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NUS National Conference 2009 - POLICY BOOK

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					        NUS National Conference 2009




                          POLICY BOOK
                            Compiled by David Wilkins, NUS National General Secretary
                                         Contact: 0413 700 667 or gensec@nus.asn.au

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                      Page 1
NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK   Page 2
                                             Contents

POLICY MOTIONS

Administration and Development                 Page 4

Economic                                     Page 14

Education                                    Page 20

Environment                                  Page 36

Ethno-cultural                               Page 37

Indigenous                                   Page 38

International Students                       Page 46

International                                Page 51

Miscellaneous                                Page 54

Part-time and Mature Aged Students           Page 63

Queer                                        Page 64

Small and Regional Campuses                  Page 67

Student Unionism                             Page 70

Welfare                                      Page 73

Women’s                                      Page 86

RULES AMENDMENTS                             Page 95




NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK       Page 3
                                             Administration and Development
ADMIN 1: NEW AFFILIATES

Preamble

1. NUS, as the peak representative student body in Australia, is in a special position to
   win real victories that improve the lives of students. Through the history of the
   student movement, NUS has achieved its goals, set out annually, all of which aim to
   benefit students, ensure education is funded and all students are given the
   opportunity to access higher education. NUS are students working together across
   the many campuses and with individual members to ensure that the higher education
   sector is everything it can be – for any campus in Australia.
2. It is not NUS as a sole entity that achieves these wins for students. Every campus
   contributes invaluably to the NUS message that is constantly sent to the government,
   whether it is through the media, universities or actions on campus that each
   affiliated student union organises.
3. Each university student union has the ability and the power to make demands of
   their university and the government on behalf of their members and constituents.
   Being able to activate local media and agitate around issues relevant to their
   individual campus is one part of being affiliated to NUS. Yet often student unions
   feel as though their universities aren’t hearing their message, or the representatives
   within those unions feel that they are unable to connect the feelings of students at
   their campus with what is changeable and winnable.
4. Becoming an affiliate of NUS means that there is national support, networks and
   expertise to draw upon. NUS provided a consolidated national voice on student
   issues, and can be used to help individual campuses in dealing with their university.
5. NUS is a national union, and to ensure that the student voice is heard loudly and
   clearly by the Government, all student unions should affiliate to continue the work
   for students across Australia.
6. In the coming climate of the Government’s proposed Student Services and Amenities
   Fee, it is unclear what financial position NUS will be in. Ensuring that all currently
   unaffiliated campuses become part of the national union will mean that NUS will
   have even greater credibility.
7. There are currently 12 public universities in Australia that are yet to be affiliated:
   Deakin (Vic), Charles Darwin (NT), Macquarie (NSW), University of Southern
   Queensland (QLD), Central Queensland University (CQU), University of Ballarat (Vic),
   University of the Sunshine Coast (QLD), Griffith (QLD), University of New England
   (NSW), Flinders University (SA), Notre Dame (NAT)

Platform

1. That NUS make affiliating new members a priority in 2010.
2. That NUS actively and openly engage with unaffiliated campuses and engage with
   established SRC’s and Unions about the benefits of being a member of NUS


Action



NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 4
1. The National Office bearing team is to set out a strategic timeline for visiting and
   running affiliation campaigns at each of the above universities. (For example,
   Macquarie University is ready to affiliate in 2010, and should be NUS’s first priority)
2. All NUS office bearers are directed to make contact with the unaffiliated university
   student unions. This means that they are required to visit each of these campuses
   throughout the year.
3. The NUS President, Education and Welfare officers shall be in charge of ensuring
   appropriate work and materials are put into the affiliation campaigns. The NUS
   General Secretary will ensure that all appropriate measures are in place for the
   constitutional change to occur at those campuses. This requires ongoing relationships
   with each individual campus president and activists.
4. NUS should aim to affiliate one campus each month of the year. This, however, may
   not be entirely possible. A minimum of 7 campuses should be affiliated by the end of
   2010.

M: Carla Drakeford (University of Melbourne)
S: Ashley Lucista (University of Adelaide)


ADMIN 2: MEETING WITH CAMPUS OFFICE BEARERS

Preamble

1. Whether or not campus associations should affiliate with the National Union of
   Students (NUS) is a constant discussion at most campus organizations in Australia,
   particularly in the cases of the more affluent campus associations that have to pay
   larger affiliation fees. A large portion of students who advocate disaffiliation are
   often disconnected with NUS, hence why they don’t value its importance.
2. Currently and in the past, there have been many campus office-bearers across
   Australian that have never met or even spoken with their NUS office-bearer
   equivalents, and in some rare cases do not even know their name! This lack of
   connection between campus office-bearers and the NUS office-bearers might explain
   why many of these students feel that NUS is irrelevant to them and their campus
   organization.

Platform

1. That NUS calls upon next year’s national office-bearers to make a deliberate effort
   to build on and expand communication with their campus office-bearer equivalents.
2. That NUS recognizes it is the obligation of NUS office-bearers to get into contact
   with their campus equivalents, and not the reverse.

Action

1. That all NUS office-bearers are instructed to have a formal conversation - of no less
   than fifteen minute - with every one of their campus office-bearer equivalents at
   some point during their twelve month term. In this formal conversation, they are to
   detail what they are currently working on, how it relates to the campus office-
   bearer and how that campus office-bearer can assist. This conversation can be taken
   in person or over the phone.



NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                          Page 5
2. That all NUS office-bearers are to take notice on their progress in speaking with
   every one of their campus office-bearer equivalents in their reports to the National
   Executive.
3. That all NUS office-bearers should keep in regular contact with campus
   organisations, so in the case of a change of campus office-bearer, the NUS office-
   bearer equivalent is aware that there is a new campus office-bearer they need to
   contact and that efforts are made to ensure that this individual is spoken to by their
   NUS office-bearer equivalent.

M: Sheldon Oski (Monash University, Clayton)
S: Stefie Hinchy (National Education)


ADMIN 3: THE HACK WANTS A LIFE PARTNER

Preamble

1. The finances of the National Union have taken a hit in a post-VSU environment and
   so it is inevitable that the Union must move towards a “sell out” approach to
   increasing its finances and viability.
2. This motion aims to bring together the two inevitable things in student politics; the
   quest for fame and notoriety, and the quest for a good hook-up, with a view to
   generating much needed profit.
3. With this in mind we propose (no pun intended) the production of a TV series titled
   “The Hack Wants a Life Partner” mirrored on the hugely popular series “The Farmer
   wants a wife”, though obviously far less sexist as our title says “Life Partner” and
   actively seeks to exclude farmers (regional students may still apply).

Platform

1. NUS recognise the need to seek new revenue streams so NUS can continue to fund
   frivolous and extravagant “activist” spending, or whatever else the Socialist
   Alternative are demanding at the time.
2. NUS conference recognises the decrease in recruitment to the national student
   movement and its factions and thus resolves to take matters into its own hands by
   establishing a means for hacks to hook-up with another hack as a life partner with
   view to creating lots of babies to furnish the national office in years to come.
3. NUS resolve to combat the mainstream reality TV giant with their own production,
   recognising that the mainstream reality TV productions are “typical of the status
   quo, part of the neo-liberal education agenda, and contrary to the principles of
   internationalism.”

Action

1. The National General Secretary will acquire copyright for “The Hack Wants a Life
   Partner”
2. The National General Secretary will secure a minimum of a two season run for the
   show on a major, corporate, sell out station.
3. The National General Secretary will open auditions for season 1 immediately, and
   will ensure that there is no bias based on factional participation.



NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 6
M: Kate Schouten (University of Wollongong)
S: Jonathan Childs (Charles Sturt University, Bathurst)


ADMIN 4: GOD SAVE NUS: CATHOLICISM, UNIONISM AND BUILDING THE LINKS

Preamble

1. The reputation and appeal of the National Union of Students (NUS) has suffered
   significant damage due to the continued election of undesirable ‘students’ to
   national office. NUS now needs to model its self on one of the most committed and
   financially viable organizations to ever exist; the Catholic Church. An NUS of entirely
   Catholic office bearers would restore the morality and financial viability of NUS
   forever.

Platform

1. NUS recognises the awesome fundraising power of the Catholic Church and recognise
   that emulating its practices will ensure greater financial security for the Union..
2. NUS recognises that student participation and interest shrinks where Catholics are
   not actively involved in controlling NUS actions.
3. That in order to gain relevance, the NUS commits to electing Catholics to every
   National Office Bearing role for the 2010 calendar year.

Action

1. The NUS approves a short-term (one calendar year) policy requiring all National
   Office-Bearer candidates to be Catholic.
2. NUS will sit back and bask in the glory of spiritual superiority and general goodness.
3. The National General Secretary will evaluate the policy merit and results over the
   2010 calendar year for possible future expansion and permanency of the policy.
4. The National General Secretary will undertake the organization of a collection plate
   for all NUS Conferences, junkets and National Executive meetings to aid with
   building the Unions finances.
5. The National General Secretary and National Women’s Officer will end the supply of
   prophylactics in NUS National Conference bags as this stems the production of future
   Catholic hacks.
6. The National General Secretary will organise Michael de Bruyn to be available to
   offer fast-track conversions and baptisms to non-catholic candidates seeking office in
   2011.

M: Simone McDonnell (National Executive)
S: Jonathan Childs (Charles Sturt University, Bathurst)


ADMIN 5: AN EFFECTIVE HEAD OFFICE

Preamble

1. NUS recognises that following the introduction of Voluntary Student Unionism (VSU)
   NUS must be restructured to operate effectively in the new political environment.
   The inevitable decrease in the union’s financial capacity requires the union office to
NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                          Page 7
   be responsibly located so as to best service the needs of the union and its office
   bearers
2. It is clear that NUS current location in trades hall, while symbolic, is an
   extravagance far beyond the means of the national union and is a cost that can be
   reduced.

Platform

1. Canberra is the most effective location for the union office. It is conveniently
   located between Sydney and Melbourne and is the political heart of Australia. Being
   located in the nations capital, it is close to Federal Parliament, government
   departments and other political organisations such as the Department of Education,
   Science and Training and Universities Australia. Given the high volume of travel
   Office Bearers take to Canberra and the increasing role of the union as a lobbying
   body, Canberra is a more suitable location for the national office than Melbourne

Action

1. That the National President and National General Secretary be directed to
   investigate leasing office space in Canberra
2. That the Union is not entered into any long term office space leasing arrangements,
   which are not in Canberra.

M: Tom Green (University of Sydney)
S: Matthew Sampson (Charles Sturt University, Bathurst)


ADMIN 6: DELETE OLD POLICY

Preamble

1. The NUS policy volume is in need of a major update and revitalisation. While it
   should be a document that provides direction and guidance to Office Bearers and
   also serve as an historical record of the Union, it is currently so unwieldy and
   cumbersome that is it impossible to use. The current volume refers to terms, dates,
   current affairs, and persons of importance domestically and internationally that no
   longer have relevance to the Unions current membership and student population
   broadly.

Platform

1. NUS recognises the importance of a policy volume that is usable for all NUS officers
   and members
2. NUS recognises the need to ensure that the NUS policy volume is a living document
   that evolves over time and reflects the modern environment.
3. NUS are committed to policy that is relevant to modern students and adequately
   reflects there needs and desires.
4. NUS recognises policy must be regularly reviewed and updated by its membership in
   order to ensure that NUS as a student representative body does not lost touch with
   those it aims to speak for.

Action

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                       Page 8
1. That the National General Secretary be directed to remove all NUS policy passed
   prior to the 2005 National Conference from the current NUS policy volume.
2. That The national General Secretary be directed to archive all old policy for history
   and posterity in a second “Past Policy” policy volume so as to ensure that the Unions
   previous positions and achievements are not lost or forgotten.
3. That the National General Secretary make both policy volumes available to National
   Office Bears and member campus in hardcopy or electronic copy upon request.

M: Jonathan Childs (Charles Sturt University, Bathurst)
S: Andrew Coleman (University of Sydney)


ADMIN 7: (NO TITLE SUBMITTED)

Preamble

1. The NUS is held as the peak representative body for students nationwide. There are
   universities affiliated with the NUS from every state and territory with
   representatives elected from each. An issue which is always held as one of the
   largest for many campuses, in regards to relations between the NUS and campus, is
   disengagement and disinterest from students. This can largely be seen by a lack of
   information being disseminated.

Platform

1. The NUS may require reports be given by each affiliate university, and many of the
   NUS executive have strong connections to campuses across the nation. As it currently
   stands there is no requirement for universities to disseminate any information from
   the national level of NUS down to its elected representatives in a uniform way. As
   the elected representatives are most commonly used as conduits to interact with
   students on a campus level it remains to be seen why there is no such method of
   disseminating information.

Actions

1. NUS executive to develop a common method to communicate quarterly activities to
   university affiliates.
2. NUS to require dissemination of this information to each university’s elected
   representatives on a quarterly basis.

M: Kate Schouten (University of Wollongong)
S: Matthew Samson (Charles Sturt University, Bathurst)


ADMIN 8: TAXI USE

Preamble

1. The availability of reimbursements for legitimate taxi use is necessary for NUS Office
   Bearers when performing some duties.

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 9
2. In a post-VSU environment, taxi reimbursement is often highlighted as an expense
   requiring thorough scrutiny, if not abolition.

Platform

1. Office Bearers often require reimbursements for some taxi use.
2. Mechanisms should be in place to ensure all incidents of occupational taxi use are
   legitimate, prior to reimbursement.

Action

1. That the National General Secretary develops a Taxi Reimbursement Form.
2. That the form will ask Officer Bearers claiming a taxi reimbursement to detail the
   origin, destination, time and purpose of the fare, and attach a receipt.

M: Xavier Williams (La Trobe University)
S: Meghan Hopper (Monash University, Gippsland)


ADMIN 9: WEBSITE DEVELOPMENT

Preamble

1. The NUS website has improved from years past, and currently acts chiefly as a ‘news
   cycle’ service, providing considerable information on ongoing campaigns, media
   releases and recent news in the Higher Education sector.
2. Deficiencies of the website include a lack of detailed information and advice on
   broader, longer-term laws and reforms affecting the state of student life in
   Australia, and a lack of information promoting engagement with NUS.

Platform

1. That the NUS website act as an advice and information hub on issues relating to
   student life and rights (e.g. Youth Allowance eligibility) as well as serving
   immediate, ‘news cycle’ functions.
2. That the NUS website provide information on the benefits of NUS involvement and
   affiliation that is comprehensive and easily accessible (e.g. A page entitled ‘Why
   NUS?’ with a dual focus on students and student associations).

Action

1. That the National General Secretary, in collaboration with Office Bearers and the
   NUS Research Department, implement changes to the NUS website.
2. That NUS ‘fact sheets’ on crucial elements of student life be developed and
   published on the website to encourage more students to directly engage with NUS.
3. That a page dedicated to promoting the benefits of NUS involvement and affiliation
   be established.

M: Xavier Williams (La Trobe University)
S: Emma Henderson (RMIT University)



NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                     Page 10
ADMIN 10: PRESIDENT SUMMIT DATE

Preamble

1. Australian university administrations currently pick and choose which public holidays
   they wish to recognise during semester or examination periods.
2. This process is unfair to students who deserve to enjoy public holidays as they were
   intended – not working or studying.
3. NUS Presidents’ Summit has been called for a period that includes Australia Day, a
   public holiday.

Platform

1. NUS acknowledges that if the national representative body of Australian students
   cannot observe the inviolability of public holidays, then it can never call for
   university administrations to do the same.
2. That NUS avoids holding its major events, for which occupational expectations
   demand full participation, during public holidays.

Action

1. That the date of NUS Presidents’ Summit 2010 be changed to avoid interference with
   Australia Day.

M: Nick McLennan (Monash University, Berwick)
S: Leon Burger (Victoria University)


ADMIN 11: ENGAGING INACTIVE AND POTENTIAL AFFILIATES

Preamble

1. Several potential NUS affiliate members remain sceptical of the benefits and
   significance of national student unionism.
2. Several current member organisations who are largely disengaged from NUS
   involvement can be similarly categorised.
3. A regular complaint from such affiliates, especially those representing small and
   regional students, is that the presence of NUS has traditionally been ‘absent’ from
   their campuses, offices and inboxes.

Platform

1. That the greater engagement of peripheral and potential NUS affiliates is crucial to
   the cause of national student unionism.
2. That the importance of continued and active NUS affiliation among such campuses
   be more effectively publicised, in person and in campaigns.
3. That all National Office Bearers prioritise engagement with new affiliates, with
   efforts to be overseen by the National General Secretary.

Action


NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                       Page 11
1. That the National General Secretary be responsible for identifying non-affiliates or
   member affiliates who have not been active within NUS for a number of years (as
   demonstrated by the failure to elect delegates, financially contribute to NUS through
   Affiliation Fees and engage in National Campaigns)
2. That the National General Secretary outline the obstacles to affiliation for those
   identified and develop a strategy to overcome such obstacles with a view to
   engaging new affiliates.
3. That the National General Secretary conduct a tour of non-affiliates or inactive
   member affiliates to undertake the process of engagement, enabling NUS to work
   directly with student associations on an affiliations strategy.
4. That the National General Secretary outline to National Executive an engagement
   strategy and report against that strategy at each National Executive.
5. That the National General Secretary organise to attend a meeting with the office
   bearers and governing body of non-affiliates or inactive member organisations to
   outline the benefits of affiliating to NUS.
6. That the National General Secretary be responsible for developing an ‘Affiliate to
   NUS’ pack which includes key documentation and the benefits of affiliation.
7. That the National General Secretary invite key leaders of non-affiliates or inactive
   member organisations to relevant conferences run by NUS throughout the year and,
   where required, provide assistance to student leaders in attending.

M: Xavier Williams (La Trobe University)
S: Emma Henderson (RMIT University)


ADMIN 12: A PROFESSIONAL WORKING ENVIRONMENT

Preamble

1. NUS is a non-profit driven organisation reliant upon the efforts of activists either
   volunteering or paid a modest honoraria. This is no excuse for an office lapsing into
   an unprofessional and unethical work environment.
2. In 2009, some National Office Bearers and State Presidents, across the factional
   spectrum, did not fully commit themselves to upholding occupational standards
   befitting a competent, hard-working union.
3. Despite punitive mechanisms installed last year, extra supervision and scrutiny of
   National and State Office Bearers is still needed to meet minimum workplace
   expectations of professionalism, ethics and efficiency.

Platform

1. NUS defines unprofessional Office Bearer behaviour as exhibiting general inactivity
   and idleness in office, and failure to uphold expectations of communication and
   punctuality with NUS and its affiliates.
2. NUS defines unethical Office Bearer behaviour as misusing of NUS resources -
   including photocopier, phone, travel, campaigns, and processes of reimbursement –
   and misappropriating the NUS title.
3. NUS defines Office Bearer inefficiency as exhibiting carelessness and imprudence in
   budgetary expenditure.
4. NUS acknowledges any public suggestion of unprofessional, unethical or inefficient
   behaviour will reduce the union’s authority in the eyes of its current and potential
   affiliates, and the mainstream media.

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                       Page 12
5. NUS recognises greater steps to avoid any substantiated suggestion of the above
   must be taken.

Action

1. That all National Office Bearers be responsible for completing fortnightly time sheets
   which are to be compiled by the National General Secretary for presentation to
   National Executive.
2. That the National General Secretary, in consultation with each National Office
   Bearer and State President, develop a job description to be presented to National
   Executive at its first meeting and to be ratified by all National Office Bearers and
   State Presidents.
3. That National Executive be responsible for objectively monitoring the performance
   of all National Officer Bearers and State Presidents against the job descriptions
   developed to ensure that NUS is working effectively and efficiently.
4. That the National President and the National General Secretary be responsible for
   convening monthly meetings of all National Office Bearers (and State Presidents,
   where deemed appropriate) to discuss activities in various Departments and monitor
   progress and work ethic.
5. That the National President and National General Secretary, in conjunction with
   National Officer Bearers and State Presidents, develop strategies to address poor
   work ethic and unprofessionalism
6. That the National General Secretary be granted the capacity to suspend access to
   departmental resources in the event that unsatisfactory performance continues.

M: Xavier Williams (La Trobe University)
S: Jesse Overton-Skinner (University of Melbourne)


ADMIN 13: ACCOUNTABILITY TRIPLE PLUS

Preamble

1. In 2009 NUS saw an unprecedented level of "transparency" from its National
   President, through his constant updating of Twitter and Facebook to inform the
   masses of his every move. This signalled a new era in the Union, as students across
   Australia were able to note every time he spoke to a student, went to a uni or
   relieved his bowel. During his reign of Facebook terror, the National President
   averaged 4 status updates a day, with interesting updates averaging 1 per 6 months.

Action

1. To prevent this level of Social Networking diarrhoea being spilled from National
   Office in 2010, NUS directs the 2010 NUS General Secretary to deduct $5 from the
   pay of any office bearer who posts a pointless, irrelevant or frivolous status relating
   to students, NUS policy, or any travel occurring on NUS funds. This will be at the
   discretion of the General Secretary, who will direct the funds to the charity1

M: Simone McDonnell (National Executive)
S: Jonathon Childs (Charles Sturt University, Bathurst)

1
    Except any organisation that supports a country run by organisations deemed as terrorists (i.e Palestine)

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                                            Page 13
                                                                              Economic
ECON 1: TRAVEL CONCESSION CARDS

Preamble

1. There is wide spread support in the student community for state governments to act
    on the problems associated with transport concession cards for international
    students.
2. However, this is not a problem only faced by international students, but also a
    problem widely felt by students studying in regional Queensland and postgraduate
    students. Students studying part-time also face this problem.
3. Considerable amounts of work have been pumped into this campaign by the
    Concession Card Coalitions in Victoria and New South Wales, as well as by students
    unions in Queensland: JCU, USQ and CQU.
4. A National Student Concession Card, while not only being equitable, would
    encourage student travel and tourism between the States during holiday periods and
    breaks
5. Students who are eligible to a travel concession in their state of issue are not able to
    use these concession cards in other States.
6. The Federal Government is in a position where they will need to enact a change to
    the lives of international students conditions in Australia to continue the education
    export industry, particularly in India. Now is the right time to get a win for all
    students and push for student concession cards to be recognized in other
    jurisdictions.
7. Currently, concession cards are subsidized by State Governments to the transport
    companies, but each of these deals is tied specifically into each transport provider in
    each state. Because they are separate deals, it is hard to implement a new scheme
    that cuts across these contracts, to have all students eligible to travel on a
    concession.
8. For this to be a reality, NUS will need to work with State and Federal transport
    ministers, and COAG (Council of Australian Governments) to convince them of the
    student need for the national recognition.
9. What is stopping progress is the perception that the taxpayer would subsidise
    International students, which is unpalatable to the electorate. An awareness
    campaign needs to be run to educate students and the community that international
    students pay tax and contribute to Australian society. This is a small difference to
    their difficult lives being students here.
10. In 2010, the Victorian State election will take place, and there is an opportunity for
    activists in Victoria to get their voices heard on these issues and to mobilize students
    to vote. However, pressure will need to come from all over the country to ensure a
    win for students.
11. This plan will have an effect on student poverty, and will alleviate a small additional
    price that is currently paid for students travelling interstate.

Platform

1. NUS supports having concession cards that are nationally recognized for all students
2. NUS believes that International Students, Post-Graduate students should be entitled
   to a concession card



NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                           Page 14
3. NUS supports all the work that has been done by activists thus far, and will facilitate
   and provide structure for this campaign to develop nationally.

Action

1. NUS is directed to approach State Governments and Premiers at the beginning of the
   year. As described in the preamble, this is an issue that needs to have pressure
   applied at State Governments as well as Federal Governments to ensure that there is
   communication around this issue from the beginning.
2. It is important that the Deputy Prime Minister for Education is behind this issue as
   one that will improve Australia’s media coverage. Approaching the Minister for
   Tourism (for the local student factor) will also be important in securing the victory.
3. That the NUS Education Officer and the International Student Officer work together
   on preparing materials (including petitions, stickers, information sheets and posters)
   to be distributed to campus student organizations and also to those that are solely
   international students. This is to be done by O-Week 2010. There is to be separate
   material relating to local student travelling interstate.
4. The NUS President is directed to approach Universities Australia and gauge support
   amongst the Universities.

M: Elly Howse (University of Sydney)
S: Carla Drakeford (University of Melbourne)


ECON 2: INTERSTATE TRAVEL CONCESSIONS

Preamble

1. Many students find themselves frequently travelling interstate for a variety of
   reasons; whether it be to return home to visit their family and friends, participate in
   interstate forums, competitions and other national activities. Currently, students
   travelling interstate do not have their concession cards recognised outside of the
   state in which the card was issued. Students’ need for concession prices do not stop
   at state boundaries, yet the current system does not reflect this. We only need to
   look at consistent denial of concession cards for international students to realise
   that lack of interstate concessions is just another example of how state governments
   are profiting from students who are already under financial stress.

Platform

1. That NUS believes that students should be able to travel interstate and still receive
   concession prices
2. That NUS call upon State Governments to stop overcharging students through their
   parochial and out of touch policies disallowing interstate concessions.
3. That NUS demand the issue be raised and resolved at the next meeting of the
   Council of Australian Governments (COAG)

Action

1. That NUS apply significant pressure and demand the Federal Government take a lead
   on making concession cards valid uniformly across the states at the upcoming COAG
   meeting.

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 15
2. That NUS encourage campus activists to involve students in the campaign by
   encouraging them to write or call their local members or sign a petition demanding
   reform on this issue to be submitted to the next COAG meeting

M: James Still (University of New South Wales)
S: Andrew Looi (University of New South Wales)


ECON 3: STUDENTS IN THE WORKPLACE

Preamble

1. Students who currently work in many industries are paid less than those who are
   older than 21. This means that many students who have moved away from home or
   trying to keep up with the costs of university life are working just as hard as other
   adults but getting paid significantly less. As a result of this discriminatory and
   illogical system, students under 21 have to work even longer hours to support
   themselves. Many students are already participating in full-time work at a higher
   rate than students that came before them. This is clearly resulting in a situation
   where these students cannot commit themselves to their studies to the same extent
   that students living at home or those supported by more wealthy parents can.

Platform

1. That NUS believes that all students of should both receive the same level of pay
   regardless of their age and be more supported under Youth Allowance to reduce
   their dependency on full-time work as their sole source of income.

Action

1. That NUS call upon employers and governments to equalise the pay of all students
   regardless of their age
2. That NUS calls upon the Federal Government to increase funding for Youth
   Allowance payments to reduce students’ dependence on full-time work

M: James Still (University of New South Wales)
S: Thom Hoffman (University of Technology, Sydney)


ECON 4: STUDENTS AND THE GOLBAL FINANCIAL CRISIS

Preamble

1. Since the onset of the Global Financial Crisis there has been much public debate on
   the effects and causes of the crisis. However, there has been limited recognition of
   the GFCs effect on students and young people.
2. The GFC has caused significant decreases in business confidence; this has
   particularly hit the retail and hospitality sectors hard. Unemployment has only
   increased slightly and this has disproportionately affected young people, with the
   unemployment rate for people between 15 years and 19 years sitting at 17.2%.
3. Further, under-employment has risen significantly and this has particularly affected
   students, with their hours being cut. Furthermore, there is significant anecdotal
NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                       Page 16
   evidence that the GFC has had particularly detrimental effects on international
   students who overwhelmingly work in venerable sectors.
4. The GFC has also had a significant effect on graduate’s employment prospects. Many
   students, particularly those with qualifications in the financial sectors have had
   significant difficulty in finding employment.
5. In previous downturns, many graduates were unable to find work in their qualified
   field for a number of years. This resulted in significant skills shortages and a
   generation of workers who were disenfranchised.

Platform

1. The National Union of Students affirms that studying a full time study load is a full
   time job; hence students should be supported in their pursuit of higher education
   with accessible, comprehensive and equitable student income support.
2. The National Union of Students understands that students hoping to enter their
   chosen field upon graduation are at the greatest risk of long-term disadvantage as a
   result of the GFC.
3. NUS appreciates that many people affected by the global financial crisis turn to
   education as a way to improve their career prospects. Adequate funding for teaching
   and learning will support these students.

Action

1. NUS calls upon the government to include students in any stimulus package- allowing
   students to qualify for both the income contingent payments and the payments to
   students on income support.
2. NUS calls upon the government to increase funding for university research and create
   new research projects in fields, which traditionally employ recent graduates and
   postgraduate students.

M: Mark Platt (Queensland University of Technology)
S: Kat O’Ryan (University of Queensland)


ECON 5: STUDENTS AND THE INTERNET

Preamble

1. The Internet has become a primary source of information for university students
   across Australia. The huge depth of information allows students to access other wise
   forgotten information, facts or opinions, which, in turns provides a wider base for
   information. However many universities are selling students short with low Internet
   quota’s and lack of available university computers which restricts students abilities
   to expand their research and learn. Also the cost for students wishing to expand
   their quota can be substantial over a long period of time putting further economic
   strain on already stretched students. Therefore it has become necessary for NUS to
   demand action on students Internet quotas and campaign for universities to
   significantly increase their quotas, moving towards an unlimited system of Internet
   access for university students.

Platform


NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                       Page 17
1. NUS believes in affordable access to the Internet for university students.
2. NUS believes universities should be making drastic increased attempts to address the
   chronic shortages of campus computers and Internet quotas.

Action

1. The 2010 NUS welfare officer will, working with campus officer bears, lobby
   universities to increase student Internet quotas and re juice the cost of these quotas
   to students.

M: Mark Platt (Queensland University of Technology)
S: Kat O'Ryan (University of Queensland)


ECON 6: PUBLIC TRANSPORT CONCESSION RIGHTS

Preamble

1. Victoria and New South Wales remain to be the last two states in Australia to refuse
   concession fares on public transport for international students. In Victoria, despite
   research by the Committee for Melbourne showing that allowing full concession
   rights to international students would only cost $2.4 million per year, the Victorian
   Government has refused to grant concession fares for international students on
   public transport.

Platform

1. NUS supports the right for all students to access concession fares on public transport.

Action

1. In 2010 NUS will continue to campaign and place demands on state governments who
   deny concession fares for public transport to any students.

M: Jen Tzong Lim (RMIT University)
S: Daniel Nair Dadich (Swinburne University)


ECON 7: LOBBY FOR TRAVEL CONCESSIONS FOR EXCLUDED STUDENTS

Preamble

1. It is widely known that the current policy on student travel concessions is that to
   obtain such a concession one must be an internal, domestic, full-time student. This
   policy has been around for many years but excludes many of the most vulnerable
   students across the country. The most vulnerable students refer to international
   students, most mature-age students, single mothers and Indigenous students. While
   International students pay to enjoy the Australian tertiary education experience they
   are treated as second class when excluded from this concession. While for a vast
   majority of mature-age students, single parents and Indigenous students find that
   the best way to be able to support their family or community is to undertake part-
   time study as a correspondence or block-release student – thus being excluded from
NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 18
    claiming this concession which their fellow students enjoy; again being treated as
    second class.

Platform

1. The NUS recognises that all students should have the same right – no matter their
   nationality, race, or home life. The NUS looks to encourage as many people as
   possible to enrol into a tertiary institution – education is the key to success. The NUS
   also cannot support a policy in which some of the most vulnerable students in our
   institutions are treated as second class – being robbed of those concessions which
   other students are able to claim.

Action

1. While recognising that vocal action has been taken on the international student
   concession front, Conference directs the 2010 National Executive and Office Bearers
   to not forget about domestic students facing the same unreasonable anomaly.
2. NUS to lobby governments of all levels to expand current student concessions to
   include:
   a. International students; both full and part-time
   b. Part-time students
   c. Block-release and correspondent students

M: Kate Schouten (University of Wollongong)
S: Jonathon Childs (Charles Sturt University, Bathurst)




NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                          Page 19
                                                                           Education
ED 1: DEALING WITH DEREGULTAION: MAINTAINING THE INTEGRITY AND DIVERSITY OF
COURSE OFFERINGS AND SUPOPRTING STUDENTS FROM LOW SES BACKGROUNDS

Preamble

1. The Federal Government’s proposed deregulation of places in the higher education
   system has the potential to force universities to take certain action regarding their
   course offerings due to uncertainty of funding from year-to-year.
2. The policy has the potential to undermine the workplace rights and job certainty
   academic staff, potentially restricting academic freedom and creativity and
   affecting quality.
3. The Bradley Review, upon which this policy is based, called for increased
   specialization of universities and cuts to the diversity of courses offered by each
   institution.
4. Without adequate income support and in light of the equity issues associated with
   potential students having to relocate to study the degree of their choice, such a
   situation would favour wealthy students and restrict the options of those from lower
   SES backgrounds.
5. The Federal Government has proposed two weak measures to deal with the equity
   issues in this deregulated system, offering start-up scholarships to students who have
   access to income support and incentivizing universities to enrol students from low
   SES backgrounds.
6. Without improvement to these measures from the government and concerted efforts
   by universities to support disadvantaged students, the system will fail to maintain
   equality of opportunity and will restrict study options of students from outer
   suburban, remote and regional areas.

Platform

1. NUS opposes the deregulation of places in the higher education system because it
   does not offer greater choice to students, it offers greater choice to powerful and
   prestigious universities.
2. NUS believes in equality of opportunity and the rights of students from any social or
   cultural background to attend university.
3. NUS believes that the higher education equity measures outlined by the Federal
   Government in the 2009-2010 budget are inadequate.
4. NUS believes that institutions should be encouraged to diversify their course
   offerings and maintain specialist courses with low enrolment, and that the Federal
   Government has shown a lack of foresight by failing to protect these courses.
5. NUS opposes a shift towards generalized undergraduate and specialised postgraduate
   degrees, and believes that many universities will see this as a more viable option
   under a deregulated system.
6. NUS, in it engagement with the new universities’ quality agency, will work to halt
   the decline of subject numbers and the generalization of subject curricula.

Action

1. The National Education Officer will write to each university outlining NUS’ position
   on deregulation and calling for consideration of the above principles in any decisions

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                        Page 20
     regarding curriculum or subject change. The letters will request information on the
     university’s attitude to the change and any broad plans to restructure staff, student
     numbers or course offerings.
2.   The National Education Officer and National President will use the responses to
     these letters to supply information and briefings to student organisations regarding
     how their university is likely to react to deregulation.
3.   The National President will use this information to lobby for extra measures in next
     year’s budget or as election commitments from the Federal Government or measures
     to deal with equity issues, incentives for universities to offer specialised
     undergraduate courses with low enrolments.
4.   The National Education Officer in conjunction with State Presidents will supply
     materials and support to student organisations for the organisation of campaigns
     regarding university plans for course cuts, subject cuts, course generalisation and
     staff cuts.
5.   These campaigns will be brought together in a National Day of Action on a date
     determined by the National Executive. The NDA shall be coordinated by the National
     Education Officer and held in semester one 2010.
6.   The National President will lobby universities to provide, in conjunction with NUS
     and campus student organisations:
     a. Transition programs in local low SES high schools or those with low university
         entrance levels.
     b. Information to penultimate year secondary school students regarding university
         entry and opportunities for enrolment
     c. Bursaries to students from low-income families or who are the first from their
         family to attend university.
     d. Peer support programs for students from low-SES background.
     e. Greater enrolment of students from low SES backgrounds in all courses across the
         university.
     f. Better pathways, information and support for students several years out of high
         school to enter university.
7.   The National President and NUS research department will work with campus student
     organisations to prepare dossiers on alternate courses of action and modelling
     regarding potential future enrolments where universities are planning major
     restructures or course cuts.

M: Jesse Marshall (La Trobe University)
S: Carla Drakeford (University of Melbourne)


ED 2: FOUNDATION REPORT ON UNIVERSITY QUALITY FOR TEQSA

Preamble

NUS recognises:

1. That issues of academic quality is core to the vision and values of NUS.
2. That NUS can improve campus issues relating to quality by running a national
   umbrella campaign.
3. That an example of this was the 2009 overcrowding report which exposed massive
   overcrowding at universities across Australia.



NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 21
4. That campus presidents and activists on campus are in a unique position to improve
    academic conditions on their campus and win real victories that will improve
    students’ educational experience.
5. That current issues of academic quality are keenly felt by all students.
6. That these issues can overcome by proper funding from the government.
7. That these issues of academic quality can be overcome if universities recognize the
    priorities of their institution are educational, not commercial.
8. That students must be constantly vigilant toward new issues of campus quality since
    the move to a deregulated system in 2012 will cause major upheaval.
9. That if the deregulated system is not properly funded, there may be problematic
    consequences for students such as:
    a. Decreased choice in subjects that universities
    b. Increased class sized
    c. Decreased student space
    d. Insufficient or ineffective staff changes to accompanying such changes
10. That there is no consolidated data on the quality of education at each university
    from the vantage point of students who attend them with the view of improving
    current issues as opposed to effecting future students choices.
11. That each student union knows the issues of quality at their university and that
    affects their students.
12. That it is to the betterment of the national student body that this knowledge is open
    shared and compared.
13. That only NUS could deliver such a coordinated, high level, student-focused project.
14. That there is a need for a new sector benchmark on quality that stems from student
    experiences.
15. That such a benchmark will be timely given the establishment of Tertiary Education
    Quality Standards Authority (TEQSA).
16. That such an effective early intervention into this process can permanently alter the
    relationship of power between students, universities and quality standards agencies.
17. That such a report will be read by, used by and will influence government ministers,
    bureaucrats, university administrations, academics and students.
18. That such a report will build the reputation and authority of NUS as a professional
    peak representative organisation that exists for the betterment of students.
19. That such a report will unite student organizations of every political persuasion
    behind a national benchmark that identifies improvements at the national level
    while accounting for nuances at a campus level.
20. That such a report will strengthen the NUS case for a permanent seat on the new
    TEQSA board.
21. That such a report will provide the research capacity and organizational architecture
    to lead onto future campaigns.
22. That the process of compiling the report will train and engage new activists,
    representatives and office bearers to carry on the work of NUS beyond 2010.

Platform

1. NUS believes that all students have the right to a quality education
2. NUS believes that current issues of quality must be addressed.
3. NUS believes that new issues may arise in the transition to a new deregulated
   system.
4. NUS is concerned that the voices of students will be lost in the transition between
   the current system of student enrolments and the new deregulated system


NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                        Page 22
5. NUS reaffirms that for a deregulated system of student placements to work
   effectively, more money needs to be allocated to higher education.
6. NUS reaffirms that the Federal government needs to recognize that deregulation is a
   system that will disadvantage student choice if staff, academic service and capital
   funding remain insufficient.
7. It is in the interests of all students and student unions to have access to a document
   that consolidates information from each campus as gathered by students through
   student-run focus groups and surveys.

Action

1. The National President will encourage campus presidents and education officers to
   compile a campus specific report based on criteria to be agreed on and established
   at the 2010 President’s Summit. These areas of criteria will likely involve collecting
   and collating data on:
   a. Class sizes
   b. Classroom sizes
   c. Teaching hours, semester hours
   d. Tutorials and contact hours
   e. Online availability of classes
   f. Quality of distance education
   g. Student feedback mechanisms (such as Quality of Teaching surveys)
   h. Course delivery and subject availability
   i. Appropriateness of communication with students regarding changes at the
       university
   j. Appropriateness and balance of student grievance procedures
   k. Class engagement and pedagogy
   l. Integration of domestic and international students
   m. Adequacy of study materials and resources
   n. Marking and examination procedure
2. Campus reports can and should be compiled using quantitative and qualitative data
   from surveys, research studies, campus focus groups and input from campus office
   bearers, faculty and academic board representatives and student representative on
   university council/senate.
3. After the completion of drafting of campus reports by campus presidents the
   National President shall visit each participating campus and assist campus presidents
   in the organization and facilitation of a series of NUS focus groups. This may involve
   visiting satellite campuses if so required
4. Optimally such focus groups would consist of;
   a. Domestic and international students
   b. Students from a diverse range of faculties
   c. Student from different years
   d. Distance-Ed, part time and full time students
   e. Students from major cohorts represented at the university
   f. Mature age and school-leaver students
   g. Undergraduate course-work, research and honours students.
   h. Students who do and do not participate in student life
   i. A contingent of education students who may assist the campus president in the
       compilation of their report.
   j. Indigenous and non-Indigenous students
   k. Students who may or may not use campus disability services


NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                        Page 23
    l. Students who once critically engaged in such an experience will likely become
        campus organizers.
    m. University council/senate, Faculty and Academic board student representatives
5. Following the gathering of data, the NUS Research Officer, National Education
    Officer and the National President will assist in compiling the draft reports and
    findings.
6. The draft report will outline campus specific issues and national issues and will
    formulate a series of questions and recommendations that will be verified by a
    National Student Survey to be compiled by the President and Research Officers.
7. Participating campuses must facilitate the collection of at least 250 of the Surveys
    from students from different faculties.
8. From the findings of the National Student Survey the final report will be compiled.
9. The National President and National Education Officer at the National Education
    Conference will launch the report in 2010.
10. Further action, changes and discussion of the document should take place at
    Education Conference in 2010.
11. After amendment the NUS president is directed to take the amended document to
    the Federal Government and release the findings to the National Media.
12. This process may be coincident with the 2010 NUS University Ratings if so deemed by
    the 2010 President’s Summit.
13. At Education Conference 2010, NUS activists will decide how a national campaign
    may assist in addressing the concerns outlined in the report. Targets may include:
    a. Federal Government
    b. State Government
    c. University Administrations
    d. Individual Faculties
    e. Individual Faculties across the sector
    f. Applying pressure on the federal government into committing
    g. More funding for higher education
    h. Increased base funding for universities.
14. For a deregulated system of student placements to work effectively, more money
    needs to be allocated to higher education. The Federal government needs to
    recognize that this is a system that will disadvantage student choice if there is not
    enough funding to cover teaching staff and quality provision of subjects as well as
    capital works projects.

M: Carla Drakeford (University of Melbourne)
S: Petra McNeilly-Rutledge (University of Technology, Sydney)


ED 3: ELECTION GUIDE

Preamble

1. NUS’s efforts in 2007 to overthrow the anti-student Howard Government worked
   quite effectively, attacking the Howard Government on many fronts. One of these
   fronts was the production and distribution of a “How to Vote” card – which evaluated
   the major parties on their policy in regard to education, as well as their track record
   on youth issues
2. Students who are not highly politically engaged often find it difficult to draw
   distinctions between the two parties major parties on policies that affect them. This


NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 24
    Election Guide will facilitate student understanding of how their issues will be dealt
    with by the major political parties.

Platform

1. All students should have the right of access to clearly laid out policy platforms from
   each major political party contesting the 2010 elections, including specific
   information on the changes and policies that candidates are using which are to do
   with educational and youth issues.
2. NUS believes, that as the peak representative body of all tertiary students, it is in
   the best position to inform student voters of the policies that will effect them in the
   next three years of government
3. NUS feels that it is important for students to be engaged not only with all policies
   that are put forward, but especially on education policy, where students are being
   directly effected by Youth Allowance, quality issues and transport concerns. The
   voice of students should be heard and exercised on all of these matters.

Action

1. NUS will develop material and information to create an Election Guide to the major
   political parties educational and youth issues in the lead up to the federal election.
   The National President and National Education Officer will be in charge of this
   project.
2. In the election guide, NUS will advocate the positions passed and endorsed by
   National Conference. These include:
   a. Greater reform to youth allowance, including increasing payments
   b. Increased base funding to the higher education system
   c. Quality assurances going into 2010
   d. Allowing students a permanent position on the TEQSA Panel
   e. National Concession Cards for all students
   f. Ability to legislate reforms
   g. Student housing strategy
3. Each major party contesting the 2010 federal election will be graded on their past
   policies and responses and future promises in each of these areas, and given an
   overall grade A-F.
4. This material is to be distributed by the National Education Officer and used in
   conjunction with the enrol to vote campaign

M: Carla Drakeford (University of Melbourne)
S: Katherine Long-Davidson (La Trobe University)


ED 4: YOUTH ALLOWANCE CAMPAIGN

Preamble

1. Youth allowance is a deeply felt issue that affects hundreds of thousands of
   students’ ability to study. It is an issue that links the ideals of public education
   activists to the hip-pocket angle relevant to students who remain unengaged.
2. A universally accessible and fair youth allowance is core to NUS vision and values.
3. A youth allowance campaign keeps NUS relevant to students, purpose driven in
   Canberra and sustainable in the long term.

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 25
4. In the Federal Budget this year, the Rudd Government made significant changes to
    the provision of Youth Allowance.
5. Among these changes were:
    a. An increase in the parental income test threshold from $32,800 to $44,165 to
        bring it in line with Family Tax Benefit A
    b. A gradual reduction in the Age of Independence from 25 to 21 by 2012.
    c. The promise of new 'Start-Up' and Relocation Scholarships targeted towards
        students from regional backgrounds who must relocate to attend university.
    d. An increase in the personal income threshold to $400 a fortnight, meaning
        students will face less severe punishment for working to supplement Youth
        Allowance
6. However, to pay for these measures, the Government changed the workforce
    participation criteria to necessitate 30 hours per week in paid employment for at
    least 18 months - a change from the prior requirement of $18, 000 within 18 months.
7. Due to pressure from the National Union of Students, the Government recognised
    that this left some thousands of students who elected to take a gap year in 2009 in
    the lurch. The government acted to delay the introduction of the workforce
    participation measures until mid-2010.
8. However, to pay for these measures, the Government has acted to delay changes to
    the personal income threshold and other positive income support reforms until July
    2012. These moves demonstrate a reluctance from the Government to commit to
    additional funding for student income support.
9. The Henry Tax Review will decide the quantum level of youth allowance in 2010.
10. The pre-budget and gap year campaign mobilized thousands of students and
    empowered a new group of activists. A 2010 campaign will build upon these wins and
    the new leadership.
11. The electorate has shifted positively towards NUS’ position, resulting in a greater
    understanding and support for youth allowance making a 2010 campaign worthwhile
    and winnable.
12. A youth allowance campaign has the ability to mobilize previously untapped groups
    into activism – regional students, students in residences, low-SES students and
    college kids.
13. While there remain differences of opinion toward youth allowance criterion, the NUS
    goals remain fundamental and universal – able to unite students from diverse
    political backgrounds and life experiences.
14. A successful campaign on one element outlined in the platform will lead to greater
    momentum towards other elements outlined in the platform – as occurred in 2009.
15. Julia Gillard, Wayne Swan and Kevin Rudd are the targets of this campaign.

Platform

1. The National Union of Students recognises that crucial changes to the rate and
   accessibility of Youth Allowance have been direly needed for many years.
2. NUS understands that the delay in implementation of youth allowance until 2012 has
   been to ensure that the measures are budget neutral, however reaffirms its stance
   that a gross increase in funding for student income support is required – not merely a
   reshuffle of funding from one area to another.
3. NUS believes that the delays in the implementation of the Budget reforms will have
   a negative impact on tens-of-thousands of students participating in higher education
   between 2009 and July 2012.
4. The National Union of Students affirms its support for the aforementioned reforms
   (Preamble, 1-4) but believes that there is more to be done on student income

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                        Page 26
   support in 2010 to ensure that Australia has the most equitable system of student
   support possible.
5. NUS reaffirms its commitment to raise the fortnightly income of youth allowance
   payments.

Action

1. The National Education and Welfare Officers will collaborate on a campaign to apply
    pressure on the Government to increase its gross contribution of funding for student
    income support in the lead up to the next Federal election.
2. The National Union of Students commits to a campaign focusing on, but not limited
    to:
    a. An incremental decrease in the age of independence to 18.
    b. Commitments to an increase in the rate of pay for Youth Allowance, AusStudy
        and AbStudy to at least the Henderson Poverty Line.
    c. Pressure on the Federal Government to bring forward the introduction of the
        personal income test from July 2012 to immediately.
    d. Pressure on the Federal Labor Government and Federal Opposition to promise to
        increase the total amount allocated to Youth Allowance from the budget in the
        view of widening participation.
3. The National Education and Welfare Officers will collaborate with State Presidents
    and campus office bearers to determine the most appropriate course of action in
    formulating a national campaign around these issues.
4. There will be a campus National Day of Action in semester 1.
5. There will be a cross-campus National Day of Action in semester 1.
6. There will be a decision made at 2010 National Education Conference as to the
    National Days of Action in semester 2.
7. The National Education and Welfare Officers will collaborate with State Presidents
    and campus office bearers to determine the form of these National Days of Action.
8. National Office bearers will discuss work with campus Presidents at Presidents
    Summit to ensure that the campaign is inclusive of as many campuses as is possible.
9. The National Education and National Welfare Officers will work with the
    International Students Officer to link domestic and international student issues under
    the National Days of Action.
10. The National Education and Welfare Officers will work with NAUCA, Get REEAL,
    universities and any other group that will assist toward winning these goals.

M: James Butchers (University of Queensland)
S: Laura Harris (University of Melbourne)


ED 5: UNIT OUTLINES

Preamble

1. Unit outlines form the basis of the core purpose of student’s time in Australian
   Universities. They set out what the unit it is, what will be learnt, what is expected
   and details of assessment. Students rely on these documents to competently
   complete their units.
2. Despite the importance of unit outlines they are often neglected by unit convenors
   and universities and are poorly written, fail to address key points, confusing and
   have sub-texts that can often be used against criteria.

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 27
3. Studies completed by student unions in recent times have shown extremely high
   rates of unit’s outlines not complying with university academic and assessment
   policy.

Platform

1. NUS calls upon Australian Universities to ensure the following:
   a. Copies of Unit outlines, hard and electronic copies, should be easily accessible to
      students throughout the teaching period
   b. That the learning outcomes and teaching content are clearly displayed
   c. That the learning outcomes can be clearly tied into the teaching content
   d. That the assessment pieces, their weighting, due date and assessment criteria
      are all provided
   e. That attendance requirements, late assessment penalties, and absentee policy is
      provided.
   f. That the unit outline is detailed, yet clear and structured.

Actions

1. That NUS work with Union Education Officers to review a sample of each institutions
   unit outlines. From the findings of these reviews each university should be rated on
   the standard of their unit outlines. The findings and ratings should be published in
   report.
2. That Campus Organisations and State branches use the media to highlight the quality
   of each campus’ unit outlines. The bodies should also work internally with
   universities to improve the quality of unit outlines.

M: Kurt Steel (University of Canberra)
S: Geoff Wakeford (University of Canberra)


ED 6: COMMONWEALTH SCHOLARSHIPS PROGRAM

Preamble

1. The Rudd Government made major changes to the Commonwealths system of higher
   education scholarships in its 2009 budget, introducing a $2254 per annum Start-Up
   Scholarship for all students receiving income support and Commonwealth Relocation
   Scholarship Scheme to provide students who must relocate to study with $4000 in
   their first year away from home and $1000 in subsequent years.

Platform

1. The NUS commends the Rudd Governments introduction of the Commonwealth Start-
   Up Scholarship Scheme as a necessary measure for low-income students.
2. The NUS commends the Rudd Governments introduction of the Commonwealth
   Relocation Scholarship Scheme and urges it to expand the amount of support made
   available to rural and regional students in years of study subsequent to their first.

Action



NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                        Page 28
1. The NUS will campaign and lobby, with a focus on Senators from regional areas, in
   order to see that the legislation necessary to enable to introduction of these
   programs passes the Senate.
2. The NUS urges all student associations servicing regional areas to make information
   concerning the Commonwealth Relocation Scholarship Scheme readily and easily
   available to students.

M: Sara Howson (University of Wollongong)
S: Mitchell Wilson (University of Notre Dame, Sydney)


ED 7: VOLUNTARY DEGREE INTERNSHIPS

Preamble

1. There are some university courses that require students to carry out voluntary
   internships and it can often be a compulsory part of the degree. While it can be a
   positive step that degrees are ensuring students are knowledgeable of the practical
   skills of the industry and or profession they are entering into, universities must
   acknowledge that this must be flexible as not all students can carry out volunteer
   work due to time restraints, work and family commitments.

Platform

1. NUS recognises that degrees that have compulsory voluntary internships should have
   an alternative for students that cannot carry out compulsory volunteer work.
2. NUS recognises that it is positive for degrees to teach practical skills, however, it
   must be applied in a manner that is equitable for all.

Action

1. NUS calls on all Universities to ensure that wherever there are compulsory volunteer
   internships that there is an alternative for students that cannot carry this out.
2. NUS calls on the Federal Government to legislate that there must be an alternative
   for compulsory volunteer internships in courses.

M: Amber Setchell (National Executive)
S: Felicity Evans (University of Technology, Sydney)


ED 8: EDUCATION CONFERENCE

Preamble

1. One of the major aims of the NUS is to facilitate and encourage education activism
   around the country. In order for the NUS to facilitate effective activism it is vital
   that the NUS has a robust policy development and campaign planning process.
2. This includes wide consultation amongst its member organisations and other
   stakeholders during the development and decision-making processes of all NUS
   campaign. It also includes giving member organisations and other stakeholders the
   necessary skills to develop and run their own campaigns at a localised level.


NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                       Page 29
3. One problem that the student movement and the NUS in particular face is that of a
   high turnover of individual activists involved. Because of this unique feature, it is
   imperative that the NUS makes serious attempts to facilitate skills sharing between
   activists from across the country.

Platform

For the NUS to address the issues outlined above, the following needs to be recognised:

1. Campaign development and decision making should, as much as possible, happen
   face to face with member organisations and other stakeholders.
2. Part of the campaign planning and development process should include a strong
   educational element incorporating external knowledge, opinions and skills.
3. The campaign planning and development process will need to happen in an
   accessible and equitable way so as to minimise disadvantage for anyone due to their
   geographical location and/or financial position.
4. All member organisations and other stakeholders should be given the opportunity to
   actively contribute to the campaign planning and development process.
5. Reflection upon past activities of the NUS is an important part of the campaign
   planning and development process.

Action

1. The NUS will hold an annual conference called “Education Conference”.
2. Education Conference will be hosted by a member organisation(s) appointed by the
   Annual Conference of the NUS immediately preceding. If the NUS Annual Conference
   does not make an appointment the first meeting of the National Executive will make
   the appointment.
3. The National Education Officer in conjunction with the National President will be
   responsible for soliciting expressions of interest from member organisations and
   presenting them to the National Conference for consideration. Expressions of
   Interest should include a detailed outline of the particular member organisation in
   question’s suitability to host the conference. It should also include a proposed set of
   aims and goals for the conference and a detailed plan of possible activities.
4. In order to keep registration fees as low as possible, additional funding should be
   sought by the conference hosts to fund “equity grants”. These equity grants should
   be provided to delegates for whom the cost of getting to and from the location of
   the conference would be prohibitive (e.g. because of their geographical location,
   financial status or the financial status of their student organisation, which cannot
   provide them with financial assistance).

M: Noah White (University of Sydney)
S: Tully Fletcher (Australian National University)


ED 9: PLAGARISM DETECTION SOFTWARE

Preamble

1. An important part of a university education is learning how to properly attribute and
   acknowledge the material and ideas of others in one’s own work. Even so, plagiarism


NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 30
   and academic dishonesty have been identified as serious problems in Australian
   universities.
2. Plagiarism and academic dishonesty can take many different forms and it is
   important to note that not all acts of plagiarism of academic dishonesty are
   malicious and may simply be accidental.
3. Checking student work for possible cases of plagiarism is commonplace today. This
   can be done in several ways; an academic may simply check over work manually,
   comparing it to work that has been submitted previously. Other, more high-tech
   methods includes passing portions of the student’s work through a search engine to
   check for similarities with other work, or submitting the student’s work to a piece of
   commercial software designed to check for plagiarism (such as “Copyscape” or
   “Turnitin”).
4. Most of these pieces of software, in addition to the internet, make use of a database
   of work, against which it checks the work in question. Some of these also then
   automatically add the piece of work in question to their database to be used in the
   future to check against other pieces of work. Using this method software such as
   “Turnitin” can build up very large databases, very quickly; a feature of their product
   which is its main selling point. Several universities in Canada and the US have
   banned the use of such software.

Platform

1. The NUS believes that the decision of whether a student has plagiarised or
   committed academic dishonesty is an academic decision. The decision should not be
   made by administrative staff nor should any possible plagiarism detected by a piece
   of software be deemed conclusive. The relevant academic should be the person
   responsible to verify possible cases and make a decision as to whether a particular
   case constitutes plagiarism or academic dishonesty.
2. The NUS believes that the best approach to reduce cases of plagiarism by students,
   particularly accidental cases, is to provide comprehensive training to students on
   how to reference material used. It should also be noted that the appropriate method
   will differ from university to university and from discipline to discipline.
3. The NUS believes that the use of plagiarism detection software that retains the
   rights to use a student’s piece of work to further enhance the commercial success of
   the product is a gross breach of students’ intellectual property rights.
4. The NUS calls for universities to ban the use of such software. In cases where it is
   used the NUS believes that it should be heavily regulated. Students should be
   informed of the software that is being used on their work and be made aware of
   what this might mean for their work. Students should also be actively given the
   opportunity to have their work removed from any databases and have the rights to
   the work transferred back to them.

Action

1. The National Welfare and Education Officers will compile an information pack that
   can be distributed to campuses on request. The information pack should include an
   outline the different types of plagiarism detection software and the consequences
   their use will have for students.

M: Noah White (University of Sydney)
S: Rachael Durrant (University of Technology, Sydney)


NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                        Page 31
ED 10: MAINTAINING QUALITY IN A PROGRESSIVE, DEMAND DRIVEN SYSTEM

Preamble

1. In 2009 the Rudd Government passed legislation changing the way funding for
   student places was allocated to universities.
2. Under the previous system the total load the Government would fund each university
   across the 12, broad funding clusters was determined by negotiation between the
   university and the department (DEEWR). Universities would be funded at a maximum
   of 105% of that level (if the university chose to over-enrol) or at a minimum of 96%
   of that level.
3. From 2010 – 2012 the funding floor of 96% will be retained and the cap on over-
   enrolment will be lifted to 110%. From 2012 this cap will be removed. In effect this
   will mean that universities will be funded for the exact load that they take on. Areas
   of study considered a national priority will be exempt from this system and will
   continue to be regulated by the DEEWR.
4. Last year approximately 30 000 people that applied for a commonwealth supported
   domestic place in an undergraduate course missed out on an offer because there
   were not enough places. With the increase and eventual removal of the cap on over-
   enrolment universities will have the opportunity to significantly increase the number
   of places they make available and will be able to, much more rapidly and
   effectively, react to student demand.
5. This system will allow the university sector to expand to meet student demand and
   minimise the amount of students who miss out on a commonwealth supported place.
   The change towards this system is also an important step towards recognising that
   funding for universities should not be artificially limited or capped but should be
   determined by demand, allowing every person capable and willing the chance to
   attain a higher education.
6. Such a system, however, does not come without potential problems. Increases in
   student numbers will mean a steep decline in quality if other elements, such as
   infrastructure and staffing are not funded to match.
7. The potential also exists for a university under this system to decide to concentrate
   on and increase student numbers in courses that are popular and cheap to run, using
   the money “made” from such a venture to cross-subsidise other areas of activity.
   This would most likely be at the expense of smaller, more resource-intensive
   disciplines, particularly those that have little or no research output.
8. The answer to this problem (and to an extent, the first) will most likely be the
   Government’s new mission based compacts funding scheme. Compacts will be
   agreements between the Government and individual universities that outline the
   university’s particular mission. The compacts will contain agreed targets for
   improvement and funding incentives to reach those targets. The mission statements
   and targets will be decided upon through a process of negotiation.
9. It is through this scheme that the Government will be able to ensure that the
   demand driven system does what is supposed to do, increase participation and
   diversify the sector; and not breed sameness (i.e. the proliferation of business and
   law schools). The introduction of compacts will give the Government a more holistic
   method to oversee the strategic direction of Australia’s higher education sector.

Platform




NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                        Page 32
1. The NUS recognises that the previous system of allocation student places was
   restrictive and ultimately caused the university sector to be unresponsive to student
   demand and stifled growth in the sector.
2. The NUS commends the Government on the introduction of the “demand driven
   system” and recognises that it represents an unparalleled commitment to fund
   higher education.
3. The NUS calls on the Government to increase infrastructure spending on universities
   to match the increased growth that is expected. This funding should in particular be
   directed to universities in rural or regional areas and post-1987 universities.
4. The NUS recognises the important role that compacts will have in overseeing the
   strategic direction of the university sector. The NUS calls on the Federal Government
   to ensure, through the compacts system, that diversity is maintained across the
   sector and within universities and is not lost at the to the proliferation of low-cost,
   high demand courses.

Action

1. The National President and the National Education Officer will make student
   involvement in the compacts negotiation and development process a priority for
   their activities in 2010.
2. The National President will send Julez a letter congratulation her on her awesome
   work.

M: Noah White (University of Sydney)
S: Petra McNeilly Rutledge (University of Technology, Sydney)


ED 11: GENERIC APPEALS GUIDE - BUILDING RESOURCES

Preamble

1. The introduction of Voluntary Student Unionism saw a wave of lay-offs for students’
   association support staff, including academic advocacy officers. At Charles Sturt
   University the advocacy services have been reduced from four and a half equivalent
   full time staff taking responsibility for this crucial service, to just two full time
   equivalent staff.
2. It has, however been heartening to see students step in to fill the void when staff
   support is not available. This has been the case at Charles Sturt, and has now doubt
   been replicated at universities across the country, particularly those that are
   relatively disadvantaged.
3. The Students’ Representative Council of CSU Bathurst first joined NUS in 2007 out of
   fear that skills would not be maintained or passed on in the VSU environment, and
   that the national union would be a point of access for a wealth of knowledge and
   resources. Sadly this has not been the case.
4. In coming years NUS should continue to campaign for the partial of complete repeal
   of VSU, while at the same time building the resources offered to student
   representatives so as to facilitate positive results for students.

Platform

1. NUS recognises that it must support students attempting to step in to fill the void
   left by their struggling students’ associations.

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 33
2. That NUS should expand the resources it has available to student representatives.
3. That such resources should be made readily available to student representatives
   from all universities, not just those that can afford to pay affiliation fees. Those that
   can’t are often those that need the most support, and will appreciate it when
   circumstances change.

Action

1. Conference directs the National Education Officer to develop a non-campus specific
   guide to appeal writing, including formatting, argument presentation and other
   relevant details.
2. That the academic appeals guide be distributed to all campuses before the end of
   first semester next year.
3. That the guide be made available on the NUS website, and that this be done in a
   visible location.
4. That the 2010 Presidents Summit allocate time to specifically address and possibly
   expand this policy.

M: Jonathan Childs (Charles Sturt University, Bathurst)
S: Bede Crasnich (University of Wollongong)


ED 12: EDUCATION OFFICERS SUMMIT

Preamble

1. Education departments in students’ associations across the country will be leading
   the charge, going into a Federal election, in ensuring issues of importance to
   students are highly prominent during the election campaign.
2. Consistent with the “Results not Rhetoric” policy, it is proposed an Education Officer
   summit be held in Canberra during a sitting week prior to the election. Invitations
   will be given to all political parties of note, as well as to independent Senators, to
   address the summit.
3. The final session of the summit will involve attendees collectively grading the
   presentations and policies as presented, and publishing the results in a form able to
   be delivered to students across the country.
4. Additionally the summit will focus on coordinating efforts going into the Federal
   election period to ensure the student voice is prominent.

Platform

1. NUS recognises the importance of co-ordinating elected campus education officers in
   a Federal election year to better disseminate NUS’s policy and positions.
2. NUS recognises the broader voice on education issues from a campus-based
   perspective that such a conference would provide.
3. NUS are committed to a strong and divers presence in Canberra prior to the Federal
   election.

Action

1. The National President, National Education Officer and National General Secretary
   are to set a suitable date for the Education Officers Summit early in their terms.

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                           Page 34
2. The National Education Officer is to send invitations to the Education Officers of all
   affiliate campuses, non-affiliate campuses the NUS wishes to include,
   representatives from the TAFE/VET sector and other relevant parties.
3. The National Education Officer is to compile feedback from those in attendance and
   produce printed material to be distributed to campus affiliates and media outlets
   prior to the Federal election. The material must also be available to be accessed
   electronically.

M: Jonathan Childs (Charles Sturt University, Bathurst)
S: Andrew Coleman (University of Sydney)


ED 13: TEXTS ON HECS

Platform

1. NUS notes the heavy financial burden of textbooks required to successfully complete
   degrees, which students are expected to pay for up front.
2. NUS calls on the Federal Labor Government to address these concerns by giving
   students the choice of having the costs of essential course readers and textbooks
   deferred to their HECS repayments.

Action

1. That the NUS Education Department run a campaign entitled ‘Texts on HECS’ based
   on the above premise, with the clear intention of delivering a fairer, more equitable
   higher education system for students.
2. That NUS remain open to models suggested by the Government, universities or other
   stakeholders that may enable the premise of the campaign to be successfully
   introduced.

M: Michael Buckland (University of Sydney)
S: Chris Monnox (University of Wollongong)




NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                        Page 35
                                                                     Environment
ENV 1: AYCC COALITION BUILDING

Preamble

1. Recognising the successes of the AYCC at mobilising young people around climate
   change,
2. Recognising that a public, free, mass higher education system will lead to a greater
   understanding of climate change,
3. Recognising that the AYCC combined tactics of lobbying, media, campaigning and
   conferences is very similar to those employed by NUS,
4. Recognising that NUS is a member of the AYCC

Platform

1. NUS continues to support the AYCC.
2. The AYCC is the preferred Environmental group of the NUS.
3. The NUS Environment Officer will represent the interests of the National Union of
   Students and act as a conduit between the two organisations.

Action

1. The NUS Environment Officer will engage with the board of the AYCC.
2. The NUS Environment Officer will contribute to the campaigns of the AYCC.
3. The NUS Environment Officer will keep activists and office bearers aware of AYCC
   campaigns.
4. The NUS Environment Officer will attend AYCC conferences and the National
   Education Conference.

M: Noah White (University of Sydney)
S: James Still (University of New South Wales)




NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                      Page 36
                                             Ethno-cultural




NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK            Page 37
                                                                         Indigenous
IND 1: YARN: RECONCILIATION IN ACTION AT AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES

Preamble

1. YARN is an Indigenous and non-Indigenous students collective currently operating out
   of the University of New South Wales and La Trobe University.
2. YARN aims to break down the barriers between Indigenous and non-Indigenous
   students by providing a weekly space for students to come together to understand
   Indigenous culture, people, and their experiences.

Platform

1. NUS believes the YARN program promotes reconciliation between Indigenous and
   non-Indigenous students.
2. NUS supports the rollout of the YARN programs to other Universities.
3. NUS note the importance of the YARN program as a student driven collective.

Action

1. The NUS Indigenous officer will present a session at NUS Presidents summit outlining
   the YARN program.
2. The NUS national Indigenous officer will work with state and campus office bearers
   to support the roll out of YARN.
3. NUS endorsees the YARN program.

M: Warren Roberts (University of New South Wales)
S: EJ Knight (Monash University, Clayton)


IND 2: NATIONAL INDIGENOUS STUDENTS’ CONFERENCE

Preamble

1. NUS Indigenous department was established in 2007, the NUS Indigenous department
   has held a National Indigenous Students Conference. This conference brings together
   Indigenous students from around the country to discuss issues and solutions
   concerning Indigenous students at University. It provides a basis for the building of
   the national Indigenous student network, and also the annual gathering of the
   national Indigenous student network. The conference also provides capacity building
   opportunities for current and incoming state campus office bearers.

Platform

1. NUS supports the National Indigenous Students conference.
2. NUS notes the importance of the conference outreaching to Indigenous students on
   campus.
3. NUS celebrate the higher number of campus office bearers who attend the
   conference.


NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                       Page 38
Action

1. NUS national officer will continue to convene a National Indigenous Students
   Conference.
2. NUS endorses the National Indigenous conference of the NUS Indigenous department.
3. NUS encourages student representative organisations to support the conference by
   sending relevant office bearers and activists.

M: Warren Roberts (University of New South Wales)
S: EJ Knight (Monash University, Clayton)


IND 3: INDIGENOUS STUDENT CENTRES ON CAMPUS

Preamble

1. Indigenous support centres encourage retention by providing a safe space to study.
   Recent trends by University administrators has seen aggressive move to take over
   these spaces.

Platform

1. NUS supports Indigenous student centres on campus.
2. NUS notes the importance of these spaces for the continued success of Indigenous
   students at Universities.

Action

1. NUS supports Indigenous student support centres on campus
2. NUS will work with campuses on campaigns to maintain those spaces.

M: Warren Roberts (University of New South Wales)
S: EJ Knight (Monash University, Clayton)


IND 4: INDIGENOUS STUDENT INCOME SUPPORT

Preamble

1. The recent Bradley review mentioned no direct references to ABSTUDY. ABSTUDY is
   a staple of income support for Indigenous students. Equally popular with students is
   the National Indigenous Cadetship Program. This program also failed to receive any
   government review as part of the recent income support review for university
   students.

Platform

1. NUS notes the ABSTUDY and National Indigenous Cadetship Program as a prime
   income support mechanism for students.
2. NUS notes the income threshold have not increased for several years under the
   National Indigenous Cadetship Program.


NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                      Page 39
3. NUS calls on the government to immediately review income support for Indigenous
   students.

Action

1. NUS Indigenous officer will work with NUS research department to produce a
   comprehensive background paper on the history of Indigenous student income
   support.
2. NUS will run a comprehensive survey with Indigenous students around their issues
   with the income support systems.
3. NUS will work with Centrelink and DEEWR to establish a collaborative approach to a
   possible review of these systems.

M: Warren Roberts (University of New South Wales)
S: EJ Knight (Monash University, Clayton)


IND 5: ENDING THE RACIST NORTHERN TERRITORY INTERVENTION

Preamble

1. The Northern Territory intervention is a racist attack on Aboriginal communities and
   on the rights of indigenous people. This attack was launched in June 2007 by the
   Howard government, and has since been continued and intensified by the Rudd
   government. The objective of the Northern Territory intervention was to destroy
   Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory, and to deny indigenous people the
   rights to practice their culture and to exercise sovereignty over their land. It was
   launched without consultation with Aboriginal people in communities in the Northern
   Territory, and has done nothing to improve the disadvantages they face as a result of
   220 years of racist dispossession and discrimination. The racism of the intervention is
   such that the Commonwealth government had to specifically exempt it from the
   Racial Discrimination Act 1975 in order to make its implementation legal.
   Additionally, the government and the media have sought to justify the intervention
   on the basis of false allegations of “paedophile rings” operating in Aboriginal
   communities, as well as racist slander of Aboriginal men as drunks, child abusers,
   and perpetrators of domestic violence. Since June 2007, indigenous people have led
   a campaign to end the Northern Territory intervention. This campaign is part of the
   broader, ongoing struggle for the rights of indigenous peoples in Australia, and
   around the world.

Platform

1. NUS recognises that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have the right of
   sovereignty over their land, and that the Northern Territory intervention is a racist
   attack on this right.
2. NUS therefore opposes the Northern Territory intervention. It does so in line with its
   commitment to support indigenous rights, and in keeping with its opposition to all
   forms of racist violence and discrimination.
3. NUS rejects the racist lies, which have been used by the government and the media
   in their attempts to justify the Northern Territory intervention. False allegations of
   endemic child abuse in Northern Territory communities perpetuate racist
   stereotypes about Aboriginal men, and do nothing to empower Aboriginal women and

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 40
   children. Paternalistic attacks such as the Northern Territory intervention are
   neither wanted nor “needed” by the people whom they target.
4. NUS recognises that the struggle for indigenous rights goes far beyond ending the
   Northern Territory intervention, and affirms its commitment to support all aspects of
   this struggle.
5. NUS supports the resistance of Indigenous communities against the racist actions of
   the Rudd Government. Such as the walk-off protest of the Ampilatwatja (pronounced
   um-blood-a-witch) community.

Action

1. NUS actively supports the campaign led by indigenous people to end the Northern
   Territory intervention. It will therefore support and endorse actions against the
   Northern Territory intervention called by the Aboriginal Rights Coalition.
2. NUS will lobby the Commonwealth government to immediately end the Northern
   Territory intervention, to restore the permit system to Aboriginal communities, to
   reinstate in full the Racial Discrimination Act 1975, and to cease the expansion of
   welfare quarantining and other paternalistic measures associated with the
   intervention.
3. NUS will make a donation towards the Ampilatwatja communities walk-off.
4. NUS will work closely with student unions and Indigenous departments within student
   unions, in support of their efforts to engage students who want to actively oppose
   the Northern Territory intervention.
5. NUS will endorse the National Day of Action against the NT Intervention on the 13th
   of February 2010.

M: Omar Hassan (Monash University, Clayton)
S: Kat Henderson (Queensland University of Technology)


IND 6: PROMOTE THE INCORPORATION OF INDIGENOUS CONTENT IN CURRICULUM
DEVELOPMENT

Preamble

1. The current government is developing a new national curriculum to be encouraged
   and incorporated for primary and secondary levels; across the nation. As it stands
   Indigenous education is limited to the history book with one page dedicated to more
   than 10,000 years of history and that is only before the arrival of Captain Cook.
   Ignorance feeds racism therefore it is only by quashing this ignorance that racist
   attitudes can be nullified.

Platform

1. The NUS recognises that there is a current lack of content regarding the history of
   Indigenous people pre-settlement within Australia and also the shared history of all
   Australians post-settlement.
2. To ensure an understanding and cultural competence with Indigenous culture
   contemporary aspects of culture must also be included in any new curriculum
   development.

Action

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                       Page 41
1. That the incoming NUS Indigenous officer, with support of the NUS executive, meet
   with the current Ministers for Education and Indigenous affairs to encourage
   consultation with Indigenous education specialist in developing and implementing
   Indigenous education aspects to the new curriculum.

M: Kate Schouten (University of Wollongong)
S: Jonathan Childs (Charles Sturt University, Bathurst)


IND 7: ENCOURAGE THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF COUNTRY IN
PARLIAMENT

Preamble

1. February 13 2008 marked a special day in our history as a nation. While the apology
   given by Prime Minister Rudd was significant the event, which made this day even
   more special, was the first ever, smoking ceremony and welcome to country held
   within parliament house.

Platform

1. While The NUS recognises that these activities are largely ceremonial they are a
   major step towards reconciliation. As such both a welcome to country and smoking
   ceremony should be held for each new government’s first sitting; on a federal, state
   and territory level.

Action

1. That the NUS lobby for the inclusion of a smoking and welcome ceremony of the
   traditional custodians of the land of parliament house be included in the order of
   proceedings for the inaugural sitting of a new government; on a federal, state and
   territory level.

M: Kate Schouten (University of Wollongong)
S: Jonathan Childs (Charles Sturt University, Bathurst)


IND 8: DEVELOP AN NUS RECONCILITATION ACTION PLAN

Preamble

1. Reconciliation Australia is the leading non-for-profit organisation dealing with
   reconciliation in Australia. The Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) as described by
   Reconciliation Australia ‘turns “good intentions into action” by encouraging and
   supporting organisations, large and small, to engage within their sphere of influence
   in the national effort to close the 17-year gap in life expectancy between Indigenous
   and other Australians.’

Platform



NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                       Page 42
1. In joining in with the efforts of major companies, government, not for profit and
   educational institutions around Australia, as the peak organisation for students, it is
   the obligation of the NUS to look inwards as to ways in which it can better interact,
   represent and aid in close the gap with Indigenous students and communities. This
   can be done through the development of a RAP.

Action

1. That the NUS support the development of a RAP working group, with the NUS
   Indigenous officer as chair.
2. The chair is to seek the help and advice of Reconciliation Australia in developing,
   registering and implementing this plan.

M: Kate Schouten (University of Wollongong)
S: Jonathan Childs (Charles Sturt University, Bathurst)


IND 9: SUPPORT A NEW INDIGENOUS REPRESENTATIVE BODY

Preamble

1. On the 27 August 2009 the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice
   Commissioner Tom Calma delivered the final report of the Steering Committee for
   the creation of a new national representative body for Aboriginal and Torres Strait
   Islander peoples to the Government. The long awaited report - Our future in our
   hands - Creating a sustainable National Representative Body for Aboriginal and
   Torres Strait Islander peoples - outlines a proposed model for a new national
   representative body for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, which was
   designed and developed from 12 months of intensive consultations with Indigenous
   peoples.

Platform

1. When the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island Commission was abolished it was seen as
   a major blow to the self determination of Indigenous people: not simply domestically
   but also internationally. With the proposed formation of this new representative
   body which is based on merit as well as being voted into a position it will allow for
   effective management of the body while allowing for community representation.
   NUS recognizes that this is still a ‘work in progress’ but that what it aspires to be
   must be commended.

Action

1. That the NUS draft a letter of support to be sent to the interim committee for the
   representative body, to Commissioner Calma and Minister Macklin outlining support
   for further work and formation of the Indigenous representative body.

M: Kate Schouten (University of Wollongong)
S: Jonathan Childs (Charles Sturt University, Bathurst)




NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 43
IND 10: ENCOURAGE WIDER INCLUSION OF INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIAN LANGUAGES AS
PART OF ELECTIVE LOTE (LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH) CLASSES

Preamble

1. As a part of the current education system, across the nation there exists a Language
   Other than English or similar program for most secondary schools. This is generally
   an elective which students may choose to undertake.

Platform

1. In a quest for greater understanding of Indigenous cultures and peoples, as the peak
   student body, NUS should be encouraging the learning of Indigenous Australian
   languages within these classes. This is not to get rid of other languages taught but to
   broaden the horizons of students to ensure that they always have the option to learn
   their local Indigenous language; where available.

Action

1. NUS to research current pilot projects and compile information
2. NUS to forward research with letter indicating support for national program.

M: Kate Schouten (University of Wollongong)
S: Jonathan Childs (Charles Sturt University, Bathurst)


IND 11: ASSESS SPENDING OF FUNDING WITHIN UNIVERSITIES OF INDIGENOUS
TARGETING LEARNING

Preamble

1. As it stands the government provides funding for Indigenous student services to each
   university on a per student basis. Most universities have Indigenous education units
   or equivalent but the way in which spending of these monies is not uniform.

Platform

1. NUS recognises the independence and uniqueness of each university and their
   respective Indigenous education unit. NUS also recognises that there are large gaps
   in the services sometimes offered and the money given to each university.

Action

1. NUS to seek further information regarding records kept by the education department
   in regards to Indigenous tertiary spending.
2. NUS Indigenous officer to contact each Indigenous higher education unit with regards
   to mechanisms for spending of funds and correlation to services for students.

M: Kate Schouten (University of Wollongong)
S: Jonathan Childs (Charles Sturt University, Bathurst)



NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 44
IND 12: ENOUCRAGE MORE BLOCK/CORRESPONDENCE UNIVERSITY DEGREES

Preamble

1. Under the system of kinship Indigenous families form relations across communities
   not only with their immediate family but with extended family and the community at
   large. It is because of this that the commonly held nuclear family support structure
   does not support these students as such it place these students at a disadvantage,
   further to other disadvantages already felt.

Platform

1. The NUS recognises that, more than the average student, Indigenous students are
   prone to feeling the effects of a lack of support structures during full-time study.
   This is seen as students must leave their home community to seek full-time study. As
   such NUS recognises that it would be in the best interest for Indigenous students to
   offer more alternative study arrangements to encourage Indigenous students with
   the requisite level of education, but who do not wish to leave their support
   structures, to attain tertiary level qualifications – helping to close the gap in
   education levels for Indigenous communities around Australia.

Actions

1. NUS to encourage greater support by the Department of Education, Employment and
   Workplace Relations for specialised programs, which encourage greater block-release
   and correspondence degrees for Indigenous students.
2. NUS to lobby universities nation-wide to offer a greater number of block-release and
   correspondence courses.

M: Kate Schouten (University of Wollongong)
S: Jonathan Childs (Charles Sturt University, Bathurst)




NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                      Page 45
                                                          International Students
INT STU 1: INTERNATIONAL STUDENT WORKING HOURS

Preamble

1. Current conditions for international students in the workplace are deplorable.
2. Paying full fees, with no access to concession cards for transport in Victoria and New
   South Wales, while needing to pay for housing, means that students are under a lot
   of pressure to work to support them.
3. There is a cap of 20 hours per week on international students’ employment. This is
   not "on average", unlike local students.
4. This often forces international students to work additional hours ‘off the books’,
   with reduced wages, conditions and workplace protections.
5. These situations place the employers in unacceptable positions of power, having the
   ability to effectively blackmail the student with the threat of deportation.
6. The system, as it currently functions, places the students at an unacceptable level of
   powerlessness and exposes them to abuse in multiple ways.

Platform

1. NUS will not stand for the abuse and maltreatment of international students
2. NUS will campaign to have the cap on international student working hours lifted so
   that the power imbalance, which currently exists, can be rectified and the students
   can get a fair go in the workplace.

Action

1. The National Welfare Officer and National Education Officer shall organize for the
   dissemination of petitions to campus International Student Organisations regarding
   the issue of working hours for International Students
2. The National Welfare Officer and National Education Officer shall liaise with friendly
   organisations and sector groups such as those involved in Concession Card Coalitions
   to build links and support for the petitions and the campaign
3. The National President shall work with peak international student representative
   bodies to develop a proposal for the Federal Government concerning the issue.

M: Jesse Marshall (La Trobe University)
S: Petra McNeilly Rutledge (University of Technology, Sydney)


INT STU 2: IMPLEMENTING THE SMITH PLAN

Preamble

1. In 2008, there were 182,770 International Students enrolled in the higher education
   sector, and a further 175,461 international students enrolled in the TAFE/VET
   sector. NUS has always recognized the educational issues faced by international
   students, but has become increasingly concerned with the additional problems that
   are faced by this large cohort of students as more and more cases of exploitation
   have come to light.

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                        Page 46
2. 2009 saw the revival of intense media scrutiny surrounding the plight of international
    students and their conditions while studying in Australia. Student activists have
    worked tirelessly to keep up the pressure on State and Federal governments to
    overturn discrimination and protect students from exploitation. One of the most
    prevalent and pressing issues is that of International Student concession cards.
3. The plight of International Students was brought into the mainstream media upon
    reports of Indian students being bashed and assaulted in Melbourne in May 2009.
    Following this was the collapse of the Sterling and Meridian Colleges. The coverage
    of these incidents has tarnished the reputation of Australia as a destination for
    students from abroad, and has strengthened the calls from student unions
    demanding that the treatment of international students be improved.
4. There is wide spread support for the NUS campaign, Justice for International
    Students. This campaign would not have been nearly as effective were it not for the
    work done by the Cross-campus Concession Card Coalition in Victoria and New South
    Wales, who were able to engage international students from all over the country.
5. The overwhelming pressure for the Government to react has manifested in a Senate
    Inquiry into International students, Ministerial Roundtable and the Baird Review –
    looking into the ESOS (Education Services for Overseas students) Act 2000.
6. NUS International Student Research Officer, Sharon Smith, has compiled a report
    into the Welfare of International Students, which has been presented to the Senate
    Inquiry as well as to the Federal Government. The report includes 52
    recommendations, encompassing safety, accommodation, social inclusion, visa
    requirements, adequate students support and advocacy, employment, recruitment of
    international students, education providers, tuition assurance schemes, travel
    concession, ESOS and student representation in Private Colleges.
7. International students face systemic discrimination, implementing the smith plan
    will bring positive, quantifiable, demonstrable changes to the everyday lives of
    international students lives.
8. As has been seen in 2009, international students who are engaged in active
    international campaigns become empowered to represent their cohort actively and
    vocally.
9. In combination with the establishment of the NUS International student department
    and building on the work of 2009 a campaign to implement the smith plan will
    continue to permanently alter the relationship of power between governments,
    university administrations and private colleges and previously powerless
    international students.
10. Exploitation of international students is deeply felt by activists in the community and
    amongst local students. Exploitation is widely felt by almost all international
    students.
11. The Smith Plan is a document full of realistic recommendations that are winnable
    and can be achieved within the next 1-5 years.
12. The broadness and diversity of the recommendations outlined in the Smith Plan
    allow student activists with varying interests, experiences and political viewpoints to
    focus on specific aspects within the report.
13. Campaigns around individual issues within the report, or the implementation of
    individual recommendations will support the validity of the plan as a total document
    and each of the easier wins will help to build the organizational strength needed to
    win the more difficult issues.
14. As a whole, the solutions outlined in the report can only effectively be implemented
    if supported by the Prime Minister, Deputy Prime Minister and the Premiers.
15. Depending on individual recommendation, there may exist multiple targets – federal,
    state, local governments, private colleges, universities and Australian society.

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                          Page 47
16. Defending the rights and ending exploitation of international students is core to the
    vision and values of the National Union of Students.

Platform

1. NUS unequivocally supports all of the recommendations of the Smith Report.
2. NUS reaffirms its unwavering support for international student rights and welfare.

Action

The National President shall:

1. Assist the NUS International Student Officer in the completion of their duties
2. Work with the ISO and the NUS Research Officers to release tri-monthly tracking
   reports on the progress of authorities on the recommendations outlined in the Smith
   Plan.
3. Communicate to the media and authorities that solutions can be found within the
   Smith Plan to the individual, campus and college international student issues,
   problems and inevitable crises that will occur during 2010.
4. Will attend the NUS International Student Conference and the TAFE and Private
   College Students Conference.

The National General Secretary shall:

1. As in 2009 take a leading role in the organization of the International Student
   Conference. In 2010 this will be in conjunction with the International Student Officer
   and will also assist in the organization of the TAFE and Private College Conference.

The National Education and National Welfare Officers shall:

1. Encourage their campus equivalents to mobilize international students around
   pertinent recommendations outlined in the Smith Plan.
2. In conjunction with state presidents, campus presidents, the national international
   student officer and community activists incorporate international student issues into
   the Semester 1 campus and cross-campus National Days of Action.

The NUS International Student Officer shall:

1.   Organize the 2010 International Student Conference
2.   Educate international students about the recommendations in the Smith Plan
3.   Mobilize international students around the recommendations
4.   Work with the activist community to discern which recommendations within the
     Smith Plan should be actioned as a matter of priority.

The NUS Women’s Officer shall:

1. Integrate recommendations concerning women international students into the
   women’s department campaigns for 2010.

The NUS Queer Officers shall:



NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                        Page 48
1. Integrate recommendations concerning queer international students into the
   women’s department campaigns for 2010.

The NUS Indigenous Officer shall:

1. work with the ISO on an education campaign for international student activists
   around Indigenous issues
2. this may take place during the NUS International Student Conference

The NUS Ethno-Cultural Officer shall:

1. Support the International Student Officer
2. Encourage international students to attend the 2010 Culture Jam Conference
3. Work with the ISO and the Research Officers on campaigns with recommendations
   relating to Ethno-Cultural issues or racism.

The National Small and Regional Officer shall:

1. Identify issues relating to international students on small and regional campuses
2. Activate international students on small and regional campuses around the
   recommendations outlined in the Smith Plan.

1. In 2010, the National President and International Student Officer will present a joint
   report on the progress of the Smith Plan to the NUS Education Conference and again
   at the NUS Annual General Meeting.
2. NUS will work with active international, political, union and community groups to
   win campaigns on the recommendations. These groups include but are not limited
   to: CCCCNSW, CCCCVIC, SUPRA, CAPA, AISA, AFIS, FISA, PPIA, MGSA, AG, UIA, SA and
   the LHMU.

M: Carla Drakeford (University of Melbourne)
S: Elly Howse (University of Sydney)


INT STU 3: RACISM AGAINST INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

Preamble

1. In 2009 we have witnessed a sharp increase in racist violence towards students,
   particularly towards students from India. This violence appears in a variety of forms,
   economic and physical. International students are increasingly being exploited in
   their workplace, working below award wages or in many cases without wages at all.
2. Violent assaults against international students have been on the increase; huge
   numbers of International students live in squalid conditions and are ripped off by
   rental agents.
3. The Federal Government has laid the basis for these racist ideas by tacitly endorsing
   exploitation of International students, and with its own racist policies. The
   workforce participation restrictions on student visa’s forces International students to
   work illegally to survive and excludes them from their right to safe workplaces and
   award wages. Lack of affordable housing entrenches poverty for students.
   International students as a vulnerable section of the student population are more
   often the victims of criminal landlords. The Governments complicity in these

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 49
   practices creates the atmosphere in which some people deem racially targeted
   violence acceptable.
4. NUS should emphatically oppose the racism towards International Students and
   publicly denounce the bigots who attack students, but also the governments neglect
   of International Students’ needs.

Platform

1. NUS condemns all racist attacks on International students.
2. NUS recognizes that racist Federal Government policy, such as workforce
   participation restrictions on visas and exclusion from income support, can only
   encourage racist attitudes.
3. NUS supports actions taken by International students and supporters to fight back
   against their oppression.

Action

1. NUS will call on the Federal Government to place harsher penalties on employers
   who exploit international students.
2. NUS will raise demands to the Federal Government to increase the availability of
   affordable on-campus accommodation for students.
3. NUS will lobby the Federal Government to grant access to income support for
   International students.

M: Damian Ridgwell (Swinburne University)
S: Omar Hassan (Monash University, Clayton)




NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                    Page 50
                                                                       International
INT 1: NUS AND INTERNATIONAL SOLIDARITY

Preamble

1. The student movement in Australia experiences some issues, which are very
   different to our international counterparts particularly, deregulation of places and
   our very unique system of student income support.
2. Despite this, we share much in common with the battles of student movements in
   other countries. From neo-liberal reforms to voluntary membership of student
   organisations, many of the battles we have fought in Australia are being fought in
   other countries.
3. Australian activists have much to offer countries that are fighting regressive reforms
   we have had in Australia. In New Zealand there is a private members bill to
   introduce Voluntary Students Unionism and in Ireland the government is very likely
   going to introduce a HECS style student loans scheme, replacing the current system
   of free education.
4. Australia is at the forefront of regressive higher education reform. With every
   country that introduces similar policies to those in Australia such as VSU and HECS, it
   makes it less likely we will be able to abolish these systems in Australia. Therefore,
   Australian students have a stake in fighting these reforms overseas.
5. Furthermore, it is recognized within the Australian student movement that constant
   skills and idea sharing increases our success. By building links internationally we can
   expand this significantly and gain knowledge, research, ideas and strategies from
   national student unions all over the world.

Platform

1. The National Union of Students has been active this year in building links
   internationally. NUS Office-bearers have travelled to Europe, New Zealand, Ireland
   and the US to build international links. All these trips were taken by individual
   office-bearers contributions, contributions from the officer bearer’s university and
   assistance by overseas student unions, meaning they came at no cost to the National
   Union of Students.
2. These trips have made significant head way in building NUS international links
   meaning many representatives form overseas student unions are present at the NUS
   conference this year.

Action

1. The National President and the National Education Officer will continue working to
   build international links in 2010 by;
   a. Inviting representatives from overseas student unions (including but not limits to
       Union of Students Ireland, New Zealand Association of Student Unions, NUS UK
       and United States Student Association) to NUS Education Conference and NUS
       National Conference; and
   b. Provide free registration to representatives from overseas student unions to NUS
       Education Conference and NUS National Conference
2. The National General Secretary will ensure that no NUS funds are used for overseas
   trips for NUS Office-bearers.

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 51
M: Stefie Hinchy (National Education)
S: David Barrow (National President)


INT 2: BURMA BOYCOTT

Preamble

1. Statement of Support

Burma has one of the worst human rights records in the world. The most basic human
rights, including the right to food, water, shelter, education and health care, are denied
to millions of people in Burma every day. The main perpetrator of human rights
violations is Burmese military dictatorship.

The United Nations, Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International and other groups call
for an end to the gross human rights violations including murder, torture, rape,
detention without trial, massive forced relocations, forced conscriptions of men and
child soldiers, and forced labour.

Burma's military leaders have consistently showed no regard for international or their
own domestic laws, subjecting the country's population to systematic human rights
violations.

2. NUS conference notes that:
   a. The Burmese military dictatorship controls all major sectors of Burma's economy
      such as mining, logging, oil and gas, transport, manufacturing, apparel and
      electricity. It also controls the export of many key commodities and also must
      approve all financial investments.
   b. All foreign investment, such as oil and gas, must be done in partnership with a
      military-owned enterprise. This means these companies are doing business
      directly with the military.
   c. Foreign investments in Burma directly contributes to the long term financial
      viability and stability of the Burmese military dictatorship because it provides an
      economic lifeline to the dictatorship through revenues gained from partnership
      agreements, tax and royalties; and
   d. As a consequence Australian companies that invest and operate in Burma are
      helping fund the country's brutal military dictatorship and their actions including
      systematic human rights violations.

Platform

1. NUS endorse the Boycott Burma campaign.

Action

1. NUS calls on the Australian Government to:
   a. Investigate Australian companies' interests in Burma; and
   b. Introduce targeted trade and investment sanctions against Burma.

2. NUS directs the National Office bearers to

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 52
    a. Coordinate the NUS response with the Burma Boycott campaign
    b. Encourage campus presidents to take actions in support of the campaign

M: David Barrow (National President)
S: Carla Drakeford (University of Melbourne)


INT 3: MAKE AMENDS FOR VIETNAM PROTESTS

Preamble

1. Upon their return to Australia, from service in the Vietnam War, many Australian
   service personnel experienced discontent from anti-Vietnam rallies that were
   organised by, and actively supported by, student bodies and NUS predecessors.
2. Many of these student led protests and actions directed anger, frustration and
   violence towards service personnel, many of whom were conscripted, rather than at
   Government policy.

Platform

1. NUS recognises that the actions of the student movement broadly, and of the
   student movement under the direction of NUS and its predecessors, have in the past
   engaged in actions and activities that have been hurtful to sections of Australian
   society, or to Australian society as a whole.
2. NUS recognises that actions as the above mentioned generate bad relations between
   the National Union and broad based community groups.
3. NUS recognises that actions such as the above mentioned generate a negative image
   and negative media attention that is harmful to the unions interests in education and
   other policy areas that directly impact university students.
4. NUS recognises that it has a membership base that is currently partially comprised of
   both full-time and reserve enlisted Australian Service personnel who should be
   entitled to equal representation and inclusion as students within their National
   Union.

Action

1. The 2010 NUS National President will issue a press statement apologising to the
   Department of Veterans Affairs, and the Vietnam Veterans Association for any
   actions or protests carried out during the anti-Vietnam rallies where action was
   directed towards Australian returned servicemen rather than the government and its
   policies.
2. The NUS National President in 2010 will send a letter of apology addressed to the
   Vietnam Veterans Association and the Department of Veteran’s Affairs
   communicating the above.

M: Tom Green (University of Sydney)
S: Kate Schouten (University of Wollongong)




NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                       Page 53
                                                                        Miscellaneous
MISC 1: MOBILISING THE BASE (ENROL TO VOTE)

Preamble

1. To make real long lasting change for students, political influence in Canberra is a
    necessity.
2. Students can permanently alter the relationship between government, universities
    and students through the process of election. Within the Higher Education sector
    only students and their parents are a considerable electoral force.
3. Thirty-eight Vice Chancellors won’t swing an electorate.
4. Academics are too widely and thinly spread.
5. Peak lobbyists representing university and private education interests while talking
    big, don’t have the electoral muscle to back up their words.
6. There are between 450’000-600’000 Australian undergraduate students over 18.
7. However these students are not electorally mobilized around higher education
    issues.
8. Additionally 300,000 18-26 year olds are not enrolled to vote. This number is roughly
    equal to 35% of all students in Australia.
9. All students who are Australian citizens over 18 must vote. Many students think
    deeply about how they will use their vote. For those students who may not have
    voted before, NUS has a responsibility to deepen their engagement by informing
    students of political facts relating to higher education and on their obligation to
    vote.
10. Taking part in an election can be an empowering process. Taking part in an "enrol to
    vote" campaign builds leadership skills for new activists.
11. This is not only important to NUS, to have our base mobilized on issues effecting
    students, but it will resonate with students who we have assisted in this process. It is
    also an easy why for NUS to engage with students, and get students engaged with our
    campaigns.
12. This is a task that must be measurable.
13. There is great variation on how students and student activists vote; NUS must
    develop a strategy that will unite students around education issues as opposed to
    political parties.
14. Issues such as the changes to Youth Allowance, housing, transport concessions and
    base funding to universities and student unions are specific to university students.
15. A successful campaign to enrol the student vote sets NUS up for a greater leverage in
    Canberra and builds student organization across electorates across Australia. Both
    elements help NUS to win 2010 and 2011 campaigns.
16. If mobilized in 2010, students can be heard in the federal election and in Tasmanian,
    South Australian and Victorian state elections.

Platform

1. NUS encourages all students to enrol to vote in the federal election, as a way of
   voicing their opinions to the federal political parties.
2. NUS believes that students are empowered by their ability to vote, and all students
   should have reasonable access to changing their enrolment status.

Action

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                           Page 54
1. At the 2010 President’s Summit, presidents will work with Wellstone Action trainers;
   savvy to the US experience to develop the details of an effective, measurable enrol
   to vote campaign.
2. NUS activists will be equipped with the appropriate materials to enrol students to
   vote on their campuses, during O-Week- to measure the number of enrolments and
   to mobilize these voters for elections and National Days of Action later in the year.
3. Campuses are encouraged to set a target for the number of students they can enrol
   on a week-by-week basis. A national target for number of students enrolled to vote
   will be made at President’s Summit.
4. Activists will keep the contact details and a list of all the students that NUS has
   assisted in enrolling. Numbers of students that have been enrolled should be
   continually reported to the National Education and National Welfare Officers, who
   will be in charge of monitoring the national target.
5. The NUS President is directed to use the collected data in meetings with government
   and use the information to engage in marginal seats youth allowance campaigns in
   conjunction with the NUS Election Guide.

M: Rachael Durrant (University of Technology, Sydney)
S: Carla Drakeford (University of Melbourne)


MISC 2: REFUGEE RIGHTS 2009

Preamble

1. In 2009 we have seen the Rudd government respond to a refugee crisis with utter
   racism and contempt for human rights. In scenes reminiscent of the Tampa, Rudd
   has responded to the arrival of asylum seekers, in particular those fleeing war and
   horror in places such as Afghanistan and Sri Lanka, where the Australian state has
   backed the Sri Lankan government’s persecution of the Tamils, by asserting that the
   government will be taking a hard line on refugees and essentially leaving tens of
   people to starve on boats, or else detaining them in the off-shore hellhole that is the
   Christmas Island detention centre.
2. People seeking asylum are not, as suggested by Rudd, ‘illegal’. The Australian
   government has no right to decide the fate of people seeking refuge, especially
   those escaping the chaos of war, which the Labor government is perpetuating
   through the continued presence of Australian troops in Afghanistan.

Platform

1. NUS condemns the Rudd government’s racist response to the refugee crisis and
   recognises the right of all people seeking asylum to be allowed to land, and given
   full citizenship rights, with no detention.

Action

1. NUS calls on the Labor government to let the refugees into Australia, particularly
   those forced to travel by boat. Further we call for these asylum seekers to be
   granted citizenship rights immediately.



NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 55
2. NUS calls on the Labor government to immediately dismantle the cruel and inhumane
   system of mandatory detention, including shutting down Australia’s offshore
   detention centre on Christmas Island.
3. NUS will work with the Refugee Action Collective, the relevant refugee and asylum
   seeker centres and other community organisations to advertise and build
   demonstrations for refugee rights and against mandatory detention in 2010.

M: Elizabeth Walsh (Swinburne University)
S: Kathleen Larkin (La Trobe University)


MISC 3: AUTOMATIC ELECTORAL ENROLMENT

Preamble

1. When Australian’s turn 18 they become eligible to vote in a compulsory electoral
   system. Despite this, people have to pro-actively enrol, and those who don’t cannot
   vote on Election Day.
2. Furthermore in 2006 the Howard Government passed legislation that meant the
   electoral role closed 24 hours after an election was called, meaning young
   Australians could not enrol after this period and thus could not vote in the election.
3. Despite NUS campaigning hard in 2007 to have all student enrolled, hundreds of
   thousands of Australians were ineligible to vote.
4. The NSW Government has flagged a proposal to automatically enrol Australians to
   the electoral roll as soon as they become eligible. This would mean that all
   Australians eligible to vote are able to vote in upcoming elections.
5. NUS would benefit by having all students on the roll, as they are more likely to vote
   for pro-student policy.

Platform

1. That NUS supports automatic enrolment of all eligible voters and calls on all
   Australian jurisdictions to implement this system. NUS sees automatic enrolment as a
   more modern, fair, practical and democratic system that will improve the electoral
   system and improve representation for young Australians.

Action

1. That the National Officer and state branches liaise with government officials to show
   their support for automatic enrolment.
2. That the National President uses all possible opportunities to speak to the media
   about benefits of automatic enrolment.

M: Kurt Steel (University of Canberra)
S: Jess Hargreaves (University of Canberra)


MISC 4: CONFERENCE FOR TAFE AND PRIVATE COLLEGES STUDENTS

Preamble

Recognising that:
NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                        Page 56
1. Students in private colleges have next to no representation
2. Students in private colleges are predominately international
3. Students in private colleges face systemic discrimination based on the precarious
    nature of their employment, education and accommodation
4. TAFE students in some states have free education
5. Some governments have introduced HECS style fees to TAFEs, others are attempting
    it
6. TAFE students are predominately from low and middle socio-economic backgrounds
7. TAFE students face issues of education quality, worker exploitation and campus
    degeneration.
8. Since the breakdown of TAFE student associations in the late 1990s there has been
    no activist representation for TAFE students on a national level and in many states
9. There exist some TAFE and Private College student activists and organisations but
    they lack coverage and national coherence
10. NUS has the long term capacity, independence and sustainability to represent these
    students
11. NUS has already been unofficially representing these groups with little organisation
    in these institutions, little knowledge of issues of these students and no internal
    consultative mechanisms.
12. NUS political clout can be used for the betterment of TAFE and private college
    students
13. TAFE and private college students expand NUS political, media and organisational
    clout
14. In order to legitimately represent these students NUS must engage in consultation
    and organisation of these institutions and work towards incorporating their issues
    into NUS campaigns, their activists into NUS training and their organisations into NUS
    governance.

Platform

1. NUS recognises that our current level of research, understanding, consultation and
   engagement with TAFE and Private College students is inadequate.
2. NUS recognises that to fight the worst exploitation and attacks on free education,
   NUS must represent, consult with, train and engage TAFE and Private College
   activists and students.
3. Thus, NUS is committed to representing the needs of TAFE and Private College
   students and engaging TAFE and Private College students in the operations and
   governance of NUS.

Actions

1. The NUS research officers will undertake research to better understand the issues
   facing TAFE and private college students.
2. The NUS research officers will undertake research to ascertain the whereabouts,
   demographics and enrolment of TAFEs and Private Colleges for the use of the
   national office bearers.
3. The National President and the ISO will consult with current TAFE and Private
   College student activists about their organisational needs.
4. The National President and the ISO will organise a conference for TAFE and Private
   College students in 2010.


NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 57
5. The 2010 conference will perform the following functions for TAFE and Private
    College students:
    a. Provide Organiser Training
    b. Provide Media Training
    c. Create a national network of TAFE students
    d. Create a national network of Private College students
    e. Make the case for engagement as NUS
6. The 2010 conference will perform the following functions for NUS
    a. Provide consultation on issues relating to TAFE and Private College students
7. The National General Secretary will investigate ways in which TAFE and Private
    College student organisations can be engaged in the governance and decision making
    of the National Union.
8. In lieu of a formal office bearing position and for the purposes of representations to
    the media, Conference gives National Executive the power to appoint an ‘ NUS
    National TAFE student spokesperson’ and an ‘NUS National Private College student
    spokesperson’ should it become necessary.
9. The National President, ISO, National Education and Welfare Officers will work with
    the Federation of Indian Students Australia (FISA), Australian Federation of
    International Students (AFIS), All International Students Association (AISA), TAFE
    Action Group (TAG) and TAFE Student Associations to meet the objectives outlined in
    the platform.
10. The National President, ISO, National Education and Welfare Officers will engage
    with trade unions such as but not limited to the LHMU, CFMEU, AMWU, AEU, IEU and
    Teachers Federations to meet the objectives outlined in the platform.
11. To build an organised network, the national education officer and state presidents
    will focus on engaging key student groups, including but not limited to;
    a. Youth, Community and Social work TAFE students
    b. Students engaged in TAFE Student Associations and action groups
    c. Students engaged in trade unions currently at TAFE or Private College
    d. TAFE students at join institutions (for example CDU, RMIT, SIT, VU, UBAL)
    e. Students in 2 year courses
    f. International students in university run private colleges and foundation programs
        (e.g. UTS Insearch)
    g. Students engaged in cross-institution political, cultural, religious or social
        institutions (e.g. Young Labor, Socialist Alternative, FISA, PPIA)
12. The 2010 NUS Education Conference and 2010 Annual General Meeting will be
    briefed on the progress of these actions.

M: David Barrow (National President)
S: Carla Drakeford (University of Melbourne)


MISC 5: ‘PUT THE LIBERALS LAST’ CAMPAIGN

Preamble

1. The Howard Government, which was in office from 1996 until its loss at the 2007
   Federal Election made many wide-sweeping reforms to the detriment of Australian
   university students.
2. These included:
   a. A 25% increase in HECS debts.
   b. Lowering government funding for higher education

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                        Page 58
     c. Voluntary Student Unionism, which crippled independent student representation
         on many campuses.
     d. The introduction of the Student Learning Entitlement which limited the extent of
         Commonwealth support to seven years
     e. Negligence of the student income support system
     f. Introduction of the Higher Education Workplace Reforms (HEWRSs) which had the
         end result of decreasing the quality of teaching and learning at many Australian
         universities.
     g. The introduction of Domestic Undergraduate Full Fee (DUFF) places at
         universities.
3.   Of all Australian Governments since Federation, the Howard Liberal Government was
     the worst for student welfare and quality public higher education.
4.   Throughout its time in office, Liberal policies and rhetoric focused heavily on
     increasing revenue from the higher education sector, not on increasing public
     funding or in improving quality and outcomes. Under the Howard Government,
     universities ceased to be places of critical inquiry and active learning and began
     their transformation into degree factories.
5.   Since the 2007 election, the Liberal Party in Opposition has opposed increased
     funding for teaching and learning. It has supported the deregulation of university
     places. It has opposed the Student Services and Amenities Fee, which would make up
     some of the funding gap left by VSU.
6.   In 2010, the Liberal Party will contest the Federal election. It will attempt to
     vindicate its atrocious record on higher education and hoodwink students into
     believing that it is capable of taking on the responsibilities of governance over
     Australian universities.

Platform

1. NUS believes that the worst outcome in the next Federal election would be the
   reinstatement of the Liberal Party: a party, which, for eleven years failed in its
   obligations to Australian students.
2. Whilst there have been differences in views and opinions, NUS recognises that the
   Labor Party, the Greens, the National Party and even Family First have been open to
   dialogue with students through their peak representative body and have taken these
   views into account in policy-making. However, the same cannot be said of the
   Liberal Party, which stonewalled NUS in Government and continue to disregard the
   student perspective from Opposition.
3. The National Union of Students affirms its commitment to securely funded, quality
   public education and to adequate student welfare whilst also recognising that these
   are not necessarily ideals promoted by Liberals or Liberal Governments in office.

Action

1. In conjunction with a campaign to promote electoral enrolment amongst university
   students, NUS will embark on a campaign encouraging students to put the Liberals
   last on their ballot paper on polling day.
2. The campaign will be run on campus and, where applicable, will also target Liberal
   held and marginal seats such as Ryan, which feature universities or a high university
   student population.
3. The National President and Education Officer will spearhead the campaign, create
   materials to be sent to campuses and work with campus presidents at Presidents
   Summit to determine which seats will be most effective to target.

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                        Page 59
4. Once targeted electorates have been selected, the National President and Education
   Officer will organise a visible on-campus and community campaign, produce
   materials for distribution and attempt to achieve media interest in the message that
   university students should 'Put the Liberals Last' to protect the quality of higher
   education and repudiate the record of the Howard Government on higher education.
5. Unlike the Demand a Better Future campaign, which continued after the election,
   this will not be an ongoing initiative but instead will be specifically focused on next
   Federal Election, concluding with the conclusion of the election itself.
6. The campaign will not endorse any political party or candidate. It will simply reflect
   the disservice, which the Liberal Party has paid students in its eleven years in office,
   and emphasise the need to avoid another Liberal Government at the next Federal
   election.

M: Carla Drakeford (University of Melbourne)
Seconded: Stefie Hinchy (National Education)


MISC 6: NUS TO ENGAGE UNIONS

Preamble

1. Australia’s National Unions have faced challenges in recent years that have included
   declining membership and increasing political marginalization. Many Unions have
   developed innovative strategies by working together and sharing ideas. This includes
   the ACTU’s/Unions NSW Unionstart program that has been increasing union
   membership for young workers, many of whom are students. The NUS has
   confronted Voluntary Student Unionism that has affected its ability to achieve real
   outcomes for real students.

Platform

1. That NUS believes solidarity between Unions will assist the Union movement
2. That NUS will endeavour, where possible, to participate in peak union bodies such as
   Unions NSW and the Victorian Trades Hall
3. That NUS will endeavour, where possible to build long-term relationships with other
   unions through responsible behaviour and mutual objectives

Action

1. At the first meeting of the NUS National Executive in 2010, potential opportunities to
   participate in Union peak bodies as well as benefits of such participation be put on
   the agenda
2. That the NUS President and General Secretary will write a letter to such peak bodies
   to open dialogue and begin any level of participation felt necessary
3. That a report is e-mailed to NUS delegates as to the progress of such involvement
   and any strategy for continuation

M: Michael Buckland (University of Sydney)
S: Sara Howson (University of Wollongong)


MISC 7: STUDENT MEDIA – CONTENT SHARING
NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                          Page 60
Preamble

1. Building a sense of shared interest among Australia’s university students is integral
   to the aims of the National Union of Students. The sharing of articles written by
   students among publications at different campuses can help to accomplish this,
   while promoting diversity of content within and increasing the exposure offered to
   talented writers by student publications.

Platform

1. The NUS recognises the importance of communication between campuses at all
   levels.
2. The NUS considers the sharing of articles and other content between student
   publications to be a positive practice deserving of the National Unions support.

Action

1. The Executive of the National Union of Students be charged with establishing a
   content sharing facility on the NUS website and appointing individuals to administer
   this facility.
2. This facility will be open to all student publications operated by affiliates of the
   NUS.
3. All publications drawing from the content sharing facility be required to post
   notification of which articles they are re-publishing and when.
4. All publications re-publishing content drawn from the content sharing facility be
   required to incorporate acknowledgement of both the original source of the content
   (author, publication and campus) and the content sharing facility in their
   publication.

M: Amber Setchell (National Executive)
S: Mitchell Wilson (University of Notre Dame, Sydney)


MISC 8: CYBORG DEFENCE INITIATIVE

Preamble

1. One student has been to the future. One student knows what is coming. That student
   has seen what is to come. He has seen war. He has seen a scorched earth. The future
   can be changed, but we must act now.
2. The National Union of Students is entirely unprepared for a future cyborg attack…
   just like the rest of the world. In fact the word “cyborg” does not even appear in
   spellcheck. Actually, neither does the word “spellcheck”.
3. We must change this. Not the spellcheck bit… we must prepare for the impending
   cyborg invasion.
4. The time is now.

Platform




NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                       Page 61
1. That NUS acknowledge the truth in the message of time travelling delegate Thomas
   Clement, who polled significantly higher than the Socialist Alternative at the
   University of Sydney.
2. NUS recognises that it is hopelessly ill prepared for the impending cyborg attack.
3. That NUS recognise the time to act is now.

Action

1.   Conference directs   NUS to redirect activist funding into cyborg defence.
2.   Conference directs   the National President to kick a cyborg in the chest.
3.   Conference directs   the National General Secretary to kick a cyborg in the chest.
4.   Conference directs   all of next years Office Bearers to research time travel.
5.   Slamball courts.

M: Thomas Clement (University of Sydney)
S: Stew Fenn (Charles Sturt University, Bathurst)




NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                           Page 62
                                             Part-time and Mature Aged Students




NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                Page 63
                                                                             Queer
QUEER 1: NUS AND GENDER IDENTITY IN CAMPAIGNS

Preamble

1. Progressive students at universities around Australia have long recognised that
   gender identity is not limited to the archaic and binary notion of a male and a
   female. Indeed, many students studying at campuses around Australia themselves do
   not identify as male or female. Many of these students experience varying levels of
   harassment and discrimination from ignorant and intolerant members of the public.
   Many local campus unions and students associations around the nation have long
   since embraced these students, and changed their language used in advertising
   material and general day-to-day activities in order to be a more inclusive student
   representative organization.

Platform

1. Students and activists on local campuses have expressed their concern over the NUS
   Queer Department’s campaigns on “Same Sex Marriage” not being inclusive of
   students who do not identify as being from any ‘one’ gender. A more appropriate
   term (and campaign) for NUS to utilise is ‘Equal Marriage” or a similarly inclusive
   name, which does not leave students feeling left out of an important civil rights
   campaign. Whilst the campaign on “Same Sex Marriage” is a critically important
   campaign for NUS to take-up, we need to act in solidarity with all students on
   campus, especially those who do no feel represented adequately by their national
   union.

Action:

1. The NUS Queer Department aim to be more inclusive of students who do not identify
   their gender along binary lines.
2. The NUS Queer Department, and any other National Departments involved in the
   fight for marriage equality, refer to the campaign in advertising and media
   statements as the campaign for “Equal Marriage”

M: James Still (University of New South Wales)
S: Mark Platt (Queensland University of Technology)


QUEER 2: NUS AND CAMPUS QUEER SPACES

Preamble

1. Campuses from around the nation have commendably created places on campus
   where queer students can go to feel safe from discrimination and harassment on
   campus, as well as discuss and explore their sexuality with others. These spaces,
   normally called “Queer spaces” have proven invaluable to queer students on
   campus, and in many cases been critical to them feeling supported and confident in
   their sexuality.


NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                     Page 64
Platform

1. The National Union of Students must take the lead on establishing Queer spaces on
   campuses that are lagging behind in instituting these essential spaces. The NUS
   Queer Department should be in close contact with, and applying significant levels of
   pressure where necessary, to these universities and students unions who are failing
   to support their own students. A recent reminder of this failure, or in this case
   blatant queerphobia on behalf of the USQ university administration, was their
   decision to ban the Alliance LGBT group from their campus “Harmony Day”, which
   ironically aimed to promote “respect, fairness, inclusion and a sense of belonging for
   everyone”. This is evidence that the fight for queer rights on campuses is sadly still a
   fight that NUS must take up. The creation of safe spaces for queers on campus will
   go a long way to creating a safe and harassment-free experience of queer students.

Action

1. The NUS Queer Department maintain constant contact with all campuses on queer
   issues, regardless of whether they have a functioning student representative body or
   not. University administrations must be lobbied to institute campus queer spaces and
   adopt a more inclusive and pro-active approach to supporting queer students on
   their campuses.

M: Mark Platt (Queensland University of Technology)
S: James Still (University of New South Wales)


QUEER 3: QUEER AND YOUTH SUICIDE

Preamble

1. A 2007 San Francisco State University study showed that queer youth and youth
   questioning their sexuality can be up to nine times more likely to attempt suicide
   than heterosexual youth. While this increased risk is well known and well
   researched, there is unwillingness on the part of many organisations to effectively
   tackle this problem for at-risk youth.
2. Organisations such as BeyondBlue, which should be taking an important role in
   addressing this risk, have been reported recently as rejecting numerous funding
   requests by queer NGOs seeking to address the heightened risk of queer youth.

Platform

1. The National Union of Students should take a leadership role through its Queer
   Officers in helping address the problem of queer youth being more at-risk of
   attempting suicide. With so few organisations dealing effectively with this issue, NUS
   Queer Officers can help address a significant problem among queer people that does
   not see enough attention from policymakers or the media.

Action

1. NUS Queer Officers should investigate means to assist queer NGOs in addressing this
   issue and the best approach to tackling this problem.
2. NUS Queer Officers should help lead and direct resources to this problem.

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                          Page 65
3. The NUS National Conference affirms its support for NGOs dealing with queer youth
   suicide and pays its condolences to the families of victims.

M: Mark Platt (Queensland University of Technology)
S: James Still (University of New South Wales)


QUEER 4: SAME-SEX MARRIAGE CAMPAIGN IN 2010

Preamble

1. The Rudd government’s continued ban on same-sex marriage into 2010 is one of the
   key forms of legal discrimination barring queers from full legal equality in Australia
   today.
2. NUS recognises that registration and civil union schemes do not represent equal
   rights. This position is also consistent with polls undertaken in 2009, which showed a
   groundswell of opinion in favour of equal rights and recorded that 60% of
   respondents are in support of same-sex marriage. Amongst younger people and in
   particular students this level of support increased to 74%. Within the queer
   community, support for marriage over civil unions or any other scheme for so-called
   equality stands at 86.3%
3. The involvement of the National Queer Office of NUS has been a vital component of
   the campaign for same-sex marriage rights over the past two years. This involvement
   has garnered a greater amount of visibility for NUS both in the queer community and
   on the campuses.
4. NUS will continue to prove its relevance to students on this key political question by
   stridently and publicly criticising the homophobic nature of the Rudd government’s
   ban on same-sex marriage.

Platform

In 2010 NUS will make its commitment to fighting for equal rights known by:

1. Condemning the Labor Party’s homophobic ban on same-sex marriage and expressing
   full support for the Greens’ position of full marriage rights for same-sex couples.
2. Rejecting civil unions and registration as sufficient to satisfy civil rights for same-sex
   partners and publicly advocating that nothing short of full marriage rights represents
   equality.

Action

1. NUS will continue to work with relevant lobby and queer Community groups such as
   the Equal Love campaign group, and the Gay and Lesbian rights lobbies, to advertise
   and build demonstrations and public forums and events for equal marriage rights in
   2010.

M: Kathleen Larkin (La Trobe University)
S: Liam Byrne (NUS Queer)




NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                            Page 66
                                                Small and Regional Campuses
SR 1: PRESIDENTIAL TRAVEL BUDGET

1. NUS reaffirms its commitment to small and regional campuses, even though VSU has
   caused the collapse or disintegration of many organisations, which has resulted in
   many regional non-members or non-active NUS members.
2. NUS recognises that it costs a significant amount of time and resources to visit small
   and regional campuses.
3. NUS continues to support the subsidisation of the cheapest form of travel for the
   president in the conduct of their duties outlined in the constitution.
4. NUS does not subsidise accommodation costs.
5. NUS recognises that the President has no campaign budget and that ensuring that the
   President can make face-to-face contact and engage in training and consultation is
   an efficient use of NUS resources.
6. NUS recognises that in some unique situations, the president is the appropriate
   office bearer to conduct a campus visit.
7. In response to criticism levelled each year at the use of NUS travel budgets,
   conference recognises that up to a 40% of travel by the President in 2010 was paid
   for by other sources;
   a. International student organisations for overseas conferences
   b. State and Federal Departments for consultations
   c. Australian Youth Forum for meetings of AYAC of which NUS is a member
   d. Universities for some visits and conferences
   e. Higher Education Conferences for speaking engagements
   f. Personal funds

Platform

1. NUS recognises the importance of continuing to support a travel budget for the
   National President.
2. NUS endorses visits to regional campuses by the President when invited by campus
   organisations or to fulfil the objectives of the President as outlined in the NUS
   Constitution.
3. NUS commends those activists who have supported, driven, housed and provided
   accommodation for national office bearers in 2010. This commitment has allowed
   NUS funds to be redirected towards supporting small and regional campuses though
   campaigns or visits to other campuses.

Action

1. NUS will continue to support travel budgets for national office bearers

M: David Barrow (National President)
S: Kaitlin Ferris (National Women’s)


SR 2: THE ROLE OF STATE BRANCHES VIS-À-VIS SMALL AND REGIONAL CAMPUSES

Preamble


NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                        Page 67
1. The distance between many Small and Regional campuses and campuses in urban
   centres often results in a lack of awareness of National Union of Students campaigns
   on these campuses. Visits to Small and Regional campuses by State Executives can
   play an important role in remedying this situation.

Platform

1. The NUS recognises the importance of developing an effective and visible presence
   for the National Union on Small and Regional campuses.
2. The NUS recognises that state branches have the potential to act as vital points of
   contact between Small and Regional Campuses and the National Union.

Action

1. That NUS State Presidents and General Secretaries will ensure that State Executive
   meetings are held on Small and Regional as well as metropolitan campuses.
2. That NUS State Presidents will keep the National Small and Regional Officer informed
   as to the position of the National Union on Small and Regional campuses in their
   state.

M: Mitchell Wilson (University of Notre Dame, Sydney)
S: Chris Monnox (University of Wollongong)


SR 3: IMPROVED PUBLIC TRANSPORT FOR REGIONAL CAMPUSES

Preamble

1. Public transport at its best provides a cost-effective and environmentally friendly
   means for students to travel to university. In many regional areas, however, public
   transport services arrive and depart at irregular intervals. Synchronisation of public
   transport and university timetables is just as much an issue as the frequency of
   public transport at many campuses.

Platform

1. The NUS recognises the value of readily available public transportation services to all
   students.
2. The NUS is aware that the quantity of public transport services in many regional
   areas is highly deficient.
3. The NUS notes that in an environment where public transport services are less
   frequent, synchronisation of public transport and university timetables becomes a
   serious issue.

Action

1. The National and State Executives of the NUS will work with regional campuses to
   pressure State Governments and privately owned public transport providers into
   providing more frequent services to regional universities.
2. The National Small and Regional Officer and State Executives will consult with
   student organisations at regional campuses about their public transport needs.


NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 68
3. The National Small and Regional Officer and State Executives will render assistance
   to these organisations in pressing for better synchronised public transport and
   university timetables.

M: Sara Howson (University of Wollongong)
S: Michael Buckland (University of Sydney)




NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                     Page 69
                                                                 Student Unionism
SU 1: NUS AND POLITICAL REPRESENTATION

Preamble

1. The Student Services Fee which the Federal Labor Government attempted to pass
   through the Senate this year had as one of it's main aspects restrictions on funds
   raised to be spent on any political activity. To fully represent students' interests
   student unions must take on political issues, whether that be over economic
   conditions of students or social issues. The ban on political representation proposed
   by Julia Gillard is anti-union, and continues one of the main aims of Howard's VSU, to
   silence the political arm of the student unions.

Platform

1. NUS reconfirms it's commitment to fight for the full funding of political
   representation provided by student unions.
2. NUS opposes legislation which places restrictions on the representative ability of
   student unions.

Action

1. NUS will campaign to the Federal Government that any legislation introduced to
   return funding for student unions must include funding for political representation.
2. NUS will campaign against any aspect of legislation, which places restrictions on
   students' political representation.

M: Rebecca Barrigos (NUS Victoria)
S: Elizabeth Walsh (Swinburne University)


SU 2: “NO CAMPUS LEFT BEHIND” - MINIMUM STANDARDS CAMPAIGN

Preamble

1. Most campuses have suffered under VSU, though some have suffered more than
   others. As the national voice of tertiary students, the National Union of Students
   must do more to highlight inequities. This campaign seeks to raise awareness of
   shortcomings at some universities, and set a benchmark for the minimum standards
   all students can expect no matter where they attend university.
2. The national lobby group for students has the power to challenge practices and raise
   standards, if done in the correct manner.

Platform

1. NUS recognises that more must be done to help students from campuses that have
   suffered most under VSU.
2. NUS recognises that a base level of services should be expected from all students
   entering university, and that as the national lobby group for tertiary students, it has
   a role in ensuring these baseline standards are met.

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 70
Action

1. NUS conference directs that Presidents’ Summit coordinating team to set aside one
   session to develop an understanding of the baseline services all students should
   expect when entering university. This is likely to be along the lines of at least one
   elected student able to speak on behalf of students from the institution, a board of
   students to which this student answers, student media, independent advocacy and
   the right to elect delegates and participate in the National Union of Students.
2. The National Education Officer, in conjunction with the National Welfare and
   National Small and Regional Officers, conduct a survey of all institutions (whether
   affiliates to NUS or not) and determine where discrepancies exist.
3. Contact the Vice Chancellor and give them an appropriate time to respond and
   react.
4. Repeat the survey and publish the results prior to the 2010 HSC or equivalent.

M: Jonathan Childs (Charles Sturt University, Bathurst)
S: Rob Meredith (University of Tasmania)


SU 3: RESULTS NOT RHETORIC: VSU AND WILLING PARTNERS

Preamble

1. The introduction of Voluntary Student Unionism, by the former Howard Government,
   has damaged student life at campuses across the country, has resulted in the
   weakening or collapse of support services designed to keep students at university
   and offered by students’ associations, or in some cases by university’s, and has
   generally had a negative impact on the general tertiary student experience in
   Australia.
2. Students at small and regional universities have felt the impact hardest.
3. Since the introduction of VSU, and even before, the tactics of the National Union of
   Students have played a central role in ensuring VSU remains firmly placed in the
   conservative federal agenda, and now, finally, as law.
4. Half a decade after the Nelson Review seems an apt time to consider a new
   approach.
5. Lobbying efforts by regional students, both in person and by telephone, have found a
   receptive audience in the minor parties of the Senate, including the Nationals. The
   biggest hindrance to achieving success is the negative publicity and ill will created
   by negative and hostile tactics. If NUS is truly committed to alleviating the damage
   VSU has caused to campuses across the country, then now is the time to elevate such
   tactics to a front and central role in the campaign strategy, rather than tactics
   which illicit ill-will between students and the Senators that could make a real
   difference to their university environment.
6. In a Federal election year, a mature, pragmatic and open approach by the peak
   representative body for Australian tertiary students will provide the best opportunity
   for positive change for students and students’ associations in the 2010 calendar year.

Platform

1. VSU will be a central focus of the NUS in the upcoming Federal election year.


NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 71
2. NUS will prioritise, and use campus networks to build, a national lobbying effort in
   the lead up to the 2010 Federal election.
3. NUS will suggest affiliates utilise non-sitting parliamentary periods to arrange for
   students to directly visit local members to discuss VSU.
4. NUS will directly lobby political parties including the Nationals, the Australian Labor
   Party, the Democrats, the Greens, Family First and independents, including Nick
   Xenophon, with a focus on gaining a clear position of VSU repeal/alleviation onto
   their policy platforms going into the election.

Action

1. NUS National Conference directs the National Education Officer to create a database
   of senior staff, advisers and personnel that could facilitate communications between
   NUS and MP’s.
2. Additionally, the National Education Officer is to create a second database of
   interest groups, involved in or with a membership base that includes, tertiary
   students that could assist in sharing the burden of the campaign for the partial or
   full repeal of VSU, including, but not limited to, cultural community groups,
   women’s lobby groups, queer lobby groups, indigenous lobby groups, independent
   media, refugee action groups, and other groups with an interest in social justice,
   youth and higher education.
3. The National Education Officer will produce and distribute materials designed to
   increase knowledge of VSU and its impact amongst mainstream students, and how to
   lobby for changes. This is to be done with printed materials and electronically.
4. The National Education Officer absorb the responsibility for coordinating periodic
   meetings throughout the Federal election year with the minor political parties and
   interested senators with the purpose of communicating the position of NUS and other
   specifically effected Students’ Associations to them. Where required the National
   Education Officer will be accompanied by other members of the National Executive
   with specific interest or expertise in the meeting topics. The Traditional position of
   primarily lobbying the Australian Labor Party and trade union movement remains the
   sole responsibility of the National President.
5. The National Education Officer will coordinate letter-writing campaigns to overseas
   media companies, particularly in the major feeder regions of international students
   that have been seriously affected by VSU.

M: Jonathan Childs (Charles Sturt University, Bathurst)
S: Rob Meredith (University of Tasmania)




NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 72
                                                                            Welfare
WELF 1: ON-CAMPUS CHILDCARE AND PARENTAL SUPPORT SERVICES

Preamble

1. Many students studying at university are doing so while raising a child, and require
   additional assistance from their university and student union to allow them to
   compete academically with other students. These students are commonly viewed as
   being solely postgraduate students, but there are many undergraduate students who
   are also young parents. Since VSU, support for parents studying on campus has
   collapsed dramatically, with childcare services becoming more expensive and in
   many cases redeveloped entirely. Several student unions as a response to this have
   introduced “Parents Rooms” or “Family Rooms” where student parents can care for
   their child themselves on campus free of charge.

Platform

1. That NUS believes that students who are not just supporting themselves through
   university, but also caring for their child, are in need of substantial support and
   services whilst studying at university.
2. That NUS believes that all students should have access to affordable childcare on
   campus
3. That NUS calls upon all tertiary education providers to consider ways of supporting
   parents studying at university while raising their children

Action

1. That NUS, and specifically the Welfare Officer, collaborate with campus student
   unions in applying pressure on university administrations that have, or are
   considering, privatising on-campus child care against the interests and needs of
   students
2. That NUS collaborate with CAPA where possible to run joint campaigns on the needs
   of parents studying at university

M: James Still (University of New South Wales)
S: Mark Platt (Queensland University of Technology)


WELF 2: STUDENT HOUSING

Preamble

1. Students have notoriously found it difficult to find affordable housing near their
   university, especially those studying in urban areas with high rental costs. The
   increasing use of universities entering agreements with private operators to
   construct student housing is also a worrying trend for students that is leading to
   campus accommodation becoming increasingly unaffordable. A frequently
   overlooked side of student housing is the relative lack of rights students have when
   boarding or lodging. In many states boarders and lodgers do not have the right to
   appeal their eviction or any misconduct/negligence by the owner/operator of the

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                      Page 73
    property to a third party arbitrator. There is also no obligation for the landholder to
    lodge the bond with a third party, such as the NSW Rental Bond Board, meaning
    students have to take legal action to regain their bond in the event of a dispute.
    With so many students living as boarders and lodgers, this is clearly an issue that
    needs to be acted upon.

Platform

1. That NUS condemn universities who attempt to privatise the construction of
   essential student housing, as it makes the cost prohibitive for many students,
   especially those from lower socio-economic backgrounds.
2. That NUS denounce the fact that many students are living as “lodgers/boarders” are
   denied rights of appeal to an independent panel in the event of a dispute with their
   landlord.

Action

1. That NUS push for changes to state laws on the rights of student lodgers/boarders to
   ensure they are given the right to appeal against their landlord and reclaim their
   bond
2. That NUS demand that a portion of the Federal Government’s $6.4 billion dollar fund
   to create 20,000 public housing dwellings be allocated to students to make living
   away form home more affordable and thus more accessible for all.

M: James Still (University of New South Wales)
S: Stefie Hinchy (National Education)


WELF 4: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES / FACILITIES ON CAMPUS

Preamble

1. Students with disabilities studying on campus face numerous additional challenges
   than able-bodied students. Whilst many universities have support services for these
   students, including resources such as computers with adaptive technologies, these
   students are in need of additional facilities such as a space to safely medicate
   themselves, rest, prepare and eat food in private and a place to socialise with other
   students with disabilities. There is a clear demand for these facilities, as they would
   go a long way to allowing students with disabilities to compete on a more equitable
   level against their fellow students.

Platform

1. That NUS calls upon universities to implement spaces on campus, or upgrade existing
   facilities, to more adequately support students with disabilities
2. That NUS demands these spaces are created with consultation with campus student
   unions and the Australasian Network of Students with Disabilities (ANSWD)

Action

1. That either the NUS Students with Disabilities Officer (if created) or the NUS Welfare
   Officer take a lead in raising awareness of the lack of facilities for students with

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                          Page 74
    disabilities studying at universities around Australia, and promote the creation of
    physical places on campus where these students can be supported throughout their
    studies.

M: James Still (University of New South Wales)
S: Rachel Durrant (University of Technology, Sydney)


WELF 5: EQUITABLE STUDENT HOUSING

Preamble:

1. The cost of living has continued to rise for tertiary students in recent years, with no
   increase in support from the federal government to rent assistance under the Youth
   Allowance scheme.
2. Housing availability in metropolitan areas is becoming harder for students to find,
   and universities are not helping to house students effectively and close to campus

Platform:

1. NUS believes that all students are entitled to access affordable accommodation,
   close to their campus, so travel is not an additional educational and financial
   burden.
2. NUS believes that students who have to relocate to study and those from
   disadvantaged backgrounds should be a priority for the government.

Action:

1. The National Welfare Officer is directed to contact each university in writing to
   ascertain the availability of accommodation nearby or on campus for students to
   access
2. The National Welfare Office, in conjunction with the NUS Research Officers, shall
   compile a report on the state of student housing at each university. The report
   should encompass a range of information such as the rates charged at on-campus
   colleges (including colleges that have been privatised) and use this information to
   compare with rent and rates charges in areas around the university campus (i.e.
   market rate)
3. The National Welfare Officer shall present the findings of this investigation to
   campus Presidents and Welfare Officers at Education Conference, as well as to
   create materials to run campaigns for additional housing at campuses, which fall
   behind what will become the National Bench-mark.

M: Jesse Marshall (La Trobe University)
S: Rachael Durrant (University of Technology, Sydney)


WELF 6: OUTREACH PROGRAM IN SCHOOLS

Preamble

1. The Government has created incentives and targets for universities to enrol students
   from low SES and indigenous backgrounds (low SES to be 20% and Indigenous 2%).
NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 75
   Some universities already meet these targets with ease, but others are still far off.
   Regardless of current enrolment levels, it is important to work with universities to
   ensure participation up to - as well as over and above - these targets.
2. Students from low SES and disadvantaged backgrounds face many barriers to
   attending university. In order to overcome some of the structural disadvantage faced
   by these students, it is important that they are given sufficient information,
   encouragement and support to promote and facilitate university attendance.
3. Universities have historically shirked the responsibility of community outreach and
   neglected young people who do not intend to attend university when they are in
   secondary schooling.

Platform

1. NUS believes that students should have the opportunity to attend university if they
   so wish, regardless of their background.
2. NUS wants to encourage students who do not view university as an option, such as
   those who do not have a family member who has attended university, to feel as
   though they are able to attend if they so wish.
3. NUS believes that universities and student organisations should shoulder the
   responsibility for meeting low SES and indigenous enrolment targets through
   effective community outreach and mentoring or peer support programs

Action

1. NUS State Presidents will:
   a. Establish a network between the campuses in their state to facilitate student
      participation in outreach programs as run by their universities;
   b. Where possible, engage with state-wide university initiatives for outreach (such
      as Tertiary Aspirations Network in Victoria) to help direct university programs
      from a student perspective
   c. If there is no such program that exists at a particular university, assist the
      campus president in establishing a program for their university.
   d. If there is no such program in a state, the State President will work with campus
      presidents to formulate a program with or without the assistance of universities,
      as the case may be.

M: Jesse Marshall (La Trobe University)
S: Mark Baker (NUS Victoria)


WELF 7: HEALTHCARE FOR STUDENTS

Preamble

1. Prior to the passage of VSU, many student organisations provided dental and other
   healthcare to students at free or discounted rates.
2. Dental care and other specialist care are prohibitively expensive for most students,
   often leading to adverse health outcomes in early adulthood.
3. The Federal Government was recently reported to be considering a “Denticare”
   scheme to provide free dental care under a plan similar to Medicare.

Platform

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                       Page 76
1. NUS supports universal provision of healthcare
2. NUS will campaign for restoration of student access to dental care, whether through
   on campus provision or a national Government-funded access scheme for private
   dentists.

Action

1. The National Welfare Officer, in conjunction with the NUS department, will compile
   a report on student healthcare services before and after VSU and health statistics for
   university students, particularly in the field of dental health.
2. The National President will use this report to lobby the Federal Government for
   commitments regarding the restoration of student access to specialist healthcare,
   particularly dental care.

M: Jesse Marshall (La Trobe University)
S: Carla Drakeford (University of Melbourne)


WELF 8: LOW-COST STUDENT ACCOMMODATION IN METROPOLITAN SYDNEY

Preamble

1. The National Union of Students (NUS) believes that, over time, it has become
   increasingly difficult for students to find affordable accommodation close to
   University in metropolitan New South Wales. The following policy uses examples
   from the University of Sydney, but applies to students from the University of
   Technology, Sydney, the University of New South Wales, and the University of Notre
   Dame, Sydney.

Platform

Prevalence of Students with Low Incomes

1. The University of Sydney Students’ Representative Council (SRC) runs regular random
   internet-based ‘welfare’ surveys of the undergraduates at the University of Sydney.
   The 2008 Welfare Survey received 202 responses, and is a broadly accurate depiction
   of the undergraduate student population, although is biased toward full-time
   students.
2. 34 per cent of respondents said that they received some kind of Centrelink payment,
   and 80 per cent of these were on Youth Allowance (YA). Hence, we may say that
   approximately 25-30 per cent of the full-time undergraduate University Population
   receives a YA payment of some kind.
3. Anecdotally, SRC caseworkers would suggest that there is a distinctly higher
   population of students who are ineligible to receive a study-related Centrelink
   payment despite need, often because their parents’ income exceeds the maximum
   threshold, yet they do not support their children whilst studying.
4. An indicator of this would be that 48 per cent of respondents worked regularly
   throughout semester, and a further 29 per cent worked intermittently.             SRC
   caseworkers believe that a significant proportion of these students work to either: a)
   supplement their Centrelink income; or b) pay for living expenses (including rent,
   utility bills, groceries, and other expenses of a non-disposable nature).

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                        Page 77
5. Hence, whilst the Australian Government would classify at least 25 per cent of
   University of Sydney students as having a low income, the NUS believes there are
   significantly more.    Extrapolating, we will assume that 25-30 per cent of
   undergraduates at various universities in Sydney have low incomes.

Students with Low Incomes and Rent

6. Median market rent in the March Quarter, 2009, for a three-bedroom house, the
   typical share-house for students at metropolitan universities, ranges from $1350 per
   fortnight ($450 per person on average) in the Leichhardt local government area
   (LGA), to $1430 per fortnight ($476.67 per person on average) in the Sydney LGA, to
   $1100 per fortnight ($366.67 per person on average) in the Marrickville LGA, $960
   per fortnight ($320 per person on average) in the Ashfield LGA, and $1290 per
   fortnight ($430 per person on average) in the Randwick LGA. These five LGAs are
   those, which surround the Universities of Sydney, Technology, Sydney, Notre Dame,
   Sydney, and New South Wales.
7. As suggested in the SRC Welfare Survey, YA is the primary form of government-
   provided means-assistance available to undergraduates. The rate of payment is
   $371.40 per fortnight for the YA payment, usually in addition to $74.13 in share-
   house Rent Assistance (RA). That means that the maximum amount, which a typical
   student receiving Centrelink support receives, is $445.53 per fortnight.
8. The following table summarises the average rent and cash remaining for rent
   payable in the aforementioned LGAs; furthermore, the final column reflects the
   amount required for a person to live on after accommodation expenses and not be in
   poverty ($527.42 per fortnight):

LOCAL              MEDIAN RENT     REMAINING BALANCE   FROM   REMAINING BALANCE FOR
GOVERNMENT AREA    PER TENANT      CENTRELINK INCOME          THE POVERTY LINE
Sydney             $476.67         -$105.27                   -$632.69
Leichhardt         $450.00         -$78.60                    -$606.02
Randwick           $430.00         -$58.60                    -$586.02
Marrickville       $366.67         $4.73                      -$522.69
Ashfield           $320.00         $51.40                     -$476.02

9. Evidently, Centrelink is grossly underpaying students, as even the maximum payment
   of YA, $371.40, is $156.02 below the Henderson Poverty Line for income other than
   housing.

Providing Low-Cost Student Accommodation

10. Regardless of the flaws in the system, universities have a role to play in providing
    safe, adequate, and affordable accommodation for their students. Although
    anything short of vast, across-the-board bursaries and free accommodation will mean
    that a significant number of students will continue to live in poverty, Universities
    can, at least, reduce financial stress and improve safety for their students.

Determining the Proportion of Low-Cost Places

11. The NUS suggests that the proportion of total undergraduate students on Youth
    Allowance conservatively reflects the proportion of total undergraduate students



NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                            Page 78
    with low incomes. As such, NUS recommends that at least 25-30 per cent of all
    student accommodation should be designated low-cost.
12. Given that market rent is so high in areas surrounding metropolitan universities and
    the immense financial burden thus placed on students requiring such
    accommodation, the NUS suggests that, for any given number of planned places, the
    first 25-30 per cent to be made available to students should be designated low-cost.

Determining Rent for a Low-Cost Place

13. The NUS believes that rent for a low-cost place should be a function of income, not
    market rent. Were a fraction of market rent to be used, then even were rent set at
    50 per cent of market rent, tenants’ after-rent income could still be less than 50 per
    cent of the non-housing income Poverty Line ($263.71 per fortnight):

               100% MARKET RENT      90% MARKET RENT     80% MARKET RENT
               MEDIAN                MEDIAN              MEDIAN
LGA            RENT      BALANCE     RENT      BALANCE   RENT      BALANCE
Sydney         $476.67   -$105.27    $429.00   -$57.60   $381.34   -$9.94
Leichhardt     $450.00   -$78.60     $405.00   -$33.60   $360.00   $11.40
Randwick       $430.00   -$58.60     $387.00   -$15.60   $344.00   $27.40
Marrickville   $366.67   $4.73       $330.00   $41.40    $293.34   $78.06
Ashfield       $320.00   $51.40      $288.00   $83.40    $256.00   $115.40


               70% MARKET RENT      60% MARKET RENT      50% MARKET RENT
               MEDIAN               MEDIAN               MEDIAN
LGA            RENT      BALANCE    RENT       BALANCE   RENT     BALANCE
Sydney         $333.67 $37.73       $286.00    $85.40    $238.34 $133.07
Leichhardt     $315.00 $56.40       $270.00    $101.40   $225.00 $146.40
Randwick       $301.00 $70.40       $258.00    $113.40   $215.00 $156.40
Marrickville   $256.67 $114.73      $220.00    $151.40   $183.34 $188.07
Ashfield       $224.00 $147.40      $192.00    $179.40   $160.00 $211.40

14. The greatest concern which the NUS has with determining rent for a low-cost place
    as a function of market rent is that market rent may increase over time at a quicker
    rate than YA, such that after-rent income would be even smaller.
15. Instead, NUS suggests that universities use a model similar to Housing NSW to
    determine the rent for low-cost places. Housing NSW provides a subsidy to those
    who cannot meet market rent in properties, which they manage. If the tenant’s
    income is so low that they are classed as having a less than moderate income (that
    is, they have a low income), Housing NSW pays a subsidy such that the tenant pays
    25 per cent of their income in rent.
16. The NUS believes that this is an equitable model, and recommends that the
    University adopt a similar approach to determining rent for a low-cost place.
    Specifically, the NUS suggests that universities determine rent for low-cost places by
    pegging rent to 25 per cent of the full payment of (Independent Living Away from
    Home) YA. This would reflect the equitable system of Housing NSW, and ensure that
    students with low incomes do not experience severe financial stress.
17. In 2009, rent would thus be $92.85 per fortnight (25 per cent of $371.40 per
    fortnight). This rent could be used for all places designated as low cost.


NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 79
18. Furthermore, the NUS suggests that universities cooperate with Housing NSW to
    determine other measures for subsidising rent for those places not designated as
    low-cost. Whilst the NUS believes that market rent should be the maximum rent
    payable by a student, rent should be determined as a function of students’ income.

Action

1. The NUS strongly recommends that universities in metropolitan Sydney:
   a. Ensure, at a minimum, 25-30 per cent of all student accommodation places be
      designated as low-cost places;
   b. Designate the first 25-30 per cent of any target quantity of student
      accommodation as low-cost;
   c. Determine rent for a low-cost places as a function of income, where rent is
      pegged at 25 per cent of the rate of payment of Youth Allowance; and
   d. Cooperate with Housing NSW to create a model by which the rent for low-cost
      student accommodation places is determined equitably.

M: David Barrow (National President)
S: Elly Howse (University of Sydney)


WELF 9: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

Preamble

1. At present there are almost 30, 000 students with disabilities in Higher education
   across Australia. These disabilities range from learning to physical or mental
   disabilities that can have varying impacts of a student’s ability to study. However
   while many universities have taken steps to assist students with disabilities more
   needs to be done to support these students.

Platform

1. NUS believes all students have the right to study in Australian universities regardless
   of Physical, mental of learning disabilities.
2. NUS supports the establishment of safe places on universities for students with
   disabilities to meet or for treatment for their disability. (For example insulin
   injections)
3. NUS believes universities must offer the appropriate support to students with
   disabilities in the classroom, in assessment and to protect students with disabilities
   from discrimination.

Action

1. The NUS National Welfare officer will act to ensure that all Australian universities
   provide the appropriate level of support for students with disabilities in Australia, in
   regards to academic support and in assessments and exams.
2. The NUS National Welfare officer will establish and mentor a cross campus students
   with disabilities support network aimed at creating cross campus dialog on these
   issues and supporting regional students with disabilities.
3. The NUS National Welfare officer shall work with campus student organisations to
   ensure the establishment and continuation of on campus disabilities officers.

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                          Page 80
M: James Still (University of New South Wales)
S: Jaxen Wood (University of Queensland)


WELF 10: HOUSING PROJECT

Preamble

1. Housing is increasingly becoming unaffordable for students living out of home, as
   well as in colleges. Housing affordability seriously affects all students moving out
   and affects their ability to study.
2. Affordable Student housing is a key step toward the realization of total access to
   higher Education. A campaign on student housing is consistent with NUS vision and
   values.
3. Thus far, there is not enough readily available data on student accommodation that
   can be compared between universities and states.
4. A campaign around student housing can unite students who have access to housing
   and are unsatisfied and those who do not yet have access to housing. A campaign
   around student housing will unite elements of the government backbench,
   Universities Australia, non-resident students, students in residences and college kids.
5. There are complex issues relating to student housing;
   a. Housing affordability
   b. Housing access
   c. Low-quality of housing
   d. Degradation of private and public student housing
   e. Privatization of university housing and colleges
   f. Inadequate rent-assistance

Platform

1. NUS supports the right of all students to move out of home while studying
2. NUS believes that there is inadequate support for students who are forced to live out
   of home to attend university (like regional students, or students attending remote
   universities), and is committed to lobbying the government on increased payments of
   rent assistance.
3. NUS is concerned that students are being taken advantage of in the rental market,
   but is equally concerned with the trend of privatising on-campus colleges.
4. NUS is committed to creating a report into the conditions of student housing, to be
   used leading into the 2010 federal election.

Action

1. The National Welfare Officer will be in charge of this project in 2010, beginning with
   President’s Summit.
2. The Welfare officer will lead a workshop for all campus Presidents based on building
   a base of information about each university’s housing arrangement, for both
   International and Local students.
3. The primary focus will be to discuss with incoming presidents the importance of
   pushing reform to student housing and support going into the 2010 Federal Election.



NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 81
4. Based on the workshop at President’s Summit, the National Welfare Officer is
   directed by National Conference to liaise with each university and student
   association and where possible, college and resident groups to investigate and note:
   a. The cost of rent compared to the cost of university provided colleges (as well as
       colleges that have been privatized).
   b. A comparative analysis of housing rates between the major cities where
       universities are located.
   c. A comparative analysis between campus life based on privatized and public
       colleges. Findings from this should lead to a campaign against college
       privatization.
5. This report will be compiled and delivered to Education Conference 2010. The
   National Welfare Officer is to workshop the document with participants of the
   conference, and is to plan a session with sector groups
6. The National Welfare Officer, in conjunction with the National President will liaise
   with the National Association of Australian University Colleges (NAUC is the peak
   body for on campus living) about student issues with on-campus housing.
7. The report will be delivered to Universities Australia and to the Federal Government.
8. At Education Conference, a campaign will be designed by the National Welfare
   Officer and engaged activists for the duration of semester 2 2010 to semester 1 and
   in 2011.
9. This campaign can occur in conjunction with the ‘enrol to vote’ campaign,
   international student justice campaign and youth allowance campaign.

M: Carla Drakeford (University of Melbourne)
S: James Butchers (University of Queensland)


WELF 11: TARGETING NATIONAL WELFARE STRATEGY

Preamble

1. 2010 provides an opportunity for NUS to successfully lobby institutions and all levels
   of government. With State elections happening in South Australia, Tasmania and
   Victoria in 2010 and a New South Wales election happening in 2011 this year is a
   prime opportunity for NUS to put student issues on the agenda. Alongside the
   imminent Federal election NUS has an opportunity to get reforms in a variety of
   student welfare issues.
2. Campaigning on issues such as youth allowance, public transport, accommodation
   and other living expenses allows NUS to make a real difference to students lives, and
   is also effective in engaging mainstream students on issues that are core to their
   studies.
3. The 2010 Youth Allowance campaign was particularly strong and was receptive to
   students and was also effective in gaining media coverage. Despite achieving good
   reforms to student income support, including lowering the age of independence and
   providing a range of scholarships, the current system is still inadequate with many
   students in need living below the poverty line and others young Australians not
   having incentives to go to university at all.
4. Public transport in metropolitan and regional areas is also an issue that can engage
   regular students, as the cost of public transport is often a large part of a student’s
   budget. Many states have limited concession benefits, others exclude some students
   (in particular the exclusion of international students from concession cards in some
   states) and some areas do not provide adequate transport to students.

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                        Page 82
5. Student housing is also an issue that needs to be addressed by state and federal
   jurisdictions. On campus accommodation needs to be evaluated to ensure that there
   is adequate places and that they are safe and affordable places for students to live
   in. Off-campus accommodation is also an issue on many campuses around the
   country. Many campuses are in highly competitive rental markets disadvantaging
   students who are have low and less stable income streams. Furthermore it also puts
   students in a vulnerable position where landlords can easily exploit them.

Platform

1. NUS acknowledges significant reform the by the Federal Government in 2009,
   however more needs to be done to ensure that Australian students are not living in
   poverty. NUS calls on the Federal Government to improve its eligibility criteria for
   income support to be more inclusive for students in need, including implementing an
   alternative criteria to cater for students who needed the $18k gap year provision to
   gain youth allowance to support them through their study. NUS also demands the
   Federal Government increase student income support funding to above the poverty
   line.
2. NUS calls upon State Governments to evaluate their public transport system and how
   it is catering for higher education students. All students studying at Australian
   Universities should be eligible to concession discounts in their state. Public transport
   needs to be affordable and accessible. More incentives need to be offered to ensure
   students take up public transport as a more practical and environmentally friendly
   mode of transport.
3. NUS calls upon all levels of government and Australian Universities to ensure that
   student accommodation is safe, fair, affordable and accessible. All students living on
   campus require a safe environment, and should have a fair opportunity to access
   affordable on campus accommodation. Off campus accommodation needs to be
   investigated at all campuses to ensure there is adequate affordable accommodation
   for students. NUS will work closely with the Tenancy Union to ensure students are
   not being exploited and are living in adequate living conditions.

Actions

1. NUS will conduct a survey that will ask students to answer questions surrounding
   student welfare issues. The survey will ask qualitative and quantitative questions
   surrounding youth allowance, transport and accommodation in order to gage
   important issues to students, both local and across Australia.
2. The National Welfare Officer will compile figures on public transport and
   accommodation around all campuses in Australia. The figures will be based on cost,
   accessibility, safety and effectiveness.
3. Using the research from Action 1 & 2, the National Welfare Officer, State Branches
   and campus organisations will then begin a campaign aimed at state and federal
   governments. Through comparing and contrasting different results, NUS will use the
   media to highlight these issues. The National Welfare Officer, State Branches and
   campus organizations should organise to meet with relevant politicians to discuss the
   figures and the issues at hand.
4. The National Union of Students should also liaise with relevant unions and where
   possible collaborate on campaigns targeting the Federal and State Governments.

M: Kurt Steel (University of Canberra)
S: Kate Maybin (University of Canberra)

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                          Page 83
WELF 12: THE HOUSING CRISIS AND AFFORDABLE ACCOMMODATION

Preamble

1. Obtaining adequate housing can be one of the most challenging aspects of studying
   in Australia, particularly for international students and students who attend
   universities away from their prior place of residence. Comprehensive information is
   not always available from commercial sources, and rent can prove extremely costly,
   particularly in metropolitan centres. Student associations, the NUS and universities
   all have a vital role to play in ameliorating these problems.

Platform

1. The NUS recognises the difficulty experienced by many students in finding adequate
   lodgings.
2. The NUS believes that universities have a vital role to play in providing affordable,
   adequate, housing for students.
3. The NUS believes that student associations have an important roll to play in
   providing students with information regarding affordable housing options,
   particularly in areas where such information is not forthcoming from other sources.

Action

1. The NUS urges all universities to increase or sustain their commitment to providing
   affordable, on-campus accommodation to the maximum extent feasible.
2. The NUS will support student associations campaigning for improvements in
   university-provided housing.
3. The NUS urges all student associations to make information concerning housing
   options in their area, including the proximity of amenities to housing, available to
   students. Where this information is made available online, the NUS will provide a
   link on its website, in order to assist students researching accommodation options
   outside their current place of residence.

M: Felicity Evans (University of Technology, Sydney)
S: Chris Monnox (University of Wollongong)


WELF 13: STUDENT REFUGES

Preamble

1. The levels of poverty university students are now experiencing, in light of the
   financial crises, inadequate Centrelink payments and the recent rental boom across
   Australia, has resulted in many students threatened with the prospect of, or,
   otherwise are currently experiencing, homelessness.

Platform

1. NUS recognises the ongoing need of the union to engage on issues of basic student
   welfare and lifestyle provisions.
2. NUS call upon University administrations to ensure an adequate provision of low cost
   and/or emergency student accommodation for their enrolments.

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                       Page 84
3. NUS calls upon University administrations to provided a database of low cost rental
   and share accommodation to their enrolments.

Action

1. That NUS National Conference directs the National Welfare Officer to liaise with
   relevant state and federal governmental departments, as well as Universities where
   students are identified as being at greater risk of inflated housing markets, to
   ascertain the viability of establishing student housing programs as a means of
   providing both short and long term accommodation to those students at risk of, or
   otherwise, currently experiencing homelessness.

M: Tom Green (University of Sydney)
S: Jonathan Childs (Charles Sturt University, Bathurst)




NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                     Page 85
                                                                           Women’s
WOMEN 1: NATIONAL ORGANISATION OF WOMEN STUDENTS AUSTRALIA

Preamble

1. The National Organisation of Women Students Australia (NOWSA) is the network of
   women activists within the National Union of Students. NOWSA was started as a
   grouping within NUS’ predecessor the Australian Union of Students. NOWSA has a
   history of being a feminist unionist activist network within NUS and should remain to
   be so.

Platform

1. In recent times there has been moves by some within NOWSA to move NOWSA away
   from the National Union of Students, making it more like an activist network such as
   Students of Sustainability, which operates separately to NUS.
2. NOWSA has existed with the support of NUS and it is essential that NUS continue to
   provide ample support to NOWSA. It is also important that NOWSA continue to
   support the National Union of Students.
3. NOWSA would not have existed and thrived for so long had it not been for support
   from the National Union of Students.

Action

1. National Conference affirms that the Network of Women Students Australia is an
   activist network within NUS. Thus, National Conference resolves that NOWSA
   conference is held only at campuses affiliated to the National Union of Students.
2. Non-affiliate campuses can only hold NOWSA conference with the approval of NUS
   National Executive.
3. The National Union of Students affirms its commit to ensuring that NOWSA thrives
   through financial support of NOWSA and the NOWSA conference.
4. The National Women’s Officer will ensure there are workshops at NOWSA covering
   a. the NUS Queer Campaigns and;
   b. the NUS Education and Welfare Campaigns
5. National Conference directs NOWSA organisers and the National Women’s Officer to
   ensure;
   a. the campus hosting NOWSA and the National Women’s Officer are consulted on
       all plans
   b. no plans can be made without approval from the nationals women’s officer
   c. all NOWSA material must feature the NUS branding

M: Stefie Hinchy (National Education)
S: Petra McNeilly-Rutledge (University of Technology, Sydney)


WOMEN 2: TREATMENT OF WOMEN IN STUDENT ELECTIONS

Preamble




NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                       Page 86
1. Women have traditionally and continue to be excluded and marginalized in political
   arenas. There is yet to be a female Prime Minister or Treasurer and most states are
   yet to have female Premiers. This is a result of women continually been viewed as
   less capable leaders due to the process of socialisation whereby men are associated
   positively with leadership.
2. Student organisations since the 1960s have actively fought against this discrimination
   and most student organisations have a strong history of supporting and encouraging
   women’s involvement in their campus organization. The National Union of Students
   and its predecessor the Australian Union of Students have a proud history of
   supporting the women’s movement.
3. Despite this history women in student organisations, like in all political arenas,
   continue to experience barriers to their participation. The unfair treatment of
   women in politics is often most blatantly seen in elections, from both commentary of
   elections and opposition attacks on female candidates. Student organization
   elections are not exempt from this.
4. Many women in the student movement find that the most despicable treatment they
   have experienced occurs in elections. Whilst in all elections there are means for
   lodging complaints against treatment, women candidates sometimes feel they
   cannot lodge a complaint or if they do feel that no action was really taken.

Platform

1. The student movement should reflect both on the treatment of women in society
   and in the student movement itself. If we are going to fight inequality in broader
   society through campaigns regarding pay equity, violence and reproductive rights, it
   is essential that we also fight inequality within the student movement.
2. The National Union of Students has a close relationship with the vast majority of
   student organisations across the country, it is important that this relation is used to
   better the treatment of women in student elections.

Action

1. The 2010 National Women’s Officer will conduct a survey of women’s experience in
   2009 campus elections and compile a report to be presented at National Education
   Conference 2010 on the treatment of women in campus elections. This report will
   include;
   a. case studies of women’s experiences
   b. statistics regarding women’s treatment and
   c. recommendations for campus student organisations on how to improve the
       treatment of women in student elections
1. The National Union of Students also calls on all student organisations to;
   a. implement affirmative action
   b. implement progressive speaking lists in all meetings and
   c. have grievance procedures all year round, not just during election

M: Stefie Hinchy (National Education)
S: Ashleigh Lustica (University of Adelaide)


WOMEN 3: ANTI-SEXISM IN ADVERTSING CAMPAIGN

Preamble

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 87
1. The objectification and sexualisation of women in advertising is one of the more
   insidious and rampant forms of sexism we confront in a western world of abject
   material consumption.
2. Advertisers use incredibly offensive imagery, text, and at times subtle innuendo to
   devalue the role of women in society, perpetuate gender stereotypes, and sell
   products through the creation of a conceptualized woman to whose supposed beauty
   and figure all females should aspire.
3. This advertising is often found in higher education institutions, and unfortunately in
   some student organizations.
4. The NUS Women’s Department has established a ‘call-out space’ website, where
   sexist advertising and media can be posted and discussion around the various forms
   is opened.
5. The NUS Women’s Department has also produced anti-sexism stickers and distributed
   them to campuses for use by women students.

Platform

1. NUS believes that the use of sexism in advertising perpetuates the oppression of
   women, and should be opposed on both a general and specific level.

Action

1. The NUS Women’s Department will write a policy about use of sexism in advertising,
   which should be implemented by all affiliate student organizations.
2. The NUS Women’s Officer will continue to maintain the Say No to Sexism website,
   and investigate ways to make it more interactive, including possible funding for a
   domain space.

M: Kaitlin Ferris (National Women’s)
S: Rachel Durrant (University of Technology Sydney)


WOMEN 4: WOMEN IN UNIONS

Preamble

1. Women students, despite some gains, continue to face inequality in their student
   organisations.
2. Some do not have Affirmative Action policies in place to ensure equal representation
   of women. Others do not have autonomous women’s departments, and those that
   do often suffer chronic underfunding and unreasonable expectations for the tasks
   they should have to perform.
3. Furthermore, they are often ignored and/or intimidated in student organization
   meetings, which are typically dominated by men.
4. The consistency of women’s representation also continues to be a significant
   problem, with the campus president role often taken on by men.

Platform

1. NUS believes student organisations should provide a space in which women can
   engage at all levels free from any form of gendered discrimination.

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                        Page 88
Action

1. To this end, the NUS women’s officer will conduct a survey of women’s officers, and
   women’s representatives experiences, focusing on:
   a. Difficulties confronting women in their student organisations
   b. Policies in place which assist in the promotion of a safe and equitable space for
       all
   c. Ways in which each situation could be improved
2. The NUS Women’s Officer will compile a briefing document for all student
   organizations, focusing on the results of the survey, and recommending ways in
   which they can work to improve the culture, attitudes and structures in place to
   improve the capacity for women to engage freely and equitably in their student
   organization.
3. The NUS Women’s Officer will write an article addressing sexism in student
   organizations, to be sent to all campus based student media.

M: Kaitlin Ferris (National Women’s)
S: Laura Harris (University of Melbourne)


WOMEN 5: ABORTION LAW REPEAL (AND QUEENSLAND DROP THE CHARGES)
CAMPAIGN

Preamble

1. Early this year, a young Queensland woman and her partner were charged under
   sections 225 and 226 of the Queensland Criminal Code with having procured an
   abortion, and having provided drugs to procure an abortion respectively. These laws
   had not been used for prosecution in over 50 years.
2. These laws are inconsistent with wider public sentiment, and exacerbate the
   inequality of women by preventing us from making choices about our bodies, and our
   lives.
3. As a result of the prosecution of the Cairns couple, doctors across the state,
   particularly in rural and regional areas have ceased offering medical, and in some
   cases, surgical terminations, until the law is clarified and they are free from the risk
   of prosecution. This has resulted in large numbers of women having to travel
   interstate to access procedures which should be legally available everywhere.
4. The Queensland Premier has refused to undertake a Law Reform Review, and has
   failed to speak out in support of the couple, which have faced incredible distress and
   trauma as a result of the public nature of the prosecution. The Queensland
   government are refusing to act, whilst their women constituents are forced across
   state borders at extraordinary cost to access abortion.

Platform

1. NUS supports every woman’s right to access free, safe and legal abortion.
2. NUS believes the charges against the Cairns couple should be dropped immediately,
   and compensation offered for the emotional and financial distress the prosecution
   has caused.
3. NUS believes that all states should repeal abortion law, so that all women would
   have the right to access terminations as they would any other medical procedure.

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                          Page 89
4. NUS supports the work of both Pro-Choice NSW and Pro-Choice QLD, two coalitions of
   women’s organizations and representatives who are seeking to repeal abortion law in
   their respective states.

Action

1. The NUS Women’s Department will run a national campaign with the following aims:
   a. Raise awareness of the current laws amongst women students
   b. Provide a forum for students to engage in state-based campaigns for repeal
   c. Demand that the charges against the Cairns couple be dropped, and
       compensation provided
   d. Provide resources (postcards, petitions) for students to express their calls for
       change to the Queensland and NSW governments
2. The NUS Women’s Department will both organizationally and financially engage with
   ProChoice NSW and ProChoice QLD to assist in the law repeal process and campaign.
3. The NUS Women’s Officer will use the travel line in the allocated budget to visit
   Cairns, and mobilize women students across Queensland to campaign for the charges
   to be dropped.
4. The NUS Women’s Officer will prepare to mobilize a national campaign in the case
   that the Cairns couple are found guilty and imprisoned.
5. The NUS Women’s Officer will continue to send media releases pressuring all
   governments to repeal abortion law, and supporting the Cairns couple.

M: Kaitlin Ferris (National Women’s)
S: Kat O’Ryan (University of Queensland)


WOMEN 6: SAFETY ON CAMPUS

Preamble

1. Anecdotally, there is a huge amount of evidence that shows women are targeted on
   campus, and that whilst there exist preventative security measures at most
   campuses, reports have been known to be dismissed, and often attacks go
   unreported.
2. In a wider context, it should be acknowledged that violence is not only that of a
   physical nature, and a wider definition of the kinds of violence which can be
   perpetrated against women would include verbal harassment, intimidation in
   learning spaces, financial abuse and any form of behaviour which a woman finds
   threatening and which compromises a student’s ability to freely undertake their
   studies.
3. This year, the NUS Women’s Officer sought to update existing information about the
   preventative and reporting mechanisms provided by security organisations and
   universities across the country.
4. This research showed that whist for the most part prevention mechanisms are in
   place and are being improved by universities keen to avoid the media spotlight which
   results from attacks on students at campuses, the reporting mechanisms in place at
   many campuses were hugely insufficient.
5. On the basis of this information, the NUS Women’s department created a set of
   benchmarks, which outline the safety standards all campuses, should be expected to
   meet.


NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                      Page 90
6. In addition to this structural campaign, a number of ideas and projects started to
   take shape, which sought to address the underlying attitudes and cultural practices,
   which result in violence being perpetrated.

Platform

1. NUS believes that all women have the right to feel safe in all aspects of their lives.
2. NUS believes that the threat and the practice of violence creates an unsafe space,
   and results in some women students being unable to freely undertake their studies
   when it occurs on university campuses.
3. NUS also recognises that the violence a woman may be subjected to in her home life
   will also have significantly negative impacts on her ability to complete her studies,
   and believes that free support and counselling should be provided as a priority for
   women students in such situations.
4. NUS believes that is the responsibility of all people to educate themselves about the
   impact of violence against women, but that the provision of information from
   organisations like NUS and campus women’s departments ensures that the right
   information is available.
5. NUS believes that if campuses are unable to meet minimum safety standards, and do
   not have adequate reporting and support mechanisms in place, they should not be
   eligible to receive government recognition as a legitimate institution, and should not
   receive public funding.

Action

1. The NUS Women’s Officer will run an "education based" campaign, which seeks to
   change university student’s attitudes towards the acceptability of violence against
   women, and specifically during O-Weeks, the issue of consent.
2. This campaign should seek to redefine the term ‘violence’, and explain that it
   encompasses a breadth of intimidating and abusive behaviour.
3. The NUS Women’s Officer will prepare a presentation addressing these issues, which
   will be distributed to campus women’s officers to conduct forums and information
   sessions.
4. The NUS Women’s Department will produce materials to ensure the campaign is
   public and visible.

M: Kaitlin Ferris (National Women’s)
S: Carla Drakeford (University of Melbourne)


WOMEN 7: SAFE COLLEGES

Preamble

1. Violence against women in our educational institutions poses a number of significant
   issues for both the women it affects, but also those with the power to make positive
   change.
2. University campuses and colleges are not the only spaces where women students will
   encounter and face the threat of violence in their lives; however they are some of
   the places where their ability to freely and safely learn, and attain important
   education qualifications is severely compromised.


NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                        Page 91
3. Recent reports have raised the community’s awareness of a misogynist, violence-
   inciting, and hateful culture amongst some male students, who not only accept, but
   also actively seek to encourage violent sexual behaviour towards women. Colleges,
   just as the rest of society, should have a zero tolerance policy towards such
   behaviour.
4. The nature of the college environment poses serious challenges, as friendships are
   forged within closed bounds, and the incidence of sexist or other unacceptable forms
   of behaviour may be tolerated for fear of not conforming to group and peer
   behaviour
5. Specifically, a culture of tolerance and indeed encouragement of sexist behaviour is
   anecdotally, and now reportedly existent within some colleges. Whilst most will be
   quick to defend their practices and records, means to eliminate, not reduce, sexual
   violence and sexist behaviour more generally need to be implemented.
6. The NUS Women’s Officer, in partnership with the White Ribbon Foundation and the
   National Association of Australian University Colleges, has released a set of
   recommendations, and a report, calling on colleges to implement safer practices in
   time for the 2010 academic year.
7. Discussions are underway for the creation of a respectful relationships/education
   initiative, which will aim to target cultural issues within colleges, and will see an
   NUS representative per state work with colleges to present and implement
   components of this project.

Platform

1. NUS believes that colleges pose a specific and immeasurable risk to women students,
   as a space where the threat of violence is heightened as a result of cultural attitudes
   and a lack of preventative measures in place.
2. NUS believes that whilst some colleges in consultation with NAAUC have taken steps
   to address these issues, more needs to be done to change cultural attitudes amongst
   men in particular, and to prevent women being subject to the threat of, and actual
   violence.
3. NUS believes that all women students have the right to feel safe in their homes.

Action

1. The NUS Women’s Officer will continue to work with the aforementioned
   organisations, to finalise the education initiative.
2. The NUS Women’s Officer will work with state women’s officers (or where absent, an
   NUS activist per state) to implement the project across colleges nationally.
3. The NUS Women’s Officer will continue to present information about the progress of
   the initiative to media outlets, in order to raise community awareness of the issue.
4. The NUS Women’s Officer, in accordance with the recommendations, will pressure
   the federal government to undertake an immediate investigation into the continued
   viability of all-male colleges, and the threat they may pose to women students.

M: Kaitlin Ferris (National Women’s)
S: Stefie Hinchy (National Education)


WOMEN 8: STATE WOMEN’S OFFICER

Preamble

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 92
1. As a meeting of the state women’s committee must elect the State Women’s Officer,
   these positions have largely gone unfilled in recent years.

Platform

1. NUS believes that state women’s officers provide an important local contact point,
   and a network of support and assistance for the National Women’s Officer.
2. NUS believes the election of state women’s officers by committees should be
   considered a priority by all factions, and elected committee members.
3. NUS asserts the right of all women student activists and feminists to a process free
   from unnecessary intervention by men in the election of state women’s officers.

Action

1. The National Women’s Officer will contact all state committee members as early as
   possible in 2010, and encourage them to meet to elect a state women’s officer.

M: Kaitlin Ferris (National Women’s)
S: Stefie Hinchy (National Education)


WOMEN 9: POLITICAL SKILLS TRAINING FOR WOMEN

Preamble

1. Despite positive reforms implemented over the lat two decades, politics remains a
   gender-biased profession. A reason for this is the exclusion of women from the
   culture of skill transferral.
2. Skills of political machinery that, for better or worse, remain relevant to
   involvement in student representation are traditionally learnt and passed down
   ‘paternally’.
3. Progressive organisations such as NUS can play a role in altering perceptions of
   women as being ‘politically unskilled’, and can target the paternalistic structures
   that lead to this perception.

Platform

1. NUS believes that, in forums of student representation, many political skills remain
   tacitly unspoken – the domain of male-dominated mentor-protégé relationships.
2. NUS recognises the NOWSA conference is necessary in helping incoming Women’s
   Officers become effective activists, but believes a separate mechanism must be
   made available for all women to be trained in boosting their representation within
   political structures.

Action

1. That the NUS Women’s Officer liaise with State and campus Women’s Officers to
   organise non-partisan political skills training seminars, open to all women involved in
   the student movement.



NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 93
2. That such seminars can cover topics including, but not limited to, balloting,
   campaigning, policy writing and meeting procedure, and can be led by relevant
   experts in the field.

M: Ella George (Monash University, Clayton)
S: Jesse Overton-Skinner (University of Melbourne)




NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                Page 94
                                                              RULES AMENDMENTS
1. C3      Objects

DELETE C3.1 and REPLACE with:

“3.1    The general object of NUS is to represent and advance the interests of university
        students in Australia.”

M: Keelia Fitzpatrick (University of Western Australia, 0421 576 481)
S: Emma Kingdon (NUS National Executive, 0416 436 399)

Explanation: This would redefine NUS as the peak body for University students, rather
than ‘post-secondary school students’. Past efforts to expand into TAFEs etc have
consistently failed.


2. C6      Qualifications

DELETE C6 (a) and REPLACE with:

“(a)    a member organisation is an organisation that represents all or some of the
        students of an Australian university, as specified in the regulations”

M: Basha Stasak (Murdoch University, 0437 800 935)
S: Keelia Fitzpatrick (University of Western Australia, 0421 576 481)

Explanation: This would redefine NUS as the peak body for University students, rather
than ‘post-secondary school students’. Past efforts to expand into TAFEs etc have
consistently failed.


3. R2      Qualifications

DELETE R2 (b) and REPLACE with:

“(b) is controlled, or has a representative facet that is controlled, by students.”

M: Emma Kingdon (NUS National Executive, 0416 436 399)
S: Nikki Graham (University of Western Australia, 0422 609 849)

Explanation: This will allow representative sub-councils of non-student controlled
organisations to affiliate to NUS. There are arguments for and against this (best
discussed before conference) but it is good for Conference to have this option.


4. R6      Subscriptions

INSERT:



NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                            Page 95
“R6.5 Any resolution to reduce an annual subscription payable by a member
      organisation must be passed before polling begins in the annual election of
      NUS Delegates by that member organisation.”

And RENUMBER accordingly.

M: Nikki Graham (University of Western Australia, 0422 609 849)
S: Basha Stasak (Murdoch University, 0437 800 935)

Explanation: This is a simple mechanism to ensure that affiliation fee waivers are dealt
with before they become politically sensitive, without becoming too prescriptive about
the process.


5. R7      Cessation

INSERT R7 (g):

“(g) National Conference, by resolution passed by a 75% majority, terminates the
membership of the member.”

M: Keelia Fitzpatrick (University of Western Australia, 0421 576 481)
S: Basha Stasak (Murdoch University, 0437 800 935)

Explanation: This would enable National Conference to give defunct, sleeper
organisations the boot – particularly when a more appropriate affiliate exists.


6. R18     Election of Delegates

REPLACE R18.4 with:

“18.4 A delegate who ceases to be a student represented by the member organisation
      on whose behalf that delegate was continues to be a delegate until the expiry of
      their term.”

M: Keelia Fitzpatrick (University of Western Australia, 0421 576 481)
S: Basha Stasak (Murdoch University, 0437 800 935)

Explanation: Recognises the administrative impossibility of chasing-up non-students
during by-elections.


7. R26     Campus Resolutions

REPLACE R26.3 with:

“26.3 Campus resolutions may only be passed by an absolute majority of the votes of
member organisations holding votes at the most recent meeting of National
      Conference.”


NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                       Page 96
M: Emma Kingdon (NUS National Executive, 0416 436 399)
S: Nikki Graham (University of Western Australia, 0422 609 849)

Explanation: This will allow campus resolutions (where the member organisations vote
by circular) possible. At the moment, the inclusion of defunct affiliates makes it
practically impossible.


8. R27     Membership

DELETE 27.1(a) and REPLACE with:

       (a) the National President,

M: Emma Kingdon (NUS National Executive, 0416 436 399)
S: Nikki Graham (University of Western Australia, 0422 609 849)

Explanation: This would remove the chair/casting vote from the National President,
paving the way for the creation of a separate chair.


9. R27     Membership

DELETE 27.1(g)

M: Keelia Fitzpatrick (University of Western Australia, 0421 576 481)
S: Emma Kingdon (NUS National Executive, 0416 436 399)

Explanation: This would remove the National Open and Distance Education Network
representative as a non-voting Executive member, which has become defunct.


10. R29    Chair

INSERT NEW R29

“29.1 At the first meeting of National Executive each year, the Executive will elect one
      of the General Members as the Chair of National Executive

29.2   The chair may exercise their vote but does not hold a casting vote.

29.3   A tied vote of National Executive is resolved in the negative.”

And RENUMBER accordingly

M: Keelia Fitzpatrick (University of Western Australia, 0421 576 481)
S: Emma Kingdon (NUS National Executive, 0416 436 399)

Explanation: This would create a new chair of National Executive, separate from the
National President.


NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                       Page 97
11. R29    Meetings

REPLACE R29.4 with:

29.4   The National General Secretary must           convene   a   meeting   of   National
       Executive:
       (a) if National Executive so resolves; or
       (b) if requested in writing by:
               (i)   the National President, or
               (ii)  2 other National Officers, or
               (ii)  3 Executive Members.

M: Emma Kingdon (NUS National Executive, 0416 436 399)
S: Keelia Fitzpatrick (University of Western Australia, 0421 576 481)

Explanation: Expands the ways that National Executive meetings can be called.


12. R29    Meetings

DELETE current R29.5 and REPLACE with:

“29.5 Voting members of National Executive may appoint as a proxy a currently
      enrolled student represented by an member organisation.”

M: Nikki Graham (University of Western Australia, 0422 609 849)
S: Basha Stasak (Murdoch University, 0437 800 935)

Explanation: This would expand the qualifications for an Executive proxy out from the
current restrictions – other members of executives and delegates.


13. R31    National Officers

REPLACE 31.3 with:

“31.3 Paid national officers will be remunerated at an hourly rate equal to the
Australian Federal minimum wage. The hours per week required of officers will be set
by the National Executive by 31st of January each year (having regard to the financial
position of the union) and:
       (a) in the case of the National President, National General Secretary and National
       Education Officer will be 1 FTE
       (b) in the case of other paid officers, will be no less than 0.5 FTE”

M: Emma Kingdon (NUS National Executive, 0416 436 399)
S: Nikki Graham (University of Western Australia, 0422 609 849)

Explanation: This would make the Education Officer full-time, increasing NUS’
campaign abilities.



NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 98
14. R35    National Education Officer

DELETE R35 (a)

M: Keelia Fitzpatrick (University of Western Australia, 0421 576 481)
S: Nikki Graham (University of Western Australia, 0422 609 849)

Explanation: Removes duplicated responsibilities to conduct phone linkups (also in the
By-Laws).


15. R36    National Welfare Officer

DELETE R36 (b)

M: Nikki Graham (University of Western Australia, 0422 609 849)
S: Tom Antoniazzi (University of Western Australia, 0431 970 664)

Explanation: Removes duplicated responsibilities to conduct phone linkups (also in the
By-Laws).


16. R37    National Small and Regional Campuses Officer

DELETE R37 (b)

M: Emma Kingdon (NUS National Executive, 0416 436 399)
S: Basha Stasak (Murdoch University, 0437 800 935)

Explanation: Removes duplicated responsibilities to conduct phone linkups (also in the
By-Laws).


17. R38    National Women’s Officer

DELETE R38 (a)

M: Keelia Fitzpatrick (University of Western Australia, 0421 576 481)
S: Nikki Graham (University of Western Australia, 0422 609 849)

Explanation: Removes duplicated responsibilities to conduct phone linkups (also in the
By-Laws).


18. R39    National Queer Officers

DELETE R39 (a)

M: Emma Kingdon (NUS National Executive, 0416 436 399)
S: Nikki Graham (University of Western Australia, 0422 609 849)

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                     Page 99
Explanation: Removes duplicated responsibilities to conduct phone linkups (also in the
By-Laws).


19. R40    National Environment Officer

DELETE R40 (a)

M: Nikki Graham (University of Western Australia, 0422 609 849)
S: Tom Antoniazzi (University of Western Australia, 0431 970 664)

Explanation: Removes duplicated responsibilities to conduct phone linkups (also in the
By-Laws).


20. R41    National Indigenous Officer

DELETE R41 (b)

M: Crystal Williams (University of Western Australia)
S: Basha Stasak (Murdoch University, 0437 800 935)

Explanation: Removes duplicated responsibilities to conduct phone linkups (also in the
By-Laws).


21. R43    Accountability and Direction

DELETE R43 (b)

M: Nikki Graham (University of Western Australia, 0422 609 849)
S: Keelia Fitzpatrick (University of Western Australia, 0421 576 481)

Explanation: Removes reference to defunct committees.


22. R43    Accountability and Direction

SWAP R43(c) and R43 (d)

M: Emma Kingdon (NUS National Executive, 0416 436 399)
S: Tom Antoniazzi (University of Western Australia, 0431 970 664)

Explanation: Increases the priority of department conferences relative to phone link-
ups.


23. R47    National Departments

REPLACE R47.2 with:

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                    Page 100
“R47.2        The work of each national department is directed by the corresponding
              national network, subject to the policy of NUS, National Conference and
              resolutions of National Executive.”

M: Keelia Fitzpatrick (University of Western Australia, 0421 576 481)
S: Nikki Graham (University of Western Australia, 0422 609 849)

Explanation: This replaces direction for departments from (now) non-existent
committees to the developing networks.


24. R53    Eligibility

INSERT NEW 53.2 and renumber

“53.2 Candidates may nominate for multiple paid national officer positions, but can
      only be declared elected to one at the elections conducted at given National
      Conference. The order of election will be taken as the list in R31.2.”

M: Nikki Graham (University of Western Australia, 0422 609 849)
S: Basha Stasak (Murdoch University, 0437 800 935)

Explanation: This would create an order of election so that a candidate cannot be
elected to two paid office-bearing positions.


25. R81    Rules of NUS

SWAP R81.1 (d) and R81 (e)

M: Emma Kingdon (NUS National Executive, 0416 436 399)
S: Tom Antoniazzi (University of Western Australia, 0431 970 664)

Explanation: Increases the priority of by-laws of State Branches relative to National
Executive standing motions.


26. R86    Interpretation

DELETE R86.4 and REPLACE with:

“R86.4 For the purposes of these regulations, a secret ballot is one where:
   (a) printed ballot papers, specifying the names of all candidates (where applicable),
       are supplied by the Returning Officer to a delegate or a member of conference
       exercising a delegation;
   (b) the ballot papers are completed personally by the member of conference who
       collected the ballot papers in secret, and must not be witnessed by any other
       person;
   (c) the ballot papers are submitted to a sealed box, which can only be emptied by
       the Returning Officer and counted following the close of polls.

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                       Page 101
Voters may not choose to show their ballot to another person before casting it, or allow
another person to fill out and cast their ballot paper on their behalf.”

M: Nikki Graham (University of Western Australia, 0422 609 849)
S: Tom Antoniazzi (University of Western Australia, 0431 970 664)

Explanation: This would make the ballot process of NUS actually secret ballot, rather
than pretend secret ballot.


27. B48    Returning Officer

REPLACE B48 with:

“48.1 The Accreditation Committee shall appoint a Returning Officer for Conference at
least 20 days prior to the commencement of Conference who shall:
      (i) not be an employee, agent or consultant of or to NUS;
      (ii) not be an NUS Office Bearer or an NUS delegate for at least 5 years prior to any
      proposed appointment;
      (iii) have experience relevant to the position;
      (iv) not be the spouse of or a relative of any current office bearer or any candidate
      for any office of NUS.

48.2 The General Secretary shall ensure that suitable applicants are made available for
selection by the Accreditation Committee by inviting the Australian Electoral
Commission and similar agencies to make recommendations as to suitable candidates for
appointment.”

M: Emma Kingdon (NUS National Executive, 0416 436 399)
S: Nikki Graham (University of Western Australia, 0422 609 849)

Explanation: This would ensure that the conference returning officer was truly
independent from the political forces at conference, and has no stake in the outcome.
Under the current rules the reverse is possible.


28. B49    Form of Nominations

INSERT:

“49.4 All candidates must submit a statement of up to 200 words with
      their nomination, to be made available to voters prior-to and during
      polling by the Returning Officer.

49.5   Candidates for a national office bearing position will be given
       the opportunity to address national conference for three minutes
       regarding their nomination on the day prior to polling.”

M: Keelia Fitzpatrick (University of Western Australia, 0421 576 481)
S: Nikki Graham (University of Western Australia, 0422 609 849)



NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 102
Explanation: This would ensure that candidates for national office have an opportunity
to present their credentials, and (conversely) that conference has a statement of intent
that they can be held accountable to.


29. S26    Accountability and Direction

REPLACE S26 with:

“State officers are responsible to, and may be directed by (increasing order of priority):
(a) the State President,
(b) the National President,
(c) the State Executive,
(d) National Executive,
(e) State Conference, and
(f) National Conference.”

M: Basha Stasak (Murdoch University, 0437 800 935)
S: Nikki Graham (University of Western Australia, 0422 609 849)

Explanation: Increases the priority State Conferences and decreases the priority of the
National President.


30. B65    Minutes and Reports

DELETE B65 (a) and REPLACE with

       “(a) the most recently confirmed minutes of the National Executive, and”

M: Nikki Graham (University of Western Australia, 0422 609 849)
S: Tom Antoniazzi (University of Western Australia, 0431 970 664)

Explanation: Replaces a requirement that unconfirmed minutes be circulated right
after National Executive.


31. B66    Travel Expenses

INSERT new B66.3:

66.3   To receive travel reimbursement, the proxy for a State President must be a
       currently enrolled student represented by an affiliated student organisation
       located in the state or territory of that State President.

And RENUMBER accordingly.

M: Keelia Fitzpatrick (University of Western Australia, 0421 576 481)
S: Nikki Graham (University of Western Australia, 0422 609 849)



NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 103
Explanation: Stops a student from, say, Queensland getting the SA State President’s
flight to a meeting in Victoria. Happened in 2006 with the Tasmanian State President.


32. Division 4 – State Committees

DELETE Division 4; B94, B95 and B96 and RENUMBER accordingly

M: Emma Kingdon (NUS National Executive, 0416 436 399)
S: Nikki Graham (University of Western Australia, 0422 609 849)

Explanation: Deletes defunct sections.


33. B98    Filling of Vacancies

REPLACE B98.4 (b) with:

“(b)   ballot papers must be sent to delegates, or their proxy, at the address of their
       member organisation within 72 hours after nominations close, unless
       otherwise agreed between the returning officer and delegate; and”

M: Emma Kingdon (NUS National Executive, 0416 436 399)
S: Nikki Graham (University of Western Australia, 0422 609 849)

Explanation: Deletes defunct sections.


34. B101 Affiliations Committee

INSERT NEW B101 – Affiliations Committee:

“101.1National Executive must elect an Affiliations Committee of 5 members of National
      Executive before 1 February each year.

101.2 The National General Secretary is responsible for convening meetings of the
      Affiliations Committee.

101.3 The Affiliations Committee must consider applications from member organisations
      for reductions in subscription under R6.2 and make recommendations to the
      National Executive.”

M: Emma Kingdon (NUS National Executive, 0416 436 399)
S: Keelia Fitzpatrick (University of Western Australia, 0421 576 481)

Explanation: Enshrines the affiliations committee in the rules of NUS, rather than just
being set up by the Executive every year.


35. R31 National Officers


NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                     Page 104
INSERT R31.1

“(h) National Disabilities Officer”

M: Noah White (University of Sydney, 0438 438 844)
S: Petra McNeilly Rutledge (University of Technology, Sydney, 0416 925 338)

NO EXPLANATION SUBMITTED


36. R31 National Officers

REPLACE R31.1 (g) with:

“(g) National Small and Regional Officer”

M: Noah White (University of Sydney, 0438 438 844)
S: Petra McNeilly Rutledge (University of Technology, Sydney, 0416 925 338)

NO EXPLANATION SUBMITTED


37. R31 National Officers

REPLACE R31.3 (a) with:

“(a) in the case of the National President, National General Secretary, National
Education Officer and National Welfare Officer will be 1 FTE”

M: Petra McNeilly Rutledge (University of Technology, Sydney, 0416 925 338)
S: Noah White (University of Sydney, 0438 438 844)

NO EXPLANATION SUBMITTED


38. R31 National Officers

REPLACE R31.3 (b) with:

“(b) National Education Officer and National Welfare Officer will be 0.75 FTE

and INSERT R31.3 (c) with:

“(c) in the case of other paid officers will be no less than 0.5 FTE”

M: Carla Drakeford (University of Melbourne, 0400 888 723)
S: Jesse Marshall (La Trobe University, 0402 776 427)

NO EXPLANATION SUBMITTED




NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                      Page 105
39. R31    National Officers

REPLACE R31.3 (b) with:

“(b) National Education Officer and National Welfare Officer will be 0.5 FTE

and INSERT R31.3 (c) with:

“(c) in the case of other paid officers will be no less than 0.25 FTE”

M: Carla Drakeford (University of Melbourne, 0400 888 723)
S: Jesse Marshall (La Trobe University, 0402 776 427)

NO EXPLANATION SUBMITTED


40. R31    National Officers

REPLACE R31.3 (b) with:

“(b) National Education Officer, National Welfare Officer, National Women’s Officer,
National Indigenous Officer and National International Student Officer will be 0.5 FTE”

and INSERT R31.3 (c) with:

“(c) in the case of other paid officers will be no less than 0.25 FTE”

M: Carla Drakeford (University of Melbourne, 0400 888 723)
S: Jesse Marshall (La Trobe University, 0402 776 427)

NO EXPLANATION SUBMITTED


41. R6     Subscription

INSERT R6.12:

“If a member organisation requests that their annual subscription fee prescribed in C8.2
be reduced to an amount equal to or greater than the number (or expected number) of
financial members of the member organisation multiplied by $2.50 (indexed annually
according to CPI from 2011), National Executive must allow the member organisation to
pay that amount as its annual subscription fee. National Executive may, by resolution,
determine if a member organisation may pay a lesser amount as its annual subscription
fee. For the purpose of this rule, a financial member is a student represented by a
member organisation who has paid membership fees to that member organisation as of
the first semester census date and a member organisation can expect the same number
of financial members year to year.”

M: Shaun Khoo (University of Melbourne, 0424 327 600)
S: Sam Rankin (University of Melbourne, 0432 625 429)



NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                      Page 106
Explanation: Local student unions are being impacted upon severely by VSU, yet are
invoiced by NUS using an out-dated formula based on the total EFTSL represented by
that student union. The formula prescribed in C8.2 sets an initial invoicing amount of
$5 per EFTSL (indexed annually from 2004). Few, if any, student unions can afford to
pay this much in affiliation fees to NUS and apply annually for fee waivers to National
Executive.

This proposed amendment does not alter the initial formula, but provides guidelines to
local student unions about how much they would be expected to pay. Under this
amendment, a local student union would be invoiced for the usual amount but could
apply for a fee waiver with certainty that it will be granted. This will greatly aid local
student unions in their budgeting processes and organisation of NUS affiliation
payments, with time saved here spent on the business of representing students and
making membership of each student union more attractive.

This amendment recognises that many of the students a local student union represents
do not make the financial contribution of membership fees to that student union. It
allows local student unions to be given an automatic fee waiver where they are only
charged $2.50 per financial member, where this figure is taken as of the first semester
census date or, if this interferes with payment deadlines, based on the number of
members for the previous year. However, if a student union is in a strong financial
position they can still pay more.

Example: A local student union represents a University of 20,000 EFTSL and they expect
their financial membership to be approximately 2,000 as of their first semester census
date. They are aware that this allows them to receive automatic approval of fee
waivers to $4,500 during their budget process. However, the representatives on this
campus are strong supporters of NUS and know that they can afford $10,000 in
affiliation fees. During the year, the local student union applies for automatic approval
of a fee waiver to $10,000 and pays its affiliation fees without difficulty or delay.


42. R7     Cessation

DELETE R7 and REPLACE with:

“A member organisation ceases to be a member organisation if:
(a) the member organisation holds a referendum to consider the question, “Do you agree
that [insert name of member organisation] should remain a member of the National
Union of Students Incorporated?” or equivalent; and
(b) voting in the referendum takes place:
(i) by secret ballot,
(ii) on at least 3 consecutive academic days, and
(iii) for at least 5 hours each day; or
(c) the member organisation holds a General Meeting which accepts a recommendation
from the member organisation’s Committee that its membership of the National Union
of Students Incorporated should cease; and
(d) the member organisation notifies the National General Secretary and the State
President in writing that a majority of the votes cast in the referendum or General
Meeting were for cessation of membership; or
(e) the member organisation is wound up or otherwise dissolved.


NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                        Page 107
M: Shaun Khoo (University of Melbourne, 0424 327 600)
S: Sam Rankin (University of Melbourne, 0432 625 429)

Explanation: At present, the regulations governing cessation of membership appear to
be designed to make cessation as difficult as possible. Cessation of membership only
occurs if a referendum is held, which is not concurrent with any other election or
referendum and NUS requires 3 months notice.

This is both undemocratic and impractical and gives the impression that NUS
membership is a trap, rather than a benefit.

For membership of other associations or unions, a resignation is sufficient for cessation
or membership. However, since the members of NUS are associations themselves, it
seems appropriate that they should use mechanisms of cessation that demonstrate
wider support within the relevant association for cessation of NUS membership.

The proposed amendment removes the requirement for a referendum to be held
independently of other elections or referendums and for the local student union to give
notice to NUS. A referendum can be expensive and requiring local student unions to
hold one independently appears designed to ensure that the costs of hiring an election
company to conduct it stop local student unions from doing so.

This proposal also provides an alternative mechanism, where the Committee of the
member organisation makes a recommendation to a General Meeting, which must be
accepted. A General Meeting provides the evidence that the cessation has wider
support, but does not have the same overheads as a referendum.


43. R31    National Officers

DELETE R31.3 and REPLACE with:

“"Paid national officers will be remunerated at an hourly rate set by National Executive
and no greater than the highest paid officer of any member organisation or the
Australian Federal minimum wage (whichever is the lesser). The hours per week
required of each officer will be set by the National Executive before 31st January of
each year (having regard to the financial position of the union) and must be no less than
0.4 FTE for any paid officer."

M: Shaun Khoo (University of Melbourne, 0424 327 600)
S: Sam Rankin (University of Melbourne, 0432 625 429)

Explanation: The present R31.3 provides for National Officers being remunerated at an
hourly rate equal to the Australian Federal minimum wage and for hours to be set by
National Executive. However, the President and Secretary must be at 1 FTE and other
paid Officers must be at least 0.5 FTE.

This proposed amendment sets a cap of National Officer remuneration such that it can
be no higher than the highest paid officer of any member organisation or the Australian
Federal minimum wage. It also eliminates the requirement that the President and
Secretary be paid at 1 FTE and reduces the requirement for all other Officers to 0.4
FTE.

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                       Page 108
For example, if the highest paid Office-Bearer of any member organisation is paid
$25,000 p.a., National Executive must set National Office-Bearer pay to an amount no
greater than $25,000 p.a. However, if the highest paid Office-Bearer of any member
organisation is paid $35,000 p.a. and the Australian Federal minimum wage is $29,000
p.a., National Executive must set National Office-Bearer pay to an amount no greater
than $29,000 p.a.

This amendment is proposed because the majority of Officers of local student unions
are not paid nearly as well as NUS National Officers. At the University of Melbourne
Student Union in 2009, a full-time officer (one holding any office individually), was
paid at $16,000 p.a., well short of the $28,000 p.a. paid to NUS National Officers. UMSU
Officers were also well paid relative to the officers of other local student unions even
though this amount has not been indexed for years.

National Officers also have access to funds for their mobile phones and travel. These
kinds of privileges can produce resentment among Officers of local student unions. It is
proposed that NUS Officer pay be brought in line with that of local student unions to
end the resentment that this creates.


44. R20    Votes

INSERT as R20.2 and renumber accordingly with:

“For such time as regional loading is included in Commonwealth funding to public
universities, the total number of votes to be exercised by the delegates of member
organisations of small and regional universities identified for regional loading under the
Higher Education Support Act 2003 (or replacement thereof) shall be increased by the
same factor as in the Act and rounded up to the next whole number."

M: Jonathon Childs (Charles Sturt University, Bathurst, 0450 317 434)
S: Rob Meredith (University of Tasmania, 0439 069 921)

NO EXPLANATION SUBMITTED


45. R29    Meetings

INSERT as R29.1 and R29.2 and renumber accordingly with:

“29.1 At the first meeting of National Executive each year, the Executive will elect one
of the General Members as the Chair of National Executive

29.2 The chair may exercise their vote and retains a casting vote when required.”

M: Jonathon Childs (Charles Sturt University, Bathurst, 0450 317 434)
S: Rob Meredith (University of Tasmania, 0439 069 921)

NO EXPLANATION SUBMITTED



NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                        Page 109
46. R31    National Officers

DELETE R31.2 and REPLACE with:

“The paid officers of NUS are
a) The National President
b) The National General Secretary
c) The National Education Officer
d) The National Welfare Officer
e) The National Women’s Officer
f) The National Queer Officers
g) The National Indigenous Officer
h) The National Ethno-Cultural Officer”

M: Kate Schouten (University of Wollongong, 0450 317 434)
S: Paul Soryal (University of Technology, Sydney, 0402 187 656)

NO EXPLANATION SUBMITTED


47. C 17 Regulations

ADD C17.3:

“National Executive may by resolution passed by an absolute majority make regulations
that give effect to this constitution.”

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare Officer, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This would provide National Executive, the body charged with governing
NUS between National Conferences, the capacity to make regulations, which give effect
to this Constitution. This would greatly increase the ability for NUS to update its
Constitution when required as opposed to waiting until National Conference.


48. C 17 Regulations

ADD C17.3:

“National Executive may by resolution passed by no less than 14 votes make regulations
that give effect to this constitution.”

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare Officer, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This would provide National Executive, the body charged with governing
NUS between National Conferences, the capacity to make regulations, which give effect
to this Constitution. This would greatly increase the ability for NUS to update its
Constitution when required as opposed to waiting until National Conference.

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                    Page 110
49. C 17 Regulations

ADD C17.3:

“National Executive may by resolution passed by no less than 15 votes make regulations
that give effect to this constitution.”

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare Officer, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This would provide National Executive, the body charged with governing
NUS between National Conferences, the capacity to make regulations, which give effect
to this Constitution. This would greatly increase the ability for NUS to update its
Constitution when required as opposed to waiting until National Conference.


50. C 17 Regulations

ADD C17.3:

“National Executive may by resolution passed by no less than 16 votes make regulations
that give effect to this constitution.”

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare Officer, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This would provide National Executive, the body charged with governing
NUS between National Conferences, the capacity to make regulations, which give effect
to this Constitution. This would greatly increase the ability for NUS to update its
Constitution when required as opposed to waiting until National Conference.


51. C 17 By-Laws

ADD C18.3:

“National Executive may by resolution passed by an absolute majority make by-laws that
give effect to this constitution.”

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare Officer, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This would provide National Executive, the body charged with governing
NUS between National Conferences, the capacity to make by-laws, which give effect to
this Constitution. This would greatly increase the ability for NUS to update its
Constitution when required as opposed to waiting until National Conference.


52. C 17 By-Laws


NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                    Page 111
ADD C18.3

National Executive may by resolution passed by no less than 14 votes make by-laws that
give effect to this constitution.

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare Officer, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This would provide National Executive, the body charged with governing
NUS between National Conferences, the capacity to make by-laws, which give effect to
this Constitution. This would greatly increase the ability for NUS to update its
Constitution when required as opposed to waiting until National Conference.


53. C 17 By-Laws

ADD C18.3

National Executive may by resolution passed by no less than 15 votes make by-laws that
give effect to this constitution.

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare Officer, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This would provide National Executive, the body charged with governing
NUS between National Conferences, the capacity to make by-laws, which give effect to
this Constitution. This would greatly increase the ability for NUS to update its
Constitution when required as opposed to waiting until National Conference.


54. C 17 By-Laws

ADD C18.3

National Executive may by resolution passed by no less than 16 votes make by-laws that
give effect to this constitution.

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare Officer, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This would provide National Executive, the body charged with governing
NUS between National Conferences, the capacity to make by-laws, which give effect to
this Constitution. This would greatly increase the ability for NUS to update its
Constitution when required as opposed to waiting until National Conference.


55. R 5 Admission after Reconstitution

INSERT R5.3 with:



NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                    Page 112
“A member organisation admitted under R5.1 after 30 September is not entitled to vote
until after the next annual meeting of National Conference”

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This enables consistency between the various ways of admittance and
provides certainty regarding the voting rights of member organisations admitted as
members after reconstitution.


56. R 7    Cessation

INSERT R7(d) and renumber accordingly with:

“ (d) the member organisation allows representatives of NUS to be present at any and all
campuses in which voting is taking place in the referendum”

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: David Barrow (NUS National President, 0411 606 808)

Explanation: This is to ensure that members seeking to disaffiliate from NUS must
ensure that representatives of NUS are allowed to be present on campus during the
referendum campaign. This is to enable NUS to present the alternative case to students
during the referendum campaign.


57. R 31 National Officers

INSERT R31.1 (k) with:

“(k) National International Student Officer, who must be a student currently enrolled as
an international student”

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: David Barrow (NUS National President, 0411 606 808)

Explanation: This is to enable NUS to elect a National International Student Officer, to
represent the interests of undergraduate international students in Australia.


58. R 31 National Officers

DELETE R31.1 (h)

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare Officer, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This removes the National Environment Officer as a National Officer of
NUS.


NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                      Page 113
59. R 31 National Officers

DELETE R31.2 and REPLACE with:

The paid officers of NUS are
a) The National President
b) The National General Secretary
c) The National Education Officer
d) The National Welfare Officer
e) The National Women’s Officer
f) The National Queer Officers
g) The National Indigenous Students Officer
h) The National International Student Officer

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: David Barrow (NUS National President, 0411 606 808)

Explanation: This includes the National International Student Officer as a paid National
Officer of NUS


60. R 31 National Officers

DELETE R31.2 and REPLACE with:

The paid officers of NUS are
a) The National President
b) The National General Secretary
c) The National Education Officer
d) The National Welfare Officer
e) The National Women’s Officer

M: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare Officer, 0413 700 668)
S: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)

Explanation: This removes the National Queer Officers and National Indigenous Students
Officer as paid national officers of NUS


61. R 31 National Officers

DELETE R31.2 and REPLACE with:

The paid officers of NUS are
a) The National President
b) The National General Secretary
c) The National Education Officer
d) The National Welfare Officer
e) The National Women’s Officer
f) The National Indigenous Students Officer

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                      Page 114
M: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare Officer, 0413 700 668)
S: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)

Explanation: This removes the National Queer Officers as paid national officers of NUS


62. R 31 National Officers

DELETE 31.3 and REPLACE with:

“Paid National Officers will be remunerated at an hourly rate in reference to the
Australia Federal minimum wage. The hours per week required of officers will be set by
National Executive by 31st of January each year (having regard to the financial position
of the union) and:
       a) in the case of the National President and National General Secretary the
       remuneration will be 1.5 FTE.
       b) in the case of other paid office bearers, will be no less than 0.5 FTE”

M: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare Officer, 0413 700 668)
S: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)

Explanation: This increases the pay of the National President and National General
Secretary to 1.5 FTE


63. R 31 National Officers

DELETE 31.3 and REPLACE with:

“Paid National Officers will be remunerated at an hourly rate in reference to the
Australia Federal minimum wage. The hours per week required of officers will be set by
National Executive by 31st of January each year (having regard to the financial position
of the union) and:
       a) in the case of the National President and National General Secretary the
       remuneration will be 1.5 FTE.
       b) in the case of other paid office bearers, will be no less than 0.25 FTE”

M: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare Officer, 0413 700 668)
S: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)

Explanation: This increases the pay of the National President and National General
Secretary to 1.5 FTE and decreases the pay of all other paid office bearers to 0.25 FTE


64. R 31 National Officers

DELETE 31.3 and REPLACE with:

“Paid National Officers will be remunerated at an hourly rate in reference to the
Australia Federal minimum wage. The hours per week required of officers will be set by

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                      Page 115
National Executive by 31st of January each year (having regard to the financial position
of the union) and:
       a) in the case of the National President and National General Secretary the
       remuneration will be 1.0 FTE.
       b) in the case of other paid office bearers except the National Queer Officers, will
       be no less than 0.5 FTE
       c) in the case of the National Queer Officers, will be no less than 0.25 FTE”

M: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare Officer, 0413 700 668)
S: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)

Explanation: This decreases the pay of the National Queer Officers to 0.25 FTE to
reflect they are two Office Bearers representing the same portfolio


65. R 31 National Officers

DELETE 31.3 and REPLACE with:

“Paid National Officers will be remunerated at an hourly rate in reference to the
Australia Federal minimum wage. The hours per week required of officers will be set by
National Executive by 31st of January each year (having regard to the financial position
of the union) and:
       a) in the case of the National President and National General Secretary the
       remuneration will be 1.0 FTE.
       b) in the case of other paid office it will be determined by National Executive by
       January 31st of each year.

M: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare Officer, 0413 700 668)
S: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)

Explanation: This enables the National Executive to determine the pay rates of all
other paid office bearers having regard to the financial position of NUS


66. R 31 National Officers

DELETE 31.3 and REPLACE with:

“Paid National Officers will be remunerated at an hourly rate in reference to the
Australia Federal minimum wage. The hours per week required of officers will be set by
National Executive by 31st of January each year (having regard to the financial position
of the union) and:
       a) in the case of the National President and National General Secretary the
       remuneration will be 1.0 FTE.
       b) in the case of other paid office it will be determined by National Executive by
       January 31st of each year.
       c) National Executive may by absolute majority alter the hours per week required
       of officers

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: Xavier Williams (La Trobe University,
NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 116
Explanation: This enables the National Executive to determine the pay rates of all
other paid office bearers having regard to the financial position of NUS. In addition it
provides NUS with the capacity to alter these work hours after they are set having
regard to the financial position of NUS.


67. R 40 National Environment Officer

DELETE R40

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This removes the National Environment Officer


68. R 43 National International Student Officer

INSERT R 43 and RENUMBER accordingly with:

“(a) The National International Student Officer is responsible for the supervision of
NUS’s activities in the area of international students.
(b) The National International Student Officer is the official spokesperson of NUS in the
area of international students (subject to the National President)”

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)_
S: David Barrow (NUS National President, 0411 606 808)

Explanation: This creates the role of National International Student Officer


69. R 43 Accountability and Direction

DELETE and REPLACE with:

“National Officers are responsible to, and may be directed by (in increasing order of
priority):

   (a) the National General Secretary
   (b) the National President
   (c) National Executive, and
   (d) National Confernece

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This removes redundant authorities and includes the National General
Sectary



NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                       Page 117
70. R 43 Accountability and Direction

DELETE and REPLACE with:

“National Officers are responsible to, and may be directed by (in increasing order of
priority):

   (a) the National President
   (b) National Executive, and
   (c) National Confernece

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This removes redundant authorities


71. R 45 National Committees

DELETE and REPLACE with:

The national committees of NUS are:

   (a) National   Education Committee
   (b) National   Welfare Committee
   (c) National   Women’s Committee
   (d) National   Queer Committee
   (e) National   Indigenous Committee
   (f) National   International Students Committee
   (g) National   Environment Committee
   (h) National   Small and Regional Committee
   (i) National   Ethno-Cultural Committee

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This creates National Committees for each activist department of NUS


72. R 46 National International Student Committee

DELETE and REPLACE with:

“R 46. Membership of National Committees

The members of each of the National Committees in R. 45 are:

   (a) the National Office Bearer for that area (chair, casting vote only) and
   (b) the State Office Bearers for that area (voting)”

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                       Page 118
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This outlines the membership of the National Committees, ensuring
greater collaboration between National Office and State Branches


73. R 48 Constitution

DELETE R.48.7 and REPLACE with:

“The State Branches are otherwise governed by the NUS Constitution, Regulations and
By-Laws”

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This supersedes all State Branch Constitutions currently in existence and
confirms that State Branches are to be governed by the NUS Constitution, Regulations
and By-Laws


74. R 48 Constitution

DELETE R.82 (g) and (i) and RENUMBER accordingly

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This removes reference to the National Liaison Committee for
International Students


75. Division 1 – Name, Objects, Membership

INSERT S4 Constitution

“The State Branches are otherwise governed by the NUS Constitution, Regulations and
By-Laws”

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This supersedes all State Branch Constitutions currently in existence and
confirms that State Branches are to be governed by the NUS Constitution, Regulations
and By-Laws


76. S19    State Officers

DELETE and REPLACE with:


NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                    Page 119
“The officers of the state branch are:
   (a) the State President
   (b) the State General Secretary
   (c) the State Education Officer
   (d) the State Welfare Officer
   (e) the State Women’s Officer
   (f) the State Queer Officers (two, one of which must be a women)
   (g) the State Indigenous Officer
   (h) the State International Student Officer
   (i) the State Ethno-Cultural Officer
   (j) the State Small and Regional Officer
   (k) the State Environment Officer
   (l) any other state officer created by resolution of State Conference

(in these regulations, “state officers”)”

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This confirms the officers of the State Branch in the NUS Constitution and
standardises State Branches to reflect National Office


77. S19    State Officers

DELETE and REPLACE with:

“The officers of the state branch are:
   (a) the State President
   (b) the State General Secretary
   (c) the State Education Officer
   (d) the State Welfare Officer
   (e) the State Women’s Officer
   (f) the State Queer Officers (two, one of which must be a women)
   (g) the State Indigenous Officer
   (h) the State International Student Officer
   (i) the State Ethno-Cultural Officer
   (j) the State Small and Regional Officer
   (k) any other state officer created by resolution of State Conference

(in these regulations, “state officers”)”

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This confirms the officers of the State Branch in the NUS Constitution and
standardises State Branches to reflect National Office, however anticipates the deletion
of the National Environment Officer


78. S19    State Officers

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                      Page 120
DELETE S20 and REPLACE with:

“20.1 A person who has held a state office position for 2 years in total is not eligible to
nominate again for that position

20.2 A person who has been a state officer for 3 years in total is not eligible to nominate
again as a state officer”

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This reflects the reality that state officers are no longer paid


79. S21    State President

DELETE S21.1 (c)

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This reflects the understanding that a State General Secretary will be
elected in all state branches


80. S21    State President

DELETE S21.2 (a) and (b) and REPLACE with:

(a) the State General Secretary must act as the State President

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This reflects the current arrangement in National Office


81.        State Officers

DELETE S22, S23, S24 and S25 and REPLACE with:

“S 22. State General Secretary

The State General Secretary is responsible for the supervision of the activities of the
state branch in the areas of administration, finances and services, in consultation with
the other state officers

S 23. State Education Officer



NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                         Page 121
The State Education Officer is responsible for the supervision of the activities of the
state branch in the area of education”

S 24. State Welfare Officer

The State Welfare Officer is responsible for the supervision of the activities of the state
branch in the areas of welfare of students

S 25. State Women’s Officer

The State Women’s Officer is responsible for the supervision of the activities of the
state branch in the areas of women and equal opportunity

S 26. State Queer Officers

The State Queer Officers are responsible for the supervision of the activities of the state
branch in the areas of gender and sexuality

S 27. State Indigenous Students Officer

The State Indigenous Students Officer is responsible for the supervision of the activities
of the state branch in the areas of Indigenous students

S 28. State International Student Officer

The State International Student Officer is responsible for the supervision of the state
branch in the area of international students

S 29. State Ethno-Cultural Officer

The State Ethno-Cultural Officer is responsible for the supervision of the activities of the
state branch in the areas of ethnically and culturally diverse students

S 30. State Small and Regional Campuses Officer

The State Small and Regional Campuses Officer is responsible for the supervision of the
activities of the state branch in the areas of small and regional campuses

S 31. State Environment Officer

The State Environment Officer is responsible for the supervision of the activities of the
state branch in the areas of the environment

And RENUMBER accordingly

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This outlines the roles of the State Officers




NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                          Page 122
82.        State Officers

DELETE S22, S23, S24 and S25 and REPLACE with:

“S 22. State General Secretary

The State General Secretary is responsible for the supervision of the activities of the
state branch in the areas of administration, finances and services, in consultation with
the other state officers

S 23. State Education Officer

The State Education Officer is responsible for the supervision of the activities of the
state branch in the area of education”

S 24. State Welfare Officer

The State Welfare Officer is responsible for the supervision of the activities of the state
branch in the areas of welfare of students

S 25. State Women’s Officer

The State Women’s Officer is responsible for the supervision of the activities of the
state branch in the areas of women and equal opportunity

S 26. State Queer Officers

The State Queer Officers are responsible for the supervision of the activities of the state
branch in the areas of gender and sexuality

S 27. State Indigenous Students Officer

The State Indigenous Students Officer is responsible for the supervision of the activities
of the state branch in the areas of Indigenous students

S 28. State International Student Officer

The State International Student Officer is responsible for the supervision of the state
branch in the area of international students

S 29. State Ethno-Cultural Officer

The State Ethno-Cultural Officer is responsible for the supervision of the activities of the
state branch in the areas of ethnically and culturally diverse students

S 30. State Small and Regional Campuses Officer

The State Small and Regional Campuses Officer is responsible for the supervision of the
activities of the state branch in the areas of small and regional campuses

And RENUMBER accordingly


NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                          Page 123
M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This outlines the roles of the State Officers but anticipates the removal of
the State Environment Officer


83. DIVISION 5 – State Committees

DELETE Division 5 and RENUMBER accordingly

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This removes State Committees


84. B10    Motions

DELETE B10.1 and REPLACE with:

“The closing date for the receipt of motions relating to the policy of NUS for
consideration by the annual meeting of National Conference is to be set by the National
General Secretary and must be distributed to all delegates 1 month before the closing
date”

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This enables the National General Secretary to set the closing date for
policy motions taking into account the dates of National Conference and the election of
delegates to NUS by member organisations


85. B13    Reports to National Conference

DELETE B13 and REPLACE with:

“13.1 National officers and State Presidents must give to the National General Secretary
a written report on their activities for consideration by annual meeting of National
Conference.

13. 2 The National General Secretary is to set the date on which reports are to be
submitted and must provide to all National officers and State Presidents 1 month before
the closing date”

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This enables the National General Secretary to set the closing date for
reports to be received

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                       Page 124
86. B47    Applicability

DELETE B47 (c) and REPLACE with:

“(c) State Officers

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This provides consistency regarding the election of State Officers


87. B79    National Environment Officer

DELETE B79 and RENUMBER accordingly

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This removes the National Environment Officer specific responsibilities


88.        National International Student Officer

INSERT B82 and RENUMBER accordingly with:

The National International Students Committee has the following specific
responsibilities:
   (a) representing and furthering the interests of international students in Australia on
       matters of concern to them, and acting as the means for the expression of
       international student concerns;
   (b) co-ordinating and assisting the activities of member organisations and state
       branches, and co-ordinating national campaigns on international student issues;
   (c) maintaining and improving the quality of access to education in Australia for
       international students;
   (d) establishing and maintaining a national resource base;
   (e) promoting international understanding and the principle of multiculturalism;
   (f) opposing the existence, creation or perpetuation of any disadvantage,
       discrimination, inequality or injustice that obstructs the achievement of any of
       these responsibilities; and
   (g) representing international students on government panels and committees with
       the sole purpose of enhancing the status of international students in Australia

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: David Barrow (NUS National President, 0411 606 808)

Explanation: This outlines the specific responsibilities of the National International
Student Officer


89. DIVISION 3 – International Students

NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                                        Page 125
DELETE DIVISION 3 – International Students and RENUMBER accordingly

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: David Barrow (NUS National President, 0411 606 808)

Explanation: This removes all reference to the National Liaison Committee for
International Students
 

90. DIVISION 4 – State Committees

DELETE DIVISION 4 – State Committees

M: David Wilkins (NUS National General Secretary, 0413 700 667)
S: James Mentor (NUS National Welfare, 0413 700 668)

Explanation: This removes State Committees
 




NUS National Conference 2009 – POLICY BOOK                            Page 126

				
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