading to suit your need. Click Tools > Options >
        User information > Name. Put in your preference.
     Click OK and return to the document.
     Select the text onto which you want to attach a comment.
     Click Insert > Comment.
     Write the comment in the bottom half of the screen.




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                  51
      Click Close (Word® 98/2000) or click the Reviewing pane button to toggle
       between on and off modes.
      Repeat as necessary.




                        Screen shots reprinted by permission from Microsoft Corporation




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                               52
Resource        Resource style         Title
number


HG 4            ‘How to’               Create and insert a sound
                guide                  file


How to do it
First, ensure that you have an external
microphone plugged into the computer.
Then click Insert > Object.




                                       With the Create New tab active, scroll down the
                                       list to Wave Sound – highlight it and ensure that
                                       the Display as icon checkbox is ticked. Click OK.




                                                                                              Start
                                                                                              recording
                                                                                              button

Record your sound: the controls to do this replicate those of a
cassette recorder.



Close the recording dialog box. To play the sound file, double click the speaker icon.


                                                          Wave Sound




A word of warning – sound files use up a lot of memory.


                        Screen shots reprinted by permission from Microsoft Corporation




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                    53
Resource        Resource style       Title
number


HO 4            Handout              Harnessing the creativity of Microsoft® Word®
                                     – activity grid

                                                 Introducing E-learning
                             Practical session 1: Harnessing the creativity of Microsoft® Word®
                        To demonstrate         In a group activity      As a self-study activity   How could you re-purpose
                        something                                                                  it?
Drag and drop




Drop-down boxes




Pop-up comments




Inserting sound
files




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                                                    54
Resource        Resource style         Title
number


HO 5            Handout                Personal action plan
                                 Introducing E-learning
                                  Personal action plan
Practical session 1: Harnessing the creativity of Microsoft® Word®
How can you use the examples on
the Resources CD-ROM?


How could you re-purpose the
examples for use in your centre?


Practical session 2: Transforming learning with digital technologies
How are you going to use the ideas from this session?




Ways in which you want to enhance the quality of your learners’ learning
What are you going to do?




                        Support for you with your action plan
What skills do you need?


What training can you get?

What resources will help you?




Who within your organisation do you need
to contact?




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                      55
Resource         Resource style         Title
number


TN 9             Trainer                Lunch break trainer
                 notes                  activities

During the lunch break trainers will need to carry out a series of tasks.

      Print a slide view of PP 4, one copy per participant for distribution.
      Combine all of DF 1 into one presentation and print it out in handout format, one
       copy per participant for distribution.
      Save the new presentation into the shared folder on the desktop.
      Put the digital images and video clips taken earlier in the day into EG 17.
      Put the digital images and video clips taken earlier in the day into the shared
       folder on the desktop.
      Check the video link to the BBC website for the presentation at EG 25.
      Load and minimise EG 14.
      Open and minimise the music player and prepare a music clip.
      Check lighting – it may be necessary to draw the curtains and dim the lights.




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                  56
Resource         Resource style         Title
number


TN 10            Trainer                Practical session 2:
                 notes                  Transforming learning
                                        with digital technologies
When participants are seated, ask them to relax as the trainers introduce the next
practical workshop. One trainer dims the lights, while the other trainer starts the music
and launches EG 14 – the presenting digital imaging presentation.

Turn up the lights once the presentation is over and ask participants what they thought
of it. Draw out issues such as:
      the power of images to communicate
      how sound, combined with images, can affect mood and interpretation
      the changing nature of literacy in the modern world – the need to understand
        multimedia messages.
(10 minutes)
PP 15
Explain that the next practical session will give an introduction to ways in which learning
can be transformed by the use of digital technologies.
PP 16
   a Follow the first hyperlink to EG 15. This file contains information about the
     National Trust is an example of dense text that does not immediately appeal to
     the reader (especially not a developing reader).

   b Either:
            click on Insert > Picture > From File and insert EG 16, the stately
             home.jpg; or
            use Google to do an image search on a string such as ‘stately home’ and
             insert an appropriate image into the document.

At this stage it is essential to remind participants about issues of copyright.

   c   Show how the image can be re-sized and briefly demonstrate the facilities of the
       Picture Toolbar, in particular: text wrap and the crop tool.

   d Follow the next hyperlink to EG 17. This will now contain digital stills and video
     clips of participants taken earlier in the day. Invite participants to suggest
     captions to go in the text boxes beneath the images.

   e Point out that digital stills and video can be inserted into PowerPoint®
     presentations relatively easily and quickly. Invite participants to start to think of
     how such techniques could be useful in their teaching and learning situations.

sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                        57
   f   Follow the final hyperlink to EG 26.

       The trainer can invite discussion around issues such as:
             text, image and video sources available on the World Wide Web
             the advantages of Microsoft® PowerPoint® as a tool for presenting
              research – learners need to identify the main points from images and text
              to fit into the slide format, rather than simply cutting and pasting into a
              word-processed document
             the importance of acknowledging web-based sources (see slide 11).
(15 minutes)
Activity
As in the previous practical session ask participants to work in groups of two or three at
a laptop. This time they should focus on files EG 14–EG 26 in the Examples folder on
their training programme CD-ROMs. The relevant ‘How to’ guides in the delegate pack
are HG 5–HG 8 (again, these are available in electronic format in the ‘How to’ guides
folder on the programme CD-ROM). In addition, participants should be directed to the
digital stills and images that have been downloaded to the shared folder on the desktop.
They also have access to the internet and can download additional resources.

During this hands-on session participants will have the opportunity to:
    explore the examples
    follow the ‘How to’ guides to re-create an example
    follow the ‘How to’ guides to create their own example.

The choice of activity may depend on individual skills and confidence. It is suggested
that the trainers:
    go through some of the techniques step by step – either by using the data
       projector for the whole group or at a laptop for a small group, as appropriate
    provide suggestions for application of the techniques to a variety of Skills for Life
       contexts
    provide technical advice.

As the session draws to a close, ask participants to save any examples they have
created into the shared folder on the desktop.
(40 minutes)

Inform participants that there will be a 10-minute refreshment break.




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                   58
Resource             Resource style               Title
number


PP 15–               PowerPoint® Practical session 2:
16                   slides      Transforming learning
                                 with digital technologies




              Practical session 2

        Transforming learning with digital
                 technologies


                                                  15




   Using digital images – some ideas
  • Insert a digital image into a Microsoft® Word®
    document
       • resize the image
       • use ‘wordwrap’ to fit with text
  • Insert still and video images into a PowerPoint®
    presentation
       • using footage digital camera and video
       • using internet-based resources                16




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                        59
Resource        Resource style        Title
number


HG 5            ‘How to’              Insert digital images into
                guide                 Microsoft® Word®

Open Microsoft® Word® and import the image (your portrait). Add text and arrange it
and the picture in an aesthetically pleasing way by following these steps.




On the Menu Bar click on Insert, then Picture, then From File.




Find and open My Pictures.

Select the file bearing your name and open it.

sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                 60
Select your portrait by double clicking to insert it into the Microsoft® Word® file or
select the image then click Insert.




Your picture will appear in the Microsoft® Word® document as above. You can now
print this image or, if there is time, add some text and then print.


                        Screen shots reprinted by permission from Microsoft Corporation
sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                    61
Resource         Resource style          Title
number


HG 6             ‘How to’                Drag and drop with images
                 guide


Software – Microsoft® Word®
Functionality – Drag and drop with images
Why do it?
Pedagogical advantages
Incorporating images into a document allows for many interactivities – text box labels
can be dragged to appropriate locations on the image; different images can be moved
around to recreate storyboard sequences; multiple images can be matched with
different text box descriptions. These different opportunities suit active learning styles,
which can involve debate, discussion, use of digital cameras and so on. By providing a
range of draggable text box answers, learners can compare and evaluate the best
labels or comments before matching them to the images. By adding some blank text
boxes a whole range of activities from easy ‘mix and match observation’ to harder
‘open-ended explanation’ can be catered for – often in a single resource. This is
excellent for differentiation, allowing different learners to work at their appropriate level.
Literacy and/or ESOL
Using digital images taken by the learners themselves, get the learners to create text
boxes describing different aspects of the image. Once a range of sentences have been
offered, the formatting tools can be used to highlight appropriate parts of speech – for
example verbs in red, nouns in blue.
Numeracy
Create ‘Living graph’ exercises, where an image of a graph has a series of text boxes
that describe different aspects of the graph – either technical terms (for example x axis,
y axis, modal values…) or interpretative details (for example climate graph – ‘good time
for beach holiday’, ‘drought problems for farmers’).
How to do it
Inserting images is straightforward but the process may
vary depending on how the defaults are set up on your
system. Check in ‘Points to note’ (below) if you experience
problems.
     1. To insert an image, ensure that it is available on
           your system. If you are using digital camera
           images, refer to the manual for instructions on
           transferring the images to the computer.




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                        62
     2.   Click Insert > Picture > From file and browse to the appropriate folder. Once
          an image has been inserted on a page, there are several properties you can
          choose to adjust it, some from the Format picture menu and some from the
          Picture toolbar. To access these menus, right click the cursor over the image.
Modifying image properties
    1. The Format picture menu has many options. One of the most useful tabs is
         the Layout tab. Select the option ‘Behind text’ if you want to drag text box
         labels on top of the image. Another useful tab in the Format picture dialog box
         is the Picture tab, which allows you to change the brightness, contrast and so
         on in the image. Use the Colours and lines tab if you want to place a border
         round an image. Once all the required settings have been chosen, click the
         OK button.

     2.   The Picture toolbar should automatically appear when you select an image by
          left clicking on it. If it doesn’t automatically appear you can call it up by right
          clicking on the image and selecting ‘Show picture toolbar’. The most useful
          tool on the Picture toolbar is the Crop tool, which enables you to trim the
          image. Click on the Crop
          tool and note the cursor
          change to an interlocking
          scissor shape. Click and
          drag on one of the
          highlighted border ‘handles’
          (thick black lines) to trim the
          image.
Tips for inclusiveness
Drag and drop works well with learners who have strong visual and kinaesthetic learning
styles. Although visually impaired learners can increase the page magnification (View >
Zoom) large magnification causes problems when trying to move text boxes round the
images. Similarly, motor impaired students can find the mouse control required to select
the text box difficult (the narrow border of the text box has to be clicked and dragged).
Visually impaired students may be better with photocopied enlargements cut out for use
on a desk. Motor impaired students can use the arrow keys to move a selected text box.
If these resources are used as group or class activities, accessibility may be less of an
issue, for example the motor impaired student can contribute to the discussion without
having to move the mouse. Similarly, visually impaired learners could enlarge images
and contribute to a group’s discussion.
Points to note
   Raw images from digital cameras can be very large file sizes – up to several
    megabytes. By the time these are placed in a Microsoft® Word® document the final
    file size can be astronomical. Use the software that comes with the camera or free
    Windows® software like Microsoft® Photo Editor® to reduce the size of the image.
    Also make sure that any photographs are saved in JPEG (also known as JPG)
    format. This allows efficient compression (done to about 60%) with relatively little
    loss of definition.


sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                      63
   If an image won’t drag, then its wrapping is still set to ‘Inline text’. Use the Format
    picture controls (see above) to change the layout to ‘Behind text’.
   If moving one image causes other images to jump around then the wrapping is set to
    ‘Square’. Use the Format picture controls (see above) to change the layout to
    ‘Behind text’.


                        Screen shots reprinted by permission from Microsoft Corporation




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                   64
Resource         Resource style        Title
number


HG 7             ‘How to’              Microsoft® PowerPoint®
                 guide                 text entry boxes

Software – Microsoft® PowerPoint®
Functionality – Text entry boxes
Why do it?
Pedagogical advantages
A presentation-based activity becomes less passive and more interactive by creating
areas within the presentation that require learners to respond to the stimuli on screen.
Furthermore, tutors can encourage discussion and reinforce learning by getting learners
to work in groups on the content of the text area. This also works well for a class
discussion, where the tutor or a learner summarises ideas from the class. When the
final PowerPoint® slide is saved and printed, it will contain a mixture of tutor input (the
main content of the slides and their images) and learner response. This can be used as
portfolio evidence where relevant.
Literacy and/or ESOL
There are many opportunities for presenting information and getting student responses.
Consider presenting text as a newspaper advertisement, a poster or a page of a
magazine.
Numeracy
By incorporating text entry areas within a slide it is possible to demonstrate a
mathematical idea (for example, areas of shapes or gradients of lines) and
then get the learners to reinforce their understanding by typing an answer to
selected examples. When learners print out the finished presentation they will
have the explanations alongside their attempted answers.
How to do it
The technique of incorporating text entry boxes appears daunting at first because it
involves a dialog box with dozens of obscure options. Once you realise that only two of
these options need any attention, you appreciate just how easy the process really is.




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                    65
   Call up the Control toolbox toolbar
    (View > Toolbars > Control toolbox).
   Select the Text box option.
   Click and drag to draw a rectangle the
    appropriate size for your needs.
   Right click over the box you have just
    drawn and select Properties.
   You need only be concerned with two
    of the options in the large list
    presented in the pop-up dialog box.
    First, click in the cell to the right of the
    heading ‘MultiLine’ and from the drop-
    down list presented, select True.
   Do the same for the WordWrap option.
   Close the Properties dialog box.

To see the text box and to practise filling
it, switch to Slideshow mode and click the
cursor in the text box, entering some sample information. Remember to delete this
before you save the presentation and use it with students!
Tips for inclusiveness
The size and font of the text within the text box can be adjusted. Visually impaired
learners may benefit from being shown how to do so. In Slide edit mode, right click over
the text box and from the Properties dialog box, select Font. Here you can adjust the
text style and size.

As with all Microsoft® PowerPoint® uses be aware that it is not possible to zoom in
while in Slideshow mode, other than with commercial magnification software.

If you have used relatively small text boxes and motor impaired users find it difficult to
access the text box with the mouse, you may need to use mouse emulator software to
allow the mouse to be controlled with keypad strokes.
Points to note
It is easier to edit text box entries while in Slideshow mode rather than any other mode.
You can also explore the other options in the Properties dialog box (right click over the
text entry box) if you want to change the box colour and so on.


                          Screen shots reprinted by permission from Microsoft Corporation




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                    66
Resource         Resource style         Title
number


HG 8             ‘How to’               Adding video to
                 guide                  Microsoft® PowerPoint®
                                        presentations

You can add clips of video from other sources such as CDs or the internet. To import a
digital clip into PowerPoint, it must be a .AVI file or WMV.
Capturing movies for PowerPoint
You can use Clipart Gallery or individual files to insert motion video files into your slides.
Motion video can be used in PowerPoint only after you have captured the clip and
stored it on your hard drive.

To capture a movie file from a camera or tape deck you need an interface card and
some cables. You must launch the capture software application that works with some
specific hardware, give a filename and spool a segment of video to disk.

If you are capturing short clips you may not need to do any editing.

After you have captured and saved your clip to disk you can insert it into your clipart
gallery.

Note: To import a digital clip into PowerPoint, you need to save the clip as an AVI file.
You can also add video clips from other sources such as CDs or the internet. Once you
have your chosen motion video digitised and stored on your hard drive, the process of
adding a movie clip to a PowerPoint slide should be as familiar and easy as adding an
image or sound file.

AVI files are not automatically embedded in the PowerPoint presentation.
AVI files are large in size, so should be kept to a minimum. If the PowerPoint
presentation is transferred to a different machine, the AVI file must be copied on the
drive of that file. For best results always store the AVI file in the same folder as the
PowerPoint presentation.




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                      67
Inserting movies and sounds
Choose Insert > Movies and Sounds > Movie from file, PowerPoint inserts the movie
clips into a slide as it would a photograph or graphic image. The image is large enough
for you to use the opening frame of the movie clearly. You can also ‘right click’ on the
image to play the movie.

1. Click the Insert menu, point to Movies and Sounds, and then click Movie from File.
The Insert Movie dialog box will appear.




2. In the Look in box, locate the drive and folder where you have saved the video clip.

Select the video clip file from the file list, then click OK. A video screen icon is added to
the slide. You can resize the icon or move it to other areas of the slide.

3. Click the Insert button. The video clip icon, a blacked-out video screen, will appear on
your slide.

Playing video clips
PowerPoint allows the video to play automatically or can be started with a mouse click
during the presentation.




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                       68
Click on the screen to see videos play. The slide show will advance automatically when
the video has finished. Clicking next slide will terminate the video and advance to the
next video clip.

Note: Full motion video plays at approximately 30 video frames per second. The AVI
desktop video format plays at 15 frames per second. Your video may not be compatible
without using a capture program such as Adobe Premier to export it as an AVI file.

In PowerPoint 2000, you are given the option of playing automatically when you select
and save the file.

The following steps show you how to add an animation effect and an animation order to
the video screen icon.

Note: Although it's not necessary to give the icon an animation effect to make it play
automatically, the Slide Show looks better when the video screen makes an entrance.

To set up the video clip so that it plays automatically, follow these steps:

1. In Slide View, click the video screen icon to select it.

2. Click the Slide Show menu, then click Custom Animation.

3. Select the video clip in the Animation order list.

4. Click the Multimedia Settings tab, and then click the check box beside Play using
animation order.




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                    69
5. Click the Effects tab.

6. In the Effects drop-down list, choose an effect. For example, Crawl from Top.

7. Click OK to close the Custom Animation dialog box.

The video clip will start once the animation stops.

                                       Acknowledgement: University of Warwick e-lab
www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/its/elab/consultancy/media/powerpoint/multimedia/video2/

                            Screen shots reprinted by permission from Microsoft Corporation




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                   70
Resource         Resource style         Title
number


TN 11            Trainer                Practical session 2:
                 notes                  Conclusion

Present the examples that have been created during the previous session to the whole
group.

Invite the participants who have created the examples to comment on how and why they
might use them. Ask all participants to discuss how the examples might be used with
learners and how they might enhance teaching and learning. As they do this ask
participants to complete HO 6.
(10 minutes)
PP 17
Show this slide to reinforce suggestions made or to pick up additional ways of using
digital technologies in Skills for Life contexts – particularly the ways in which e-learning
can support discussion, decision-making and collaborative activities.

Ask participants to complete the first section of HO 5.
(5 minutes)




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                      71
Resource         Resource style             Title
number


PP 17            PowerPoint® Creating participative
                 slide       learning activities with
                             digital technologies




   Creating participative learning activities
          with digital technologies
   • Project work, individual or collaborative
   • Field trips, resource gathering, exploring your
     environment or community
   • Video analysis of practical skills, discussion or
     role play
   • Collecting photographic or video evidence of
     learning for a portfolio or assessment              17




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                         72
Resource           Resource style        Title
number


HO 6               Handout               Transforming learning with digital technologies
                                         – activity grid
                                                   Introducing E-learning
                               Practical session 2: Transforming learning with digital technologies

How could I use these ideas with my learners?
Insert digital stills
photographs into
Microsoft® Word®
documents
Drag and drop with
stills


Insert digital stills
photographs into
Microsoft®
PowerPoint®
presentations
Use text entry
boxes in
Microsoft®
PowerPoint®
presentations
Insert digital video
clips into
Microsoft®
PowerPoint®
presentations
sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                                 73
Resource         Resource style          Title
number


TN 12            Trainer                 Introducing WebQuests
                 notes

PP 18
Show PP 18 and introduce the purpose of WebQuests and their structure. Then follow
the hyperlinks on the slide to show the two examples.

WebQuests provide a focused method of using the internet effectively in lessons and
give the tutor a framework for exploring and developing subject topics.

For learners, WebQuests offer opportunities to work individually or collaboratively to
build their knowledge of a topic and present their findings creatively. WebQuests are a
very rich, interactive and empowering activity, enabling learners to think about and then
take control of their own learning experience.
Components of a WebQuest
Creating a WebQuest is a structured process. A WebQuest should contain six elements
under the following headings.
1. The introduction
This creates a context for the task and should be a short paragraph that introduces the
WebQuest activity. This is where you can be quite creative – have fun!
2. The task
Here, the task that the learners are asked to do is described more fully. This section
describes clearly what the end result of the learners’ activities will be. It also defines
how the learners should record and present their finished information.
3. The process
The process section should outline how the learners will accomplish the task. It is
essential to make sure that it includes clear guidance on how learners should organise
their information.
4. Resources
The resources section should contain a list of websites, web pages or other sources of
information which will help the learners to accomplish the task.

Learners will use these online resources as they go through the process outlined above.
All resources should be pre-selected by the teacher, so that learners can focus their
attention on the topic rather than surfing aimlessly.

Of course, there is nothing wrong with encouraging learners to search for their own
information, but they need support and guidance on what to search for.


sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                        74
5. The evaluation
Obviously learners need to know how their work will be assessed and whether there will
be individual or group assessment. The evaluation section should describe the
evaluation criteria needed to determine how well the learner (or group of learners) has
done.
6. The conclusion
This section brings the WebQuest to a close and should encourage learners to reflect
on what they have achieved. It should summarise what the learners will have
accomplished or learned by completing this activity. It might include some thought-
provoking, open questions to encourage them to extend their thinking.
(10 minutes)
Activity
Direct participants to the electronic version of HO 7 in the Handouts folder on the
programme CD-ROM and the paper-based version in their pack.

Ask participants to either:
    follow some of the links in the electronic version of the handout to find out more
      about WebQuests and see some examples; or
    use a search engine to look for examples of WebQuests on an area of interest.
(15 minutes)




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                     75
Resource             Resource style               Title
number


PP 18                PowerPoint® Introducing WebQuests
                     slide




             Introducing WebQuests
   • A learning activity where most or all of the information
     used by the learner is obtained from the internet
   • Provides a focused method of using the internet
     effectively in teaching and learning
   • Provides both the teacher and learner with a framework
     for exploring and developing subject topics
   • Offers learners opportunities to work individually or
     collaboratively to build their own knowledge of a topic
     and present their findings creatively

   Visiting London                    The Salem Witch Trials
                                                                18




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                76
Resource         Resource style         Title
number


HO 7             Handout                About WebQuests


In the mid-1990s, Bernie Dodge and colleagues from San Diego State University
created the concept of a learning activity whereby most or all of the information used by
the learner was obtained from the internet. They named this activity a WebQuest.

The use of WebQuests provides a focused method of using the internet effectively in
lessons and arms the tutor with a framework for exploring and developing subject
topics.

Creating a WebQuest is a structured process. However, the basic principle is that it
should contain six stages under the following headings:
1.    The Introduction provides the setting or scenario.
2.    The Task tells the learner what you want them to do.
3.    The Process suggests to the learner how they could go about completing the task.
4.    The Resources are a set of website links or other resources (on or offline) that the
      learner will use to find the appropriate information they need. Excellent
      opportunities for a blended learning approach.
5.    The Evaluation informs the learner as to how they have done, or how you will
      judge their success. This could also include soft outcomes.
6.    The Conclusion rounds up the activity – almost a ‘further reading’ section.


                                        Source: www.aclearn.net/display.cfm?page=1008


Examples of WebQuests
There are a growing number of WebQuests published on the internet which you can use
freely with your learners. However, you will need to carefully evaluate the WebQuests’
suitability for your learners first, because many will not be appropriate for all Skills for
Life learners.

Here is a selection of well-drafted WebQuests to give you an idea of the kind of
resources that exist for you to use.

    One very straightforward WebQuest that offers a good introduction to the technique
     for novices is Bas Trimbos’s guide to visiting London:
     www.bastrimbos.f2s.com/WebQuests/WebQuestLondon/



sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                    77
   For an example of a stunning visual presentation and excellent literacy content see
    The Salem Witch Trials WebQuest: www.geocities.com/salemwitches_ca/

   Have a look at the WebQuests on www.webquest.org

   Another great range of WebQuests from Canada can be seen at
    http://sesd.sk.ca/teacherresource/webquest/webquest.htm The site also has an
    excellent on-screen tutorial about writing WebQuests.

   To find some more, try a straightforward search on ‘webquest’ plus a topic or subject
    area on any search engine. See what you can find both in the UK and elsewhere.
More about WebQuests

   In the UK the www.aclearn.net (the Community Learning Resource) website has an
    excellent section on WebQuests and detailed instructions on how to create them.
    For the full text and examples showing each stage of creating a WebQuest see
    http://aclresources.net/Webquests/
   Another good place to start is the Becta/Ferl website which has a few links to useful
    resources on WebQuests at http://ferl.becta.org.uk/display.cfm?resID=6110
   WebQuest UK has been created by a consortium including Worcestershire LEA to
    promote the use of WebQuests and provide a central resource. Although quite
    schools oriented, it offers very useful information on creating WebQuests for all
    educational purposes: www.webquestuk.org.uk/index.htm
   San Diego State University is where it all began and you can view its very
    comprehensive website on WebQuests at http://webquest.sdsu.edu/ This site offers
    detailed information and is updated regularly by some of the USA’s most
    experienced WebQuest writers.




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                   78
Resource        Resource style         Title
number


TN 13           Trainer                What next?
                notes

PP 19
Ask participants to start to focus on what they might do as a consequence of the day’s
training.

At an individual level, the practical activities might have highlighted a need for further
skills development to boost confidence when introducing e-learning. Opportunities for
skills development might be provided in-house, through partner organisations or through
organisations such as learndirect.

A team approach to introducing e-learning is always powerful: it will be advantageous
for participants to cascade the ideas and materials from today to colleagues and
managers. Remind participants that there are electronic versions of all the materials
from the day’s training on their programme CD-ROM. This CD-ROM also contains
additional background information and a list of URLs (HO 8) from which they can gain
further information and examples of practice.

There is a requirement for every organisation funded by the Learning and Skills Council
to have an e-learning strategy. Are participants familiar with their organisation’s e-
learning strategy? Do they have an input into the strategy? Who do they need to talk to
within their organisation to support the development of e-learning within Skills for Life
provision? Remind participants about Harnessing Technology (HO 3).

E-learning is now explicit in all Adult Learning Inspectorate and Ofsted inspections. It
will be important, when you carry out self-assessment, to identify your capacity to use
e-learning to improve the quality of your provision. The Raising Standards: Contextual
Guides to Support Success in Literacy, Numeracy and ESOL Provision – CD-ROM,
which participants have been given to take away, provides essential information to
support the self-assessment process.
PP 20
Remind participants about further e-learning support that may be available in their
region through the Skills for Life Quality Initiative. (The ‘Exploring E-learning’
programme is delivered in-house to a team of practitioners by a trainer skilled in both
e-learning and Skills for Life. The team can choose from a menu of modules. The
programme is accredited at Level 3 through the National Open College Network.)
(5 minutes)




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                      79
Resource              Resource style                   Title
number


PP 19–                PowerPoint® What next?
20                    slides




                        What next?
   • Seek further skills training.
   • Cascade ideas and resources from today’s
     training.
   • Link into your organisation’s e-strategy and
     resources.
   • When you carry out self-assessment, identify
     your capacity to use e-learning to improve the
     quality of your provision.
                                                                   19




                       What next?
  The Skills for Life Quality Initiative regional
   offer may include:
    •   Train the Teacher Trainers ‘Introducing E-learning’
    •   Exploring E-learning programme
    •   regional e-learning coordinator
    •   regional sharing practice networks.

                                                              20




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                   80
Resource         Resource style         Title
number


TN 14            Trainer                Action planning and
                 notes                  evaluation


PP 21
Ask participants to work either individually or in small groups to draw up a list of ways in
which they are using, or would like to use, e-learning to enhance teaching and learning,
and to start planning how to integrate these e-learning ideas into their teaching and
learning. Encourage them to ask each other and/or the trainers for their suggestions to
help implement ideas.
(10 minutes)
PP 22
Ask individuals to record their ideas on their action plan (HO 5) together with personal
areas for development.
(5 minutes)

Remind participants of the purpose of the day (PP 1).

Ask participants to complete an evaluation form before leaving and thank them for their
contributions.
(5 minutes)

Close.




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                      81
Resource                   Resource style                         Title
number


PP 21–                     PowerPoint® Action planning and
22                         slides      evaluation




                    Integrating e-learning
   •   Discuss and draw up a list of ways in which
       you are using or would like to use, e-learning
       to enhance teaching and learning.

   •   Use what you already know and what you have
       learned today to start planning how to
       integrate these e-learning ideas into your
       teaching and learning.

   •   Ask colleagues and trainers for their
       suggestions to help you implement your ideas.




       Add to HO5 ‘Personal Action Plan’ to take back to your organisation.
                                                                               21




           What will you do now to
           enhance your learners’
         experience with e-learning?


                                                                          22




sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                               82
  Resource          Resource style              Title
  number


  HO 8              Handout                  URLs

                                                Introducing E-learning: web addresses
Becta Demonstrating Transformation                                 http://ferl.becta.org.uk/display.cfm?page=721
including E-learning – E-living

Department for Education and Skills’s report, Harnessing  www.dfes.gov.uk/publications/e-strategy
Technology: Transforming Learning and Children’s Services


Institute of Education research into Skills for Life and           www.ioe.ac.uk/hgm/research/Skillsforlife/index.htm
information and communication technologies

National Research and Development Centre for Adult                 www.nrdc.org.uk/uploads/documents/doc_258.pdf
Literacy and Numeracy’s report, ICT and Adult Literacy,
Numeracy and ESOL

Raising Standards: A Contextual Guide to Support Success           www.dfes.gov.uk/readwriteplus/raisingstandards/elearning
in Literacy, Numeracy and ESOL Provision – E-learning

The Joint Information Systems Committee’s Effective                www.elearning.ac.uk/effprac
Practice with e-Learning website – a good practice guide to
designing learning, aimed at practitioners in further and higher
education institutions and adult and community learning

AClearn – Community Learning Resource                              www.aclearn.net
This is a major community learning resource with key sections on
learning content, skills development, technical guidance and
leadership and management. The content section contains web
links to a range of sites that support trainers with content

  sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                                                       83
creation, ideas and tools

AClearn WebQuest Toolkit                                               www.aclresources.net/webquests
The page contains an overview and examples of WebQuests.
You can sign up to use the WebQuest Toolkit

Community Learning Image and Audio Resource Exchange                   http://aclimages.net/images


Exploring E-learning                                                   www.elnet.org.uk
Website and resources of the Exploring E-learning project

Becta/Ferl                                                             http://ferl.becta.org.uk
Ferl is a national resource for the FE sector and, as such,
contains much material relevant to Skills for Life. The teaching
and learning section includes focus areas on adults with learning
difficulties, basic skills, resource creation and so on. Have a look
at the basic skills focus area at
http://ferl.becta.org.uk/display.cfm?page=83

Uniquely, Ferl hosts hundreds of downloadable resources across         http://ferl.becta.org.uk/display.cfm?page=628
a range of subject areas – all copyright cleared for adaptation
and use in your own context




  sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                                                84
NLN materials team                                                      www.nln.ac.uk/materials/default.asp
This national repository of free, high-quality learning material is
available for download. There are many excellent materials at
different levels across a wide spectrum of the curriculum

Connecting Communities                                                  www.ltscotland.org.uk/connectingcommunities
A major Scottish programme aimed at upskilling adult and
community learning (ACL) trainers to use e-learning effectively.
Most of the material is highly relevant to any ACL institution – lots
of useful training materials downloadable in pdf format

BBC Skillswise                                                          www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise
The BBC site with a huge range of resources for literacy,
language and numeracy



  There is a comprehensive list of Skills for Life websites in Raising Standards: A Contextual Guide to Support Success in
  Literacy, Numeracy and ESOL Provision – E-learning: www.dfes.gov.uk/readwriteplus/raisingstandards/elearning/webography




  sess5.2-ver1-jun20-HH                                                                                                 85

				
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