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					                           SNRE MASTER’S PROJECT PLANNING SEMINAR
                          RESEARCH PROPOSAL COVER SHEET
Submit proposal and unsigned coversheet in electronic form. Also submit two hard copies of the proposal and the signed coversheet.

1. Ecotourism in the Mountain Pine Ridge Forest Reserve, Belize
                                                          Title of Project

2. Elizabeth Brabec
                    Name of Project Advisor                                             Signature / Date

3. Client Information:
  Ministry of Natural Resources                                         Osmany Salas
                    Name of Client Organization                                         Name of Primary Contact

  #23/25 Unity Blvd. Belmopan City, Belize                              882-1524-2079      osalas@umich.edu
   Street Address                  City, State Zip Code                  Phone Number         Email Address




4. Final Team Members:

    Belize05@worktools.si.umich.edu
                    Group Email Name
  Dorothy Buckley
                    Name of Member 1                                                    Signature / Date

  Curtis Davidson
                    Name of Member 2                                                    Signature / Date

  Kathryn Herweyer
                Name of Member 3                                                        Signature / Date

  Kiyoko Edick Julyk
                  Name of Member 4                                                      Signature / Date

  Eric Letourneaux
                  Name of Member 5                                                      Signature / Date

  Lori Tuchman
                    Name of Member 6                                                    Signature / Date


                    Name of Member 7                                                    Signature / Date


                    Name of Member 8                                                    Signature / Date


                    Name of Member 9                                                    Signature / Date


                    Name of Member 10                                                   Signature / Date


                    Name of Member 11                                                   Signature / Date

5. Project Summary:
This project team will continue research completed by previous groups and will focus research on the development
of specific ecotourism management guidelines for protected areas applied to the Mountain Pine Ridge Forest
Reserve (MPRFR). The MPRFR is a currently undeveloped, mountainous area, on the crossroads to existing tourist
areas. Much like the rest of Belize, it is an area of great natural beauty that needs to conserve biological diversity
and yet meet the economic needs of local communities and indigenous people. The site management guidelines will
promote the sustainable use of biodiversity by generating income through increased tourist routes through the area.


6. NRE 701 Instructor Approval:
                    Raymond De Young
                                                                                        Signature / Date


                                                                                                               701-888: 26 January 2004
Ecotourism in the Mountain Pine Ridge Forest Reserve, Belize
                                                     Master’s Project - 2005
                       School of Natural Resources - University of Michigan

                                                         Dorothy Buckley
                                                       Curtis L. Davidson
                                                       Kathryn Herweyer
                                                       Kiyoko Edick Julyk
                                                         Eric Letourneaux
                                                            Lori Tuchman




                         ABSTRACT
Ecotourism is of special interest to the country of Belize. Belize, a small country in Latin
America, is home to some of the most diverse topography in the world. The Belize
Government desires to increase tourism within several districts. Its fragile ecosystems
demand that a balance be struck between preserving its unique biodiversity and profiting
through increased tourism, without causing destruction of natural areas.

Ecotourism jointly promotes economic sustainability and environmental sustainability.
The use of tourism in protected areas to generate income is a development tool that can
positively impact the Belize economy. Several studies originating from the University of
Michigan have evaluated protected area co-management techniques in several areas of
Belize. According to these studies, success of protected areas - as measured by the
establishment, funding, and maintenance of protected areas - is highest where there is full
participation of all shareholders.

This project team will continue research completed by previous groups and will focus
research on the development of specific ecotourism management guidelines for protected
areas applied to the Mountain Pine Ridge Forest Reserve (MPRFR). The MPRFR is a
currently undeveloped, mountainous area, on the crossroads to existing tourist areas.
Much like the rest of Belize, it is an area of great natural beauty that needs to conserve
biological diversity and yet meet the economic needs of local communities and
indigenous people. The site management guidelines will promote the sustainable use of
biodiversity by generating income through increased tourist routes through the area.




Table of Contents




Ecotourism in the Mountain Pine Ridge Forest Reserve, Belize                                   i
Abstract                                                       i

Introduction and Problem Statement                             2

Background                                                     2

Description of Research                                        4

Methodology                                                    6

Schedule of Major Tasks                                        8

Anticipated Results and Products                               9

Institutional Resources                                        10

Budget                                                         12

Personnel                                                      13




Ecotourism in the Mountain Pine Ridge Forest Reserve, Belize        1
                 INTRODUCTION AND PROBLEM STATEMENT

Developing countries in Central America, such as Belize, are looking for ways to
increase economic development. One way of achieving economic development is
through tourism. Increased traditional tourism may generate greater revenues for Belize,
but it also creates negative externalities. While traditional tourism encourages more
visitors, it does so without considering the negative impact on the local communities and
ecosystems. This has led to the need for careful planning while developing tourist
facilities and attractions.

Ecotourism stresses building upon the local, environmental and social resources of the
region. In this context, it emphasizes the objectives as defined by Lindberg et al (1996)
which are to “generate financial support for protection and management of natural areas,
provide economic benefits for residents living near natural areas; and increase support for
conservation among residents.”

Mountain Pine Ridge Forest Reserve (MPRFR), in the Cayo District of Belize, is a prime
location for ecotourism. MPRFR is centrally located, provides easy access to Thousand
Foot Falls Natural Monument, the most frequently visited Mayan ruins, pristine forests
and diverse ecosystem habitats. Co-management among stakeholders in the MPRFR is
well developed and highly coordinated. This creates an arena that is ideal for ecotourism.
The project team will focus on an ecotourism based approach to develop guidelines and
design plans for the MPRFR, as it satisfies both conservation and development
objectives.

BACKGROUND
PROTECTED AREAS
To date Belize has 42% of its land under some form of legal protected status
(http://www.pactbelize.org/). The Forest Department within the Ministry of Natural
Resources has been primarily responsible for all protected areas within the country.
Much of the burden of conservation work in these areas has been undertaken by non-
governmental organizations such as the Belize Audubon Society (BAS) and the
Programme for Belize. In the absence of an appropriate government authority, the BAS
has been given the authority to manage government reserves established between 1981
and 1990. Forest reserves and marine nature reserves are not included. Many of the
protected areas not managed by BAS are considered paper parks, meaning they are only
preserves on paper and are not managed or patrolled (Crooked Tree Wildlife Sanctuary
Proposal, UM Masters Project 2003). Therefore, there is the threat that natural areas
within these reserves could be negatively impacted in some way.

Two previous research efforts were conducted by the University of Michigan focusing on
the development and management of protected areas. “Enhancing Collaboration For
Conservation and Development in Southern Belize”, a Master’s project completed in
2003, conducted field research in the Toledo district of Belize to evaluate co-
management techniques among groups involved in ecosystem conservation and


Ecotourism in the Mountain Pine Ridge Forest Reserve, Belize                                  2
development. Analyses revealed challenges to collaboration were due primarily to
political barriers and the lack of a unified vision, a lack of trust among stakeholders, and
resource constraints. However, when collaboration was successful, it was due to political
support, shared stakeholder concerns and potential for joint gains.

The second project, “Crooked Tree Wildlife Sanctuary, Belize: An Assessment of the Co-
Management Plan between the Belize Audubon Society and Buffer Zone Communities”
developed a comparative analysis and assessment of co-management techniques in
Belize. This project compared co-management projects at two protected sites in Belize
with other, similar sites in Belize and worldwide. The outcome was a recommendation of
improved co-management techniques to streamline management of protected areas.

In January 2004, the Belize Ministry of Natural Resources Forest Department completed
a Visitor Use Master Plan for the Mountain Pine Ridge Forest Reserve. This document is
a guide for authorities in making concrete decisions about dedicating time and resources
to meet specific goals and objectives pertaining to the sustainable management of the
MPR.

The project team will build upon the past projects and develop design guidelines for eco-
tourism development within MPRFR.

TOURISM
“Tourism is the single largest contributor to the country’s economic growth and the
largest foreign exchange earner for the country with one out of every four jobs in the
tourism industry” (Visitor Use Master Plan. DeVries, 2004). The strength of tourism in
Belize lies with the diversity of its natural and cultural attractions. Tourism has great
potential as a catalyst for economic growth. There are strong connections between the
tourism industry and many other sectors, such as transportation, food production, utilities,
energy, construction, real estate, and retail sales. It is for this reason that tourism must be
considered a national priority. “Responsible tourism will be the key guiding principle for
tourism development in the future.” (http://belizetourism.org).

MOUNTAIN PINE RIDGE FOREST RESERVE
MPRFR comprises 171 square miles (109, 406 acres) of mountainous relief in the center
of Belize’s Cayo District. Not only does the reserve serve as a corridor to the spectacular
Maya Ruins of Caracol and the Thousand Foot Falls Natural Monument but with its
many ecologically and economically valuable natural resources it is a destination in itself.
Pine forests, savannahs, and riparian hardwood corridors cover the granite massif, steep
slopes, sink holes and cave systems, which comprise Central America’s oldest rock
formation. This creates an ideal location for “Rainforest to Reef” type workshops, and
other environmental education showcases.

Between 1995 and 2002, an average of 24,118 people visited the MPRFR every year
(Visitor Use Master Plan. DeVries, 2004). The MPRFR is nestled within larger tourism
networks in Belize. The reserve offers a wide variety of tourism attractions, particularly
to visitors interested in natural or cultural history. The Cayo District allows visitors to



Ecotourism in the Mountain Pine Ridge Forest Reserve, Belize                                      3
        2
explore the Maya Mountains, to visit Maya ruins such as Caracol and Cahal Pech and to
travel beyond the southwestern border to the Maya site of Tikal in Guatemala. In the
1990’s, the country capitalized on these natural endowments and began to focus on
ecotourism rather than traditional tourism as a preferential development strategy (Linderg
et al, 1996). However, current tourist industry trends are moving away from the small-
scale ecotourism of the 1990’s and toward large-scale, cruise ship, and hotel tourism.

LOCAL COMMUNITIES
San Antonio and Georgeville, two of the largest communities that surround the MPRFR,
lie along the main access roads for the Forest Reserve. The majority of households in
these communities practice subsistence agriculture and engage in wage labor and local
commodity markets. Many residents are currently employed in heavy labor in local
construction projects, or in the service industry as tour guides and restaurant staff.
Tourism services and folk art production are rapidly increasing in importance.
Communities surrounding the MPRFR are very interested in the prospect of employment
generation throughout the area. Alternative income sources would reduce community
reliance on food sources and materials harvested around the northern boundary of the
MPRFR. Increased visitation to the Forest Reserve would attract a wider clientele for
tourism-based enterprises, support services, and food production. However, increased
pollution and traffic hazards may affect roadside communities and threaten the traditional
horse and buggy practices of local Mennonites.

DESCRIPTION OF RESEARCH
GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
The primary objective is to integrate the goals of our own research with the vision and
goals of the different stakeholders of the Mountain Pine Ridge Forest Reserve. The
Visitor Use Master Plan will be used as a foundation from which to build upon and refine
a more specific design and management program for selected areas. The master plan
already incorporates broad goals for sustainability concerns, environmental protection,
cultural sensitivity, community development, and area resource conservation. The goal
of this project is to create a design that will incorporate sustainable design techniques and
feature ecotourism in the planning and management of the selected areas. The focus of
the research will be to examine how best to implement ecotourism into design and to
generate guidelines that integrate ecosystem protection with ecotourism’s goal of
community economic development.

Some questions the project team will use for guidance:

      How is ecotourism different from tourism?
      What are the current and projected levels of tourism?
      How can potential negative impacts of tourism be minimized?
      How can ecotourism be beneficial instead of harmful to the surroundings,
       especially when accommodating the projected additional tourists?
      How can we incorporate sustainable design techniques such as recycled materials,
       water conservation, etc.?


Ecotourism in the Mountain Pine Ridge Forest Reserve, Belize                                    4
      Can historical and cultural artifacts/traditions (e.g. Mayan influence) be
       incorporated into the design plan?
      How will the contemporary cultural landscape inform the final design plan?
      Should we improve connectivity between areas within the reserve and outside?

The design plans in the MPRFR will accommodate the following themes:

      Activity Concentration at Douglas D’Silva
      Diversity of User Groups
      Wide range of Recreational Activities
               -Hiking
               -Biking
               -Horseback riding
               -Fauna observation
               -Ruin visits
      Efficient Pedestrian and Vehicular Circulation
      Preservation of Local Character and Culture
      Total Perceptual Experience
      Preservation and Enhancement of Viewsheds
      Preservation of Ecological Systems
      Minimal Build and Maintenance Expenses

RECREATIONAL USE ZONES
Based on current and proposed activities, the MPRFR is divided into 6 separate
functional zones and corridors. These areas broadly correspond to their suitability to
provide for different types of recreational activities.

       Douglas D’Silva Hub – Serves as the logistical hub for forest management, visitor
       use, and recreational activities; concentrates urban development and its impacts

       Core Recreational Zone – North, south, east, and west divisions of the core
       recreational zone contain the majority of existing and planned activities

       Brunton Trail Corridor – Forms the literal and figurative rim of the basin
       containing the majority of visitor use activities

       Wilderness Recreation Zone – Provides for more adventurous yet minimal impact
       pursuits outside of the Core Recreational Zone

       Thousand Foot Falls Zone – Contains unique scenic and natural attractions; serves
       as a link to sites outside of the Forest Reserve like the Baldy Hills and Hidden
       Valley Inn

       Macal River Corridor – Forms a conduit along the southern border of the Forest
       Reserve intertwining human impacts and ecological systems.



Ecotourism in the Mountain Pine Ridge Forest Reserve, Belize                               5
                                   METHODOLOGY

The project will be completed in 3 phases.
   Phase 1: On site resource evaluation
   Phase 2: Site survey and analysis
   Phase 3: Model process and design plans

Phase 1: On site resource evaluation
       Reconnaissance in MPRFR, Douglas D’Silva.
       Determine work facilities
                    Computer availability and internet connection. Establish email
                              connectivity for communication with Stateside team
                              members
                    Establish voice communication; telephones, two way radios.
                    Setup work space and tables
                    Digital photo storage, disposable cameras, video camera

Phase 2: Site survey and analysis
       Site survey – Douglas D’Silva, Brunton Trail Corridor, Wilderness Recreation
       Zone, Thousand Foot Falls Zone, Macal River Corridor
                   Review pedestrian and auto circulation, create site analysis maps
                   Review sensitive areas, generate flora and fauna analysis maps,
                      evaluate nearness to tourist areas and paths
                   Review soil maps, topographical maps
                   Initiate contact with stakeholders such as Ministry of Natural
                      Resources, tour operators, local restaurants owners; interview
                      regarding perceived impact of increased tourism on facilities
                   Contact client at Ministry of Forestry (Osmany Salas)

       Visitor use survey - Douglas D’Silva, Brunton Trail Corridor, Wilderness
       Recreation Zone, Thousand Foot Falls Zone, Macal River Corridor
                    Visit and photograph potential rebuild and new build sites
                    Evaluate sites for team review; prioritize sites
                    Detailed visitor counts; define highest use areas
                    Determine facility use- overnight camping, day trips
                    Evaluate areas for individual, small groups and large group visits
                    Evaluate areas for educational field trips, determine if facilities are
                      appropriate for school age children

Phase 3: Model Process and Design Plans
       The final product will have two parts the first will be a set of guidelines which
       outline a model process for further development, the second an application
       specific set of design recommendations and site plans.



Ecotourism in the Mountain Pine Ridge Forest Reserve, Belize                                   6
       Develop Model Process using ecotourism approach
                 Evaluate and further define ecotourism model as applied to
                   MPRFR
                 Develop design guidelines based on ecotourism model

Application Specific Design Recommendations
                    Site stabilization
                    No negative impact on conservation areas
                    Develop visitor support services

 ASSUMPTIONS
The project team will use the archived material on location from the genesis of the
Visitor Use Master Plan, which includes topographical maps, soil and vegetation data,
stakeholder interviews, community surveys, and aerial photos. The majority of analyses
will take place during and after multiple trips to the country. The project team assumes
that some data will be incomplete or missing (e.g. incomplete soil surveys) as the region
is under explored.

CLIENT NEEDS
The primary client is the Ministry of Natural Resources, the Environment, and Industry
who have expressed a desire to accommodate significantly new and impressive eco-
design and programming. This is a politically sensitive area with multiple stakeholders
that is undergoing a cultural shift from traditional forestry towards recreational activities.
In addition to the actual design documents, we will provide the client with general
guidelines for future development.

                                      REFERENCES
The following is a list of reference materials:

Kreg Lindberg, Jeremy Enriquez, Keith Sproule. Ecotourism Questioned. Case Studies From
Belize. Elsevier Science Ltd, 1996.

Gregory W. De Vries. Mountain Pine Ridge Forest Reserve: Visitor Use Master Plan.
Ministry of Natural Resources, the Environment, and Industry, February 2004.

D. Bruce Means. Natural History of Mountain Pine Ridge, Belize. Bull Run Overseas,
Ltd. January 1997.

Tom Sweeney, Ginny Leikam, Nicole Sielken, Tristan Raymond, Stephanie Otis.
Crooked Tree Wildlife Sanctuary. (UM Masters Project”, 2003.

Belize Tourism Board. www.belizetourism.org. www.travelbelize.org

Belize National Institute for Culture and History. www.nichbelize.org

Protected Areas Conservation Trust (PACT), www.pactbelize.org

                                                                                                 7
Ecotourism in the Mountain Pine Ridge Forest Reserve, Belize
BELIZE ECOTOURISM ASSOCIATION (BETA), www.sidsnet.org/eco-
tourism/beta.html

Las Cuevas research Station, www.nhm.ac.uk/botany/lascuevas/lascuevas3.html

Belize Botanical Gardens, www.belizebotanic.org

Green Hills Butterfly Ranch, http://biological-diversity.info/greenhills.htm

Kreg Lindberg, Donald Hawkins. Ecotourism: A Guide for Planners and Managers. The
Ecotourism Society. 1993.

Elizabeth Boo. Ecotourism: The Potentials and Pitfalls. World Wildlife Fund. 1990.

Ecumenical Coalition on Third world Tourism. Tourism and Indigenous People: A
Resource Guide. March 1995.

David Fennell. Ecotourism: An Introduction. Routledge. 1999.

Toledo Maya Cultural Council. Maya Atlas : The Struggle to Preserve Maya Land in
Southern     Belize. North Atlantic Books. 1997.

Macduff Everton. The Modern Maya: A Culture in Transition. University of New Mexico
Press. 1991.

Victoria Schlesinger. Animals and Plants of the Ancient Maya. University of Texas Press.
2001.

Peter Eltringham. The rough guide to Belize. Rough Guides, 2001.

Belize Zoo and Tropical Education Center. The ABC’s to the Vegetation of Belize: a
Handbook. 1998.

Meb Cutlack. Belize: Ecotourism in Action. Macmillan Education, Ltd, 2002.

Kreg Lindberg, Jeremy Enriquez. An Analysis of Ecotourism’s Economic Contribution to
Conservation and Development in Belize: A Report. World Wildlife Fund. 1994.

Alex Bradbury. Guide to Belize. Globe Pequot Pr. November 1996.




Ecotourism in the Mountain Pine Ridge Forest Reserve, Belize                               8
SCHEDULE OF MAJOR TASKS
March-May 2004
Background research on the following topics:
    Ecotourism
    History of Belize
    Ecosystems of Belize
    Native vegetation
    Precedents
    Case studies
Funding Applications and submittals
Proposal revisions
Travel planning
Contact various stakeholders

June-August
Travel to Belize
    Site inventories
    Site analyses
    Documentation of sites
    Creation of base maps
    Meetings with stakeholders
Research continuation

September-December
Draft preliminary design concept
Gather feedback and critiques from advisor, other faculty members and client

January-March 2005
Finalize design and documentation
Printed bound version

April
Final presentation to school and client

                    ANTICIPATED RESULTS AND PRODUCTS

The government of Belize wants to enhance its country’s tourism potential without
compromising the environment. The eco-tourism approach seems a priori to be the
perfect solution to answer their needs. Yet, current literature on eco-tourism precedents
indicates mixed results. Extensive bibliography reviews, discussions with stakeholders
and Belize Mountain Pine Ridge Forest Reserve surveys will allow first to evaluate all
issues and unwelcome outcomes that have arisen, and second, to find adapted solutions to
that specific location.




Ecotourism in the Mountain Pine Ridge Forest Reserve, Belize                                9
Eco-tourism is still evolving, requiring standard criteria as well as refinement to the
definition that can be adapted for individual sites. The project will determine appropriate
management and design plans that will contribute to the ecological, social and economic
development of the local areas and communities. Understanding the local needs and
tourists’ behaviors will play a major role in our decision-making ability.

The MPRFR study will provide a model for eco-tourism development and study methods.
The final product will contain a set of site management plans and designs for the town of
Douglas D’Silva, including several recreational areas in the Cayo district. The purpose is
to offer various facilities that will bring comfort and safety to short and long term
visitors, including students and researchers. Thus, economic and environmental
sustainability will be attained, maximizing educational opportunities and increasing
tourist frequency. In the end, the forest reserve benefits, balancing the needs of the
unique and fragile ecosystems in the Cayo district of Belize, against the economic needs
of the local communities.

INSTITUTIONAL RESOURCES

The purpose of this project is to build upon the vision put forth in the Visitor Use Master Plan and inform
ourselves on aspects of tropical ecosystems, ecotourism, and local cultural history in order to create unique
and useful designs that will integrate the diverse goals and interests of the many stakeholders in this forest
reserve. The process of design entails not just seeking out information, but embracing new ideas.
Therefore, the project team will rely on a variety of resources including people, websites, organizations,
literature, and our own experience.

STAKEHOLDERS
Government Institutions: The primary institutional resource for logistical help, information on project
continuity, and funding is Osmany Salas, a Policy Advisor in the Belize Ministry of Natural
Resources, Environment, Commerce and Industry. Osmany, who is working with the Forest
Department in Belmopan, has been the driving force behind the Visitor Use Master Plan project recently
compiled by Gregory DeVries.

Of the many stakeholders in this group, the Belize Tourism Board will most likely be a
primary resource and liaison. It has expressed interest in tourism-related activities within
the forest reserve and engendering a supportive role as a community liaison in the Cayo
District. Other organizations that have a vested interest in the region’s development and
that may be additional resources:
        Ministry of Tourism
        Ministry of National Defense
        Protected Areas Conservation Trust (PACT)
        Institute of Archaeology
        Project-based users (Chalillo Hydroelectric Dam, Pine Ridge Reforestation,
        Caracol Tourism Development)
        Area tour guides (Cayo Tour Guide Association)
        Area tour operators
        Local communities




Ecotourism in the Mountain Pine Ridge Forest Reserve, Belize                                                     10
                                                        Industry Association (BTIA) Cayo
Tourism NGOs and research institutions: The Belize Tourism
and the Belize Ecotourism Association are important stakeholders and regularly use the
forest reserve in their programs. They promote the development of sustainable, eco-
cultural tourism in Belize. Various research institutions are also important users of this
reserve because of its biological importance: Belize Botanical Gardens, Green Hills
Butterfly Ranch, Las Cuevas research Station. They also maintain websites with valuable
information.




                                                                                         11
Ecotourism in the Mountain Pine Ridge Forest Reserve, Belize
BUDGET

Preliminary Budget (3/8/03)
email: belize05@worktools.si.umich.edu
Budget Item                    Units                                   Per Unit Cost                       Units Requested Total Unit Cost
          1
Airfare                                       roundtrip tickets        $625.00 - $805.00                                    10            $8,050.00
                    2
Vehicle Rental                                per week                 $450.00 - $480.00                                      5           $2,400.00
                        3
Vehicle Insurance                             per day                                         $14.00                        35                $490.00
      4
Fuel                                          per week                                      $100.00                           5             $500.00
        5
Lodging                                       per day                                        $20.00                         210           $4,200.00
Meals                                         per day                                        $20.00                         210           $4,200.00
                6
Art Supplies                                  flat cost                                     $220.00                           1               $220.00
                               7
Document production                           flat cost                                   $1,394.40                           1           $1,394.40
Film and film development                     flat cost                                     $200.00                           1               $200.00
Medical / Accident Insurance                  per person                                      $90.00                          6             $540.00
Indirect Costs                                                                                 $0.00                                          $0.00
Total Project Cost                                                                                                                       $22,194.00


Projected Revenue
                                               Amount            X Team          Total             Total                          App.
Funding Sources                                Requested         Members         Requested         Received       Status          Deadline
Individual UM Grants:
SNRE Masters Project Funds                             $115.00               6           $690.00                  Pending
SNRE Alumni Incentive Internship                     $1,000.00               6      $6,000.00                     Pending           3/2004
Rackham Discretionary Funds                          $1,500.00               2      $3,000.00         $1,500.00 Secured
Int'l Institute Travel Award                         $1,605.00               6      $9,630.00                     Pending          3/8/2004
External Funding Proposals:
EFA Funding                                          $5,000.00                      $5,000.00                     Pending         3/22/2004
David and Lucile Packard Foundation                                                                               Pending
Speckhard - Knight Charitable Foundation                                                                          Pending
                         7
Belize Ministry of NRE                               $4,200.00                      $4,200.00         $4,200.00 Secured
Total:                                                                             $24,320.00         $5,700.00
1
 Airfare cost is an approximation based on March 2nd, 2004 American Airline rates for the projected travel times in May and June of 2004.
    The 10 units requested represent one trip for each of the 6 students and advisor as well as three additional units for follow up trips to
   conduct further research and/or present work to the Belize Ministry of Natural Resources and other interested parties.
2
 Vehicle Rental cost is an approximation based on a March 2nd, 2004 quote from Budget Rent A Car for a 4 passenger manual 4WD
vehicle.
3
 Insurance costs based on quote from Budget Rent A Car for above said vehicle.
4
 Fuel prices based on current gas prices and estimated mileage. We recognize that prices will be subject to change.
5
 The Belize Ministry of Natural Resources has graciously provided lodging
6
 Art supplies needed to complete product include: 36" vellum, trace, markers, drafting pens, sketchbooks
7
 Document production cost is based on the resources needed to produce several 2' X 3' plotted presentation boards, as well as 12 copies
    of an estimated 100-page supplemental document. Plotting estimates are based on a quote of $6.50/ linear foot. Additional
    Documentation cost projection is based on a quote from Kinko’s of $1.05/page for each single sided color copy, $.08/page for each black
    and white copy, and a binding fee of $25.00 plus an additional $4.95 per document.




Ecotourism in the Mountain Pine Ridge Forest Reserve, Belize                                                                       12
PERSONNEL
Dorothy Buckley, Ann Arbor, MI buckleyd@umich.edu

EDUCATION: Master of Landscape Architecture, University of Michigan. 2005
Bachelor of Science : University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA
Major: Urban Studies and Design

WORK EXPERIENCE: Landscape Architect Intern, Henry Ford Estate, UM-Dearborn,
Assist the estate’s landscape architect with restoration activities and interpretation or
original Jens Jensen landscape plans.
U.S. Navy Cryptologic Officer stationed in Japan, Hawaii and California.

Curtis L. Davidson, Canton, Michigan cdavidso@umich.edu

EDUCATION: Master of Landscape Architecture, University of Michigan. 2005
Bachelor of Science with distinction: The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
Major: Environmental Policy and Behavior, School of Natural Resources and
Environment

WORK EXPERIENCE: Design landscapes for residential and commercial entities in
Plymouth, Canton, Northville, Livonia and other Michigan locations

Kathryn Herweyer, Ann Arbor, Michigan kherweye@umich.edu

EDUCATION: Master of Landscape Architecture, University of Michigan. 2005
Bachelor of Arts: Hope College, Holland, Michigan
Major: Kinesiology

WORK EXPERIENCE: Nichols Arboretum, University of Michigan Planting. Caring for
different collections, removal of invasive species, and maintenance of trails.

Kiyoko Edick Julyk, Dexter, Michigan kjulyk@umich.edu

EDUCATION: Master of Landscape Architecture, University of Michigan. 2005
Bachelor of Arts, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, Michigan
Major: Political Science, Minor: Physical Geography

WORK EXPERIENCE: Software Analyst at Integrated Design Software, Ann Arbor,
Michigan

Eric Letourneaux, Ann Arbor, Michigan eletourn@umich.edu

EDUCATION: Master of Landscape Architecture, University of Michigan. 2005
PhD.Candidate in French Literature and Civilization, The University of Michigan
Master’s Degree in French Literature and Civilization, Miami University of Ohio


Ecotourism in the Mountain Pine Ridge Forest Reserve, Belize                                13
Master’s Degree in British Literature and Anglophone Civilizations, The University of
Burgundy, Dijon, France
Bachelor’s Degree in Anglophone Literature and Civilizations, The University of
Burgundy, Dijon, France

WORK EXPERIENCE: French language instructor for The University of Michigan, Ann
Arbor, MI and Miami University of Ohio
English as a Foreign Language instructor, translator, interpreter and reserve officer for
the French Air Force and NATO
Residential designer and gardener

Lori Tuchman, Ann Arbor, Michigan ltuchman@umich.edu

EDUCATION: Master of Landscape Architecture, University of Michigan. 2005
Bachelors of Science, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Michigan State
University
Major: Resource Development with a concentration in Natural Resource Management

WORK EXPERIENCE:
Hubbell, Roth & Clark, Inc., Bloomfield Hills, Michigan
Reviewed site plans submitted by developers for urban building; determined compliance
of proposed plans with local municipality engineering standards, designed roadways and
upgraded underground utility layout.




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Ecotourism in the Mountain Pine Ridge Forest Reserve, Belize

				
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posted:4/5/2012
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