Citizens Budget Commission MTA TWA Wage Negotiation

Document Sample
Citizens Budget Commission MTA TWA Wage Negotiation Powered By Docstoc
					 

     


    MTA‐TWU Wage Negotiations: 
    A “Fair Increase” Will Not Increase Fares 
    January 2012 

    The contract of the Transport Workers Union (TWU), the union representing about 38,000 
    employees of the New York City Transit and MTA Bus divisions of the Metropolitan Transportation 
    Authority (MTA), expired on January 15, 2012.  The MTA, facing out‐year budget gaps, is depending 
    on a three‐year wage freeze to balance its budget; the TWU has rejected this offer and demands a 
    “fair wage increase.”   Negotiations are continuing, but if they reach an impasse, the parties may file 
    for arbitration with the Public Employment Relations Board (PERB).  The TWU and MTA have gone 
    before PERB in the last 2 rounds of collective bargaining, for the contracts covering 2009 to 2012 
    and 2005 to 2009. 

    The case would be heard by a tripartite panel whose decisions are binding upon both parties.  The 
    panel would be composed of one representative appointed by the MTA, one appointed by the 
    TWU, and one member, who chairs the panel, jointly appointed by both parties.  The statute1 that 
    provides for the arbitration process makes explicit the factors that the panel must weigh in coming 
    to its decision, but does not specify how much weight should be given to each factor. 

    The stakes of the settlement are significant.  The MTA’s dedicated sources of revenues are volatile 
    and were hard hit by the recession,2 and recent State agreements and the uncertain economic 
    climate place revenues further at risk.  Riders have already experienced fare increases in tandem 
    with service cuts, and are fearful that a downward turn in negotiations will lead to a transit strike 
    similar to the one that crippled New York City in 2005.  Workers would like improved benefits and 
    safety precautions, while the MTA would like to loosen work rules so as to improve efficiency and 
    prevent further deterioration of its finances.  

    To determine what a fair wage increase for transit employees would be in the current fiscal climate, 
    this report applies the criteria specified by PERB for determining arbitration awards.  It finds that 
    the public interest will be served by an agreement that maintains a good standard of living for 
    workers, is within the MTA’s ability to pay, and does not force further harm upon riders; in short, a 
    fair increase will not increase fares or reduce service.   
                                        A FAIR SETTLEMENT:  
    CITIZENS BUDGET COMMISSION 
                                        ARBITRATION CRITERIA 

    Two Penn Plaza, Fifth Floor         There are five factors that an arbitration panel must consider to 
    New York, NY 10121                  make a determination: 

    540 Broadway, Fifth Floor           (1) Overall level of compensation, including salaries and wages, 
    Albany, NY 12207                    paid leave, and fringe benefits; 
    T: 212‐279‐2605 
    F: 212‐868‐4745                     (2) Comparison of compensation and work conditions to 
                                        employees performing similar work and to other employees in 
    www.cbcny.org 
                                        New York City;  
    www.twitter.com/cbcny 
                                        (3) Changes in the cost of living, as indicated by average 
    Kenneth Gibbs                       consumer prices; 
    Chairman 
                                        (4) Financial ability of the MTA to pay award and the impact 
    Carol Kellermann                    on fares and services; 
    President 
                                        (5) Public interest and other factors. 

    The Citizens Budget Commission      Each of these is analyzed in turn. 
    is a nonprofit, nonpartisan  
    civic organization devoted to        
    influencing constructive change  
    in the finances and services of     Overall level of compensation  
    New York State and City 
    governments.                        TWU employees receive a salary, overtime pay, longevity 
                                        increases and other pay; in addition, they are also entitled to 
                                        benefits that do not provide direct cash payment.  Vacation, 
    This policy brief was researched    holiday and excused time, health insurance, pensions and other 
    and written by Maria Doulis, 
                                        fringe benefits add significantly to the value of compensation, 
    Director of New York City 
                                        and any improvements or reductions to wages and these 
    Studies.  Rahul Jain, Research 
                                        benefits (except for pensions) must be collectively bargained.  
    Associate, provided significant 
    research contributions.  Charles    As a result, compensation decisions assess the overall level of 
    Brecher, Consulting Director of     compensation, not merely salaries and wages. 
    Research, offered editorial 
                                        Salaries and Wages. The most recent salary schedule shows 
    suggestions. 
                                        current hourly wage rates for 45 titles represented by the TWU.  
                                        Wages range from a low of $16.11 for traffic checkers to a high 
    January 2012                        of $35.51 for electronic specialists working at Woodside.3   Bus 
                                        and train operators, the positions with the greatest number of 
                                        employees, earn a minimum of $29.95 and $31.87 an hour, 




                                                    2 
 
respectively.  Most positions (26 out of the 45) make at least $30 an hour, amounting to $62,400 a year 
as a base salary.4  

The hourly wage rate is supplemented in several ways.  Employees earn “differentials” for working on 
nights, weekends and on some holidays.  Employees are also eligible to earn overtime pay at a rate of 
time and half; typically this adds about 15 to 20 percent to base salary, as shown in Table 1.  In addition, 
senior employees earn annual longevity differentials of $200 a year after 15 years, $300 after 20 years, 
$400 after 25 years and $500 after 30 years on the job.  An employee with a $30 an hour wage can earn 
over $72,000 with these additional payments. 

 



        Table 1:  Average Wages of New York City Transit Full‐Time Employees in Selected Titles, 2010

                                         Full‐Time       Average        Average    Average Overtime Pay as 
                                        Employees         Wage        Overtime Pay a Share of Average Wage
       Bus Operator Revenue                9,390         $73,166         $16,539                    23%
       Train Operator                      3,108         $78,218         $14,813                    19%
       Cleaner                             2,966         $52,826          $4,579                     9%
       Station Agent                       2,669         $63,789         $10,295                    16%
       Conductor                           2,663         $67,621         $12,588                    19%
       Car Inspector                       1,948         $74,757          $2,833                     4%
       Track Worker                        1,687         $69,292         $12,113                    17%
       Signal Maintainer/Helper             834          $81,359         $17,944                    22%
       Bus Maintainer B                     827          $79,783         $17,933                    22%
       Bus Maintainer Chassis               492          $83,530         $20,870                    25%
       Light Maintainer                     491          $75,197         $11,108                    15%
       Collecting Agent                     300          $63,082          $7,001                    11%
       Bus Maintainer A                     238          $71,989          $9,800                    14%
       Electronic Specialist                201          $77,163          $6,455                     8%
       Car Maintainer                       173          $68,986          $2,501                     4%
       Bus Maintainer Body                  124          $78,563         $17,631                    22%

       Notes: Average wage calculated by CBC using the number of full‐time employees and total compensation in 
       each title. Full‐time employees were determined by comparing reported year‐to‐date earnings in 2010 to 
       yearly wage that would have been earned at the hourly rate of pay for a 40‐hour work week for 52 weeks; if 
       yearly wage was less than 75 percent of year to date earnings, employees were deemed to be part‐time 
       employees working less than 30 hours and were excluded from the analysis.

       Source: Empire Center for New York State Policy, SeeThroughNY: Payrolls: Public Authorities: Metropolitan 
       Transportation Authority: 2010, 2011, http://seethroughny.net/payrolls.
                                                                                                                      

                                                               



                                                             3 
 
CBC used 2010 payroll data obtained from SeeThroughNY to determine the average wages of full‐time 
employees in major titles. Bus and train operators, the most staffed titles, earned $73,100 and $78,200, 
on average.  Cleaners had the lowest average wage, $52,800, and earned little in overtime; on the other 
hand, bus and signal maintainers worked significant amounts of overtime, and increased their 
compensation by over 20 percent to about $80,0000, on average.  CBC estimated the average wage, 
including salary, overtime and differentials, for the full‐time employees in the transit titles listed on the 
preceding page to be just over $70,000. 

Holidays and Leave.  Employees receive 11 paid holidays a year – including their birthdays – and one 
personal day after a year of service.  Employees earn additional vacation time according to their length 
of service.  After 1 year, employees receive 10 vacation days, growing to 20 days after 3 years and 25 
days after 15 years.   

TWU employees are also entitled to paid sick leave that is accrued according to length of service.  All 
employees have 12 standard sick days a year, and after four years of service, can take additional sick 
leave – ranging from 15 to 90 days and increasing with seniority – at 60 percent of their pay.  Employees 
who do not use sick leave for an entire year are entitled to receive a cash equivalent worth two days of 
leave, to be paid right before Christmas. 

Health Insurance. TWU employees are offered comprehensive health insurance coverage. They can 
choose from plans, which include the cost of prescription drugs, offered by Empire BlueCross Blue Shield 
and United Health Care.5   Retirees also receive health insurance coverage for themselves and their 
dependents.  Current employees pay 1.5 percent of their gross bi‐weekly wages toward health 
premiums,6 but retirees do not contribute to the cost of their premium.  Retirees over 65 receive partial 
reimbursement of federally‐determined premiums for Medicare Part B. 

Pension. TWU employees are provided a defined‐benefit pension when they retire.  The most common 
retirement plan7 allows employees with 25 years of service to retire at age 55 with 50 percent of their 
final average salary, which is calculated as the average of all cash earnings, including overtime pay, in 
the last three years.  TWU members contribute 3 percent of their salaries a year toward the cost of their 
pensions. 

Other Benefits.  Employees also receive the benefit of contributions to a childcare fund that subsidizes 
daycare and afterschool programs for children of employees;8 free uniforms or allowances for uniform 
cleaning; and $100,000 benefit for surviving spouses of workers killed on the job. 

                                  




                                                      4 
 
Comparison of compensation and work conditions  

The level of compensation is difficult to evaluate in isolation; therefore, the arbitration statute calls for 
assessing compensation and work conditions relative to (1) employees performing similar work and (2) 
other employees, both public and private, in New York City or comparable communities.  Because the 
MTA is a public authority of the State, comparison to State employees is also relevant. 


Employees performing similar work in other transit systems 

Other large cities have extensive bus and transit operations, but none of them are of the scale of New 
York City; nevertheless, a comparison to these other large cities can reveal any glaring differences in the 
level and nature of compensation.  For example, if TWU employees receive less than employees in other 
cities, increasing compensation would be appropriate. 

The Federal Transit Administration collects data on the operation of mass transit systems across the 
country.  This source, the National Transit Database (NTD), contains data on over 660 systems and is 
considered to be the most reliable dataset available for comparing urban transit systems.  The most 
recent data available on employee compensation from the NTD provides total salaries and fringe 
benefits, including overtime pay, sick leave, holidays, health insurance and pensions, for 2010.   CBC 
calculated the average hourly rate of compensation per employee and the average yearly compensation 
for vehicle operations and vehicle maintenance employees using data provided by the NTD on the 
number of positions and hours worked.    

The data indicate that the value of overtime and other benefits add substantially to the value of 
compensation received by TWU employees.   While the most recent salary schedule shows hourly wage 
rates of approximately $30 an hour for bus and train operators, the NTD data indicate that, when 
benefits are properly accounted for, hourly compensation is closer to $60 and $70 an hour for bus and 
train operators.  

The results also indicate that TWU employees are well compensated relative to their counterparts in 
other large transit systems.  TWU heavy rail and bus vehicle operators average over $140,000 and 
$120,000 in compensation, respectively.  Both earn at least $20,000 more than their counterparts in the 
second highest‐paying systems, a difference of 20 percent for train operators and 25 percent for bus 
operators.  

Compensation for vehicle maintenance employees is similarly high relative to other systems.  TWU 
heavy rail vehicle maintenance employees average the highest hourly rate of compensation at close to 
$60 an hour, 10 percent greater than the second‐place transit system in Philadelphia (SEPTA).  TWU 
heavy rail vehicle maintainers earn over $95,000 in annual compensation on average, almost twice 
what’s earned by their counterparts in Atlanta. On average, bus vehicle maintainers earn $117,660 in 
MTA Bus and $125,260 in New York City Transit, the highest of all bus systems, although counterparts in 
other systems also make over $100,000. Only San Francisco bus maintainers average a slightly greater 


                                                       5 
 
hourly rate, though their average annual compensation does not surpass New York City Transit or MTA 
Bus workers. 



              Table 1: Hourly Rate and Annual Compensation of Urban Transit Employees, 2010

                                                                                   HEAVY RAIL
                                                                 Vehicle Operators            Vehicle Maintenance
                                                               Hourly       Annual           Hourly         Annual 
     Agency Name                                                Rate     Compensation         Rate       Compensation 

     New York City Transit                                     $68.55      $140,176           $59.58         $95,295
     Chicago Transit Authority                                 $51.40       $87,159           $49.38         $82,924
     Los Angeles Metro. Transportation Authority               $50.51      $106,841           $49.95         $98,077
     Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority                $50.32       $90,092           $50.42         $94,587
     Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority              $30.13       $71,154           $42.25         $85,551
     Miami‐Dade Transit                                        $57.56      $117,394           $24.37        $47,758
     Southeastern Pennsylvania Trans. Authority                $51.72      $100,765           $53.95        $112,140
     Washington Metro. Area Transit Authority                  $54.58      $101,906           $52.27        $90,320

                                                                                       BUS
                                                                 Vehicle Operators            Vehicle Maintenance
                                                               Hourly       Annual           Hourly         Annual 
     Agency Name                                                Rate     Compensation         Rate       Compensation 
     New York City Transit                                     $58.61      $120,908           $63.68        $125,259
     MTA Bus Company                                           $56.86      $123,962           $56.20        $117,657
     Chicago Transit Authority                                 $49.03      $87,126            $53.58         $95,738
     King County Dept. of Trans.‐ Metro Transit                $48.11      $78,930            $57.31        $101,133
     Los Angeles Metro. Transportation Authority               $42.09      $99,029            $47.33         $95,290
     Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority                $52.16      $90,135            $50.92         $91,688
     Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority              $33.94      $60,816            $37.76         $74,512
     Miami‐Dade Transit                                        $39.94      $79,359            $45.03         $87,958
     New Jersey Transit                                        $44.35      $78,055            $43.95         $86,003
     San Francisco Municipal Railway                           $49.87      $99,272            $65.74        $116,662
     Southeastern Pennsylvania Trans. Authority                $48.95      $92,695            $48.53         $92,932
     Washington Metro. Area Transit Authority                  $46.55      $87,327            $58.13        $106,274

     Notes: Compensation includes total salaries, wages and fringe benefits, including overtime pay, health insurance and 
     pensions.  Average hourly rate of compensation per employee and annual compensation calculated by CBC data on number 
     of positions and hours worked available from National Transit Database.


     Source: Federal Transit Authority, National Transit Database, Operating Expenses & Transit Agency Employees, 2010.
                                                                                                                              

 
TWU employees operate the transit system of a city that never sleeps, and their increased pay may 
reflect the added complexities of their job; however, the large discrepancy between the average 



                                                                 6 
 
compensation level of TWU employees and employees of all other systems indicates that a large wage 
increase is not necessary to compensate TWU employees fairly for the type of work they perform.   


New York State and City Public Employees 

TWU employees receive the same types of benefits as other public employees: they earn overtime pay, 
have comprehensive health insurance coverage, and enjoy the retirement security of a defined benefit 
pension.  Arbitrators consider wage increase or benefit changes negotiated by other public employee 
unions, as well as the special circumstances of each union and the relative generosity or paucity of 
contractual benefits.   

The “Pattern” 

Collective bargaining agreements for State and City public employees typically follow a “pattern” that 
includes a series of similar wage increases, benefit changes and/or productivity measures.   

Governor Andrew Cuomo recently settled contracts with the two largest civilian unions in the State.  The 
contracts provided for a wage freeze in the first three years and a 2 percent increase in the fourth year.9  
The agreements also increased required employee contributions toward health insurance premiums, 
with higher earning employees making a higher level of contribution.   

In New York City, almost all union contracts have expired.  The City’s financial plan assumes a three‐year 
wage freeze for all employees and a five‐year wage freeze for teachers and principals.  The City’s 
contributions to the welfare funds, which provide prescription drugs and other supplemental benefits 
not provided under the City’s health insurance plans, have been frozen since 2006.10 Mayor Michael 
Bloomberg is pursuing broad health insurance changes, including increasing vesting periods for health 
insurance benefits, implementing premium sharing for all plans, and eliminating Medicare Part B 
reimbursements, in negotiations with the Municipal Labor Committee.11  

In sum, the pattern set by the State and advocated by the City establishes a three‐year wage freeze with 
added employee responsibility for health insurance costs.  MTA has already taken a step in this direction 
by freezing the wages of managerial and administrative personnel.12  Applying this pattern appears 
reasonable given the superior salaries of TWU employees relative to transit workers in other systems 
and the low contribution that TWU employees now make toward the cost of their health insurance 
coverage.  

Special Circumstances  

Recent attacks on transit workers highlight the dangers faced by many transit workers, particularly bus 
operators.  Bus operators can fall victim to attack, with 76 assaults reported in 2010.13  The MTA and the 
TWU reached an agreement in 2009 to equip buses with cameras and clear partitions.14  Partitions are 
already in use on Greyhound buses and on city buses in Milwaukee and Chicago.15  Cameras have been 
installed in 195 buses and installations will continue into the spring;16 however, installation of partitions 



                                                      7 
 
has stalled as the MTA has piloted several prototypes in search of a product that works well for all 
models of city buses and seeks additional funding to furnish them.17  More than 500 new buses have 
been equipped with a clear partition, but the progress of retrofitting the existing fleet remains unclear.   

The MTA’s new chairman, Joseph Lhota, has recognized the importance of safety for transit workers, 
signing a letter with TWU President John Samuelsen to New York City’s district attorneys requesting 
strong prosecution for those who assault bus drivers.  A greater priority should be placed on the safety 
of TWU employees and on accelerating the installation of the clear bus partitions. 

Relative Comparison 

There is one area – maternity benefits – in which TWU members receive relatively poor benefits and 
two others – health insurance and pension benefits – in which TWU members fare better than other 
public employees. 

Maternity Leave. The TWU contract does not provide for any additional maternity leave beyond that 
required by the U.S. Family and Medical Leave Act, which allows for up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave.  
Public employees are typically allowed to deplete their available paid leave and may elect to take unpaid 
leave for extended periods of time.   New York State employees represented by the Civil Service 
Employees Association may request a seven‐month, unpaid leave of absence that may be extended for 
up to two years.  New York City employees represented by District Council 37 are eligible for up to 48 
months of unpaid child care leave for children up to the age of four.18 

Health insurance. TWU employees make only a modest contribution to the cost of their lifetime health 
insurance coverage.  Like New York City public employees, TWU members do not pay directly any share 
of the cost of their health insurance premiums; however, they do contribute 1.5 percent of their base 
pay toward the cost of health coverage.  While this contribution was originally negotiated as a share of 
gross wages (including overtime) that was to rise with the growth in health care costs, it was reduced to 
1.5 percent of base pay for a 40‐hour work week in the last MTA‐TWU arbitration.  A hypothetical $30 
an hour worker pays $936 a year, or $78 a month, for the cost of coverage for himself and his family.  
Retirees make no contribution.  

In contrast, New York State employees and retirees pay at least 10 percent of their premium costs for 
individual health coverage and 25 percent for dependent coverage.  Most civilian employees now pay 12 
or 16 percent for individual coverage and 27 or 31 percent for dependent coverage, depending on the 
employee’s pay grade.19  A State employee with the same salary as our hypothetical TWU employee 
contributes $4,800 a year, or $400 a month, for family coverage and will continue to make a payment 
when she is a retiree.20   

Pensions. TWU employees are in a defined benefit pension plan that is more generous than the plans for 
new State employees and some new City employees.  In response to financial difficulties, the State 
adopted a “fifth tier” for new employees in December 2009.  The plan included State uniformed and 
civilian employees and State and City teachers, but did not include MTA employees.  New MTA 



                                                      8 
 
employees can join the same 55‐25 plan in which more senior employees are enrolled.  The plan 
requires a 3 percent salary contribution for each year of service and allows for unlimited amounts of 
overtime to be pensionable. 

In contrast, new State civilian employees must now work until 62 to collect a full benefit and must 
contribute 3 percent toward their pension for their length of service.  The amount of overtime pay that 
is pensionable was also limited to the first $15,000, with a 3 percent inflation factor.  State and City 
teachers can retire at 57 or 55, but make contributions of 3.5 percent and 4.85 percent, respectively.  
Uniformed employees must make 3 percent contributions for the entire length of service, and 
pensionable overtime for State uniformed employees has been capped at 15 percent of salary.21   

TWU employees have been included in the latest “Tier VI” proposal to change the benefits offered to 
new State, City and MTA employees.  The proposed changes would include increasing the vesting period 
to 12 years; increasing the retirement age to 65; increasing mandatory contributions; and changing 
overtime pay to non‐pensionable status.  These reforms would bring New York closer to nationwide 
norms.22  While PERB does not have the authority to change pension benefits or recommend the 
adoption of the legislation, they can be considered as part of the overall level of compensation received 
by employees. 


New York City Private Sector Employees 

Public compensation should also be considered relative to private employees in the New York City 
metropolitan area.  TWU employees have fared better than private sector workers in New York City on 
three counts: wages, health insurance, and pensions. 

Wages. The last TWU contract was settled in arbitration in August 2009, in the midst of the Great 
Recession.  The award locked in wage increases of 4 percent in 2009, 4 percent in 2010 and 3 percent in 
2011,23 a compounded increase of 11.4 percent.  Other workers in New York City did not fare as well.    
In 2010, the median wage for all occupations in the New York City area was $42,800 – a one percent 
increase from $42,350 in 2009.24   

Health Insurance. TWU employees have access to comprehensive health insurance coverage for which 
they pay directly no part of the premium.  This is a highly unusual arrangement; private sector 
employees in New York share 21 percent of the cost of premiums for single coverage and 25 percent for 
family coverage, on average.25  In 2010, the average premium paid by a private sector employee in New 
York City and Long Island was $1,110 for single coverage and $3,473 for family coverage.26  As health 
insurance costs have grown, employees have shouldered a greater burden for health insurance costs, 
but TWU employees have not been exposed to these rising costs.  As a result, the MTA has seen its 
health insurance costs grow at a rate of 6 percent a year in the last three years, with costs projected to 
continue growing over 9 percent a year. 




                                                     9 
 
TWU employees also receive health insurance coverage when they retire.  This is a benefit rarely offered 
in the private sector in New York:  10.6 percent of private firms offer insurance to those under 65 and 
9.5 percent offer insurance to those over 65.27 TWU employees pay 1.5 percent of their gross base 
salary toward providing this benefit, but this share has been locked in despite rising health care costs 
that have forced private sector companies to increase or implement co‐payments, increase premium 
contributions or limit prescription benefits.  A 2009 survey of large corporations in New York City found 
that almost two‐thirds had made or planned to make such changes to retiree health insurance in the 
wake of the recession.28   

Pensions. TWU employees have another benefit that is rarely found in the private sector nowadays: a 
defined benefit pension.  Retirees receive a pre‐determined amount based on earnings and length of 
employment, and share none of the risks associated with poor investment decisions, lackluster 
investment returns or extended longevity.  Only 20 percent of employees in the private sector have 
access to a defined benefit plan;29 most private sector employees who have retirement plans are in a 
defined contributions plans, such as 401(k)s, in which employers make only a set contribution.  The size 
of the retirement benefit is determined by employees’ saving habits and investment choices, and where 
these fail, employees must work longer or make due with less. 

 

Cost of living  

Potential wage increases must be assessed in terms of changes in the cost of living, specifically, changes 
in the consumer price index.   TWU wage increases have consistently exceeded inflation; as a result, the 
real wages of TWU employees have grown. 

The 2009 arbitration award provided for a compounded wage increase of 11.4 percent between January 
2009 and January 2011.  For that time period, urban inflation in the New York metropolitan area was 5.5 
percent – less than half the awarded wage increases.30  Taking a longer perspective, TWU wage growth 
has outpaced inflation since at least 1999: 47 percent versus 38 percent, respectively. 

The latest MTA’s latest economic projections indicate inflation of 2.2 percent in 2012, 2.0 percent in 
2013 and 1.9 percent in 2014 – a total of 6.2 percent.  Based on these projections, wage growth for TWU 
employees would still be ahead of inflation if a three‐year wage freeze were to be enacted. 

 

Stress on finances and service provision  

The impact of any potential award on the MTA’s ability to pay, fares and service must also be taken into 
account.  The latest MTA financial plan shows a surplus of $80 million anticipated for fiscal year 2013; 
this surplus evaporates the following year, when deficits of $141 million and $221 million are projected.  
The picture is worse when considering the MTA’s finances as reported under generally accepted 



                                                    10 
 
accounting principles (GAAP), which provide a more comprehensive and accurate picture because they 
also recognize the costs of depreciation, and, more importantly, providing post‐employment health 
benefits (otherwise known as OPEB).  GAAP reporting indicates deficits of $3.5 billion, $3.8 billion and 
$4.0 billion starting in 2013.   

The outlook is grimmer than even these figures suggest, as the MTA is also struggling to meet its capital 
needs.  Financing for the five‐year capital plan have yet to be approved by the State, and plans to get to 
a “state of good repair” have been delayed to after 2024 for key components of infrastructure, such as 
line structures, subway shops and, most importantly, signals.  If the level of investment is reduced, the 
maintenance and condition of the system will deteriorate further.  This is not in the public interest, and 
is of particular concern to TWU members, who are hindered in performing their duties and potentially at 
risk of hazard to the extent the system is not well‐maintained and safe.   

The MTA’s deficits are projected despite significant actions undertaken by the MTA to bring its financial 
house in order.  These efforts include (1) a wide scale efficiency program that is projected to yield $720 
million in savings in 2012; (2) fare increases in 2009 and 2011; (3) service reductions that slowed service 
on some lines and eliminated entire bus and subway routes; (4) elimination of over 1,000 positions, 
including over 500 layoffs;31 and (5) the assumption of a three‐year, “net‐zero” wage freeze to hold the 
line on labor costs.   

The “net‐zero” wage freeze assumes that any wage increases awarded will be offset by savings from 
benefit changes that will reduce costs or easing of work rules to enhance worker productivity.  Failure to 
achieve this target will widen the MTA’s operating deficit: each one point increase awarded to the TWU 
would increase costs by $42 million, if applied to setting wages elsewhere in the system.  An award 
along the lines of projected inflation – 2.2 percent in 2012 and 2 percent thereafter – would open a 
budget gap of $92.4 million in 2012, $176.4 million in 2013, and $256.4 million in 2014, approximately 
2.25% of operating expenses.32    

The MTA’s ability to pay such an award is further limited by additional uncertainties that make its 
financial position precarious.  First, the MTA’s reliance on economically sensitive revenue sources makes 
its finances vulnerable to revenue losses due to a potential “double‐dip” recession.  Second, revenues 
lost to the MTA from a reduction of the payroll mobility tax may be at risk, as State appropriations to 
make up the lost funds may be vulnerable to the challenges posed by the State’s own fiscal difficulties.   

Since the MTA does not have the financial ability to pay any wage increases awarded with a greater cost 
than “net zero,” riders are likely to bear the burden in the form of increased fares or reduced service.  

Fares 

The MTA’s financial plan already assumes biennial increases of 7.5 percent on farebox revenues in 2011, 
2013 and 2015. The 2011 fare increase produced $424 million more in revenues in 2011; the other 
increases are similarly expected to yield an additional $449 million in 2013 and $494 million in 2015.  In 




                                                     11 
 
sum, more than $1.4 billion will be raised from these fare increases by 2015 – and the deficits still 
persist. 


                             Table 2: Value of Fare Increases (dollars in millions)

                                            2011         2012      2013        2014     2015
                  2011 Fare Increase        $424         $442      $447        $451     $455
                  2013 Fare Increaes                               $449        $466     $472
                  2015 Fare Increase                                                    $494
                  Total                     $424         $442      $896        $917   $1,421

                 Source: Metropolitan Transportation Authority
                                                                                                  


While the cost of the fare does not cover the average cost of a ride, New York City riders already pay 
more toward the operations of the mass transit systems than in other cities.  New York City Transit leads 
other major transit systems in the share of total operating expenses covered by fare box revenues.  The 
fare box operating recovery ratio for New York City Transit is 53 percent – more than any other large 
transit system except that of San Francisco (72 percent).33   

Funding wage increases in line with inflation – without any other savings – would require an additional 
fare increase of approximately 4 percent in 2013; applying this across the board would raise the base 
fare to $2.50 from $2.25 and monthly Metrocards to $116 from $104. 

Service 

In addition to fare increases, the MTA implemented extensive service reductions in 2010.  Over 30 bus 
routes and two subway lines were eliminated entirely.   Overnight and weekend bus service was 
reduced or eliminated, and fewer trains were scheduled to run during off‐peak hours.  Dozens of station 
booths were shuttered and over 200 station agents were laid off.  No additional service cuts have been 
proposed as of the most recent MTA plan, but this would likely change in the event of a greater budget 
deficit. 

In sum, the MTA does not have the ability to pay any wage increases above what is budgeted in its 
financial plan.  Its financial situation is precarious, despite extensive efforts to pursue efficiency and 
reduce staffing and imposing hardship on riders in the forms of fare increases and reduced service.  
Operating deficits loom, and limited resources are available for maintenance and upgrades to the 
system.  Any award that costs the MTA more than a “net‐zero” increase will negatively impact fares 
and/or services. 

 




                                                         12 
 
Public Interest and Other Factors  

The public interest is served by ensuring that the MTA has the resources to provide reliable service, 
preventing fares from becoming burdensome to riders, and securing decent compensation and work 
conditions for workers.  Accomplishing these goals requires that the mass transit system operate 
efficiently, so that public resources are used in the most cost‐effective manner possible. 

The MTA launched an ambitious “top‐to‐bottom” efficiency program in 2010 that is generating more 
than $500 million in recurring savings.  The reductions in service described above were a large part of 
this program, but the focus centered on MTA administration.  Administrative personnel (15 percent) and 
staff at MTA headquarters (20 percent) were cut, wages for management personnel were frozen, and 
authorized overtime was reduced. The operation of MTA Bridges and Tunnels was also overhauled, and 
additional efforts were made in 2011 to achieve efficiencies in paratransit operations, streamline 
procurement processes and consolidate redundant back office operations (such as IT and customer 
service functions).  Collectively, these measures are expected to yield over $700 million in savings in 
2012. 

Significantly less has been done to make operation of the transit system more efficient. Savings have 
been generated by laying off relatively low‐paid employees like station agents and cleaners, which has 
reduced the cleanliness and perception of safety of some stations.  No revisions have been made to 
work rules to enhance the productivity of the workforce. 

The MTA has proposed several work rule changes.  They fall into three general categories.  The first are 
concessions that do not significantly affect the work day or responsibilities of employees.  These are 
requests to eliminate paid wash‐up time, end shape‐up periods for bus and car maintainers, end tool 
allowances, require 2‐hour advance notice for absences, and terminate the penalty for moving bus 
maintainers with less than seven days’ notice. 

The second set of proposals change the length of the workday or expand the range of duties required by 
each title.  For example, under one MTA proposal, station cleaners would be required to perform 
routine maintenance chores, such as changing light bulbs and removing graffiti.  Another would require 
up to one‐fifth of train operators and conductors to work on a part‐time basis; this would provide 
scheduling flexibility and reduce the need for overtime. 

The third, and most significant, are proposals to make changes that will fundamentally affect the 
operations of the transit system. The most important such proposal is one to merge the position of 
“conductor” and “train operator.” Currently, train operators “drive” the train, and conductors are 
positioned in the middle of the train to operate the doors and make announcements.   Staffing trains 
with a single person would be a shift toward more efficient operations, and shuttle trains and weekend 
service already operating in this manner demonstrate that it can done safely.34 

The public interest demands that the transit system that is operated as efficiently as possible.  The 
MTA’s proposals deserve serious consideration.  



                                                    13 
 
A FAIR SETTLEMENT: FINDINGS & AWARD 
Each of the criteria that would be applied by an independent, tripartite arbitration panel in determining 
an appropriate award for TWU employees was used to analyze wages and work conditions.  The findings 
are summarized below and are used to suggest the outline of an award that would maintain a good 
standard of living for TWU workers – without harming riders or the MTA’s finances.  

(1) The overall level of TWU compensation is sensible – TWU employees receive a high level of 
    compensation that includes a salary supplemented by overtime pay and other differentials, leave for 
    sickness, vacation and holidays, comprehensive health insurance coverage, and a defined benefit 
    pension. 

(2) The relative level of TWU compensation is high – TWU compensation– with solidly middle‐class 
    wages, comprehensive health insurance and a defined benefit pension– exceeds similarly skilled 
    employees of all other large transit systems, as well as the average private sector worker in the New 
    York City metropolitan area.  TWU members receive health insurance on more generous terms than 
    even other State public employees: they pay a very modest part of health insurance premiums for 
    the coverage they receive during employment and in retirement. 

(3) The financial ability of the MTA to pay an award is severely constrained, and would impact fares 
    and services – The MTA’s extensive efforts to pursue efficiency, coupled with service cuts and fare 
    increases, have not been enough to put it on stable financial footing and have severely constricted 
    the ability of the MTA to pay out wage increases.  The uncertain economic climate does not offer 
    hope for added revenues; any award with a financial impact greater than a three‐year “net zero” 
    increase is sure to negatively impact fares and/or services. 

(4) Past pay has exceeded changes in cost of living and future increases to cost of living are expected 
    to be minimal – TWU wage increases exceeded inflation for the past decade, and the disparity was 
    especially great in the last contract award, when wage increases exceeded changes in the urban 
    consumer price index by more than two times.  The projected inflation rate is expected to be low for 
    the next three years.   

(5) Public interest is best served through efficiency – Work rule changes are essential to ensuring that 
    the system is operated with greater efficiency and that public resources are used cost‐effectively.   

The findings indicate that awarding “net‐zero” wage increases is fair and appropriate given the current 
economic climate, the fiscal outlook of the MTA, the burdens recently placed upon riders, and the high 
relative and overall compensation level of TWU employees.   State and City governments have set a 
three‐year wage freeze, with added employee responsibility for health insurance costs, as the pattern 
for settling expired public employee contracts.  Applying this pattern to the TWU contract would not 
compromise the standard of living of TWU workers; the inflation rate is projected to be about 2 percent, 
and a three‐year wage freeze will not undo the real wage growth that TWU employees have realized 
over the last decade.  Increasing employee responsibility for health care costs, through increased 


                                                    14 
 
premium‐sharing or salary contributions, is also appropriate given the relatively modest contributions 
made by TWU employees as compared to other public and private employees.   

The award should also serve the public interest by promoting both greater efficiency in MTA operations 
and fair and safe treatment of MTA employees.  Both will improve the system for the riding public in the 
long‐term.  The award should include work rules changes that will produce savings that allow for 
enhanced maternity benefits and the accelerated installation of clear partitions for buses.  A more 
ambitious award could provide for small wage increases, not to exceed inflation, funded by additional 
productivity concessions or added employee responsibility for health insurance costs: implementing 
premium‐sharing, increasing the contribution toward retiree health insurance, or ending the partial 
Medicare Part B reimbursement.                                    




                                                   15 
 
ENDNOTES 
                                                            
1
  Public Employees’ Fair Employment Act, also known as the Taylor Law, Civil Service Statute, Article 14, Section 209, No. 5.  
Note that this section of the statute is different from that which provides for arbitration for police and firefighters. 
2
  New York City Independent Budget Office, “Budget Buster: For MTA, Tax and Fee Revenues Are Not Always On Track,” August 
2011. 
3
  Starting salaries for entry‐level employees are lower.  From salary schedule published by TWU Local 100 at 
http://www.twulocal100.org/sites/twulocal100.org/files/pay_rates_by_title_over_contract_2011.pdf.   
4
  Calculated by CBC, assuming a 40‐hour work week using the salary schedule published by TWU Local 100 at 
http://www.twulocal100.org/sites/twulocal100.org/files/pay_rates_by_title_over_contract_2011.pdf. 
5
  In 2010, the MTA changed from HIP and GHI to plans provided by United Healthcare, Empire Blue Cross/ Blue Shield, and 
Aetna Medicare Advantage.  The TWU has filed a grievance that coverage has decreased as a result of this change. 
6
  Based on a tentative Memorandum of Understanding between the MTA and the TWU (which was later rejected by TWU 
membership in a vote), the 2006 arbitration award “linked” the 1.5 percent health care contribution with the cost of improving 
pre‐Medicare retiree health benefits.  
7
  For Tier IV members of the New York City Transit 25 Year ‐ Age 55 Retirement Plan. See Chapter 10 of the Laws of 2000 of New 
York State. 
8
  The childcare fund is funded by the MTA and jointly administered by 2 MTA trustees, 2 TWU Local 100 trustees, and a 
Director.  For more information, see Transport Workers Union– Local 100/ MTA New York City Transit Childcare Fund at 
http://www.twulocal100ccf.org/index.html.  
9
     The CSEA contract also included a 2 percent increase in the fifth year, but the PEF deal did not. 
10
  A one‐time increase to the welfare benefit funds in 2010 was provided by tapping the Health Insurance Stabilization Fund as 
part of a larger health insurance deal.  Some unions have received one‐time increases negotiated under different collective 
bargaining agreements.  See Citizens Budget Commission, Better Benefits From Our Billion Bucks: The Case for Reforming 
Municipal Union Welfare Funds, August 2010, http://www.cbcny.org/sites/default/files/REPORT_UWF_08032010.pdf, page 3. 
11
      David Sims, “Mayor Looking to Roll Back Health Care For Workers and Retirees,” The Chief‐Leader, March 7, 2011. 
12
      Metropolitan Transportation Authority, November Financial Plan 2011‐2014, November 2010.  
13
      Sarah Dorsey, “Bus Operators Feel Under Siege, Unprotected by Law,” The Chief Leader, November 7, 2011. 
14
      Ari Paul, “NYC Transit, TWU Agree on Partitions For Bus Drivers,” The Chief Leader, December 26, 2008. 
15
  Ari Paul, “NYC Transit, TWU Agree on Partitions For Bus Drivers,” The Chief Leader, December 26, 2008; Flora Fair, “Bus 
Driver’s Brutal Beating Spurs Union Call for Shield,” The Chief Leader, June 27, 2011. 
16
      Rebecca Rosenberg, “Picture this ‐ safer buses MTA's camera campaign,” The New York Post, December 6, 2011.  
17
  Flora Fair, “Bus Driver’s Brutal Beating Spurs Union Call for Shield,” The Chief Leader, June 27, 2011; Flora Fair, “TWU Bus 
Operator Advocate Pressing For Safety Shields,” The Chief Leader, July 11, 2011. 
18
      Section 20 of the 1995‐2001 Citywide Contract Agreement between District Council 37 and the City of New York. 
19
  New contribution rates negotiated under labor agreements with the Civil Service Employees Association (CSEA) and the 
Public Employees Federation (PEF) in 2011.  
20
  Calculated as a 25 percent contribution for Family Plan Prime coverage, using 2011 Empire Plan monthly gross premiums 
published by Employee Benefits Division, New York State Department of Civil Service, “Empire Plan Experience Report: Second 
Quarter,” September 14, 2011, accessed December 19, 2011, http://www.cs.ny.gov/ebd/ebdonlinecenter/qer/pa11‐17.cfm. 
21
  While New York City police and firefighters were not covered under Tier V, Governor Paterson’s repeal of Tier 2 provided that 
new police and firefighters were covered under Tier 3, which mandates a 3 percent contribution for the length of service.  




                                                                    16 
 
                                                                                                                                                                                                
22
  Citizens Budget Commission, “First Priority in the New Year – Pension Reform,” January 2012, http://bit.ly/AecueJ ; Citizens 
Budget Commission, “The Explosion in Pension Costs: Ten Things New Yorkers Should Know About Retirement Benefits for New 
York City Employees,” April 2009, http://www.cbcny.org/sites/default/files/report_10pensionfacts_04062009.pdf; Citizens 
Budget Commission, “8 Things New Yorkers Should Know About Public Retirement Benefits in New York State,” October 2010, 
http://www.cbcny.org/sites/default/files/REPORT_PensionFacts_10202010.pdf.  
23
  Wage increases were staggered to be 2 percent effective April 16, 2009 (retroactive), 2 percent on October 16, 2009, 2 
percent on April 16, 2010, 2 percent on October 16, 2010 and 3 percent on January 16, 2011. 
24
  Median wages for all occupations in the New York‐White Plains‐Wayne metro area.  From U.S. Census Bureau, “Metropolitan 
Area Cross‐Industry Estimates,” Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates, May 2010 and May 2009, available for 
download at http://www.bls.gov/oes/oes_dl.htm.  
25
   Agency for Health Care Research and Quality, ““Table II.C.3: Percent of total premiums contributed by employees enrolled in 
single coverage at private‐sector establishments that offer health insurance by firm size and State: United States, 2010” and 
“Table II.D.3: Percent of total premiums contributed by employees enrolled in family coverage at private‐sector establishments 
that offer health insurance by firm size and State: United States, 2010,” Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 2010, accessed 
December 21, 2011 at http://www.meps.ahrq.gov/mepsweb/data_stats/summ_tables/insr/state/series_2/2010/ic10_iia_f.pdf. 
26
   Agency for Health Care Research and Quality, “Table IX.A.2: Average total premiums and employee contributions (in dollars) 
for private‐sector establishments for areas within States: United States, 2010,” Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 2010, 
accessed December 21, 2011 at 
http://www.meps.ahrq.gov/mepsweb/data_stats/summ_tables/insr/state/series_9/2010/tixa2.pdf.  
27
    Agency for Health Care Research and Quality, “Table II.A.2.e: Percent of private‐sector establishments that offer health 
insurance by plan options and insurance offerings to retirees by State: United States, 2010,” Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 
2010, accessed December 21, 2011 at 
http://www.meps.ahrq.gov/mepsweb/data_stats/summ_tables/insr/state/series_2/2010/ic10_iia_f.pdf. 
28
  Citizens Budget Commission, “Out of Balance: A Comparison of Public and Private Employee Benefits in New York City,” 
December 2009, http://www.cbcny.org/sites/default/files/REPORT_Survey_12162009.pdf. 
29
  U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, National Compensation Survey‐ Benefits, 2010, available for download at 
http://www.bls.gov/ncs/ebs/.  
30
   Annual inflation calculated as of January, the month in which the current contract begins and ends.  See U.S. Bureau of Labor 
Statistics, New York – New Jersey Information Office, Consumer Price Index, New York‐Northern New Jersey ‐ October 2011, 
accessed at http://www.bls.gov/ro2/cpinynj.htm.  
31
  Metropolitan Transportation Authority, “MTA to Eliminate More than 1,000 Positions,” Press Release, February 23, 2010, 
http://www.mta.info/mta/news/releases/?en=100223‐HQ9 
32
      As a percent of operating expenses without non‐cash liabilities.  
33
  Of the 10 largest urban systems, where operating expenses do not include depreciation, OPEB obligations, debt service, or 
costs of environmental remediation. The data is from the Federal Transit Administration National Transit Database for 2010.  
34
  Weekend service on the G and M lines and some shuttles use one person train operation.  See Metropolitan Transportation 
Authority, “One‐Person Train Operation,” accessed January 5, 2012 at http://www.mta.info/nyct/service/opto.htm.   




                                                                                             17 
 

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Tags: Mass, Transit
Stats:
views:30
posted:3/29/2012
language:
pages:17