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					   Chapter 10

Multimedia Technology
         You Will Learn…
10
        About the fundamental workings of
         multimedia technology
        About many multimedia standards and
         how they have helped shape the
         industry
        How to support many multimedia
         devices, including CD-ROM drives,
         sound cards, and DVD drives
         The Right Tools for the Job
10
        Most popular special-purpose applications
         • Web-authoring software
         • Desktop publishing
         • Multimedia presentations
        Hardware and software resources
         • Satisfied users, retailers, books, the Internet, and
           computer service centers
         • Trade magazines
         • Special-interest Web sites
         • Magazine Web sites
         Minimum Requirements for
         Special Purpose Applications
10
        Pentium MMX computer with a hard
         drive and minimum of 64 MB of RAM, a
         mouse, and high-resolution color
         monitor and video card
        Word-processing software package
        Scanner and related software
        Laser printer or ink-jet photo-quality
         printer

                                              continued
         Minimum Requirements for
         Special Purpose Applications
10
        Graphics software package
        Video-capturing card and digital camera
         (optional for Web authoring and
         multimedia presentations)
        Page composition software (for DTP)
        Authoring tool (for Web authoring)
        Presentation package (multimedia
         presentations)
     Page Composition Software
10
         Uniform Quality of Multimedia
         Devices
10
        Represent data as a series of 0s and 1s
        Transfer data over same bus to CPU
        May require an IRQ, a DMA channel, an
         I/O address, and room in memory for its
         BIOS or drivers
         Multimedia on a PC
10
        Trends
         • Video conferencing
         • Computer-based training (CBT)
         • Multimedia presentations
        Hardware improves in advance of
         software designed to use it
         Special Challenge Confronting
         Multimedia Technology
10
        To reproduce something that is
         continuously changing (analog) on a
         PC, which is incapable of making
         continuous changes because it is digital
         (has only two states; can only change
         from one state to another, with no
         gradations in between)
     Multimedia Fundamentals
10
         Multimedia Fundamentals
10
        Sampling: part of
         the process of
         converting sound or
         video from analog to
         digital format
     Multimedia Fundamentals
10
         Multimedia PC Requirements
10
        MPC (Multimedia Personal Computer)
         guidelines
         • The minimum standards created by
           Microsoft and a consortium of hardware
           manufacturers for multimedia PCs
         MPC Specifications that
         Currently Affect Multimedia
10
        Standard for managing compressed data
         • MPEG (type of lossy)
         • CODEC methods
        Standards for video
         • Interpolative scaling
         • Color space conversion
        Standards for sound
         • MIDI technology
        Standards for communication
         • Inbound and outbound call control
         • Comply with TAPI
     MPC Specifications that
     Currently Affect Multimedia
10
         What CPU MMX and SSE
         Technology Does for Multimedia
10
        MMX
         • Used by Pentium MMX, Pentium Pro, Pentium II
         • Architectural enhancements
            New instructions
            SIMD process
            Increased cache
        SSE
         • Used by Pentium III
         • Improves performance of high-end multimedia
           software
         Devices Supporting Multimedia
10
        CD-ROM drives
        Sound cards
        Digital cameras
        Digital Video Disc (DVD) drives
         CD-ROM Drives
10
        Accommodate large space
         requirements of video and sound files
        Read-only devices; data is embedded in
         disc surface (lands and pits)
        Constant linear velocity (CLV) and
         constant angular velocity (CAV)
        Multisession
     CD-ROM Drives
10
         Caring for CD-ROM Drives
         and Discs
10
        Causes of most problems with CD-
         ROMs
         •   Dust
         •   Fingerprints
         •   Scratches
         •   Defects on surface of CD
         •   Random electrical noise
        Precautions
         How a CD-ROM Drive Can
         Interface with the System Board
10
        Use an IDE interface
        Use a SCSI interface with a SCSI host
         adapter
        Use a proprietary expansion card that works
         only with CD-ROMs
        Use a proprietary connection on a sound card
        Be a portable drive and plug into bidirectional
         parallel port on PC
     Installing a CD-ROM Drive
10
     Installing a CD-ROM Drive
10
         Configuring an IDE CD-ROM
         Drive
10
        Uses ATAPI standard
         Caring for CD-ROM Drives
         and Discs
10
        Insert the CD-ROM drive properly
        Connect the cables and cords
        Verify power to the drive
        Install the device driver for DOS
        Install the device driver for Windows 9x
        Test the drive
        Update Windows 95 rescue disk to include
         access to the CD-ROM drive
        Optimize CD-ROM cache
     Install the Device Driver for
     Windows 9x
10
     Optimizing CD-ROM Cache
10
         CD-R and CD-RW Drives
10
        CD-recordable (CD-R)
         • A CD drive that can record or write data to a CD
         • Data cannot be erased once it is written
         • May or may not be multisession
        Rewritable CD (CD-RW)
         • A CD drive that can record or write data to a CD
         • Data can be erased and overwritten
         • May or may not be multisession
         Sound Cards
10
        Expansion cards that record sound,
         save it to a file on the hard drive, and
         play it back
        Have ports for external stereo speakers
         and microphone input
        May be Sound Blaster compatible
         Stages Sound Goes Through
         when Computerized
10
        Sampling and digitizing the sound
         (analog-to-digital conversion)
        Storing sound in compressed files
        Reproducing or synthesizing the sound
         (digital-to-analog conversion)
         MPC3 Specifications for Sound
         Cards
10
        Support MIDI technology
        Provide for either 8- or 16-bit DAC
         samples with PCM coding
        Use CDEC samples at a rate of 8.0,
         11.025, 16.0, 22.15, and 44.1 kHz with
         stereo channels
        Buffer sound data from ISA to PCI by
         DMA transfers

                                                  continued
         MPC3 Specifications for Sound
         Cards
10
        Provide internal wavetable synthesizer
         capability with 16 simultaneous melody
         voices and six simultaneous percussive
         voices
        Provide direct audio output from the
         CD-ROM drive to the sound card
     Installing a Sound Card and
     Software
10
     Installing a Sound Card and
     Software
10
     Installing a Sound Card and
     Software
10
     Using Sound with Windows 9x
10
     Using Sound with Windows 9x
10
     Using Sound with Windows 9x
10
     Using Sound with Windows 9x
10
     Using Sound with Windows 9x
10
     Using Sound with Windows 9x
10
     Using Sound with Windows 9x
10
     Recording Sound Using
     Windows 9x
10
     Controlling Windows 9x Sounds
10
     Using the Sound Application
     Software
10
         Problems with CD-ROM
         Installation
10
        Error message “Invalid Drive Specification”
         appears while system is starting up
        Install process is terminated with message
         “MSCDEX.EXE Not Found”
        Error message “Not Enough Drive Letters”
         appears during startup process
        Conflict errors exist
        Computer does not recognize CD-ROM drive
        No sound
         Digital Cameras
10
        Faster than scanner technology
        Scan field of image set by picture taker
        Translate light signals into digital
         values, which can be stored as a file
         and viewed with software that can
         interpret the stored values
     Digital Cameras
10
     Digital Cameras
10
         Video-capturing Card
10
        Captures input from a camcorder or
         directly from TV
         Digital Video Disc (DVD)
10
        Faster, larger, CD-ROM format
        Can read older CDs
        Can store over 8 gigabytes of data
        Can hold full-length motion picture
         videos
     Digital Video Disc (DVD)
10
     Other DVD Devices
10
         Chapter Summary
10
        Multimedia devices, what they can do, how
         they work, and how to support them
        Goal of multimedia technology
         • To create or reproduce lifelike representations for
           audio, video, and animation
        Requirements of multimedia technology
         • Large amounts of storage capacity
         • Ability to process large quantities of data at high
           speed and at lowest cost possible

				
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