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How To Pick An Air Compressor

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Check out this handy guide on how to pick an air compressor.

More Info
									                                    Folks frequently get
                                    bewildered regarding
                                    selecting the most
                                    appropriate air compressor
                                    to operate their equipment.
                                    Quite simply, there are
                                    several factors that you
                                    need to look at when
                                    choosing an air compressor
                                    for your garage or store.

                                  It might also be a good idea
to check out some air compressor reviews.


Let’s have a look at the factors to keep in mind:



1. Horse power rating

Many people are of the view that the greater the hp, the better
is the air compressor. However, all horse power ratings aren't
equal and may even be misrepresented. For instance, when
you go to a hardware store to buy a 6 horse power air
compressor, you find one that's priced really cheap. So, exactly
why is 6 horse power industrial unit so expensive? Well, 6 hp is
6 horse power, right? Not necessarily, because when selecting
an air compressor, you need to see the power that the air
compressor draws. If if requires 15 amps from a 110 volts
circuit, then you are really getting around 2 horse power. So,
the 6 hp rating on the compressor is inflated.

In order to generate 6 horse power, you would require no less
than 24 amps from a 220 volts circuit. For that reason, if you
are interested in a 6 hp electric compressor, you should get a
commercial compressor, rather than getting a cheaper unit from
a hardware store.



2. How much PSI will you need?

For all newbies, PSI means “pounds per square inch” and a lot
of the compressors in the United States are rated this way. In
the European Union, they're measured in bar. When choosing
an air compressor, you might want to settle for 90 PSI for
correct operation. Even so, still you would have to have a air
                                compressor that has greater
                                shut-off pressure. Air
                                compressors in hardware stores
                                are “single-stage” and have a
                                shut off around 126-135 PSI.
                                Almost all light duty air
                                compressors shut off at about
                                100 PSI and so are fine for light
                                duty garage use. However, if you
                                are planning to use power tools,
                                then more is certainly better. A
                                lot of the commercial air
compressors are “two-stage”, that is they build up the shut-off
pressure in two separate stages. The first stage builds up at
around 90 PSI and the second state builds it to 175 PSI.



3. CFM

CFM (Cubic Feet per Minute), is a measurement of volume,
which is the quantity of air that's being moved. Air tools need
certain volume of air to operate effectively. Although every
manufacturer tries to impress that his item gives higher CRM
ratings at various pressures, your true concern when selecting
an air compressor ought to be on how much you'd get at 90
PSI because this is what the majority of the air tools require for
effective operation.



4. Tank size

The tank size of air compressor is expressed in US gallons.
Lots of people get confused about the right tank size when
choosing an air compressor. Firstly, you shouldn't confuse a
large tank with more run time for your air tools. If tools are used
intermittently, then a large tank is useful. However, should you
need to use your tools constantly, you'd do better with a small
tank and large enough motor and pump. This would make sure
that you won’t run out of air.

Now you can easily pick an air compressor equipped with this
helpful information. Lastly, you need to decide on what you're
likely to use your air compressor for and choose a suitable
model.

								
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