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BEHAVIORAL HEALTH

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					                             BEHAVIORAL HEALTH

"In everything we do, we must remember that every soldier, sailor, airman or
Marine is part, not just of the military, but also a larger community. Their families,
their hometowns, their civilian employers, their places of worship -- all must be
involved in the solution."

                –Secretary Robert M. Gates at the launch of the National Action
                 Alliance for Suicide Prevention, September 10, 2010

Over 2 million troops have been deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan since
September 2001, many of them having deployed more than once. Estimates
suggest that at least 18 percent of those deployed suffer from severe depression
or post-traumatic stress, and over 19 percent have suffered a traumatic brain
injury. Symptoms of severe mental health difficulties are as high as 35 percent
among OIF/OEF Veterans, and only about half are seeking treatment.


   (1)   Annual Anti-Stigma Media Campaign: Local media contributes
         coverage urging Veterans and their families with behavioral health
         issues to seek help

          i.     Operation In Their Boots
                Operation In Their Boots (OITB) is a unique filmmaking fellowship
                in which Brave New Foundation commissions five Veterans from
                the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to produce and direct their own
                documentary films.

                This is a rare opportunity for these Veterans to communicate
                directly, through the powerful medium of documentary film, what
                they have witnessed and experienced, on and off the battlefield,
                and how these experiences have impacted their lives and the lives
                of people around them. The films these Veterans are producing
                reflect a range of styles, tone and point-of-view. Whether their films
                are character-driven, autobiographical or focus on a specific
                subject, the filmmakers and will express what it’s really like to be In
                Their Boots.

                http://www.intheirboots.com/itb
                Richard Ray Perez, Executive Producer
                310-204-0448

          ii.    The Coming Home Project
                The Coming Home Project is a non-profit organization devoted,
                since 2006, to providing compassionate expert care, support,
                education, and stress management tools for Iraq and Afghanistan
       Veterans, service members, their families, and their service
       providers. We are a multidisciplinary, experienced team of
       psychotherapists, Veterans and interfaith leaders committed to
       helping transform the wounds of war. Our programs address the
       psychological, emotional, spiritual, and relationship challenges
       experienced during all stages of deployment, especially
       reintegration. We help rebuild the connectivity of mind, body, heart
       and spirit that combat trauma can unravel, renew relationships with
       loved ones, and create new support networks. We build a safe
       place – a community -- for families, their Veterans and service
       members, and their service providers to come together and share
       their stories, struggles and accomplishments. We connect families
       with their communities as we collaborate to create integrative
       continuums of care. Single Veterans and service members as well
       as those with physical injuries are also most welcome.

       http://www.cominghomeproject.net/
       Dr. Joseph Bobrow, Roshi, Founder and President,
       1801 Bush St. # 213, San Francisco, CA 94109
       415-353-5363

iii.    The Pathway Home
       The Pathway Program is a Residential Recovery program
       specifically created for, and dedicated to serve, our Nation’s “New
       Warriors”—those of any age who have served our Nation’s Global
       War on Terror in areas of the world such as Afghanistan and Iraq.
       These Warfighters have survived the stressors of war, but find
       themselves experiencing problems that are “getting in the way” of
       functioning at their top form.

       http://www.thepathwayhome.org
       Fred Gusman, MSW, Executive Director
       707-287-2969 cell, 707-948-3030 fax

iv.     100 Faces of War Experience
       For the “100 Faces of War Experience,” Mitchell is planning to paint
       oil portraits of 100 people involved in the wars in Iraq or
       Afghanistan. Most portraits depict soldiers, while some involve
       civilians. Mitchell, who started the project in 2005, is working on his
       41st portrait currently. He hopes to have 100 portraits completed by
       2013.

       Each portrait is accompanied by a text written by the person
       pictured. In the case of the deceased, loved ones have written a
       statement to accompany the portrait.
           “The idea was to do something which kind of brought home the
           reality of the wars through the widest spectrum of the American
           audience,” Mitchell said. “But when I started doing the portraits, and
           meeting families and meeting people in person, I started realizing
           the stories they had to tell were just as important as the paintings I
           could make.”

           http://www.100facesofwarexperience.org/portrait-gallery
           Matthew Mitchell,Artist/Director
           matt@100facesofwarexperience.org

      v.    Defense Center of Excellence: Real Warriors Campaign
           The Real Warriors Campaign is an initiative launched by the
           Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and
           Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) to promote the processes of building
           resilience, facilitating recovery and supporting reintegration of
           returning service members, Veterans and their families.

           The Real Warriors Campaign combats the stigma associated with
           seeking psychological health care and treatment and encourages
           service members to increase their awareness and use of these
           resources. To reach the broadest audience possible, the campaign
           features a variety of strategies including outreach and partnerships,
           print materials, media outreach, an interactive Web site and social
           media. The campaign features stories of real service members who
           have sought treatment and are continuing to maintain successful
           military or civilian careers. In addition, DCoE established the DCoE
           Outreach Center, a 24/7 call center staffed by health resource
           consultants to provide confidential answers, tools, tips and
           resources about psychological health and traumatic brain injury.

           http://www.realwarriors.net/
           866-966-1020 or resources@dcoeoutreach.org


(2)   Provider Training: Training local mental health providers on special
      issues on TBI/PTSD and other Veteran issues and resources

      i.   AfterDeployment.Org
           Offers quick, fundamental facts about military culture, evaluating
           and treating PTSD and TBI, and how to refer to specialty care when
           necessary. Also offers continuing education programs.

           http://afterdeployment.org/
           866-966-1020
ii.     The National Center for PTSD
       The Center aims to help U.S. Veterans and others through
       research, education, and training on trauma and PTSD. The section
       cited below contains training materials as well as information and
       tools to help you with assessment and treatment. These materials
       are based on the latest research, much of which is conducted by
       National Center staff.

       http://www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/index.asp
       ncptsd@va.gov
       (802) 296-6300

iii.    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
        (SAMHSA), SAMHSA’s Operation Immersion
       SAMHSA, along with the Tennessee Department of Mental Health
       and Development Disabilities (TDMHDD), the Tennessee National
       Guard (TNNG) and the Tennessee Veterans Task Force hosted a
       training designed to immerse attendees in military culture and the
       deployment experience in an effort to help remove the barriers and
       apprehension soldiers often face when seeking help for mental
       health or substance use disorders. SAMHSA’s role in this effort is
       part of the agency’s strategic initiative on promoting the behavioral
       health interests of those in the military, Veterans, and their families.

       1 Choke Cherry Road
       Rockville, MD 20857
       1-877-SAMHSA-7 or 240-276-1573
       http://www.samhsa.gov/MilitaryFamilies/
       http://www.samhsa.gov/newsroom/advisories/1008234708.aspx
       linda.fulton@samhsa.hhs.gov

iv.     Citizen Soldier Support Program (CSSP)
       To build bridges between local community resources and military
       families, Congress established the National Demonstration
       Program for Citizen Soldier Support. Spearheaded by the Odum
       Institute at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the
       Citizen Soldier Support Program (CSSP) focuses on all branches of
       the military and other reserve component members and families.

       They have developed a course designed to help primary care
       physicians, case workers, mental health providers - who may see a
       Veteran or family member on an unrelated issue - develop a better
       understanding of the culture in which Veterans and their families
       live and work, and provide best practices for identifying, assessing,
       and treating or referring mild traumatic brain injuries that result from
       the trauma of war.
             http://www.aheconnect.com/ahec/cdetail.asp?courseid=citizensoldi
             er2
             http://www.citizensoldiersupport.org/
             Harold Kudler, MD
             Associate Director, Clinical
             Mental Health Coordinator, VISN 6
             Durham VA Medical Center
             harold.kudler@va.gov


(3)   First Responder Training: Training Police/Fire/Schools/ERs
      regarding special issues and resources for Veterans

      i.     Beyond Yellow Ribbon
             Training Video by District Attorney Keating in Massachusetts
             explains the “natural reactions to unnatural events” that cause
             PTSD. Made for combat Veterans, their family, friends and
             community leaders:

             http://www.mass.gov/da/norfolk/Videos.html
             Norfolk County District Attorney's Office
             45 Shawmut Road | Canton, MA 02021
             Phone: (781) 830-4800
             Fax: (781) 830-4801

      ii.     Combat to Community
             Swords to Plowshares is a community-based, not-for-profit
             organization that promotes and protects the rights of Veterans
             through advocacy, public education and partnerships with local, state
             and national entities. The community training program is privately
             funded through the Zellerbach Family Fund.

             The Combat to Community training programs are designed to increase
             awareness and understanding of the issues relevant to the military
             Veteran and first responder communities as they relate to Post
             Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and
             Domestic Violence (DV).

             http://combattocommunity.com/law-enforcement-training/
             1060 Howard Street
             San Francisco, CA 94103
             415-252-4788

      iii.   Indiana National Guard Family Program Office
      Programs designed to connect military families to resources and to
      educate schools about military children and the impact of
      deployment.

      1-800-237-2850
      http://www.doe.in.gov/sservices/counseling/docs/Military_Children_
      and_Families_ws_09.pdf (PDF)

iv.    Washington State Operation Military Kids
      Washington State: Operation Military Kids is a partnership
      established in April 2004 between the Office of Superintendent of
      Public Instruction, Washington State University Extension 4-H
      Programs, the Washington State National Guard and U.S. Army
      Reserve. Under grant funds provided through the 4-H/Army Youth
      Development Project, our mission is to create replicable and
      sustainable support networks for geographically dispersed military
      youth in schools and communities before, during, and after the
      deployment of a parent or loved one.

      http://www.k12.wa.us/OperationMilitaryKids/default.aspx
      Mona M. Johnson, Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction
      (360) 725-6050
      mona.johnson@k12.wa.us

v.     Military Child Education Coalition
      A 501(c)(3) nonprofit, worldwide organization, the Military Child
      Education Coalition (MCEC) focuses on ensuring quality
      educational opportunities for all military children affected by
      mobility, family separation, and transition.

      The MCEC offers a course, Guard and Reserve Institute, with a
      goal of reaching out in a support network to the children of the
      Army National Guard, Reserve components, and geographically
      isolated families through: State Education systems, Informed and
      resourced professional educators, School-based model for training
      and support, State and local partnerships between the schools,
      military communities, and other organizations.

      The course is intended for educators and families of Guard and
      Reserve members.

      http://www.militarychild.org/education/guard-and-reserve-institutes/
      The Military Child Education Coalition
      909 Mountain Lion Circle
      P. O. Box 2519
      Harker Heights, TX
             76548-2519
             Ph: (254) 953-1923, Fax: (254) 953-1925
             info@militarychild.org


(4)   Ease of Access to Care: Making it easy for military personnel and
      their families to access mental health care

      i.     Local mental health programs, such as:
             http://www.sofarusa.org/
             www.omh.state.ny.us/omhweb/military/mh_resources
             www.thesoldiersproject.org/

      ii.     Give an Hour
             Give an Hour is a national nonprofit organization providing free
             counseling and other mental health services to active duty service
             members, members of our National Guard and Reserve forces, and
             Veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan who have separated or retired
             from any branch of military service. There are thousands of
             volunteer providers across the country.

             www.giveanhour.org
             Barbara Van Dahlen, Founder and President
             bvandahlen@giveanhour.org

      iii.    Defense Centers of Excellence National Resource Directory
             The National Resource Directory (NRD) is a website for connecting
             wounded warriors, Service Members, Veterans, their families with
             those who support them.

             It provides access to services and resources at the national, state
             and local levels to support recovery, rehabilitation and community
             reintegration. Visitors can find information on a variety of topics
             including benefits & compensation, education & training,
             employment, family & caregiver support, health, homeless
             assistance, housing, transportation & travel and other services &
             resources. For help on how to find resources on the site, visit the
             How to Use this Site section of the NRD.

             The NRD is a partnership among the Departments of Defense,
             Labor and Veterans Affairs. The information contained within the
             NRD is from federal, state and local government agencies;
             Veterans service and benefit organizations; non-profit and
             community-based organizations; academic institutions and
             professional associations that provide assistance to wounded
             warriors and their families.
            http://www.nationalresourcedirectory.gov/
            info@nationalresourcedirectory.gov

      iv.    Citizen Soldier Support Program
            The Citizen Soldier Support Program (CSSP) Primary Health Care
            and Behavioral Health Provider Directory is a network of primary
            and behavioral health care providers who are trained in, or who
            have expressed an interest in serving the specific needs of military
            members and their families.

            The CSSP is working to connect servicemembers and their families
            to primary health care and behavioral health providers trained to
            address issues that affect military members and the people who
            support our Nation's troops before, during, and after deployment.

            www.warwithin.org
            http://www.citizensoldiersupport.org/
            Citizen Soldier Support Program (CSSP)
            University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
            23 Manning Hall, CB 3355
            Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3355

            Phone: (919) 843-3998
            Fax: (919) 962-4777
            Email: warwithin@unc.edu

      v.     The Pathway Home
            The Pathway Program is a Residential Recovery program
            specifically created for, and dedicated to serve, our Nation’s “New
            Warriors”—those of any age who have served our Nation’s Global
            War on Terror in areas of the world such as Afghanistan and Iraq.
            These Warfighters have survived the stressors of war, but find
            themselves experiencing problems that are “getting in the way” of
            functioning at their top form.

            http://www.thepathwayhome.org
            Fred Gusman, MSW, Executive Director
            707-287-2969 cell, 707-948-3030 fax


(5)   Annual Gap Analysis: Leaders from local government, military,
      advocacy groups and behavioral health gather to discuss gaps and
      solutions

      i.    TexVet
      In order to ensure Veterans and their families have easy access to
      state-wide resources; TEXVET has developed a Veteran Services
      Provider Network (VSPN) in which information is gathered and
      disseminated. This comprehensive network allows Veterans and
      their families to save time and effort when searching for services.

      Through collaborative efforts the TEXVET Partners also benefit by
      learning about like-minded programs, funding, and best practices to
      serve the Veterans and their families. To identify partners in rural
      areas, TEXVET has collaborated with DSHS, TMF, and other
      organizations to reach the community leaders in those areas to
      capture information and services to Veterans and their families.

      www.texvet.com
      Katherine Kotrla, Executive Director
      512-388-6310
      Kotrla@medicine.tamhsc.edu

ii.    VeteransFocus.Org
      The mission of the North Carolina Governor’s Focus on
      Servicemembers, Veterans, and their Families is to promote
      evidence-based and best practices in the screening, assessment,
      and treatment of active duty, National Guard, Reservists, and
      Veterans who served in the military and their families. This effort
      includes the articulation and implementation of an integrated
      continuum of care that emphasizes access, quality, effectiveness,
      efficiency, and compassion. Principles of resilience, prevention, and
      recovery are emphasized along with state-of-the-art clinical
      services as part of a balanced public health and behavioral health
      approach. The Governor’s Focus envisions a referral network of
      services that will comprise a system through which
      servicemembers, Veterans, and their families will have access to
      assistance during all stages of the deployment cycle in North
      Carolina.

      The Governor’s Focus is working to develop partnerships with
      professional organizations at the state level. Partnering
      organizations include the N.C. Medical Society, N.C. Academy of
      Family Physicians, N.C. Pediatric Society, N.C. Psychiatric
      Association, N.C Psychological Association, and the N.C.
      Association of Social Workers. The N.C. Governor’s Focus is a
      model that can be adapted to the specific needs of each state.

      http://www.veteransfocus.org/
      Wei Li Fang
      Wei.Li.Fang@governorsinstitute.org
iii.    Community Prosperity Partnership, Department of Veterans Affairs
       The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) established the
       Community Prosperity Partnership (CPP), a mutually supportive
       coalition to promote collaborative efforts to address the needs of
       the Nation’s Minority Veterans and their dependents. The CPP
       goal is to develop a seamless service delivery system that
       promotes employment opportunities, promotes education and
       associated youth initiatives, and fosters veterans’ business
       development in their communities.

       Jose O. Marrero and Carolyn Wong
       202-461-4041
       http://www.va.gov/cpp/index.htm

iv.     California Statewide Collaborative for Our Military and Families
       "The purpose of the California Statewide Collaborative ("CASC" or
       "Collaborative") is to be a strong voice advocating for a wholistic,
       compassionate continuum of services, treatment and care for our
       service members, veterans and their families. It provides a forum to
       share information and education, raise awareness, and promote
       strategic partnerships that will streamline and improve access to
       health and human services."

       Mary Ellen Salzano, Founder and Facilitator
       maryellen_salzano@yahoo.com
       408-779- 6916 or 408-489-0911
       http://www.rebuildhope.org/casc.php

v.      Office of the Secretary, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
       Douglas Carmon, NGO Ombudsman, (202) 461-4815
       Kevin Secor, Veterans Service Office Liaison,
       Kevin.Secor@va.gov, (202) 461 4835
       http://www.va.gov/opa/bios/secretary.asp

vi.     Defense Center Of Excellence: Real Warriors Campaign
       The Real Warriors Campaign is an initiative launched by the
       Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and
       Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) to promote the processes of building
       resilience, facilitating recovery and supporting reintegration of
       returning service members, Veterans and their families.

       The Real Warriors Campaign combats the stigma associated with
       seeking psychological health care and treatment and encourages
       service members to increase their awareness and use of these
       resources. To reach the broadest audience possible, the campaign
        features a variety of strategies including outreach and partnerships,
        print materials, media outreach, an interactive Web site and social
        media. The campaign features stories of real service members who
        have sought treatment and are continuing to maintain successful
        military or civilian careers. In addition, DCoE established the DCoE
        Outreach Center, a 24/7 call center staffed by health resource
        consultants to provide confidential answers, tools, tips and
        resources about psychological health and traumatic brain injury.

        http://www.realwarriors.net/
        resources@dcoeoutreach.org
        888-966-1020

vii.      Mental Health America of San Diego County, Breaking Down
          Barriers Program
        The purpose of the Breaking Down Barriers program is to increase
        access to mental health services for persons with severe mental
        illness who come from unserved and under-served, culturally-
        diverse populations. MHASD issued a special report for more
        information about how to break down barriers to Mental Health
        Services in San Diego County among Veterans of OIF/OEF.

        http://www.mhasd.org/Reports/Addressing%20Barriers%20to%20M
        ental%20Health%20Services%20for%20Military%20Populations%2
        0in%20San%20Diego%20County.pdf (PDF)

        4069 30th Street
        San Diego, CA 92104
        Phone: (619) 543-0412
        Fax: (619) 285-1938
        E-mail: info@mhasd.org
        Web: www.mhasd.org

viii.    Mental Health Association of Erie County, New York
        Since 1962, the Mental Health Association of Erie County, Inc. has
        provided essential programs and services to seniors, adults,
        families and children in Erie County. Over the years, the Mental
        Health Association has positioned itself to know what the most
        pressing and current mental health needs are in our community and
        to deliver the best possible programming and services to meet
        those needs. They have a variety of programs to address the
        unique needs of military and their families.

        http://www.eriemha.org/veteran_s_programs.php
        Mary McParlane 886-1242 ext. 321 or mcparlane@eriemha.org
         ix.    SAMSHA News: Paving the Way Home
               A free publication covering a conference on returning Veterans and
               their families that addressed suicide prevention, employment,
               homelessness, and traumatic brain injury. Also discusses bullying,
               mutual support groups, and mental health services in primary care
               settings.

               http://store.samhsa.gov/product/SAM08-165
               1 Choke Cherry Road
               Rockville, MD 20857
               1-877-SAMHSA-7


   (6)   Smart Donors: Local philanthropy using performance-based
         metrics to make high-impact donations

         Many generous and patriotic donors support behavioral health programs
         for the military community. Many factors including the frequency and
         duration of deployments and have created significant stress and
         nonprofits who provide mental health services to the military community
         need your support now more than ever.

         To help you ensure that your donations are having maximum impact,
         below are guidelines for local philanthropists/foundations. We urge
         those who contribute to military issues, to consider these standards, and
         if you comply- celebrate your effort by posting it on the Blueprint Site and
         yours!


Minimal Threshold (Based on recommendations by Leaderdship-18, a
collaboration of many of America’s leading charities)

   1)    The primary focus of the program is to work with the military and the
         family members.

   2)    Certify that the Organization is non-partisan.

   3)    Certify that the organization does not actively promote religion/religious
         beliefs.

   4)    The IRS (Internal Revenue Service) recognizes the organization as tax
         exempt under 26 U.S.C. 501 (c) (3).

   5)    The organization accounts for its funds on an annual basis in
         accordance to generally accepted accounting principles. The
         organization consents to disclosing the financial records upon request in
        the spirit of transparency so potential donors, volunteers and recipients
        of its services may see the percentage of funds used for administrative
        costs versus the organizations mission. The organization must complete
        an audit or Form 990 annually.

   6)   Certify that an active and responsible governing body or board, whose
        members have no material conflict of interest and a majority whom serve
        without compensation have oversight of the organization.

   7)   Certify that the organization does not share of sell personally identifiable
        information with vendors or other agents, companies, or services without
        the expressed permission from the services member, Veteran, or family
        members who requested or received their services.

   8)   Certify that the organization does not exhibit hate, bias, or discrimination.

   9)   Certify that the organization conducts publicity and promotional activities
        based upon its actual program and operations, and that these activities
        are truthful and non-deceptive, include all material facts, and make no
        exaggerated or misleading claims.

   10) Certify that the organization effectively uses the funds it receives for its
       announced purposes.

   11) Certify that the organization has been positively evaluated by at least
       two of the following charity evaluator organization: Better Business
       Bureau, Charity Navigator, Guidestar, State Certificate of Status (provide
       the most current certificate from the Secretary of State).


Advanced Impact Metrics (Based on recommendations of the Veterans
Innovation Center)

While the list above should indirectly help ensure a nonprofit program is a good
steward of your donations, there are more detailed analyses you might consider,
especially if you have multiple good choices within your community. Some of this
information may be hard to obtain- easier for larger donors/foundations. But
don’t underestimate the power of small private donors asking these questions.
Also know that just by ASKING the right questions about effectiveness and
efficiency, you can send powerful messages to nonprofit leaders.

   a.   How many hours of care do you deliver to service
        members/Vets/families?

   b.   What is your total budget for this program?
   c.    What is the cost/hour? (Calculated from the numbers above)

   d.    What special populations do you specifically target with
         outreach/programming? (Generally the more the better) Veterans,
         Wounded, Severely-Wounded, Specific Injuries, Military Spouses,
         Caregivers, Surviving Spouses

   e.    Do you long term impact of your services (The longer the better) What
         are your statistics?

   f.    Is your staff specifically trained on PTSD and TBI?

   g.    Is your staff specifically trained on military culture/issues?

Are your staff trained on other benefits/resources available to the military community
including therapy, education, housing, family support, financial, legal?

				
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