“Chink in the Armor” case Over- Sensationalized? by jennifermordith

VIEWS: 33 PAGES: 2

More Info
									“Chink in the Armor” case Over‐ Sensationalized? 

          March 5, 2012 ‐ Jeremy Lin indeed had come a long way already. In fact, Huffington Post 
reported that Jeremy Lin applies for trademark on “Linsanity”. The winning streak of New York Knicks 
with efforts of Lin had captured the heart of basketball enthusiasts making him one of the attention‐
grabbing players in NBA. And as much as asr hip recall and Zimmer hip recall and so with the DePuy hip
recall class action and Zimmer hip class action respectively had stirred news, any comment intended 
for Lin, is subject to tumultuous reactions for fans and non‐fans alike. Just like what happened to the 
recent “chink in the armor” comment an ESPN commentator had made on‐air.  




                                                                             

         After Lin’s first loss the ESPN analysts commented on‐ air if Lin had any weakness. Maybe the 
sports analyst just made a poor choice of word “a chink in the armor” phrase he enthused. We all know 
that ‘chink’ means right? This very word had triggered the sports network to dismiss the sports analyst 
while the news anchor was suspended for 30 days.  

        While Lin fans might praise ESPN’s decision, while other people, views the network’s move as 
the opposite. Interpretation of a certain phrase differs from one person to another; that is a plausible 
fact. One’s interpretation is directly related to one’s cultural bearing, the environment where one grows 
up and of course his education.  

        The question that now stands out is that is ESPN’s decision too harsh? Is the media nowadays 
had a very high standard when it comes to demeanor and etiquette? Or is Lin’s case just a result of a 
hyper‐sensitive political correctness? 

       For the record the “clink of the armor” headline had been just visible for 30 minutes and those 
phrase was uttered aloud twice: TV and in ESPN radio who was by the way broadcasted by a non‐ESPN 
employee.  

         Honestly, in my own opinion, the “clink in the armor” comment does not connote any negative 
impact on me, because I perceived it as a no‐pun intended comment or maybe the fact that I don’t what 
a “clink” means helps a lot. Is it just that the moment that ESPN issued this statement, “we are aware of 
three offensive and inappropriate comments made" made me realize that there must be something on 
that idiom. Which I did, and there I found out what “chink” really means.  
         In a certain context, the word “chink” can be offensive, but the rest of the idiom such as the 
word “armor” is often used in sports journalism, and that is should ESPN should focus more on. The 
sport’s network released statement and the recent firing of its employees just worsen the racist issue. 
Or should I say just fueled the perceived racist comment.  

         

         

         

 

 

 

								
To top