Strategic Plan

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					             Strategic Plan
Moving the Department of Food Science and
    Agricultural Chemistry Forward
                  (SWOT Analysis)



                  Submitted to:
              Dr. C. Madramootoo
          Dean, Faculty of Agricultural
          and Environmental Sciences

                February 10th, 2011




                  Presented by:

               Dr. F.R. van de Voort
                     Professor


           Department of Food Science
           and Agricultural Chemistry
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Table of Contents
Executive Summary ............................................................................................................................................... 4

     Action Plan Summary - Next 5 years: .......................................................................................................................4

Background............................................................................................................................................................ 5

A Brief History ....................................................................................................................................................... 6

SWOT Analysis: ...................................................................................................................................................... 6

Food Science Strengths (Measurable) .................................................................................................................... 7

     Core Competencies:..................................................................................................................................................7

     Programs: .................................................................................................................................................................7

     Performance: ............................................................................................................................................................8
        Outstanding Research Funding: .........................................................................................................................8
        Outstanding Highly Qualified Personnel (HQP) ..................................................................................................8
        Outstanding Undergraduate Food Science Program ..........................................................................................9

Food Science Weaknesses...................................................................................................................................... 9

     Perceived Weaknesses: ............................................................................................................................................9
        Lack of Critical Mass: ..........................................................................................................................................9
        Lack of Synergy: ..................................................................................................................................................9
        Lack of Leadership and Initiative: .....................................................................................................................10

     Measurable Weaknesses:.......................................................................................................................................10
       Aging Demographics/Lack of New Blood: ........................................................................................................10
       Lack of Sufficient Budget: .................................................................................................................................10
       Lack of an Industrial Internship/Stage: .............................................................................................................11
       Lack of Pilot Plant Facilities: .............................................................................................................................11
       Lack of Food Safety/Microbiology/Toxicology Expertise: ................................................................................11

Food Science Opportunities: ................................................................................................................................ 12

          Demand for Qualified Food Scientists: .............................................................................................................12
          Renewal and Growth Opportunity: ..................................................................................................................12
          New Funding Opportunities: ............................................................................................................................12

Food Science Threats (Measurable) ..................................................................................................................... 13

          Budget: .............................................................................................................................................................13
          Competition: .....................................................................................................................................................13


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Strategic Plan ....................................................................................................................................................... 14
     Vision ......................................................................................................................................................................14
         (1)       To continue strengthening Food Science and Food Chemistry programs .............................................14
         (2)       To lead the Food Safety initiative at the Faculty level ..........................................................................14
         (3)       To replace retiring Department staff ....................................................................................................14
         (4)       To continue to contribute to excellence ...............................................................................................14

     Strategic Actions ....................................................................................................................................................14
         In Relation to Critical Mass and Synergy: .........................................................................................................14
         In Relation to Program Development: ..............................................................................................................15
         In Relation to Leadership: .................................................................................................................................16
         In Relationship to New Initiatives: ....................................................................................................................17

Required Financial and Human Resources ........................................................................................................... 18

     Human Resources...................................................................................................................................................18

     Implementation Timeline .......................................................................................................................................18

     Operating Budget ...................................................................................................................................................18

     Pilot Plant ...............................................................................................................................................................19

Conclusion ........................................................................................................................................................... 19

Signatures ............................................................................................................................................................ 21

Appendices .......................................................................................................................................................... 22

     Documents .............................................................................................................................................................22
        Document 1 – Department Minutes of September 29, 2010 ...........................................................................22
        Document 2 – Faculty Minutes of May 15, 2010 (extract) ...............................................................................28
        Document 3 – Memo from Dean Dated November 5, 2010 ............................................................................29
        Document 4 – Faculty Minutes of October 2010 (extract) ...............................................................................30
        Document 5 – Faculty Strategic Research Plan ................................................................................................31
        Document 6 – Faculty Minutes of November 2010 (extract) ...........................................................................32
        Document 7 – Faculty Minutes of December 2010 (extract) ...........................................................................33
        Document 8 – Department Annual Report 1987-88 ........................................................................................34
        Document 9 – Definitions .................................................................................................................................35
        Document 10 – Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) B.Sc. Food Science Approval ........................................36
        Document 11 – Faculty Enrollment Statistics ...................................................................................................37
        Document 12 – Food Safety for Export Compliance (SFfEC) Project ................................................................38
        Document 13 – Food Safety for Export Compliance (SFfEC) Project – Uganda Letter of Interest ...................40
        Document 14 – McGill-Health Canada Student Integration Success Story ......................................................41
        Document 15 – Food Safety Position Announcement......................................................................................42
        Document 16 – Agriculture and AgriFood Report ............................................................................................43

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     Document 17 – Memo of December 9, 2008, Re: Negative Permanent Budget..............................................44
     Document 18 – Memo of September 7, 2009, Re: Negative Permanent Budget ............................................45
     Document 19 – Memo from the Dean dated December 16, 2010 ...................................................................46
     Document 20 – Letter to the Dean re: Re-Appointment Second Term as Chair (excerpt) ...............................47
     Document 21 – Memo from the Dean Re: Department Chair and Planning Document ..................................48

Figures ....................................................................................................................................................................49
   Figure 1 – Reframed Department .....................................................................................................................49
   Figure 2 – Department Graduate Students ......................................................................................................50
   Figure 3 – Departmental Operating and Demonstrator Budgets .....................................................................51
   Figure 4 – Operating Budget and Student Numbers ........................................................................................52
   Figure 5 – Department Publications .................................................................................................................53
   Figure 6 – Department Research Funding ........................................................................................................54
   Figure 7 – Department Graduate Student Distribution ....................................................................................55
   Figure 8 – Department Undergraduate Enrollment .........................................................................................56
   Figure 9 – NSERC Per Capita Funding: Faculty vs. Department .......................................................................57
   Figure 10 – Publications Faculty vs. Department .............................................................................................58
   Figure 11 – Weighted Graduate Students/Staff Faculty vs. Department .........................................................59
   Figure 12 – Departmental Operating Budget/Undergraduate Student ...........................................................60
   Figure 13 – Reframing Food Science and Agricultural Chemistry .....................................................................61

Tables .....................................................................................................................................................................62
   Table 1 – Professional Activities .......................................................................................................................62
   Table 2 – Interaction with Other Departments and Institutions ......................................................................65
   Table 3 – Industrial Collaborations ...................................................................................................................68
   Table 4 – Quebec-France Collaborations..........................................................................................................70
   Table 5 – Faculty Tenure Track Academic Staff Profile 2005-2009 ..................................................................71
   Table 6 – Committees .......................................................................................................................................72
   Table 7 – Retirements.......................................................................................................................................73
   Table 8 – M.Sc. Food Safety (Non-Thesis) Proposal .........................................................................................74
   Table 9 – Short Course Proposals .....................................................................................................................76

Power Points ..........................................................................................................................................................77
   Power Point 1 – Food Safety and Quality Program (FSQP) ...............................................................................77
   Power Point 2 – Food Science Recruiting .........................................................................................................78




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Executive Summary
The Department of Food Science and Agricultural Chemistry has excelled in
relation to the key indicators associated with research and teaching within the
Faculty and University for well over 20 years, but has been largely neglected by
successive administrations in terms of budgetary and human resource
allocations. The Department of Food Science is now approaching a crossroads in
terms of staffing, with more than half of the current FTE staff (5/9.5) reaching the
age of 65 by 2015, two of whom turn 65 this year. Given the new Faculty
priorities and funding associated with the Food Safety and Quality Program
(FSQP), now is the ideal time to plan for and act on Departmental renewal, and
to reframe (Figure 1) its mission within the Faculty. This document outlines the
issues facing the Department and the action plan that has been formulated for
the next five years as well as the resources that will be required to implement it,
whereby the Department can continue to excel and develop while contributing to
the broader success of a continually evolving Faculty.

Action Plan Summary - Next 5 years:
   (1) Recruit 3 replacement positions for pending retirees in the shorter term
       (with bridge funding if required) for:
          One Food Toxicologist
          One General Food Scientist
          One Food Biotechnologist
   (2) Add new positions (2.0 FTE) - Director of Food Safety as possible future
       Department Chair and Faculty leader in the Food Safety Initiative and a
       Food Packaging/Minimal Processing position
   (3) Upgrade the current 0.5 FTE Food Microbiology position to 1.0 FTE
   (4) Add non-academic support staff – 1.0 FTE
   (5) Hire professional Internship/Stage Coordinator for Concurrent program(s) -
       1.0 FTE
   (6) Develop a new Non-Thesis M.Sc. Food Safety Program in collaboration
       with the Faculty and the broader University
   (7) Develop new Food Safety related courses as part of a Faculty Summer
       Short Course Program
   (8) Develop a joint concurrent degree program with Bioresource Engineering
       (BREE)
   (9) Expand research collaborations with Bioresource Engineering and the
       School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, and wider Faculty
   (10) Plan joint (FDSC/BREE) Pilot Plant Facility (longer term)

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   (11) Hire two retirement replacements in the longer term, their specific
      expertise to be determined by Departmental needs at that time

Background
At a Departmental meeting held on September 29th 2010 (Document 1), the
Dean castigated the Department for its performance in general and specifically
for not having taken the lead in the Food Safety Initiative outlined at the
Departmental Chairs meeting in May of 2010 (Document 2), a proposal which
had not been brought to Faculty for discussion, nor resources allocated to it.
Although the Department did contribute significantly to structuring this relatively
vague and undefined initiative, the Dean discounted the Department’s
contribution, and the “lack of action” rationale was broadened to include other
perceived weaknesses, cited as a lack of critical mass, a lack of interfaculty
synergies, a lack of leadership and a lack of new initiatives. Notwithstanding the
turnaround of the Department’s enrollment and its new programs, engineered
over the past five years, the Dean proposed to dismantle the Department or
merge it with an unspecified unit. Later in the month of October 2010, the Dean
invited all staff in the Faculty to listen to a presentation by a consultant outlining a
proposal to be made to the food industry to obtain financial support for the
Faculty-wide Food Safety Initiative. Subsequently, a Departmental delegation
met with the Dean (Document 3) to seek clarification in regard to the
dismantling/merging scenario originally proposed. The original course of action
(dismantling/merging) was dropped in favor of a more constructive approach, it
being suggested that “the Department comes forward with a well thought out,
sound and reasonable plan to restructure and reposition itself within the Faculty,
taking advantage of new opportunities”. At the behest of the Department of Food
Science (Document 4), the broader implications of the Faculty Strategic
Research Plan (Document 5), including the Food Safety component were
explained at the November Faculty meeting (Document 6) by the Associate Dean
of Research. In December, after having met with representatives and leaders of
the food industry, the Dean reported to Faculty (Document 7) that he had
succeeded in obtaining new funding for the proposed FSQP and reiterated that
these new funds would now be available for any department taking the lead in
developing the FSQP initiative. Thus success of the FSQP Initiative comes at a
critical point in the generational cycle of the Department and presents an
opportunity for securing new resources to facilitate the renewal and re-direction
of the Department. The Dean’s suggestions and comments have been carefully
considered and reflected upon by the Department through wide-ranging internal
consultations and have resulted in this strategic proposal and plan. The

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Department has approached the plan in the context of the current “Reframing
Initiative” being undertaken by McGill by targeting performance enhancement,
adjusting our program and enrollment mix and by taking a more interdisciplinary
and holistic approach to our discipline as well as related disciplines within the
Faculty, using FSQP (Power Point 1) as a focal point for renewal and
restructuring.

A Brief History
The Department of Food Science and Agricultural Chemistry was formed in 1986
as a result of transferring the Food Science staff residing in the School of Food
Science and Human Nutrition to the Department of Agricultural Chemistry and
Physics, and renaming the departments after a formal cyclical review (Document
8) of the two organizations. The reorganization and renaming of these units
recognized the essential differences between the Nutrition and Food Science
disciplines with respect to their orientations and mandates, one being more
socially/ community/ medically oriented and the other more industrially/
technologically/ chemically oriented; each having completely different clientele
and mandates. This course of action strengthened the position of both disciplines
within the Faculty and as differentiated entities, the Department of Food Science
was able to develop internationally recognized academic and research programs.
When formed, the new Department hired 4 new food scientists, and in
conjunction with reorientation of the remaining Chemistry staff to the discipline of
Food Science, brought the Department complement to 9 FTE where it has
subsequently remained until the addition of 0.5 FTE in 2008. Early on, a
comprehensive Food Science program with a strong chemistry base was
developed and accredited by both IFT and CIFST, professional bodies that
govern Food Science academic criteria in the USA and Canada, respectively. In
addition, a rigorous Food Chemistry program was developed which met the
provincial requirements of the Ordre des chimistes du Québec giving these
graduates the specific right of practice as chemists in Quebec, as well as the rest
of Canada.

SWOT Analysis:
We have used a structured SWOT analysis to assess our present status and
formulate an action plan to build on our strengths and overcome our weaknesses
as well as capitalize on the opportunities we have identified and address the
threats faced, including our external environment (e.g., competition, what other
universities are doing, economic factors, etc.). The strategic goals are designed
to be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and timed. Some key definitions
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(Document 9) are provided to clarify some of the technical terms associated with
this document.


Food Science Strengths (Measurable)
The academic staff in the Department of Food Science is recognized nationally
and internationally as having a strong chemistry based academic and research
program. The departmental statistics for graduate students (Figure 2), operating
and demonstrator budget (Figure 3), operating budget and students numbers
(Figure 4), publications (Figure 5), research funding (Figure 6), thesis student
distribution (Figure 7), and undergraduate enrollment (Figure 8) as well as
Faculty statistics for funding (Figure 9), publications (Figure 10) and graduate
students (Figure 11), covering the last 25 and 16 years, respectively, have been
compiled and graphed to provide a wide-ranging snapshot of the performance of
the Department over time in relation to key university performance indicators. An
examination of these statistics, from the Department’s inception to the present,
places the Department of Food Science well above the Faculty mean in relation
to most indicators, except for budget. The strengths of the Department in relation
to competencies, programs and performance in funding and formation of highly
qualified personnel are summarized below.

Core Competencies:
Food Chemistry and Biochemistry/Biotechnology
Nutraceutical and Flavor Chemistry
Food Processing and Functional Foods

Programs: The Food Science and Food Chemistry options are heavily chemistry
oriented and students can qualify to be members of the “Ordre des chimistes du
Québec” and attain professional accreditation as practicing chemists. Both
programs are also accredited (Document 10) every 5 years by the IFT and
CIFST. These bodies represent the profession and the discipline of Food
Science in the USA and Canada, respectively. Recent additions to our program
offerings include a four-year Concurrent Food Science/Nutrition degree program,
the Non–Thesis M.Sc. and the Post-Baccalaureate Certificate programs which
have contributed significantly to student numbers. However, the contribution of
the Concurrent degree students has not been reflected (Document 11) in the
most recent Department statistics obtained from the Dean’s office.



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Performance:
The Food Science Department has an excellent publication record, averaging 50
papers/annum, and at 6 papers/capita/annum, it has been one of the strongest
(Figure 5) and steadiest in the Faculty for much of the Department’s 25 years of
existence. The staff is also well represented on key scholarly journals in our
discipline as editors and members of editorial boards and is extensively involved
in grant review and selection committees (Table 1) and in institutional and inter-
departmental collaborations (Table 2). The Department and its staff have strong
research ties with the industrial sector and work closely in concert with a wide
range of companies (Table 3). The Department and its staff have also initiated
and participated in a variety of international development and research
collaborations, e.g., Ghana-Canada early on and more recently a CIDA Ethiopia-
Canada project as well as a substantive Quebec-France (Table 4) research and
industrial collaboration. A major initiative (Document 12) is in development under
the direction of Dr. A. Ismail which draws on our unique expertise in analytical
infrared spectroscopy to address the new Food Safety thrust in developing
countries (Document 13).

Outstanding Research Funding:
Over the past 25 years, all members of the Department have continuously held
NSERC (Figure 9) Operating/Discovery grants as well as consistently garnering
NSERC Strategic Grant funding, indicative of the Department’s ongoing
fundamental research strengths. Our new hires have also been successful in
obtaining Discovery grants as well as CFI funding and other substantive grants.
As well, members of the Department have received funding for specialized
infrastructure, including a state-of-the-art High-Pressure Processing Facility and
a unique Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy facility for research and
development of new instrumental methods for bacteria identification (Document
14) and edible oil analysis under the direction of the McGill IR Group.

Outstanding Highly Qualified Personnel (HQP)
The Food Science Department has strong Masters and Doctoral programs and
has supervised and graduated, on a per capita basis (Figure 11), more M.Sc.
and Ph.D. students than most other departments in the Faculty. The total number
of graduate students reached a high point of 75 graduate students (Figure 7) in
1998. These high levels of enrollment and workload were obviously
unsustainable, in part because departmental resources never rose to support this
level of activity; however, even after declining to a more manageable level, the
graduate student numbers per staff have remained well above the Faculty
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average (Figure 11). The loss of a staff member in 2006, who was not replaced
for two years, also had an impact on graduate student numbers and funding;
however, recent hires in the process of building up their research groups have
started to compensate for this loss. In addition, new academic programs have
also been implemented such as the Non-Thesis Masters and Post-Baccalaureate
Certificate programs, both of which have been very successful and contributed a
significant number of graduate as well as undergraduate students to the
Department enrollment over the last few years. The higher percentage of foreign
students in these programs, with their defined duration, has contributed to the
Faculty tuition revenue. Many of the graduates from the Department are in
leadership positions in industry, academia and government.

Outstanding Undergraduate Food Science Program
Outside our own Institution, our academic programs are considered rigorous and
attractive from an employment perspective by both students and employers. With
the Department once again being permitted to participate in the student recruiting
process (Power Point 2) as of 2005, enrollment has tripled over the last 5 years
(Figure 8). Further growth is expected from the concurrent degree and certificate
programs and almost all of our graduates have found positions the food industry,
government and other ancillary sectors.

Food Science Weaknesses
Perceived Weaknesses: *
Lack of Critical Mass: With an FTE complement of 9.5 the Department was not
viewed as a viable, stand-alone department, able to create synergies, take
leadership positions in the Faculty or initiate new programs/projects. In terms of
size (Table 5), the Department is smaller than most, but not unique in that
regard, and this brings into question why other departments of similar size are
not viewed in the same manner.

Lack of Synergy: The Department was viewed as insular, and lacking in its
interaction and synergy with other departments. Tables 1-3 (professional
activities, inter-institutional and departmental collaborations and industrial
collaborations) clearly indicate that this is not the case, with the staff actively
participating at the Departmental, Faculty and University levels in terms of
committees and other activities (Table 6).

*
Specifically noted by the Dean

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Lack of Leadership and Initiative: The Department was not considered to have
leadership potential within its present staff complement and to be limited in its
ability to tackle new initiatives. However, as indicated in Table 2, aside from
program development, many other significant initiatives have been taken over the
years, as well as more recently.

Measurable Weaknesses:
Aging Demographics/Lack of New Blood: The Department is long on
academic staff close to the age of 65 and potentially close to retirement (5/9.5
FTE), while short on new recruits (1.5 FTE). The average age of the
Department’s academics is 55.4 and more than half our staff complement will
have reached the age of 65 by the year 2015; two this year (2011), one in 2013,
and two more in 2015 (Table 7). Only a net 0.5 FTE (2008) have actually been
added since the inception of the Department in 1986. Tentatively 5 replacement
staff will be required by 2016-17, of which 3 are likely to be needed in the shorter
term (3 years) and two within the longer term (6 years).
Lack of Sufficient Budget: The departmental operating budget is effectively at
~1/3 of the level it was 5 years ago (Figure 4) due to an accumulating deficit,
leaving only $17,000/annum to work with. This deficit has accumulated as a
result of salary underfunding for secretarial staff replacing those who retired five
years ago. This over-expenditure has been carried forward on the Department
budget, effectively subsidizing the Faculty/University at Departmental expense, a
matter which has been ignored by the administration, despite repeated attempts
to rectify the situation. In the meantime undergraduate enrollment has tripled.
Even if the deficit were annulled, we would still have an operating budget similar
to the one the Department had 20 years ago (Figure 12). Thus, if any department
has done more with less within the Faculty, it is the Department of Food Science.
As a result, the Department has been chronically underfunded for teaching
assistants, laboratory supplies, equipment and services, office supplies and field
trips. Our only technical support person (Mr. E. Noroozi), who is charged with
management of our laboratory courses, has 20% of his time allocated to Faculty
Waste Management and Safety. In addition the Department has been picking up
costs of chemicals, materials and reagents for courses taught by other
departments (e.g., Freshman Chemistry courses taught by Bioresource
Engineering). The Department also lost secretarial staff (0.5 FTE) two years ago
without cause, and this component will need to be replaced and upgraded to 1.0
FTE if the department is to provide adequate support to its new thrust and
staffing.

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Lack of an Industrial Internship/Stage: The Department has no dedicated
Professional Internship/Stage Coordinator to coordinate the newly implemented
“internship/stage” in the concurrent program as does the School of Dietetics and
Human Nutrition. Our competition, Université Laval, has two structured 12 week
industrial stages. Although an Internship Coordinator has been appointed for the
Faculty, it appears that coordinating the Concurrent Food Science/Nutrition
degree program internship is not within their mandate. One of the agreed
prerequisites associated with the development of the Concurrent Food and
Nutrition degree program was the requirement of a professional internship
coordinator to interact with the food industry, preferably via a Coop type program
to facilitate and arrange suitable internships for this program. The current lack of
a coordinator will cause significant problems in the very near future as students
are now close to reaching the internship component in their program and the
Department is not in a position to deliver this element of the program.

Lack of Pilot Plant Facilities: There is no suitable Pilot Plant available for
teaching and research to properly address the processing component of the
Food Science and Food Engineering programs and/or to perform contractual
work and research with the food industry. The original Pilot Plant, a renovated
coal storage area next to the Physical Plant, was never adequate, nor supported
by the Faculty. As of 2004, it could not be further modified due to new building
code restrictions. Staff working in processing must now travel to St. Hyacinthe
and work in collaboration with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, a very
substantial trek from the campus with no timely access and very limited ability to
undertake new research initiatives. Suitable Pilot Plant facilities are an essential
component to processing and food safety research and training in Food Science
(and Engineering) and this basic requirement has been ignored by the
administration for more than two decades.
Lack of Food Safety/Microbiology/Toxicology Expertise: With the passing of
Dr. James Smith in 2006, a vacuum was left in the food microbiology component
of our discipline. This position has only been partially filled (0.5 FTE) as of 2008
through a new hire jointly appointed to the Department of Animal Science. With
the pending thrust into food safety, this aspect of Food Science will need to be
bolstered significantly, including positions in food microbiology, food safety and
food toxicology, these being core competencies that will be required to seriously
respond to the new Faculty Food Safety Initiative.




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Food Science Opportunities:
Demand for Qualified Food Scientists: The different sectors of the food and
beverage processing industry provide a variety of employment opportunities to
our graduates as do government, ancillary sectors and to some extent NGOs.
This is because the food industry is the largest manufacturing industry in Quebec
and the second largest in Canada, with 2/3 of the companies located in Montreal.
The current demand for McGill food science graduates well exceeds supply, with
the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) also ramping up its recruiting
because of heightened industry and public awareness of food safety issues due
to a number of high profile incidents. Thus there is potential to expand into food
safety and respond to the increase in demand for food science graduates,
especially if they have strong food safety credentials and expertise at both the
undergraduate and postgraduate levels.

Renewal and Growth Opportunity: To maintain the current undergraduate
program in Food Science, a minimum of 3.0 FTEs are anticipated for possible
retirements by 2014, with an additional 0.5 FTE to bring the microbiology position
to full complement. In addition we would need at least one new food safety
expert and one expert in packaging and minimal processing, plus one
internship/stage coordinator for the Concurrent Food Science/Nutrition degree
program, if the latter role is not carried out by the Faculty coordinator. Beyond
these basic needs, should any early retirements occur, bridging funds will also be
required to prevent the ongoing teaching load from overwhelming the remaining
staff. With regard to the new Food Safety position, the individual recruited would
need to be senior, with strong food safety and microbiology credentials and the
capability to direct and launch new research initiatives in this area, in order to
successfully lead, implement and participate in the Faculty’s Food Safety
initiative. While such a Food Safety position has recently been advertised by the
Faculty (Document 15), the credentials sought are very vague, and the
Department in which the successful candidate will be appointed is left open. It is
difficult to see this position as being credible or making an impact unless the
person is associated with the Food Science Department in a central supporting
role. In addition a new position for a person with minimal processing and food
packaging expertise will be required to back up and bolster these two aspects of
the Food Science discipline in terms of teaching and research expertise.
New Funding Opportunities: As outlined in the Five Year Faculty Strategic
Research Plan (Document 4), Food Safety and Quality is to be one of the three
Faculty research “pillars”. The plan is designed to focus Faculty energies in a
more unified and cohesive manner to serve as a vehicle for change, provide a
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means of replacing aging staff, expand our base staff complement, initiate new
research programs and upgrade infrastructure. Now that funding appears
assured, this provides a basis for optimism and an opportunity for the
Department of Food Science to contribute its expertise to the Faculty and “food”
pillar of the plan. With rejuvenated manpower the potential to leverage this
investment into new ideas for growth and funding should be substantial.

Food Science Threats (Measurable)
Budget: As noted, the Departmental budget is clearly inadequate and doing
more with less can only be carried so far. Course fees are being implemented in
an attempt to stay afloat; however, a budget has to be allocated that reflects the
reality of operating the Department and support its programs.
Competition: McGill has one of the strongest Food Science programs in
Canada, but it is in the unfortunate position to be in the only province which has
two Food Science departments, with provincial support largely favoring the
Université Laval. Confronted with this unbalanced funding situation, the
Department of Food Science at McGill has carved itself a unique niche with
strengths in food chemistry, food biochemistry and processing and has focused
on obtaining federal and industrial research funding. Pedagogically, we have also
developed a uniquely principles-based program, as opposed to the commodity-
based programs that are the norm, so as to prepare our undergraduates for
employment in the broader Canadian and US markets. To some extent, our
research interactions at the Provincial level have been constrained by linguistic
limitations as well as competition from Université Laval. The lesson we have
taken from this constraint is that facility in both languages has to be a key
consideration when hiring new staff in the future. We would like to interact more
with local companies in terms of research; however, while larger food companies
have in-house R&D, most small and medium enterprises (SMEs) do not invest in
R&D and, as indicated by La Commission sur l’avenir de l’agriculture et
l’agroalimentaire québécois (Document 16) only 15% of the food companies in
Quebec make use of the R&D resources available to them. For these and other
reasons, more of our research has been grant driven, with industrial interactions
tending toward larger national and international companies. As ongoing liaison
with industry is a key element in our discipline, the internship component built
into our Concurrent Food Science/Nutrition degree program is seen, in part, as a
means of building and maintaining stronger ties with the Montreal food industry in
the future.



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In regard to the Food Safety Initiative, there are already a plethora of institutions
and organizations across the country which claim to deal in “food safety” in
various guises, addressing training, technical and laboratory services at both the
provincial and national levels (i.e., CINTECH, University of Guelph, Guelph Food
Technology Center, Ag. Canada in St-Hyacinthe, Transtech, Transbiotech,
Institut de technologie agro-alimentaire University of Laval, U of T, Canadian
Food Safety Institute, OMAF, Agat Laboratories, Certispec, POS, etc.). Given the
multitude of organizations claiming food safety expertise, entry into the food
safety realm will need to be based on sound market research in terms of program
development, focus on specific niches, and optimize the Department and the
Faculty’s core competencies to address specific needs of industry and
government. At present, neither the Department’s core competencies, nor those
of the Faculty include a structured food safety component and this new thrust will
need to be led, developed and integrated by someone with substantial expertise;
tentatively the individual targeted by the Food Safety Position advertised
(Document 15).

Strategic Plan
Vision
   (1) To continue strengthening Food Science and Food Chemistry programs
       and maintain and strengthen the high standing our programs have in the
       discipline of Food Science nationally and internationally.
   (2) To lead the Food Safety initiative at the Faculty level by developing a
       strong and viable graduate Food Safety program (Table 8), a related
       research program and a series of Food Safety short courses for industry
       (Table 9)
   (3) To replace retiring Department staff with bilingual new hires and
       strengthen our Faculty through interdepartmental collaboration, developing
       structured research and academic program ties.
   (4) To continue to contribute to excellence in a more integrated manner
       within the Faculty and University


Strategic Actions
In Relation to Critical Mass and Synergy:
Under the strategic reframing initiative, the Department’s focus for the future will
be to further increase undergraduate enrollment, to strengthen our enrollment
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                                                   FDSC STRATEGIC PLAN 2011-2016




mix with the School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition and to develop a
Concurrent Food Science/Engineering degree in collaboration with the
Department of Bioresource Engineering. Closer collaboration should also lead to
new synergies and cost efficiencies. The Department will further exploit the
success of the Concurrent Food Science/Nutrition degree program operating in
conjunction with the School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition to forge new
collaborative links with the School through the new sensory evaluation and
product development facilities we share.

In Relation to Program Development:
Concurrent Degree in Food Science/Food Engineering: The development of an
innovative concurrent degree program in Food Science/Food Engineering is
proposed. According to “La Commission” (Document 16), see page 125), there
are almost no qualified food engineers being produced in Quebec and there is a
dearth of Food Engineering programs in Canada. Thus, such a concurrent
degree program should be unique and address a real need. This concurrent
degree program would be designed to facilitate the integration (Figure 13) of the
Food Science and Engineering components and focus on the commonalities of
the departments of Food Science and Bioresource Engineering to enhance their
innate strengths in the following key areas: food processing, waste processing
and energy efficiency. It would also be supported by a deeper strategic research
alliance between the two departments, with the rationale for this closer
association being summarized below:
   (1) The two departments have a substantial common research component; at
       least 3 faculty members in Bioresource Engineering (Drs. Raghavan,
       Ngadi and Orsat) are explicitly carrying out food science related research
       and are key players in the Food Safety and Quality pillar of the 5 Year
       Strategic Research Plan (Document 4).
   (2) The two departments have a very similar orientation: both are research-
       intensive departments focusing on applied sciences. The departments
       have ongoing collaborations and can readily share resources by virtue of
       the close proximity of their research facilities.
Non-Thesis M.Sc. in Food Safety: With the FSQP funded, the intent is to develop
a Non-Thesis M.Sc. in Food Safety, which is outlined in Table 8. With the
Department’s current expertise, it can lead the academic coordination for this
program on behalf of the Faculty, fine tune this outline and ensure that the
appropriate pedagogical expertise is obtained, if it is not available locally. For
example, it is anticipated that food law and legislation will be an important
component and could be provided by the Faculty of Law and that other expertise
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                                                   FDSC STRATEGIC PLAN 2011-2016




within and outside of the Faculty will contribute to this program. A question that
arises however is whether the current Non-Thesis M.Sc. in Food Science should
be dropped in favor of the Non-Thesis M.Sc. in Food Safety to limit our program
offerings.
Short Courses in Food Safety: It is anticipated that short courses, designed to be
revenue positive, will be developed for industry and government employees and
organized through the Continuing Professional Education program which will be
supported by a professional manager in the near future. Although the courses
will be developed in-house by staff, they, and possibly other professionals, will
deliver them and these courses will need to be integrated and synchronized with
the overall theme and direction to be provided by the newly appointed resident
Food Safety Director.
Continuance of Existing Programs:
  (1) Program in Food Science: The core IFT/CIFST Food Science program will
      continue to be the mainstay of the Department and discipline. It will serve
      as a basic component supporting the Concurrent Food Science/Nutrition
      degree program as well as the proposed Concurrent Food Science/Food
      Engineering degree program, as well as elements of the Non-Thesis M.Sc.
      in Food Safety.
   (2) Program in Food Chemistry: In addition to the core IFT/CIFST Food
       Science curriculum, this program encompasses additional required
       courses, including courses in reaction kinetics, enzymology, flavor
       chemistry, proximate analysis, and instrumental techniques, etc. all of
       which are required for product development, food safety and quality
       assurance.

In Relation to Leadership:
Research Program in Food Safety: The Department has been a leader in Food
Chemistry and related domains, however, our expertise in food safety ended
suddenly with the passing of Dr. James Smith. This void has been only partially
filled by our replacement hire, Dr. Martin Chénier, however, he contributes only
0.5 FTE and his focus is not on food safety per se. The Department does deal
with food safety peripherally through teaching and research, but more from a
chemical and toxicological as opposed to a microbiological standpoint. It would
be logical to locate the incoming Food Safety hire in the Department of Food
Science to provide leadership and direction to the Faculty and integrate the
retiree replacement hires into the broader Faculty Food Safety Initiative which
he/she will direct. This can be achieved via the funding forthcoming from the

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                                                     FDSC STRATEGIC PLAN 2011-2016




FSQP initiative, possibly with additional support from Ministère de l’Agriculture et
Pêche du Quebec (MAPAQ) and the Montreal food industry. In this context, it is
essential that a bilingual individual be hired to broaden the interactive and
support base to the greatest extent possible.

Food Safety: Teaching Component: This would be a central theme that would
serve to link Food Science to other departments within the Faculty and possibly
other faculties via a new Non-Thesis M.Sc. Food Safety program. Microbes such
as bacteria, fungi, yeast and molds are both beneficial (intimately involved and
used for the production of fermented food products such as in the bakery, dairy
and meat industries, as well as the beer and wine industries) and harmful,
causing food-borne diseases. Thus, food microbiology in relation to food
production and safety will be central to this program as well as its sanitation and
regulatory aspects. Microbiologists from other departments could also fit well
and find opportunities under the Food Safety umbrella. Funding and staffing can
be sourced from the Food Safety and Quality Program which target this initiative.
The Faculty of Law could contribute to the regulatory component. Again,
microbiology, being at the core of food safety, is also intimately tied in with food
processing and engineering and would address safety issues from production
through to processing, preservation and storage providing a clear link to
Bioresource Engineering. Microbiology is also the foundation of quality control,
quality assurance and hazard critical control point (HACCP) analysis, as well as
sanitation programs, all suited to short courses for industry. In addition, food
microbiology is also critical to the development of food biotechnology, a growing
field of endeavor. In recognition of the importance of food safety issues the
industry is facing, MAPAQ has recently made Food Safety a priority, appears to
be prepared to invest in this type of initiative and may be an additional source of
financial and/or infrastructure support.

In Relationship to New Initiatives:
Using the concurrent degree as a vehicle, it should be possible to achieve new
interdepartmental synergies, develop broader research strategies and
pedagogically stronger programs through closer staff interactions with the
Department of Bioresource Engineering and the School Dietetics and Human
Nutrition. Replacement of retiring staff in conjunction with new hires would take
the Department of Food Science beyond its base complement of 9.5 FTE to 12
academic FTE (Figure 1) and 1.0 additional secretarial FTEs. This would provide
the manpower to support these new initiatives and result in the rejuvenation and
reframing of the Department to make food safety one of the three pillars on which
the future of the Faculty rests.
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                                                   FDSC STRATEGIC PLAN 2011-2016




Required Financial and Human Resources
To achieve the Department’s strategic goals, resources are required and these
are summarized below:

Human Resources
   (1)    Replacement academic staff (3 FTE) for pending retirements:
           (a) Food Scientist - Courses covered: Teach Introduction to Food
                 Science, Food Chemistry, Graduate Course
           (b) Food Toxicologist – Teach Food Toxins and Toxicants, Analytical
                Chemistry, Graduate Course
           (c) Food Biotechnologist – Teach Food Biotechnology, Professional
                Practice, Graduate Course
   (2)    New academic staff (2.5 FTE):
           (a) Food Safety/Microbiologist – Lead Food Safety within Faculty via
                the Department (Director of Food Safety)
           (b) Food Packaging/Minimal Processing
           (c) Microbiologist (0.5 FTE) – upgrade current 0.5 FTE to 1.0
   (3)    Food Internship Coordinator (1.0 FTE) - Food industry liaison/internship
   (4)    Replacement of 0.5 FTE of office staff lost earlier and upgrading to 1.0
         FTE in order to support the increased workload of the rejuvenated
         Department and its programs

Implementation Timeline
New food safety, minimal processing/packaging and food microbiology hires (2.5
FTE) to start 2011-2012. Three academic replacement staff to be placed
progressively as staff discloses their retirement dates (likely by 2014). Program
development to begin in 2012-2013 in collaboration with Bioresource
Engineering, with 1.0 FTE secretarial staff implemented to support program and
new staff. Summer courses are to start 2012, Pilot Plant planning to begin 2014
and tentatively, in 2016-17, hiring of two final retirement-replacement academics.

Operating Budget
The accumulated deficit due to past underfunding must be rectified, and the
accumulated permanent salary deficit imposed by the University on the
Department (see Documents 17 and 18), for which the Department is not
responsible, needs to be cleared. The Department requires a realistic working
budget commensurate with current and anticipated program requirements.


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                                                     FDSC STRATEGIC PLAN 2011-2016




Pilot Plant
Longer term: Develop a strategy with Bioresource Engineering for a Pilot Plant
facility, equipment and support staff based on joint teaching and research needs,
as well as that associated with the Food Safety Initiative. This would require that
this initiative be part of a future Capital Campaign.

Conclusion
This document outlines the current status of the Department and where it could
go given the opportunity, manpower and resources. Hypothetically, with teaching
and research alliances developed between Food Science and Bioresource
Engineering and Nutrition via concurrent degree programs, and financial support
from the new FSQP, critical mass will be achieved, new synergies attained, with
new leadership and initiatives emerging as a result. As the intent of the FSQP
initiative is to facilitate participation and collaboration amongst units within the
broader Faculty, the actions proposed are designed to foster excellence and
provide programs that are meaningful, provide employment prospects and thus
facilitate an increase in student enrollment. In the process the Department of
Food Science would renew itself, develop individual and common strengths, and
correct perceived as well as real weaknesses, thus strengthening the Faculty as
a whole. As noted, the Department of Food Science is at a make or break point
in its generational cycle, the FSQP initiative opportunely coinciding with more
than half of the Department staff turning 65 within the next five years. This
presents a unique opportunity to reframe the Department in a more holistic
manner within the Faculty as well as to guide it in participating in the strategic
food safety objectives the Faculty has decided to invest its future development in.

At the time of this writing, the Department does not have a Chair in place to
conduct its day-to-day operations. For close to two months, the Department has
been administered by the Dean (Document 19), pending delivery of this report,
despite the fact that an interim Chair (Document 20) had been put forward by the
Department in lieu of Dr. Kermasha accepting a second term as Chair
(Document 21). This peculiar situation has led to low morale and threatens to
undermine the very essence of what this report is trying to achieve: ensure
continuity, move on to deal with the issues outlined in this report, and thus begin
the process of renewal.

In conclusion, the Department is justifiably proud of what has been achieved over
the years, albeit with limited support from the administration. This report has
been prepared knowing full well what action is required for the Department to
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                                                   FDSC STRATEGIC PLAN 2011-2016




rejuvenate itself and contribute to the Faculty and to the broader University. We
hope that this report, and the process associated with it, will lead to an
investment of the resources required for it to bear fruit for the Department,
Faculty and University.

FRV




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                                                 FDSC STRATEGIC PLAN 2011-2016




Signatures




__________________      Dr. I. Alli

__________________     Dr. M. Chénier

__________________     Dr. A. Ismail

__________________     Dr. S. Karboune

__________________     Dr. S. Kermasha

__________________     Dr. W. Marshall

__________________     Dr. H. Ramaswamy

__________________     Dr. B. Simpson

__________________     Dr. F. van de Voort

__________________     Dr. V. Yaylayan


Academic Staff of Department of Food Science and Agricultural Chemistry




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                                                              FDSC STRATEGIC PLAN 2011-2016




Appendices
Documents

Document 1 – Department Minutes of September 29, 2010
Department of Food Science and Agricultural Chemistry
Minutes of the Meeting
September 29, 2010

The regular meeting of the Department was called to order at 2:00 p.m. on Wednesday,
September 29th, 2010 in MS2-084 by Dr. S. Kermasha, Chair.


Present: Drs. Alli, Chénier, Ismail, Karboune, Kermasha, Marshall, Ramaswamy, van de Voort,
Yaylayan and Mrs. LaDuke.
Absent: Dr. Simpson
Guest: Dean Madramootoo

Approval of Agenda: The agenda was unanimously approved as distributed.
Approval of Minutes: The minutes of the previous meeting were unanimously approved as
distributed.


1. Office / Administration
   a. Expense reports and travel advances: Leslie is responsible for assisting in checking and
      processing expense reports and travel advances prior to their submission to the Financial
      Services Team.
   b. Graduate program admissions:           Diane is responsible for collecting the required
      components of graduate program admission files; once complete they are given to Leslie
      for further processing (circulating files for supervisors, program changes, decisions).
   c. Thesis program supervisors: If applicants have specified potential supervisors, the file is
      circulated to them. If applicants have not specified potential supervisors, the file is
      circulated to academic staff. Applicants are advised to refer to the Department website
      and are encouraged to communicate with potential supervisors. If no supervisor is found
      for M.Sc. thesis program applicants, they may request changing their applied-to program
      to the M.Sc. non-thesis program. Dr. van de Voort informs M.Sc. non-thesis students that
      they cannot apply to the Ph.D. program.
   d. Teaching laboratory supplies: The Department may request an advance for the term, and
      course professors may use the allotted amount to make purchases which will be processed
      via an expense report which Leslie will initiate. Dr. Kermasha will provide Leslie with a
      list of eligible courses per term, a dollar amount per course, and Leslie will administer the
      funds.

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2. Dean Madramootoo
   Dean Madramootoo joined the meeting, as per his request to attend the next scheduled
   department meetings in the Faculty.
   a. Dean Madramootoo announced that Dr. Kermasha would step down as Chair as of
       December 31, 2010, and asked that either a Departmental committee be formed to find a
       new Chair or asked if anyone would come forward to express their interest in the
       position.
   b. Dean Madramootoo stressed that there are challenges and issues that need to be addressed
       in the Department, and if not addressed, the Department may not continue as it has. The
       Department is losing ground gradually, compared to others in the Faculty.
       i. Undergraduate enrollment: The Department had the chance to rebuild, but is still low
       compared to other departments in the Faculty. The Dean asks that the Department work
       with Dr. David Lewis in the Student Affairs Office on time tabling, recruitment, etc.
       ii.     Institutional culture: The culture within the Department is hostile with in-fighting,
               and the only one in the Faculty that cannot solve problems from within. The
               Dean asks that academic staff rally collectively and collaborate.
       iii.    Leadership: There are no big leadership initiatives from the Department and
               energies are spent individually. There is a box around each staff member, and
               again around the Department. The Dean asks the Department to capitalize
               sufficiently on Department strengths.
       iv.     Operating and research funds: There have been two budget cuts of 2.5%. It is
               necessary to support the base budget with big initiatives involving external funds.
               The Provost has kept 1.5% of the budget cut funds aside for a priority pool.
               Requests were made by Directors and Chairs; no proposal was submitted by the
               Department the first year. The second year a proposal was submitted, but it was
               not true to the context for which the funds were intended.
       v.      Change will take time and energy. The Dean asks that the Department use time
               and energy to think outward and reach outward, not to let fear continue to
               marginalize the Department, otherwise it could have the result of Agricultural
               Economics.
       vi.     Food Safety Program: The Program is moving ahead with consulting activities
               and there is a presentation to Faculty on Monday. The idea is to work with
               industry. Only one person from the Department has signed up. In the last Chairs
               meeting it was mentioned that there were four positions open in the Faculty, one
               of which was the food safety position. With access and leverage from the Dean,
               the position can be developed with the Faculty, with Faculty funds in addition to
               external (industry) funds. All Directors/Chairs were asked to respond – no
               proposal came from Food Science.
               Question: How does the Department fit into that? Question: How can the
               Faculty move on food safety with no role from the Department? If there is no role
               for the Department, it could be the demise of the Department.


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                                                            FDSC STRATEGIC PLAN 2011-2016




            Example: The Dean mentioned Directors/Chairs are invited to be involved with
            the Global Food Security Conference. Money was not a problem, and gives
            visibility externally. There were three proposals to submitted to IDRC –
            potentially $15M for the Faculty. With that leverage the Faculty can approach
            Gates, etc. for more funding for the graduate programs, etc. These are big
            initiatives and are moving ahead. Food Science is presently not playing a role.

c.   The Dean asked those present for their views.

     Dr. van de Voort said that the Department had made big efforts over the years, but had
     difficulties in the past. He said they met the challenges with regard to research, teaching
     and the programs. He agrees that the Department needs restructuring - something better
     than it is now – but asks how can the Department be better restructured. Dr. van de
     Voort said the Department has not been part of the exercise, and that there was a problem
     with the past administration in that the Department did the ground work, but did not get
     the credit.

     The Dean said something must be done that will be successful; that he needs to hear from
     the Department itself – how is the Department going to address the difficulties it is
     currently facing.

     Dr. Alli said he is surprised to hear that we did not contribute, as he provided Dr.
     Yaylayan’s name and worked with him.

     Dr. Yaylayan said there must have been a misunderstanding about the function of our
     contribution regarding food safety; not asked to provide names.

     Dr. Ismail said four months ago he spent three hours with Sylvia, provided documents,
     discussed Departmental needs, but there was no communication since then.

     The Dean said Sylvia’s mandate was to build a database of expertise for the Faculty. On
     November 30th Jacob will approach industry with this material. The Dean asks where is
     the leadership in the Department to take on this file. The Dean had shared the background
     with Dr. Kermasha. The onus is on the Department. The Dean said he cannot tell the
     Department what to do and cannot wait for the Department to act. The work has been
     done, a network built of 20-25 companies (all public information) – he urges the
     Department to take it and use the information to lead, perhaps for an NCE or CFI.

     Dr. van de Voort said initiatives have been tried in the past with no result, and feels that
     this is a tenure-track assignment. The Dean said the Chair and the Department does not
     have a choice, and encourages the Department to run with it, otherwise it means watching
     our own demise. It may be possible to get $100M with industry; we are past the $1K
     stage.

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                                                      FDSC STRATEGIC PLAN 2011-2016




Dr. Ismail said he is applying for grants, trying to show initiative, but his past CFI
application was not successful.

The Dean urges the Department to apply with other departments. Increased research
funds means increased funds for the Department, and in turn for the Faculty. The Dean
asks each academic to stop thinking individually, and urges everyone to think bigger, to
collectively do something bigger and better.

Dr. Ismail asked what is the comparison between individual funding versus the larger
initiatives. He asks if it would be possible to recruit a full professor, through NSERC or
industry, for a chair position.

The Dean mentioned that alumni come to him rather than the Department Chair – this is
the only Department where this happens. The Dean asked Dr. Ismail if he is willing to
lead. Dr. Ismail said he would need support, guidance, a mission document. The Dean
said entrepreneurship is needed to generate income for the Department for equipment,
etc., and that the Department Chair must lead for bigger and better initiatives for the
Department. Dr. Ismail mentioned the plans for a 25 year anniversary event which he
hopes will lead to endowments from alumni.

Dr. Karboune mentioned she joined the Department in the last two years, and agrees that
improvements and initiatives are needed, but pointed out the Department now has two
new programs (concurrent and non-thesis).

The Dean said that salaries and tuition are part of the budget - $8K/year per undergrad,
$12K/year per M.Sc. and $15K/year Ph.D. student – this barely covers our expenses.
The Dean said the Department does have some strengths, but must be able to use them to
become stronger.

Dr. Chénier asked rhetorically how should things have been done – but agrees that the
Department must now start fresh.

Dr. Ramaswamy said that all academic staff have contacts in industry.

Dr. Alli said the list is being handled by a consultant, and unless there is commitment
from industry, the Food Safety initiative cannot be successful. He said we have done the
legwork and participated as much as we can, as participants. He does not feel the
Department should have the leadership role until we get something concrete from
industry.

Dr. Ramaswamy suggested contacting research heads.


                                       25
                                                      FDSC STRATEGIC PLAN 2011-2016




Dean Madramootoo said that there is an industry alumni board who do the contacting.
He said the Department cannot maintain the status quo, cannot re-appoint the chair to
muddle along another five years. The Dean says there is advantage around the
Department, cautions not to build a fence and stand alone, to move forward with
initiatives. With regard to the Provost’s priority pool, he said we must ask: a) how the
request builds on the Faculty and b) how the interest fits in with other components and
initiatives in the University.

Dr. van de Voort said the definition of food safety is very broad, and that actual funds
based on food science is narrow.

The Dean asks to look at where our alliances may be: Plant Science, Animal Science,
Parasitology, Engineering, etc.; there can be alliances outside of the Faculty (e.g., law
and medicine). The Dean said the academic staff and the Department must take the
initiative. Five years ago the Dean closed the program, the Department worked on the
program for four years, and yet have not achieved its full potential. The Dean urges the
Department to work with the Student Affairs Office, stop restrictions and increase
numbers.

Dr. van de Voort asked how the Department would benefit.

Dean Madramootoo said there are no promises. He said the Department must take the
initiative and go with it, use our resources, work with Faculty members with collegiality,
ask how we are going to be team players. The Dean said the Department is perceived in
the Faculty as territorial, and cautions that we will be looked on with suspicion. There
are ranges in scales, and obvious stages – FQRNT and NSERC are not NCE scale. The
Dean reiterated that as of December 31 the present Chair’s term ends, leadership must be
found, and the Department academic staff must work together to benefit the Department
and the Faculty.

The Dean mentioned that the initiative for a new Faculty building is in the works. He
mentioned that NRS created their own vision committee to plan the next 25 years,
creating new positions for the new direction of their department, taking into consideration
that with each retirement courses will have to allocated to other professors. The Dean
mentioned that the University advances bridging funds as part of the plan to keep a
Department going. Courses enrollment is critical. Bridging funds may be available from
the Faculty with a plan (not for courses with low enrollment).

Dr. van de Voort is named as interim Departmental Chair.

Dean Madramootoo stressed the urgency of the situation, his discomfort in having to
touch on some of these issues, and asks that we deal with our institutional culture
problems and how other departments perceive us. The Dean left the meeting.

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                                                             FDSC STRATEGIC PLAN 2011-2016




3. Resulting Discussion
   Dr. Alli felt that the Dean’s comments were not accurate, and it was not a fair assessment. He
   said names were provided for the food safety initiative, but there was no response. Dr. Alli
   said that we can meet with industry, but if industry does not come through, we go through the
   exercise for nothing.

4. Academic Program Status
   Dr. Kermasha provided student numbers:

 Undergraduate Programs: Currently registered Fall 2010 – 106 students
 B.Sc. Concurrent Certificate
 U0 5 U0 4 U1 7
 U1 22 U1 12 U2 1
 U2 15 U2 4
 U3 30 U3 6
 Total:72 Total:26 Total:8


 Graduate Programs: Currently registered Fall 2010 – 52 students
 M.Sc. Ph.D. M.Sc. Non-Thesis
 12 24 15

5. Graduate Students
   Graduate funding plan: To be discussed at a later meeting (document circulated).
   Thesis Advisory Committee: To be discussed at a later meeting.
   Comprehensive Examination: 1.5 years - To be discussed at a later meeting.
   M.Sc. Non-Thesis transfer to M.Sc. Thesis: Must apply by end of first session.
   M.Sc. Thesis transfer to Ph.D.: Must apply by end of first year.
   Progress Reports: Will be requested shortly.

6. Ordre de chimistes
   Mandatory membership by November 15 – To be discussed at a later meeting.

Meeting was adjourned at 4:00 p.m. by Dr. Kermasha.
Minutes submitted by: Leslie Ann LaDuke, Administrative Assistant
Approved by: Dr. S. Kermasha, Chair and Dr. F. van de Voort




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                                                            FDSC STRATEGIC PLAN 2011-2016




Document 2 – Faculty Minutes of May 15, 2010 (extract)
The May 15, 2009 meeting of Staff of the Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences,
held in R3-048, was called to order at 2:30 p.m. with Professor Donnelly in the Chair and
Professor Naseem as Secretary.

The Dean mentioned that the Chairs had a very successful retreat last week, in which the chairs
discussed challenges they are facing, new developments taking place within their units. Much of
the discussion centered around the Faculty’s new research plan and the three broad areas of
environment, food, nutrition and health and also bio based life sciences. Some very interesting
initiatives were brought forward.
The Dean invited everyone to attend the Convocation next week. Our honorary degree recipient
is Professor Walter P. Falcon. Dr. Falcon is and Emeritus and Farnsworth Professor of
International Policy at Stanford University and he will be giving a lecture on Climate Change
and Agriculture on Thursday, May 21 at 2:00 p.m. The Dean encouraged everyone to attend to
hear the speech and to welcome Professor Falcon to our campus.
Finally, the Dean mentioned that we are in the midst of preparing for the 2nd McGill Conference
on Global Food Security. We are currently lining up the speakers and there is a lot of interest.
The Principal has agreed to co-chair the Conference along with Marilyn Knox, President of
Nestlé Canada. The Dean will be calling on Faculty to help assist with the Conference.

The September 17, 2010 meeting of Staff of the Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental
Sciences, held in R3-048, was called to order at 2:30 p.m. with Professor Cue in the Chair and
Professor Adamowski as Secretary.


*Nothing relevant to the Food Safety and Quality Program was noted in these minutes.*




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                                                              FDSC STRATEGIC PLAN 2011-2016




Document 3 – Memo from Dean Dated November 5, 2010
From:                             Chandra A. Madramootoo, Dr.
Sent:                             Friday, November 05, 2010 5:55 PM
To:                                Inteaz Alli, Dr.; Frederik R. Van de Voort, Dr.; Salwa
                            Karboune, Dr.
Cc:                                Selim Kermasha, Dr.; Joanne TenEyck
Subject:                          Food safety position and moving forward
Attachments:                     FSQP Position Nov 5 2010.doc

Dear Colleagues,

As a follow up to our meeting this afternoon, attached please find the position description, as
discussed. Also this is to confirm that if the Department comes forward with a well thought out,
sound and reasonable plan to restructure and reposition itself within the Faculty, taking
advantage of new opportunities, then I am prepared to work with your Department Chair and
another unit head to make the restructuring successful. I emphasize the word “reasonable”, since
we also want to see success. You have my personal commitment on that front, since my goal is
to build and grow a Faculty which is in a leadership position on all fronts.

Please feel free to consult with me, or seek my inputs, as you develop your plans.

Chandra

Chandra A. Madramootoo Ph.D., Ing., FCSBE, FASABE
James McGill Professor and Dean
Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
McGill University, Macdonald Campus
21,111 Lakeshore Road
Ste. Anne de Bellevue QC
Canada H9X 3V9
Tel: 514-398-7707
Fax: 514-398-7766
email: chandra.madramootoo@mcgill.ca

                               Give us the power to help.
                             Donnez-nous le pouvoir d’aider.




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                                                              FDSC STRATEGIC PLAN 2011-2016




Document 4 – Faculty Minutes of October 2010 (extract)
The point the Dean is trying to make is that as departments they have to be more aggressive. The
Dean threw the departments a challenge to participate actively in the faculty and not stay on the
sidelines and to try to get as much research money as possible, to increase graduate and
undergraduate enrolment etc. and that there is great potential to grow. Professor Van de Voort
stated that he had seen the five year Faculty Research Plan on the faculty web site and wanted to
know if there was a plan to discuss this at the Faculty Meeting. The Dean retorted that the Chairs
had been widely consulted and were intimately involved in the preparation of the research plan,
they were asked to take it back to their departments for consultation and feedback. Professor Alli
led the Food Safety Program discussion. This was not done overnight and the plan went through
many iterations before deciding on the final version. While the Dean had no objection to the plan
being discussed at Faculty he made it clear that there was certainly no plan to reopen or rewrite
the strategic plan. Professor Van de Voort asked that the Strategic Research Plan be brought to
the November meeting for discussion as he wanted a clearer understanding of the plan and
clarification from the Dean and the Chairs as to what the implications of this plan are for the
Faculty. In particular Professor Van de Voort stated that he was interested in knowing if there are
any Faculty structural changes contemplated or pending based on this plan and if it is
independent or in a way dependent on the success of the FSQP initiative presently underway. He
said that answers to these questions will help everyone better understand the ramifications of this
strategic plan, what resources might be available for its development and success and how
individuals and departments might contribute more effectively to attaining its objectives. The
Dean suggested that Professor Van de Voort request Associate Dean Jabaji to bring it. After
some debate, Professor Van de Voort made a formal request that this be done.




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Document 5 – Faculty Strategic Research Plan
Double click for full document




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Document 6 – Faculty Minutes of November 2010 (extract)

b. Strategic Research Plan – Professor Jabaji
At the last Faculty meeting, Professor Van de Voort had made a formal request that the Faculty’s
5 Year Strategic Research Plan be placed on the agenda for discussion and elaboration at a future
Faculty meeting so that the implications associated with its content could be clarified and
discussed. In answer to this request Professor Jabaji made a presentation on how the Faculty’s
Strategic Research Plan (SRP) evolved and came to be. Professor Jabaji explained that she sits
on a committee with all the Associate Deans of Research from all the Faculties and that they
collectively helped develop a SRP for the University. Our SRP in turn had to be in line with the
University’s SRP. Our Strategic Research Plan (SRP) for the Faculty was developed during the
latter part of 2009, with inputs from the Chairs and Directors of the academic units in the
Faculty, and work groups comprised of the Chairs and Directors. They solicited inputs from staff
within their units. The primary goals of the SRP were identifying broad areas of research pursuit,
our research priorities that we wished to advance in the coming years, thereby enhancing funding
opportunities to the Faculty. In preparing the SRP, we were guided by FAES mission and the
primary goal was critical mass, new hires, enhancing funding and new initiatives. Professor
Jabaji presented a timeline for the whole process:
• Winter 2009, ADR drafted SRP based on previous planning and strategy documents including
the Faculty Strategic Plan (2004), the Faculty Strategic Research Plan (2004), FAES CFI-
Innovation Priorities and Projects (2004), The Faculty Case for Support (2007), Long Term
Planning Issues (2007), Priority Pool Allocation Submission (2008), FAES Compact (2008) and
the McGill Strategic Research Plan (2007). 2010-2011/3
• April 2009, Chairs presented with three large thematic research thrusts and sub-themes which
were found in the draft SRP.
• Sub-theme teams were assigned to refine thematic research thrusts and sub-themes.
• Chairs met with their departments to review their own research plans.
• May 2009, Chairs retreat dedicated to discussion on SRP
• Summer 2009, with all this information, thematic groups met and refined themes and sub-
themes.

Three distinctive pillars of teaching and research were identified: Agriculture, Biosciences and
Bio-products, Environment of Natural and Rural Ecosystems, and Food, Nutrition and Health.
Professor Jabaji explained that the whole process took one and half years of planning and is an
evolving document. Professor Van de Voort thanked Professor Jabaji for her presentation and for
clarifying the process.




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Document 7 – Faculty Minutes of December 2010 (extract)


Professor Van de Voort asked the Dean about the Food Safety and Quality Meeting that was held
in Toronto. The Dean replied that the meeting was outstanding, the industry have indicated that
they will support the program and are united in their belief in the program. It is going to be a
multidisciplinary program with the Faculties of Medicine, Law and Management. An interim
Board of Directors was agreed upon with the Nancy Coiteru, President of Food and Consumer
Products of Canada, and a Mac graduate, as Chair, Marc Guay, President of PepsiCo and Darryl
Rowe, President, McCain Foods, have both agreed to be members of the Board. They are going
to meet the week of January 17th to work out the details of membership and the terms of
reference.




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Document 8 – Department Annual Report 1987-88
Double click for full document




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Document 9 – Definitions
Definitions
It is important to define key terms and concepts to begin any productive assessment and the
definitions below represent the definition of reframing, the objective of this process as well as
definitions of food science, food safety and quality, all which are relevant to placing everything
into an appropriate context.

Defined:
Reframing
Food
Food Science
Food Safety
Food Quality

Reframing: Involves the ability to see things differently, including new ways of thinking about an
organization’s strategic challenges and basic capabilities. “It involves questioning or restating
the implicit beliefs and assumptions that are often taken for granted by organization members. It
plays a critical role in the formative phases of the strategic learning process from assessing
where we are through learning how to get there.” In other words, resilience in an organization
(or life, or society, or group, etc.) requires the ability to re-imagine the core competencies,
strengths, opportunities, threats, goals, and even purpose of the entity, and also must
include the development of strategy that not only fits the discoveries, but also allows for new
waves of reframing to take place on a continual basis.

Definition of Food: The international and regulatory definition of “food” is any substance or
product whether processed, partially processed or unprocessed, intended to be ingested by
humans. “Food” includes drink, chewing gum and any substance, including water, intentionally
incorporated into the food during manufacture, preparation or treatment. Food in Canada is
regulated by the Food and Drug Act. It does not include feed, live animals unless they are
prepared for placing on the market for human consumption or plants prior to harvesting.

Definition of the Food Science Field: Food Science is the application of science and engineering
to the preparation, processing, distribution and evaluation of food.

Definition of Food Safety: Food safety is a scientific discipline describing handling, preparation,
and storage of food in ways that prevent food-borne illness.

Definition of Food Quality: Food quality is the quality characteristics of food that is acceptable to
consumers. This includes external factors as appearance (size, shape, color, gloss, and
consistency), texture, and flavor; factors such as federal and international grade standards (e.g.
size) and internal standards such as chemical (e.g., composition), physical (rheology) and
microbial (as per FDA).




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Document 10 – Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) B.Sc. Food Science
Approval
Double click for full document




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Document 11 – Faculty Enrollment Statistics
Double click for full document




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Document 12 – Food Safety for Export Compliance (SFfEC) Project
  2011


  Ashraf A. Ismail
  McGill IR Group
      Susan Sproule
       Consultant


Food Safety for Export Compliance (FSfEC) Project
Two of the primary goals among the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)
are to develop global partnerships for development (MDG 8.A) and to reduce
hunger by stimulating economic development (MDG 8.B). This will be achieved, in
part, through encouraging entrepreneurship and the training of women and by taking
advantage of the global demands of consumers for novel and international foods.
However, consumer demand for such products, to be addressed by importers and
exporters, can only be met if very rigorous and specific guidelines for testing, labeling
and traceability are adhered to. For example, should an entrepreneur discover an item
to import, he/she must ensure that it is produced and tested in accordance with
international guidelines (e.g., Codex Alimentarius) in order to sell globally.
Alternatively, an entrepreneur may identify an indigenous product that, if
produced and packaged under Good Manufacturing Practice and tested and labeled
in accordance with international guidelines, might lead to a successful export enterprise.


While responsibility f o r t e s t i n g lay, in the past, with national regulatory
agencies of the importing countries, the tremendous increase in the volume and
diversity of im p o rt e d food products has resulted in a paradigm shift. Responsibility
now lies with exporters, who must present the certificate of analysis produced in
compliance with Codex Alimentarius. This Certificate attests to compliance related
to food labeling, food hygiene, food additives and pesticide residues. This has
disadvantaged developing countries owing the cost of analysis coupled with a lack
of technically trained personnel. Another significant factor lies in the inability of the
majority of small and medium- sized enterprises to afford the cost of the
analytical instrumentation required to ensure compliance with international guidelines
for global export.

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The Food Safety for Export Compliance (FSfEC) Project addresses these two issues
through 1) training and        2)    accessibility  to   state-of-the-art    analytical
instrumentation to meet the Codex Alimentarius guidelines for labeling. The goal of
the Project is to assist developing t o improve competitiveness by strengthening
food safety training leading to expanded multi-lateral export potential. This will be
achieved through 1) the development of long-term strategic and collaborative
partnerships; 2) the provision of technical assistance and training; a n d 3)
capacity development support. Three initiatives are currently at various stages of
development: (1) the CARICOM (Caribbean Community) initiative: an unsolicited
proposal for CIDA funding is currently in preparation; (2) the Uganda initiative in
collaboration with the Department of Food Science of Makerere University
(Memorandum of Understanding signed); (3) Egypt Food Safety Centre (meeting held
December 10, 2010 with the Egyptian attaché in Montreal).




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Document 13 – Food Safety for Export Compliance (SFfEC) Project – Uganda
Letter of Interest
Double click for full document




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Document 14 – McGill-Health Canada Student Integration Success Story
Double click for full document




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Document 15 – Food Safety Position Announcement
Double click for full document




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Document 16 – Agriculture and AgriFood Report
Double click for full document




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Document 17 – Memo of December 9, 2008, Re: Negative Permanent Budget
Double click for full document




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Document 18 – Memo of September 7, 2009, Re: Negative Permanent Budget
Double click for full document




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Document 19 – Memo from the Dean dated December 16, 2010


From: Chandra A. Madramootoo, Dr.
Sent: Thursday, December 16, 2010 12:06 PM
To: Selim Kermasha, Dr.
Cc: Varoujan Yaylayan, Dr.; Leslie Ann LaDuke, Ms.; Joanne TenEyck; Gary O'Connell, Mr.
Subject: Department of Food Science

Dear Selim,

This is to acknowledge receipt of your letter dated December 03. Please note that I will be
handling the administrative matters of the Department of Food Science while it is preparing its
strategic plan. I look forward to receiving the document and discussing it with the department in
due course.

I take this opportunity to thank you for your very hard work and many contributions as Chair of
the Department over the past 5 years. I wish you continued success in your endeavours.

Finally, I wish you the very best for the holiday season.

Yours truly,

Chandra

Chandra A. Madramootoo Ph.D., Ing., FCSBE, FASABE
James McGill Professor and Dean
Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
McGill University, Macdonald Campus
21,111 Lakeshore Road
Ste. Anne de Bellevue QC
Canada H9X 3V9
Tel: 514-398-7707
Fax: 514-398-7766
email: chandra.madramootoo@mcgill.ca

                                Give us the power to help.
                              Donnez-nous le pouvoir d’aider.




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                                                               FDSC STRATEGIC PLAN 2011-2016




Document 20 – Letter to the Dean re: Re-Appointment Second Term as Chair
(excerpt)

I would like to report to you outcome of the last Department meeting on November 26th, 2010.
The Department staff met on November 26th, 2010 and discussed how the Department can
contribute positively in the orientation of the Faculty and the University. With all staff attending,
the points below outline the consensus reached in relation to merging, reframing, the interim
Chair, strategic planning and the Food Safety thrust:

(1) At the present time, merging is not considered a viable option unless significant and
    measurable benefits can be demonstrated.

(2) The Department is ready to evolve with the Faculty and the University objectives in regard to
     the current structuring process and other objectives such as developing a Food Safety thrust.

(3) The Department Staff re-affirmed their previous proposition that Dr. F.R. van de Voort
    should be the Interim Chair as of January 1st, 2011 during the transition period.

(4) The Department will present a preliminary strategic plan for your consideration by January
    30th, 2011, with the intention of working closely with the Dean on the proposed
    Departmental renewal and restructuring.

(5) Without prejudging the pending strategic plan under development, the staff would consider
    that the job description of Food Safety academic to be hired could potentially include the
    leading of the Department in its re-development and restructuring within the Faculty and the
    University vision.




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Document 21 – Memo from the Dean Re: Department Chair and Planning
Document


Dear Selim,

I thank you for this note. Just to be clear to those working on the planning document –
the status quo is not acceptable. And simply adding more courses and programs (even
in conjunction with other units) is also not an option. The Faculty is trying to reduce the
number of courses and programs offered, to be more in line with other faculties. The
emphasis is on boosting enrolment in current courses and programs.

With respect to the interim Department Chair, as we have already discussed, it is my
intention to re-appoint you Selim for a six months duration, while the new departmental
structure and merger is being finalized. I wish to express my confidence in you and
your abilities to lead the department through this time of reflection and change.

I firmly believe that out of this initiative, the Faculty will come out stronger and our
efforts in food safety and food quality will be rooted in a new structure, through which
you have an opportunity to rebuild and renew, in order to have a stronger sense of
mission and intellectual vigour. It is an opportunity that we must all seize and embrace,
rather than wither through benign neglect.

Yours truly,

Chandra

Chandra A. Madramootoo Ph.D., Ing., FCSBE, FASABE
James McGill Professor and Dean
Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
McGill University, Macdonald Campus
21,111 Lakeshore Road
Ste. Anne de Bellevue QC
Canada H9X 3V9
Tel: 514-398-7707
Fax: 514-398-7766
email: chandra.madramootoo@mcgill.ca




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Figures

Figure 1 – Reframed Department




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Figure 2 – Department Graduate Students




                        80

                        75

                        70
    Graduate Students




                        65

                        60

                        55

                        50

                        45

                        40

                         1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010
                                                    Year



Mean per capita graduate student enrollment = 5.7 students




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Figure 3 – Departmental Operating and Demonstrator Budgets




                         60                                                Demonstrators
                                                                           Operating

                         50



                         40
       Dollars (x1000)




                         30



                         20



                         10


                              1990     1995            2000             2005             2010
                                                       Year


Significance: Operating at a similar dollar level today as 20 years ago.
Mean Demonstrator mean budget = $18,715
Departmental Operating budget = $42,690*
*
 Not shown is the accumulating deficit associated with salaries not covered when replacement secretarial staff joined
the department in 2005.




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Figure 4 – Operating Budget and Student Numbers




                                              80
    Undergraduate Students/Operating Budget




                                                              Undergraduates Numbers
                                                              Operating Budget (x1000)
                                              70


                                              60


                                              50


                                              40


                                              30


                                              20


                                               1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010
                                                                           Year


Operating budget is completely out of whack with enrollment – this budget does not
reflect an accumulating deficit due to secretarial staff underfunding. The actual
operating “residual” budget was $17,000 for 2010.




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Figure 5 – Department Publications




                   70
                   65
                   60
                   55
                   50
                   45
    Publications




                   40
                   35                            Total Publications
                   30                            Publications/staff
                   25
                   20
                   15
                   10
                   5

                    1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010
                                               Year



Mean publications per annum per capita = 5.22
Mean total for department per annum = 51.6




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Figure 6 – Department Research Funding




                                1.6



                                1.4
     Resaerch Funding (x 10 )
    6




                                1.2



                                1.0



                                0.8



                                0.6
                                      1994   1996   1998   2000   2002   2004   2006   2008   2010
                                                                  Year



Mean $ 1.2129 million/annum ± $258 thousand or
~$ 130,000/faculty member




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Figure 7 – Department Graduate Student Distribution




                                                                         Non-thesis MSc
                        45                                               MSc

                        40                                               PhD

                        35
    Graduate Students




                        30

                        25

                        20

                        15

                        10

                        5

                         1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010
                                                    Year




Mean number of MSc 26 students/annum
Mean number of PhD = 30 students/annum
Mean number of graduate students 56/annum or 5.6 students per capita




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Figure 8 – Department Undergraduate Enrollment




                               80


                               70
    Undergraduate Enrollment




                               60


                               50


                               40


                               30


                               20


                                1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010
                                                           Year



Very significant upsurge in enrollment due to recruitment drive and program changes
led by Department.
Mean number of students = 40/annum – However, very significant growth in the last 5
years and continuing.




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Figure 9 – NSERC Per Capita Funding: Faculty vs. Department




                                                                                     Dept
                                                                                     Fac
                      100000
                                                                                                Death of Dr.
                      90000                                                                     James Smith

                                                                                                No replacement
                      80000                                                                     for 2 years
     NSERC/capita $




                      70000


                      60000


                      50000


                      40000


                      30000
                          1994   1996   1998   2000   2002   2004   2006   2008   2010   2012
                                                        Year



Per capita NSERC funding:
Faculty mean = $42,729/staff
Department mean = $74,644/staff*

*Does not include monies new staff have obtained through Discovery Grants




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Figure 10 – Publications Faculty vs. Department




                                                                                  FacPapers
                                                                                  FdscPapers
                         9


                         8


                         7
    Publications/Staff




                         6


                         5


                         4


                         3


                         1994   1996   1998   2000   2002    2004   2006   2008   2010
                                                      Year



Food Science publication mean = 6.03/annum,
Faculty publication mean = 3.44/annum




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Figure 11 – Weighted Graduate Students/Staff Faculty vs. Department




                                        11.5                                           FacultyWGradStud
                                        11.0                                           DepartWGrdStud
                                        10.5
     Weighted Graduate Students/staff




                                        10.0
                                         9.5
                                         9.0
                                         8.5
                                         8.0
                                         7.5
                                         7.0
                                         6.5
                                         6.0
                                         5.5
                                         5.0
                                         4.5
                                         4.0

                                           1994   1996   1998   2000   2002    2004    2006   2008   2010
                                                                        Year



Weighted Graduate Students/Staff for:
Faculty = 6.1
Department of Food Science = 9.1




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Figure 12 – Departmental Operating Budget/Undergraduate Student




                                                                  Budget/Student
                        1.8


                        1.6


                        1.4
     $/Student (x100)




                        1.2


                        1.0


                        0.8


                        0.6


                        0.4
                          1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010
                                                     Year



This $/student does not consider the salary deficit carried over for the past 3 years.




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Figure 13 – Reframing Food Science and Agricultural Chemistry




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Tables

Table 1 – Professional Activities

Staff Member      Role                                Journal/Grants/Honors


Marshall          Editorial board                     Int J Environ Anal Chem
Marshall          Reviewer                            Chemosphere
Marshall          Reviewer                            J Hazard Mater
Marshall          Reviewer                            Environ Sci Technol
Marshall          Reviewer                            Surface Sci Technol
Marshall          Reviewer                            NSERC Disc/Strategic/Int
Marshall          Reviewer                            Theses, U Lahore, U West Indies

Karboune          Reviewer                            NSERC Disc/Strategic
Karboune          Reviewer                            FQRNT
Karboune          Member                              IFT/CIFST
Karboune          Member                              CRIBIQ
Karboune          Member                              European Bioconversion Association

Yaylayan          Contributing editor                 IMARS Highlights
Yaylayan          Editorial board                     Food Chemistry
Yaylayan          Reviewer                            NSERC
Yaylayan          Expert Group member                 ILSI Europe - Task force on food toxins
Yaylayan          Book review editor                  Food Research International

Ismail            Reviewer                            NSERC RTI
Ismail            Referee                             Applied Spectroscopy
Ismail            Referee                             Vibrational Spectroscopy
Ismail            Referee                             AOCS
Ismail            Technical coordinator               ASTM
Ismail            Founding member                     CBB
Ismail            Co-Director                         McGill IR Group
Ismail            Senator                             McGill


Kermasha          Res. Committee member               CORPAQ
Kermasha          Res. Committee member               Agr. Canada
Kermasha          Examiners Committee                 Ordre des Chimistes du Quebec
Kermasha          Undergrad External Evaluator        University of Moncton

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Kermasha    Graduate External Evaluator        University of Laval

Alli        Fellow                             Can Inst Food Sci Technol
Alli        Fellow                             Amer Soc Quality
Alli        Reviewer                           NSERC grants
Alli        Food Safety Expert/Assessor        Standards Council of Canada

Ramaswamy   Chair                              Graduate Paper Competition, IFTPS, USA
Ramaswamy   Chair                              Food Process Engineering Interest Group, CIFST,
Ramaswamy   Chair                              Canadian Standards, Flexible
                                               Expert Committee Food Engineering and
Ramaswamy   Member,                            Processing
Ramaswamy   Editor,                            Journal of Food Engineering (2006-current)
                                               Electro-Technologies in Food Processing, CRC
Ramaswamy   Book Series Editor                 Press
Ramaswamy   China Honorary Consultant           Member of Scientific Committee
            Recognized Thermal Processing
Ramaswamy                                      CFIA, HC, FDA
            Authority
Ramaswamy   Fellow,                            Canadian Society of Bioengineers
                                               Association     of    food   Scientists    and
Ramaswamy   Fellow,                            Technologists, India
Ramaswamy   WJ Eva Award, CIFST
Ramaswamy   John Clark Award, CSAE
Ramaswamy   Outstanding Alumni Award, CFTRI
Ramaswamy   President's Award, CIFST

Chénier     Section Chair                      Canadian Society of Microbiologists
Chénier     Registered Member                  Canadian College of Microbiologists
Chénier     Reviewer                           NSERC’s Discovery Grants Program,
Chénier     Reviewer                           Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
Chénier     Member                             Faculty Academic Program Committee
Chénier     Chair                              Library Committee of the FAES
Chénier     Academic Advisor                   U2 students in the B.Sc. Food Science program
Chénier     Acting member                      Recruitment Committee of FAES


Simpson     Panel Selection Committee          NSERC Strategic - Bioproducts
Simpson     Panel Selection Committee          NSERC Strategic - Fisheries
Simpson     Panel Selection Committee          American Inst. Biol. Science (NOAA), USA
Simpson     Reviewer                           Florida Sea Grant Program (USA)
Simpson     Reviewer                           Alaska Sea Grant Program (USA)
Simpson     Reviewer                           Oregon Sea Grant Program (USA)

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Simpson        Reviewer                      North Carolina Sea Grant Program (USA)
Simpson        Reviewer                      Louisiana Sea Grant program
Simpson        Executive Committee Member    Aquatic Foods Division (IFT)
Simpson        Associate Editor              Journal of Food Biochemistry
Simpson        Advisory Committee Member     International Federation of Science

van de Voort   Editor                        Food Research International
van de Voort   Associate Editor              Egyptian J. Dairy Sci.
van de Voort   Associate Editor              J. Off Anal Chem.
van de Voort   Reviewer                      NSERC Disc/Strategic
van de Voort   Fellow                        Can Inst Food Sci Technol
van de Voort   Co-Director                   McGill IR Group
van de Voort   Member                        ASTM D2 Committee




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Table 2 – Interaction with Other Departments and Institutions

Staff Member     Collaborator               Department/Institute

van de Voort     Dr. Lee                    CRDA St. Hyacinthe
van de Voort     Dr. Rao                    Alberta Research Council Edmonton
van de Voort     S. Juneau                  Naval Engineering Test Establishment Montreal
van de Voort     Dr. Fofano                 UQAC Chicoutimi

Marshall         none

Karboune         Dr l'Hocine                CRDA St. Hyacinthe
Karboune         Dr Fliss                   University of Laval
Karboune         Dr Moores                  Chemistry Department, McGill University
Karboune         Dr Archelas                Universty of St-Jerome, France
Karboune         Dr St-Louis                Institut des Sciences de la Mer de Rimouski (ISMER)

Yaylayan         Dr. Pare                   Environment Canada
Yaylayan         Dr. Fustier                CRDA
Yaylayan         Prof. Liu, Zhun            Nankai University, china

Ismail           Dr. Boye                   CRDA St. Hyacinthe
Ismail           Dr. Trottier               Food Directorate-Health Canada
Ismail           Dr. Austin                 Health Canada, Ottawa
Ismail           Dr. Labelle                Montreal General Hospital
Ismail           Dr. Turnbull               Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry/Concordia
Ismail           Dr. English                Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry/Concordia
Ismail           Dr. Hancock                Sheldon Biotechnology
Ismail           Dr. Mossoba                US-FDA
Ismail           Dr. Kubow                  Nutrition/McGill
Ismail           Dr. Ngadi                  Bioresource Engineering/McGill


Selim Kermasha   Dr. Monique Lacroix        Institut Armand Frappier
Selim Kermasha   Dr. Emile Pelletier        ISMIR/University of Rimouski (UQAR)
Selim Kermasha   Dr. Richard St-Louis       ISMIR/University of Rimouski (UQAR)
Selim Kermasha   Dr. Andre Morin            CRDA - Agriculture Canada - St-Hyacinthe
Selim Kermasha   Dr. Ron Neufeld            Chemical Engineering/Queen's University
Selim Kermasha   Dr. Marc Beverini          Danon - Paris, France
Selim Kermasha   Dr. Pierre-André Geraert   Adisseo - Paris, France
Selim Kermasha   Dr. Marc Maesteracci       Adisseo - Toulouse, France
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Selim Kermasha   Dr. M. Metche                Institut Polytechnique de Lorraine, Nancy, France
Selim Kermasha   Dr. Eric Spinnler            AgroTech Paris, Paris, France
Selim Kermasha   Dr. Jean-Marc Engasser       Institut Polytechnique de Lorraine, Nancy, France
Selim Kermasha   Cross-Appointment             School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition (1989 – )
Selim Kermasha   Cross-Appointment            INRS-Institut Armand Frappier (2003 - )

Ramaswamy        Dr Michele Marcotte          AAFC
Ramaswamy        Dr. John Austin              HC
Ramaswamy        Dr. Louise Deschances        AAFC
Ramaswamy        Dr. Tatiana Koutchma         AAFC
Ramaswamy        Dr. V. Prakash               CFTRI, Mysore, India
Ramaswamy        Dr. S. Demeke                JUCAVM, Ethiopia
Ramaswamy        Dr. T. Astatkie              NSAC, Truro, NS
Ramaswamy        Dr. Kubow                    McGill Nutrition
Ramaswamy        Dr. Ngadi                    McGill BioE
Ramaswamy        Dr. Raghavan                 McGill BioE
Ramaswamy        Dr. Gray-Donald              McGill Dietetics
Ramaswamy        Dr. Alain LeBail             ENITIAA France
Ramaswamy        Dr. Fadia Naim               CINTEC
Ramaswamy        Dr. Tajchakavit              Lassonde Inc

Chénier          Dr. Grant Clark              Bioresource Engineering
Chénier          Dr. Joann Whalen             Natural resource Sciences - Soil Science
Chénier          Dr. Shiv Prasher             Bioresource Engineering
Chénier          Dr. Chandra Madramootoo      Bioresource Engineering
Chénier          Dr. Arif Mustafa             Animal Science
Chénier          Dr. Philippe Fravalo et al   U of M - Faculty of Veterinary Medicine
                                              Institut de recherche          et développement      en
Chénier          Dr. Caroline Côté            agroenvironnement
Chénier          Dr. Luke Masson              NRC - Biotechnology Research Institute
Chénier          Mr. François Chrétien        Agriculture Canada R[-55]C

Alli             Dr. Y. Knoishi               Biotechnology Research Institute


B. Simpson       Dr. Joyce Boye               CRDA
B. Simpson       Dr. Claude Champagne         CRDA
B. Simpson       Dr. Fidel Toldra             CSIS, Spain
B. Simpson       Dr. Sue Marshall             Crop & Food Research Institute, New Zealand
B. Simpson       Dr. Soottawat Benjakul       Prince of Songkla Univ., Thailand
B. Simpson       Dr. Sappasith Klomklao       Thaskin Univ., Thailand

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B. Simpson   Dr. Valerie Orsat          Bioresource Engineering, McGill
B. Simpson   Dr. Shiv Prasher           Bioresource Engineering, McGill
B. Simpson   Dr. Michael Ngadi          Bioresource Engineering, McGill
B. Simpson   Dr. Xin Zhao               Animal Science Dept., McGill
B. Simpson   Dr. Patricia Owusu Darko   Kumasi Polytechnic, Ghana
B. Simpson   Dr. Reynaldo Villalonga    Univ. of Matanzas, Cuba
B. Simpson   Dr. E. James Squires       Animal & Poultry Science Dept., Univ. of Guelph
B. Simpson   Dr. Stan Kubow             Dietetics & Human Nutrition, McGill
B. Simpson   Dr. Byong Lee              CRDA / McGill




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Table 3 – Industrial Collaborations

Staff Member   Company                            Type of Collaboration

van de Voort   Thermal-Lube Inc. Canada           Research Infrared Spectroscopy
van de Voort   Nicolet Instruments USA            Research Infrared Spectroscopy
van de Voort   ABB-Bomem Canada                   Research Infrared Spectroscopy
van de Voort   Perkin-Elmer USA                   Research Infrared Spectroscopy
van de Voort   Wilks Enterprise Ltd. USA          Research Infrared Spectroscopy
van de Voort   Cummins Diesel USA                 Research Infrared Spectroscopy
van de Voort   Rothsay (Maple Leaf) Canada        Research Infrared Spectroscopy
van de Voort   Hewitt                             Research Infrared Spectroscopy


Marshall       SNC Lavalin                        Research Soil Remediation

Karboune       Acer Inc. Canada                   Bioconversion&Polysaccharide Characterization
Karboune       Saint-Arneault. Canada             Potato-Based Functional Ingredients
Karboune       Biocatalysts Limited, UK           Feruloylated oligosaccharides
Karboune       Solanic, Netherlands               Potato Propteins


Yaylayan       Danone                             Research
Yaylayan       Best Foods                         Research
Yaylayan       FritOlay                           Consultation
Yaylayan       Nestle                             Consultation
Yaylayan       FONA                               Research
Yaylayan       Ben's Bakery                       Research
Yaylayan       Schering Canada                    Consultation
Yaylayan       Lassondre                          Research
Yaylayan       Bilopage                           Research

Ismail         Nicolet Instruments USA            Technology transfer
Ismail         ABB-Bomem Canada                   CRD-Technology transfer
Ismail         Quelab Laboratories                IRAP_Technology transfer
Ismail         Hershey PA                         Research Infrared Spectroscopy
Ismail         Frito-Lay                          Research Infrared Spectroscopy
Ismail         Bariatrix                          Research food product development
Ismail         Davisco                            Research Protein chemistry
Ismail         Senus                              Inulin characterization
Ismail         Dwight Analytical                  Research food product development


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Ismail           CanAmera                                     Research Infrared Spectroscopy
Ismail           Central Soy                                  Research Infrared Spectroscopy

Selim Kermasha   Lassonde & Fils, Canada                      Enzymatic browning
Selim Kermasha   Danone, Paris                                Stability of red color in processed food
Selim Kermasha   Adisseo, Paris                               Characterization of commercial enzymes

I. Alli          Bellairs Research Institute                  Bellairs, Barbados
I. Alli          Dr. I. Chang-Yen                             University of West Indies, Trinidad

Ramaswamy        Lassonde Inc                                 Research and consultaion
Ramaswamy        CINTEC                                       Research and consultaion
Ramaswamy        Mondiv Foods                                 Research and consultaion
Ramaswamy        AAFC                                         Research and consultaion
Ramaswamy        HC                                           Research and consultaion
Ramaswamy        NCFST, Chicago                               Research and consultaion
Ramaswamy        CFTRI, Mysore                                Research and collaboration
Ramaswamy        DFRL, Mysore                                 Research and collaboration

Chénier          Bélisle Solution Nutrition                   Alternatives to antibiotics in swine production
Chénier          JEFO                                         Alternatives to antibiotics in swine production

B. Simpson       Neptune Technologies & Bioressources, Inc)   Carotenoid pigments
B. Simpson       Rothsay                                      Biofuels
B. Simpson       Atkins & Freres                              Bioactive peptides
B. Simpson       Cusimer, Inc                                 Fish gelatin
B. Simpson       Les Fruits de mer (Matane)                   Enzymatic browning in raw shrimp




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Table 4 – Quebec-France Collaborations
Dr. Kermasha

  (1) France – Quebec Collaboration in Biotechnology (McGill – INPL-
     INSAIA, Nancy, France, 1989 – 1992)

  (2) France – Quebec Collaboration in Biotechnology (McGill –
      ENSBANA/INRA, Dijon and INAPG-Paris, France, 1992 – 1995)

  (3) France – Quebec Collaboration in Biotechnology (McGill – INSA,
      Toulouse, France, 1994 – 1996)

  (4) France – Quebec Collaboration in Biotechnology (McGill – INPL-
      ENSAIA, Nancy, France, 2001 - 2002)




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Table 5 – Faculty Tenure Track Academic Staff Profile 2005-2009




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Table 6 – Committees


Staff Member   Committee

Yaylayan       Faculty planning committee 2007-2009
Yaylayan       Academic standing committee - Current
Yaylayan       Committee on information technologies 2004-2007
Yaylayan       Graduate student advisory committee Plant Science
Yaylayan       Search Committee for Food Safety

van de Voort   Faculty Promotions Committee
van de Voort   Non-Thesis MSc Coordinator

Alli           Department: Member Undergraduate Program committee
Alli           Faculty: Member Academic Program Committee
Alli           Director, Barbados Field Study Semester Program
Alli           Member, Dean’s Food Safety Advisory group, 2009-2010
Alli           University: Member Faculty of Arts Tenure Committee (2010-2012)

Simpson        Department: Graduate Committee
Simpson        FAES: Grant Review Committee
Simpson        FAES: Scholarships Committee
Simpson        FAES: International Development Committee
Simpson        FAES: Library Committee
Simpson        McGill: Committee for Student Discipline

Marshall       Faculty Nominations Committee
Marshall       Pesticides sub-committee




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Table 7 – Retirements


Aged 55 and over are generally considered possibly eligible for any status as “retiree” either at McGill
     or under any of the government retirement benefits.
As of 2011 the following staff will be 55 years or older:
   7 / 10      Tenured/non-tenured academic staff
   2/5         Unranked professional associate/technical/clerical/admin staff
   1/3         Unranked professional associate/technical/clerical/admin staff

Average
age:
    55.4       Tenured/non-tenured academic staff
    49.6       Tenured/non-tenured academic staff + unranked professional associates/technical/clerical/admin staff
    50.7       Tenured/non-tenured academic staff + unranked professional associates/technical/clerical/admin staff


Reach 65 by year:
Academic Staff                                                               Non-Academic Staff
2011:                                 2
2013:                                 1
2015:                                 2        1
2016:                                 1                                  1
2017:                                 1
2019:                                 0        1
2022:                                 1                                  0
2028:                                 0        1
2030:                                 0        1                         1
2035:                                 0        1                         1
2036:                                 1                                  0
2040:                                 1
Total:                                    10                         5




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Table 8 – M.Sc. Food Safety (Non-Thesis) Proposal
                      Second Draft - For Discussion at FQSP Group Only:

                          Proposal for M.Sc. Food Safety (Non-Thesis)

Considerations:

   1) Justification/need: extremely important for a new program, especially in McGill’s current
       difficult financial situation – program has to fit with strategic ‘priority’ of
       Faculty/University ‘Food processing, quality and safety’ is one of sub-themes of
       Faculty’s Strategic Research Priorities ‘Food, Nutrition and Health’ .

      Letters of support from industry/government are required – commitment that some
      students will come from industry/government??

   2) Program structure/content:

                 - focus on food safety, courses cover the ‘farm-to-health’ continuum – a unique
                     feature??
                 - can be completed in 12 months (minimum) full-time – important for students
                     coming from industry, government; should we consider part-time
                     enrollment???
                 - use mainly existing courses in Faculty to come up with a ‘high-quality’ Food
                     Safety graduate program; – minimal additional resource requirements
                 - enrollment: 20-25 when program is established; 10 at start-up??
   3) Program proposed start date: Fall 2012
   4) Others??




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                                         Proposed Program:
Required courses – (27 credits):
Existing courses:
ANSC 350 (3) Foodborne Pathogens (For M.Sc. need to convert to 500 level course)
FDSC 634 (3) Food Toxins and Toxicants
FDSC 695 (3) M.Sc. Graduate Seminar 1
FDSC 696 (3) M.Sc. Graduate Seminar 2
FDSC 697 (4.5) M.Sc. Project Part 1
FDSC 698 (4.5) M.Sc. Project Part 2

New course:?? FDSC 5XX (3 credits) Current Food Safety Issues?? (Webinar-type course with
contributions (Instructors) from industry/government; requires IT resource??
New Course: XXX XXX (3 credits) Food Laws and Regulations (title to be confirmed):
Following discussions with Prof. Helena Lamed, McGill Faculty of Law, it is proposed that this
new course be given by the Faculty of Law and be a required course
From Helena: "A lot on our plate - Food Law and Regulation in Canada. This course examines the
historical development of federal and provincial legislation in the area, looks at current law, regulation
and enforcement related to agriculture and livestock, and considers divisions between public and private
domaines through tort liability, food safety, and intellectual property, as well as how perceptions of risk
influence legislative choices. "

Complementary and elective courses (18 credits):
A minimum of 12 credits of Complementary courses to be taken from the list below; the
remaining 6 credits of ‘elective’ courses to be selected in consultation with Program Adviser -
elective courses can be on-line courses (outside McGill)???
Existing courses:
FDSC 510 (3) Professional Practice
FDSC 536 (3) Food Traceability
FDSC 545 (3) Advances in Food Microbiology
PARA 515 (3) Water, Health and Sanitation
PLNT 636 (3) Epidemiology and Management of Plant Disease

Others?? (Faculty of Medicine)
For M.Sc. convert (some/all of) the following undergraduate courses to 500 level courses???
ANSC 312     (3)   Animal Health and Diseases
FDSC 425     (3)   Principles of Quality Assurance
MICR 341     (3)   Mechanisms of Pathogenicity
NUTR 420     (3)   Toxicology and Health Risks
                                                                                  July 16, 2010

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                                                             FDSC STRATEGIC PLAN 2011-2016




Table 9 – Short Course Proposals
A short course in Microbiological Food Safety
A one day short course intended for food Industry personnel who want to improve their
awareness of current topics in microbiological food safety. Upon successful completion the
students will receive a certificate of attestation. A minimum of 20 students are required to offer
the course. They will receive copies of all the lectures on a USB key. Estimated cost $5000.
Fees: $1,500.0 per student.

Tentative plan – one day (6h)
Introduction to microbiological food safety- 0.5h
Food-borne pathogens – 1 h
Microbial contamination and food processing -1h
Modern techniques of detection of pathogens and analysis – 1h
Food traceability – 1h
Food allergens – 1h
Conclusion – 0.5h

A short course in Chemical Food Safety
A one day short course intended for food Industry personnel who want to improve their
awareness of current topics in chemical food safety. Upon successful completion the students
will receive a certificate of attestation. A minimum of 20 students are required to offer the
course. They will receive copies of all the lectures on a USB key. Estimated cost $5000. Fees:
$1,500.0 per student.

Tentative plan – one day (6h)
Introduction to chemical food safety- 0.5h
Chemical toxicants – 1 h
Process-induced toxicants – 1h
New product development/packaging and food safety – 1h
Food Traceability – 1 h
Seafood Safety – 1h
Conclusion – 0.5h




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                                               FDSC STRATEGIC PLAN 2011-2016




Power Points

Power Point 1 – Food Safety and Quality Program (FSQP)
To Power Point 1




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                                          FDSC STRATEGIC PLAN 2011-2016




Power Point 2 – Food Science Recruiting
To Power Point 2




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