Docstoc

Allergic Drug Reactions

Document Sample
Allergic Drug Reactions Powered By Docstoc
					Allergic Drug Reactions

 Joseph F. Alexander, Jr., M.D.
                  Background
• Adverse drug reactions incidence
  Accounts for 5% of hospitalizations
  Occurs in 10‐20% of hospitalized pts.
Old Dogma
  Immunologic
      Gel & Coombs types I –IV
  Non‐immunologic
  Side effects, toxicity, idiosyncratic, anphylactoid
               Background
• New Dogma
  Type A – related to pharmacologic action
  Type B ‐ idiosyncratic
     Factors Influencing Risks of Drug 
                 Reactions
•   Dose
•   Route
•   Duration
•   Dose Frequency
•   Molecular Wt.
•   Complexity
•   Chemical properties of drug
                Mechanisms
Haptens
  Beta – Lactams (covalent bonding to self 
  proteins)
Prohaptens
  Sulfamethaxazole
      Creation of a hydroxylamine intermediate
      Converts to
      Reactive sulfamethoxazole‐nitroso
            (covalent  bonding to self proteins)
Direct presentation to T‐cells (non‐covalent
              Risk Factors I
Phenotypic differences of metabolism/genetic 
  polymorphisms
Examples:
  HLA‐DR3 phenotype 
     Increased risk of insulin allergy in DM
     Increased risk of penicillamine or gold 
          induced nephropathy in RA
               Risk Factors II
Age
Gender:  F > M
Concurrent Infection
  Upregulation of the immune system
  Release of endotoxins and cytokines
Example:
  50% of AIDS pts. Treated with sulfamethoxazole‐
  trimethoprim for Pneumocystis carinii develop 
  rash ( a 10 fold higher incidence)
              Risk Factors III
AIDS patients at increased risk of drug fever, 
  thrombocytopenia, neutropenia from sulfa
Increased rates of adverse reactions to dapsone, 
  rifampin et. al. antibiotics.
Increased incidence of rash (>90%) with 
  amoxicillin in Epstein – Barr infection
              Risk Factors IV
Concurrent drug use
  Amoxicillin risk greater with concurrent use of 
  allopurinol
Future risk with amoxicillin use not increased in 
  absence of these factors.
             Cross Reactivity I
Sulfonamide antimicrobials
  Contain arylamine group ‐C‐NH2
     metabolizes to hydrozylamines
  Partial cross‐reactivity among sulfa antibiotics
     lesser cross reactivity with sulfapyridine or 
     sulfamoxazole
             Cross Reactivity II
Non antibiotic sulfonamides do not possess an 
  arylamine group:  e.g. celecoxib, diuretics, 
  sulfonylureas, sumatriptan
In vitro and in vivo (skin testing) fail to 
  demonstrate cross reactivity
Allergic reactions have occurred nonetheless 
  but is it an occult cross reactivity or general 
  predisposition to drug reactivity?
     Gell & Coombs Reactions III
Type I – Immediate IgE mediated
  anaphylaxis
Type II – Cytotoxic
  IgG/IgM antibody mediated and complement 
  mediated hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, 
  granulacytopenia.
      Heparin – platelet factor 4 complexes in 
      heparin induced thrombocytopenia with 
      thrombosis
     Gell & Coombs Reactions IV
Type III – Serum sickness
  Immune complexes with IgG/IgM, 
  complement
One – four weeks following anti‐sera or drug 
  exposure.
Presentation:
  Fever >99%    Arthritis/arthralgia 10 ‐50%
  Rash >95%      Lymphadenopathy 10 ‐20%
            Gell & Coombs V
Treatment:
  Antihistamines
  Corticosteroids
Cannot predict future risk of recurrence with 
  skin testing !
            Gell & Coombs VI
Subtypes 
  IV a ‐ eczematous
  IV b – maculopapular or bullous exanthem
  IV c – Eczematous, maculopapular, bullous, 
  pustular exanthem
  IV d – Pustular exanthem
  Combination occurrences
              Gell & Coombs VI
Combination of types IVb and Ivc
  Erythema multiforme minor
  lesions spread peripherally and clear     centrally 
  producing target appearance.
  Erythema multiforme major
  progressive involvement of mucous membranes 
  and bullae
  predilection for the limbs
Erythema Multiforme Minor
      Stevens‐Johnson Syndrome
An advancing form of Erythema Multiforme Major

  Involving blistering purpura of face, trunk and 
  proximal limbs.
  mucous membrane erosions
Generally involves < 10% body surface area
Steroids may be beneficial or IVIG
More ominous form advances to > 30% of body 
  surface area:  Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis
SJS
                      TEN
Nikolsky’s sign:  skin shearing with lateral 
  pressure
Fatality rate can be 35%
Corticosteroids not helpful, likely deleterious
Admit to burn unit
Results with cyclosporin very encouraging
    Acute Generalized Pustulosis
90% of these due to drugs
Incidence about that of TEN or SJS
Disseminated sterile pustules assoc with fever, 
  leukocytosis and eosinophilia
Acute Generalized Pustulosis
    Drug Related Eosinophilia with 
    Systemic Symptoms Syndrome
DRESS Syndrome
Most frequently from anticonvulsants, dapsone, 
   sulfamethoxazole, sulfalasaline, allopurinol
It is a systemic disease:  lymphadenopathy, 
   fever, exanthemata, eosinophilia (>90%)
10% fatality rate
         Vancomycin Reactions
Red man syndrome
  Due to histamine release
  Infusion rate related
  Pretreat with H1 antagonists
IgE mediated anaphylaxis occurs more rarely
  Skin testing is helpful for risk predicting
Include other immune reactions eg., Linear IgA 
  bullous dermatosis, vasculitis, TEN
Linear IgA Bullous Dermatosis
Linear IgA Bullous Dermatosis
   Linear IgA Bullous Dermatosis
Most frequent offender is vancomycin.
Others include phentoin, carbamazapine, ACE 
  inhibitors, ARBS
Skin sloughing may occur.
             Other Reactions
Pulmonary hypersensitivity reactions
  non‐productive cough, radiologic infiltrates, 
  eosinophilia
Interstitial nephritis and nephrotic syndrome
Hepatitis, cholestasis, granulomatosis
Aseptic meningitis
Drug fever
               ACE Inhibitors
• Inhibit angiotensin converting enzyme
• Angiotensin I              Angiotensin II 

     Bradykinins and Tachykinins            Vagal 
  afferent and non‐myelinated C fibers 
        Substance P, Arachidonic acid pathway
               ACE Inhibitors
Cough (25%)
  Onset 1 day to > 1 year
  May take weeks to disappear upon cessation of 
  drug
Angioedema ( 0.1 – 0.68%)
  Facial features, upper airway
  Onset 1 day to months
  exacerbates pre‐existing idiopathic or hereditary 
  angioedema
ARB’s usually tolerated
       Evaluation and Diagnosis
Prior history is crucial but too often lacking or 
  fragmented
Current history most important especially 
  chronology of events
Physical exam
General labs: cbc, ua, lft’s, rft’s
Drug specific testing
              Management 
Stop the drug  !
Acute management:  epinephrine, 
  antihistamines, corticosteroids, IVIG, 
  cyclosporin, prayers
Reduce future risks by reducing future drug use
               Re‐exposure
Skin testing
Graded challenge
Desensitizaton:
  IV, subcu, oral
         Drug Readministration
Why is succeeds:
  Original reaction misdiagnosed or history bogus
  Expected dissipation of antibody response over 
  time
  Physical condition of patient
  Desensitization works
Balance risks of readministration with benefits of 
  treatment

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:21
posted:3/29/2012
language:Latin
pages:34