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Coping With Stress

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					                               High School

                      Unit: Coping with Stress

Multidimensional Unit

Author:        Dorinda White

Subject:       Language Arts

Theme(s):      Health & Well Being

Experiential
Goal:        At the end of this unit students will be able to create a
rotary containing learning centres for students who are in, or will be
entering grade 11 or 12, informing them of the types of stress they can
expect to encounter this year and some effective ways of dealing with
them. The rotary will become an open house where students will invite
other schools and classes to visit.
Rationale: Stress is a very real feeling among all people especially
youth at this age who are entering a period in their lives filled with
change, decisions and growth. Stress can be a source of motivation or
an instrument of suffering depending on how it is dealt with. This unit
seeks to allow second language learners to identify, share and discuss
their stressors with those who are most likely experiencing the same
kinds of things. This unit will introduce some short-term and long-term
strategies to help cope with stress.

Language
Level:         Benchmark 6 (Stage II)

Grade/Age
Level:         Grade 11 or 12 English Immersion Class

Lessons:

If a full lesson plan is available, clicking on the lesson number will
get you to it.

Lesson    1:   Introduction: What makes you stressed?
Students brainstorm about what they are stressed about now and in their
experience, what happens to a person when they become stressed? Write a
poem about stress and get into partners to present.

Short-term stress management strategies:

Lesson 2: Prioritizing, Organizational Skills, and Agenda Use- They
work!
Have the mayor, a university student, or some other person that the
particular class would look up to, come in to talk about how they use
these techniques to cope with stress.

Lesson 3: Assertiveness Training: How can I say no?
Using the "Corners" activity explore different approaches to saying no
and then put them into practice using skit in a bag role playing.

Lesson 4: Journal Writing/Speaking: Get it all out!
Students read sample journal entries from Anne Frank: The Diary of a
Girl and analyse them for feelings, usefulness, and vocabulary.
Students then create a journal of their own either by writing, making a
cassette recording, drawing, or creating a choreographed dance.

Lesson 5: Take time for yourself: What do you like to do?
Students do an in class survey of strategies people use to cope with
stress. Then they experience some stress management techniques by
making stress balls while listening to a compact disk of nature's
peaceful music.

Long-term stress management strategies:

Lesson 6: Resume Writing: Let's get started
By interviewing at least 2 local employers or by researching library or
Internet sources students will work in groups to explore the latest
trends in resume writing. They will then develop their own resume by
incorporating these latest trends.

Lesson 7: Interview/Presentation Skills: Don't stress about it!
Students will play the game of who wants to be a good presenter. This
game will be prepared by the teacher and will highlight different do's
and don't's of interviewing and presenting.

Lesson 8: Budgeting: How to make money last
In cooperative groups, students will create a budget scenario that will
be used by the public to understand how a budget planning works and why
it is an important long-term strategy in coping with stress. Students
will also create their own budget planning sheet.

Lesson 9: Open House Rotary: Lets share what we have learned!
Using the materials that they have prepared and the ideas presented in
class, students will create various learning centres for other grade 11
or 12 classes in the school and community, informing them of the types
of stressors they can expect to encounter and some effective ways of
dealing with them. An open house (class) will take place at a later
date.

Lesson 10: Evaluation and reflection-Celebrating stress.
In a circle students will individually describe their favourite and
least favourite way of coping with stress. They will then write down
all of their stressors, put them in a bottle, and have a stress funeral
outside where all the stressors will be buried.

Multidimensional Unit Goals
Communicative/
Experiential:

Students will be able to:
    • create a poem.
    • role play different ways of saying no.
    • use dance, writing, speaking, or drawing to express their
       feelings.
    • design their own resume.
    • present stress management techniques to other students.

Language:

Students will be able to:
  • demonstrate their understanding of appropriate ways of saying no.
  • identify and explain vocabulary associated with stress such as
     panic, coping, and relaxation.
  • summarize some stress management techniques.
  • ask questions about stress.
  • read a text to explore journal writing.
  • demonstrate spontaneity in the language.

Culture/Content:

Students will be expected to:
  • speak and listen to explore, extend, clarify, and reflect on their
     thoughts, ideas, feelings, and experiences related to their
     organizational skills.
  • communicate information and ideas effectively and clearly, and to
     respond personally and critically to organizational strategies
     that are presented to them.
  • interact with their classmates using sensitivity and respect,
     using negotiation and cooperation.
  • select, read, and view with understanding a range of literature
     for independent reading.
  • interpret, select, and combine information in order to get a sense
     of how Anne Frank used her journal as a way of coping with stress.
  • respond personally to a sample budget by discussing how they think
     they are useful.
  • use a range of strategies to develop effective writing and other
     ways of representing, and to enhance clarity, precision, and
     effectiveness such as revising, editing, reading aloud, etc. .
  • use writing and other ways of representation to explore, clarify,
     and reflect on their thoughts, feelings, experiences, and
     learnings concerning coping with stress, and to use their
     imaginations to create learning centres for the public.
  • individually create easy- to- follow, grammatically correct texts
     for their learning centres while paying attention to the audience
     that will be coming to visit their centres

General
Language
Education:
Students will be able to:
  • use models to create their own journals.
  • use visual and auditory aids to help others learn.
  • find current resume trends by using interviews or the Internet.
  • work in groups to carry out a task.
  • develop organizational skills by listening to a guest speaker.
  • differentiate between appropriate and inappropriate interview and
     presentation skills.


             Lesson 1: What makes you stressed?

Outcomes:

Communicative/
Experiential:

  •   Students will be able to write a poem about stress.

Language:

  •  Speaking:
          o Students will be able to participate in small group
discussion on non-personal familiar topics and issues: express
opinions, feelings, obligation, ability, certainty.(Canadian Language
Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 63).
                + I think people become less fun to be around when they
are stressed.
                + When I'm stressed I eat, do you?
                + I'm not sure I understand what you are saying. Can
you repeat it again?


  •  Listening:
           o Students will be able to demonstrate comprehension of
details and speaker's purpose in suggestions, advice, encouragements
and requests. (Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p.
79).
                 + My favourite part of your poem is the last line
because...
                 + I liked the way your poem rhymed
                 + What did the first line mean?
           o Students will be able to understand a set of instructions
when not presented completely in point form: sequence/order must be
inferred in the text.(Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark #
6, p. 79).
                 + After you have all visited each question, we will
discuss the responses.


  •  Reading:
          o Students will be able to identify factual details and some
inferred meanings in moderately complex formatted texts containing
advice, requests, specifications.(Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000,
Benchmark # 6, p. 91).
                + able to understand the explanations of how to write
the different poems.


  •  Writing:
          o Students will be able to write one or two paragraphs in the
form of a poem to provide a detailed description of stress.(Canadian
Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 103).

Culture/Content:

Students will be expected to:
  • speak and listen to explore, extend, clarify, and reflect on their
     thoughts, ideas, feelings, and experiences related to stress.
  • communicate information and ideas effectively and clearly, and to
     respond personally and critically to their feelings on stress.
  • interact with their classmates using sensitivity and respect,
     considering the purpose of the unit is to cope with stress.
  • poetry writing to explore, clarify, and reflect on their thoughts,
     feelings, experiences, and learnings concerning stress.
  • create texts collaboratively using Carousal Brainstorming

General
Language
Education:

Students will be able to:
  • share prior knowledge to generate ideas about stress.
  • use models to create their own poems.
  • reflect upon one line from their partner's poem.

Activity:
Pre-Activity:     (35 minutes)
Using Carousal Brainstorming, students will answer these questions:

  •   What does the word "Stress" mean?
  •   What are you stressed about right now?
  •   What gets you stressed?
  •   In your experience, what happens to a person when they become
      stressed?
  •   What stressors do you experience in Canada that you would not
      experience in your country?

Carousel Brainstorming: Put each question on a big piece of chart
paper. Place each question in a different place within the classroom
and divide the students into groups. Send each group to a chart and get
each group to choose a recorder. Give a different colour marker to each
group. Tell the students they will have four minutes at each question
station and they are to write down as many points as they can. You will
give the signal to stop and rotate. Continue until each group has
visited each station. Keep the results up around the room so everyone
gets to see the final products.

Activity:   (35 minutes)
Students will individually write a poem about stress. They have the
option of what kind of poem they would like to create. Examples and
explanations of the types of poems will be visible to the students. Ex:
Acrostic, Haiku, Free verse, Limerick, etc. (See Resources for examples
of the different types of poems).

Post-Activity:    (20 minutes)
Students will get into partners and students will read their poem aloud
to their partner. Students will then choose their favourite line from
their partner's poem and share it with the class.

Homework: Students will read their poem aloud to someone                  outside the
class and they will decorate their poem with art work to                  make it more
attractive to the reader. Students will pass their poems                  into the
teacher next class so they can be used in the open house                  rotary at the
end of the unit.

Evaluation:       Students will put their poems in their portfolios but
not until after the rotary is finished at the end of the unit.
Portfolios will serve as a method of evaluation throughout the unit and
the year because it will give the teachers, the students, and the
parents a sense of how the student is improving. Also regular teacher-
student conferencing will take place to see where the student is
struggling and where he or she is experiencing success. The teacher
will combine this information with informal observations of each
student done in the form of a performance checklist. I will be using a
performance checklist which will be based on my informal observations
of the students throughout the unit. This will be a form of formative
evaluation because it will give me a chance to see if the student is
experiencing success, needing extra help, feeling unengaged, etc. (See
Appendix A for checklist.). I will use this to modify and improve my
next lessons.

Materials:
  •   Big sheets of chart paper
  •   5 different colour markers
  •   Tape to put charts on the wall

Resources:
  •   Activators Handout [ED 3561, 2002]
  •   Richard Amato, Patricia. Making it Happen. New York: Longman,1996.
      (Ch.6)
  •   Fern's Poetry Club (2001) PBS Kids [Online]. http://pbskids.org/
      arthur/games/poetry/what.html
  •   Lansky, B. (2002) Giggle Poetry. [Online]. http://
      gigglepoetry.com/poetryclass/acrostic.html


Appendix:
                             Appendix A
                    Performance Checklist
                             LESSON LESSON LESSON LESSON LESSON LESSON LESSON LESSON LESSON LESSON
THE STUDENT...               1      2      3      4      5      6      7      8      9      10
gave at least two comments in
group discussion
was engaged in the activities
asked a question
understood the concept of the
lesson
helped and supported others
when possible
seemed to be having trouble
contributed to group activities
was able to articulate his or her
ideas
reflected on what was learned
took a risk
used some new vocabulary
auto-corrected or corrected
someone else
gave a revision or editing
suggestion



 Lesson 2: Prioritizing, Organizational Skills, and
               Agenda Use - They Work!

Outcomes:
Communicative/
Experiential:

  •   Students will be able to listen to a guest speaker who is
      knowledgeable about organizational strategies.
  •   Students will be able to make a to-do list

Language:

  •  Speaking:
          o Students will be able to ask for and provide information in
an interview related to daily activities. (Canadian Language
Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 63).
                + What do you find the most stressful in your job and
how do you deal with it?
                + Have you always used an agenda or did you start when
you became mayor?
                + Do you always get everything done on time? If no, how
do you deal with this.
           o Students will be able to indicate partial comprehension.
(Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 62).
                 + I'm sorry I don't understand, can you repeat what you
just said?
                 + Could you be more specific, or give me an example of
what you mean?
                 + I'm not sure I understood you correctly, are you
saying...


  •  Listening:
          o Students will be able to demonstrate comprehension of
details and speaker's purpose in suggestions, advice, encouragements
and requests.(Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p.
79).
                + able to understand the main points of the guest
speaker


  •  Reading:
          o Students will be able to identify factual details and some
inferred meanings in moderately complex formatted texts containing
advice, requests, specifications.(Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000,
Benchmark # 6, p .91).
                + Able to understand directions and details contained
within the pre-activity sheet.


  •  Writing:
          o Students will be able to write one or two paragraphs to:
relate a familiar sequence of events, tell a story; provide a detailed
description and comparison of people, places, objects, and animals,
plants, material, or routines. (Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000,
Benchmark # 6, p. 103).
                + Able to write a paragraph in the pre-activity about
which objects should be thrown overboard and explain why.
          o Students will be able to take notes from an oral
presentation or a page of written information.(Canadian Language
Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 103).
                + Take notes during the guest presentation.

Culture/Content:

Atlantic Canada English Language Arts Curriculum High School, (1998),
New Brunswick Department of Education.

  •   Students will be expected to speak and listen to explore, extend,
      clarify, and reflect on their thoughts, ideas, feelings, and
      experiences related to their organizational skills.
  •   Students will be expected to communicate information and ideas
      effectively and clearly, and to respond personally and critically
      to organizational strategies that are presented to them.
  •   Students will be expected to interact with their classmates using
      sensitivity and respect, using negotiation and cooperation.
  •   Students will be expected to select, read a text that explains
      instructions for an activity.
  •   Students will be expected to respond personally to the pre-
      activity text.
  •   Students will be expected to create texts collaboratively and
      independently, using negotiation to narrow their texts down to one
      agreed upon solution to the problem presented in the pre-activity.

General
Language
Education:

  •   Students will be able to use experts to learn organizational
      skills.
  •   Students will be able to remember the information learned in this
      lesson by playing a trivia game.
  •   Students will learn how to comprehend a text by summarizing or
      paraphrasing each section of the text.
  •   Students will be able to cope with talking to strangers in English
      by preparing what they want to say beforehand.

Activity:
Pre-Activity:     (1 class)
Give the students a copy of this survival dilemma:

Your ship is sinking, but you have managed to board a lifeboat with
twelve other people. Most of the people were not able to reach the
cabins to get warm clothing, so they are in street clothes. One woman
is in a bathing suit. The ship is in the North Atlantic, and the
temperature is near freezing, with strong winds and high waves. The
lifeboat is an open wooden craft with no motor, so it must be rowed.
You may have to spend several days at sea, depending on when the boat
is spotted. The ocean is very foggy with low heavy clouds. Because the
boat is dangerously overloaded, you must remove 60 pounds of weight in
order to stay safely afloat. Decide which items you will remove. For
safety reasons you cannot suspend any items from the lifeboat. You
cannot remove any of the people. You must choose from among these
items:

  •   3 wet suits , each 5 lbs.
  •   2 gallon container of water, 15 lbs.
  •   4 wool blankets, each 2 lbs.
  •   a large S.O.S flag, 3 lbs.
  •   30 cans of tuna, (flip tops) each 1 lb.
  •   eight oars, each 5 lbs.
  •   first -aid kit 10 lbs.
  •   5 slicker raincoats with hoods, each 2 lbs.
  •   battery operated signal light, 8 lbs.
  •   two buckets for bailing, each 3 lbs.

After reading it over as a class, asking different people to summarize
what each sentence is saying to ensure comprehension the students will
individually make thoughtful decisions. They will each write a
paragraph on what 60 lbs. are to be tossed and why. The teacher will
have samples of these things at the front of the class for those who
are visual learners. They then get into groups of 4, compare responses,
agree upon the best decisions and combine them into one document. The
groups will share their ideas and as a class, they will decide upon a
final list. The class as a whole will then discuss these questions. The
teacher will facilitate the discussion surrounding these questions:
  •   What strategies did you use to make decisions? (Categorizing-
      sustenance, communication tools, protection tools, etc.)
  •   What place did prioritizing play in your decisions?
  •   What would happen if there was no organization within your groups?
  •   What was the hardest part about this activity?
  •   What was the easiest part about this activity?
  •   How do you think this lesson introduces a lesson about coping with
      stress —organizational skills, prioritizing, lists, etc. will help
      to reduce stress.

During the last 15 minutes of class tell students that we will be
having a guest speaker come in next day to talk about some
organizational strategies. Tell them to think of two questions to ask
the guest. The guest can be a mayor, a politician, a university
student, or anyone who the students would look up to and take their
advice. Explain to the guest that you want the students to see how busy
he or she is and how time can be managed effectively using agendas,
prioritization, and other organizational tips. The guest will have the
whole next class for discussion and his or her presentation. Inform the
guest that the students are not native speakers and ask him or her to
bring along visuals if it is possible. Students will use the last 15
minutes to prepare their questions. Tell students to bring their
agendas with them to class for the next couple classes because we will
be using them.

Activity:   (60 minutes)
The guest speaker will come in, present his or her ideas and then
students will take turns asking their questions. The students will take
notes during the presentation. These notes will be put in the students'
portfolios. They will be used again when students go to prepare for the
open house rotary.

Post-Activity:    (30 minutes)
Split the class up into two groups. Tell them to give themselves a team
name because we are going to play Agenda and Organizational Trivia!!!

All players will be seated. The teacher will say something that is
located in the agenda and the first team to find it in their agenda and
show it to the teacher wins a point. Some examples of things located in
an agenda are:

  •   a map of Canada
  •   the month of June
  •   a federal holiday
  •   a place to put important addresses
  •   a place to put emergency phone numbers
  •   a quote of the day
  •   a class schedule
  •   the month at a glance
  •   a place to put to do lists for each day
  •   study tips

Then the teacher will ask some questions about what was said in the
guest speaker's presentation. Some possible questions are:

  •   Name three ways of organizing your time.
  •   What are two things that are important about setting goals and
      writing to-do lists?
  •   How much time a day should you take for yourself?
  •   What can you do to prevent falling behind in your work?
  •   Who can you talk to if you feel burnt out or unable to manage your
      time?

After the game is finished ask students to write a realistic to-do list
in their agendas and set a goal for when they want to accomplish these
things. The goal should be within the next week so that students can go
back before the unit is finished and see how well this organizational
strategy is working.

Homework: Students will get started on their to do list and use what
they learned from the guest speaker to organize their rooms, school
work, and personal lives in order to make their time more effective.

Evaluation:       To evaluate this lesson, I will be using a
performance checklist which will be based on my informal observations
of the students throughout the unit. This will be a form of formative
evaluation because it will give me a chance to see if the student is
experiencing success, needing extra help, feeling unengaged, etc. (See
Appendix A for checklist.). I will use this to modify and improve my
next lessons.

Materials:
  •   Some of the objects in the pre-activity for the visual learners.
  •   Chart paper and markers for the guest speaker
  •   Agendas for each student (many schools supply agendas)

Resources:
  •   Richard Amato, Patricia. Making it Happen. New York: Longman,1996.
      (Ch.11)
  •   Newsstrom, John, and Edward Scannell. The Big Book of Team
      Building Games. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1998.
  •   Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000.
  •   Atlantic Canada English Language Arts Curriculum High School,
      (1998), New Brunswick Department of Education

Appendix:
      •   Appendix A: Performance Checklist


Lesson 3: Assertiveness Training: How can I say no?

Outcomes:
Communicative/
Experiential:

      •   Students will be able to role-play different ways of saying no.

Language:
     •  Speaking:
          o Students will be able to participate in small group
discussion on non-personal familiar topics and issues: express
opinions, feelings, obligation, ability, certainty.(Canadian Language
Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 63).
                + I think a good example of the pleasant no would be...
                + What do you think?
                + -That's a good idea; let's go with that.
          o Students will be able to make a simple suggestion; provide
reason (Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 62).
                + How about we go to the movies on the weekend? I have
to much work to do tonight.
                + If you bring the movie back, I will walk to meet you.


     •  Listening:
          o Students will be able to identify specific factual details
and inferred meanings in dialogues containing openings and closings.
(Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 79).
                + able to understand which technique for saying "No" is
being conveyed in each skit.
          o Students will be able to demonstrate comprehension of
details and speaker's purpose in suggestions, advice, encouragements
and requests.(Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p.
79).
                + able to summarize in a sentence one thing that they
saw or learned through the skits.


     •  Reading:
          o Students will be able to follow a set of common everyday
instructions (up to ten steps) when not presented in point form:
sequence/order must be inferred. (Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000,
Benchmark # 6, p .91).


     •  Writing:
          o Students will be able to write one or two paragraphs to:
relate a familiar sequence of events, tell a story; provide a detailed
description and comparison of people, places, objects, and animals,
plants, material, or routines. (Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000,
Benchmark # 6, p. 103).
                 + Write a 1-2 minute skit

Culture/Content:

Students will be expected to
     • speak and listen to explore, extend, clarify, and reflect on
        their thoughts, ideas, feelings, and experiences related to
        assertively saying no.
     • communicate information and ideas effectively and clearly, and
        to respond personally and critically in preparation for the
        role play.
     • interact with their classmates using sensitivity and respect.
     • use skit writing and other ways of representation such as role
        play, to explore, clarify, and reflect on their thoughts,
        feelings, experiences, and learnings concerning assertiveness.
     •   collaboratively create texts for the role play using a variety
         of forms for a range of audiences and purposes.

General
Language
Education:

Students will be able to:
     • convey their opinions in a coherent, effective fashion.
     • work in groups to carry out a task.
     • identify assertiveness as a strategy for preventing and
        managing stress.
     • use examples of saying no, to grasp the concept of
        assertiveness

Activity:
Pre-Activity:     (35 minutes)
The teacher places a chart displaying a different way of saying no in
each corner of the room. An example will be given with each strategy.
Write the instructions on the board. The students are asked to go to
the corner that contains the method of saying no that they think they
need to work on the most. Make sure the groups are relatively equal in
numbers. Once in their groups at each corner, the students discuss what
this method consists of, why they think this method is effective, and
how this method can be used to manage stress. As a group, they come up
with an example of how this method can help manage stress. One person
from each group writes the example on the board.

Examples of four assertive ways of saying no are:

   1. The pleasant no
     • Would you like to take over my shift Friday night? I have a
        date.
     • That's awesome that you have a date, but I'm going to have to
        say no thanks. I already have plans.
   2. The conditional no.
     • Come to the movies with me, you work too much.
     • I can't, I'm broke right now, but if you wait till 9:00, I'll
        go for a walk with you.
   3. The sleep on it no
     • Would you mind tutoring me in math? I'm fed up with my
        professor.
     • Let me think about it and I'll let you know by tomorrow
        afternoon.
   4. The alternative solution no
     • Can you give me a drive to the mall?
     • I don't have any gas in my car, but I can help you figure out
        the bus route. with you.

Activity:   (40 minutes)
Each group will be asked to prepare a short 1-2 minute skit, displaying
the method of assertively saying no which they chose in the pre-
activity. Everyone must speak and everyone must incorporate a question
into their part of the dialogue. To make the activity more interesting,
each group will choose one item from a bag that has to be used in their
skit. Items could range from an oven mitt to a cowboy hat. The purpose
of the items is to provide a safe environment for the students to
practice assertiveness. It also puts a fun spin on learning. Each group
has 20 minutes to prepare their skit. The groups will then present
their skits to the class

Post-Activity:    (15 minutes)
Alphabet Soup Summariser: Each student chooses a letter from a hat and
creates a summery sentence about assertively saying "no," using a word
or a sentence that begins with the letter that they chose. It could be
an observation, an evoked emotion, or an example of how being assertive
can manage stress levels.

Homework: Students will practice using at least one of the assertive
ways of saying no with someone in their family.

Evaluation:       Students will be evaluated using the role play
evaluation sheet taken from the Maritime Oral Communication Assessment
Portfolio. See attached form. They will also be evaluated using the
performance checklist. (See Appendix A for checklist).

Materials:
     •   4 sheets of chart paper
     •   A chalk board/ white board
     •   Chalk/white board markers
     •   Four random items that could be found around the house. (The
         crazier the better!)
     •   A bag that you cannot see through
     •   Letters from the alphabet cut out separately and placed in a
         hat.

      Notes: Have the methods of saying no and the examples already on
the walls in each corner of the room before students arrive. This will
save time and allow more time for explanations if they are needed

Resources:
     •  Activators Handout [Ed 3561, 2002]
     •  Maritime Oral Communication Assessment Portfolio (MOCAP)
        Handout [ed 3561, 2002]
     • Skit in a bag activity [ED 5143, 2002]
     • Summarizers [ED 3561, 2002]
     • UNB Security. Communication- Verbal Judo. Fredericton, Canada,
        2002.
     • Vaccaro, Pamela.(1998) Balancing Act. Family Practice
        Management. [Online].
      http://www.aafp.org/fpm/980700fm/balance.html

Appendix:
     •   Appendix A: Performance Checklist
     •   Appendix B

   Role Play Evaluation Sheet
   Name:_________________________________

   Date:_____________________
   Communication of the message:
A= Message is communicated in an effective and appropriate manner.
B= Message is communicated but the accuracy and effectiveness needs
improvement.
C= Message was not communicated effectively.
Language Tasks:
         A          B          C

      1. To ask properly formed question.


      2. To demonstrate a method of assertively saying no.


      3. To incorporate the chosen object into the dialogue.


Diagnostic Analysis
Articulation: Pronunciation, intonation, and flow




Fluency: vocabulary(accuracy and variety); communicative strategies




Grammar: grammatical accuracy; cohesion of speech




  Lesson 4: Journal Writing/Speaking: Get it all
                       out!

Outcomes:
Communicative/
Experiential:

  •     Students will be able to make a journal entry in an effort to
        gain a strategy of dealing with stress.
  •     Students will be able to participate in learning centres.

Language:

  •  Speaking:
          o Students will be able to participate in small group
discussion on non-personal familiar topics and issues: express
opinions, feelings, obligation, ability, certainty.(Canadian
Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 63).
                + I think what Anne is saying in this paragraph is
that she's tired of being looked at as a little girl.
                + What do you think?
                + I disagree, I think this book will be about...
          o Students will be able to indicate partial comprehension
(Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 62).
                + I'm not sure I understood that part of the
journal. Can you read it again?
                + I don't understand what we are supposed to do at
this centre. Can you explain?


  •  Listening:
          o Students will be able to identify specific factual
details and inferred meanings in dialogues containing openings and
closings.(Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 79).
                + able to understand what Anne Frank is feeling in
her journal entries.


          o Students will be able to demonstrate comprehension of
details and speaker's purpose in suggestions, advice, encouragements
and requests.(Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p.
79).
                + able to answer questions about what was just read
to them.


  •  Reading:
          o Students will be able to find two or three pieces of
information in moderately complex formatted texts. (Canadian
Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p .91).
                + Able to answer comprehension questions on what
they just read.


  •  Writing:
          o Students will be able to fill out moderately complex
forms. (Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 103).
                + Able to fill out a worksheet designed by the
teacher.


          o Students will be able to write one or two paragraphs to:
relate a familiar sequence of events, tell a story; provide a
detailed description and comparison of people, places, objects, and
animals, plants, material, or routines. (Canadian Language
Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 103).
                + Able to make a journal entry

Culture/Content:

  •   Students will be expected to speak and listen to explore,
      extend, clarify, and reflect on their thoughts, ideas,
      feelings, and experiences related to Anne Frank's Diary and
      their own lives.
  •   Students will be expected to communicate information and ideas
      effectively and clearly, and to respond personally and
      critically in the discussion of Anne Frank's journal entries.
  •   Students will be expected to use writing and other ways of
      representation such as dancing, speaking, drawing to explore,
      clarify, and reflect on their thoughts, feelings, experiences.
  •   Students will be expected to select, read, and view with
      understanding a range of literature for independent reading.
  •   Students will be expected to interpret, select, and combine
      information in order to get a sense of how Anne Frank used her
      journal as a way of coping with stress.
  •   Students will be expected to respond personally to Anne Frank's
      journal entries.
  •   Students will be expected to respond critically to Anne Frank's
      Diary in the learning centres, applying their understanding of
      language, form, and genre.

General
Language
Education:

  •   Students will be able to convey their opinions in a coherent,
      effective fashion.
  •   Students will be able to work in groups to carry out a task.
  •   Students will be able to use examples to grasp how journals
      work to relieve stress.
  •   Students will use examples to understand what a rhyme is, why
      rhythm is important in English, and how to change verb tenses.
  •   Students will be able to read aloud and independently to
      improve their reading ability.
  •   Students will be able to use interactive reading to become
      interested in reading in English.
  •   Students will be able to draw upon their multiple intelligences
      to create a journal entry.

Activity:

Pre-Activity:   (1 class)

Do an interactive read aloud of a few journal entries from Anne
Frank: The Diary of a Girl. This book shows how journal writing can
be used to cope with stress. (Inform the students about Anne Frank's
situation before reading the diary.)

Born on June 12, 1929, Anne Frank was a German-Jewish teenager who
was forced to go into hiding during the Holocaust. She and her
family, along with four others, spent 25 months during World War II
in an annex of rooms above her father''s office in Amsterdam, the
Netherlands.Her diary, saved during the war by one of the family's
helpers, Miep Gies, was first published in 1947. Today, her diary
has been translated into 67 languages and is one of the most widely
read books in the world.

Anne Frank: The Diary of a Girl. 1947.

Here are some suggestions of how to make the read aloud interactive:

  •   What do you see when you look at the cover page?
  •   By looking at the title and the cover page, what do you think
      this book is about?
  •   After reading Anne Franks Biography, ask where Holland is. Can
      you point to it on the map?
  •   Stop after reading a paragraph and ask the students what Anne
      was feeling at the time she wrote.
  •   What do you think will happen next?
  •   What do the words... mean?
  •   What was this journal entry about? Get students to put all
      their words on a big piece of chart paper.
  •   Why was journal writing effective for Anne Frank?
  •   How could it be effective for you?
  •   What kind of information would you find in a journal?
  •   Does the information always have to be about your feelings or
      could you just talk about what you did today?

You could have these discussions in small groups, partners, or as a
whole class by choosing volunteers to answer.

Activity:      (1   class)
Say: Now that you   have seen how journals can be used to express
feelings, to talk   without being judged, and to say anything you
want, you can see   how it can be used to cope with stress

Because every person has more than one intelligence, I know that for
some, journal writing would not be the source of stress relief. You
may feel more comfortable expressing yourself through dancing,
drawing or speaking. It is for this reason that I am giving you the
opportunity to make any kind of journal you feel comfortable
expressing yourself through. There are cassette recorders if you
want to keep an oral journal, there are paints and sketching paper
available, and there is music and space outside the class available
if you want to make a choreographed dance.

Post-Activity:       (1 class)
The class will be divided up into learning centres; one group will
take turns reading from Anne Frank: The Diary of a Girl. They will
each read half a page and then they will discuss it to ensure
comprehension. If the class likes what they have read, you could
read a little bit of the book each day as a warm up to the class.

The second group will do some guided reading where they read one of
Anne Frank's journal entries into a cassette recorder. (The teacher
will select one of Anne Frank's entries based on the class' reading
level and make several photocopies of it.) They will then answer
three or four comprehension questions about what they just read. The
answers to these questions along with the student's reading of the
text will later be analysed by the teacher to see if the student is
reading at the expected level, what his or her strengths and
weaknesses are, and whether or not he or she comprehends what is
being read.

The third group will be doing some independent reading with a book
of their choice. While this is happening, the teacher will pull
students from this group one at a time to conference with them
about:

  •   Their journals - what they chose to do. Did it help them
      relieve any stress? Will they continue to use it? They can show
      it to you if they want.
  •   How their to-do lists from lesson two are coming along. What
      they can do to improve their time management skills.
  •   How they are feeling about the unit so far. What is the most
      challenging part. What have they learned? What do they need
      extra help with? What do they like about this unit? Anything
      else they would like to discuss.

The fourth group will analyse the language used in one of Anne's
journal entries that the teacher has chosen and photocopied. This
will be done by following a worksheet. (See Appendix C for
worksheet.)

The centres will take place for the whole class with each group
rotating every 22 minutes. The teacher will facilitate this
rotation. Ex: Ring a bell every 22 minutes and tell students to go
to the centre to their right. There will be approximately 5 people
in each group.

Explain each centre to the students before starting and have a list
of rules for the centres posted. Here are some examples:

  •   Speaking should not disturb the other groups so do not speak
      too loudly.
  •   When you hear the bell, move to the centre on the right and
      bring all worksheets with you to the next station
  •   Please stay on task. You will be given a mark for these
      centres.

Homework: Students will continue using their journals at least twice
a week.

Evaluation:          This lesson will play a very important part of
the evaluation for this unit. The performance checklist will be used
throughout the lesson, the guided reading will help measure the
students' reading abilities, the worksheets will measure students'
awareness of grammar, rhythm, and pronunciation, and the individual
conferencing will be used to get an idea where the students are from
their own perspective. The conferencing will also let students know
that the strategies being experienced in class are ongoing and they
should be incorporating them into their lives.

Materials:
  •   chart paper
  •   cd player
  •   cassette recorder
  •   paints and brushes
  •   pencil crayons
  •   different types of music
  •   books at the students' reading level
  •   photocopies of two separate journal entries by Anne Frank.(one
      for center number four and two)
  •   sketching paper
  •   space for students to develop a choreographed dance.
  •   Anne Frank: The Diary of a Girl.


Resources:
  •   Herrell, A. Fifty Strategies For Teaching English Language
      Learners. Ohio: Merrill, 2000. (Ch. 15 & 23)
  •     Richard Amato, Patricia. Making it Happen. New York: Longman,
        1996. (Ch.4)
  •     Anne Frank: The Diary of a Girl. 1947. http://www.annefrank.com
  •     Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000.
  •     Atlantic Canada English Language Arts Curriculum High School,
        (1998), New Brunswick Department of Education

Appendix:
  •     Appendix A: Performance Checklist
  •     Appendix C

Learning Centre Worksheet
Name:_________________________________

Date:_____________________
Read this journal entry done by Anne Frank

   1. Find two words that rhyme.       _____________________
_____________________

   2. What are three new words in this text?
_____________________    _____________________
_____________________

   3. Find a word that has three syllables. Write the word down and
write where the stress is in the word.

         Examples:        Finally        Contribute        Submarine

   4. Find three words in the text with two syllables that have the
stress on the last syllable.

         Examples:        Contain        Refresh        About

   5. Find three words in the text with two syllables that have the
stress on the first syllable.

         Examples:        Cheaper        Funny        Stable

   6. Find a sentence in the text that is written in the past and
put it in the future tense.

         Examples:
             * Yesterday, I went to the store and bought some eggs.
             * Tomorrow I will go to the store and buy some eggs.

   7. Find a sentence that is written in the present and put it in
the past.

         Examples:
             * I am feeling really tired today, and I don't know why.
             * Last night I felt really tired and I didn't know why.

      8. Choose a word from the text and find a synonym for it

         Examples:
             * Happy = Content
            * Very = Exceptionally

   9. Find two words that have a silent letter.
_____________________    _____________________




              Lesson 5: Take Time for Yourself

Outcomes:
Communicative/
Experiential:

  •   Students will role play phone conversations in order to survey
      each other about what they do to relieve stress.
  •   Students will make stress balls as one strategy of relieving
      stress.

Language:

  •  Speaking:
          o Students will be able to make a simple suggestion;
provide reason (Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6,
p. 62).
                + Why don't we spread all the directions out on the
table and then put them in order.
                + It will probably work best if everyone reads their
paragraph silently first and then aloud.
          o Students will be able to take phone messages with three
to five details (Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6,
p. 62).
                + Able to take a message of what his or her friend
likes to do to relieve stress.


  •  Listening:
          o Students will be able to understand a set of
instructions when not presented completely in point form: sequence/
order must be inferred in the text.(Canadian Language Benchmarks,
2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 79).
                + After you have finished putting your paragraphs in
order, come see me to see if they are in the correct order. You will
have to paraphrase to me what the article is saying.


  •  Reading:
          o Students will be able to find two or three pieces of
information in moderately complex formatted texts. (Canadian
Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p .91).
                + able to paraphrase three main points in the
article.
          o Students will be able to follow a set of common everyday
instructions (up to ten steps) when not presented in point form:
sequence/order must be inferred. (Canadian Language Benchmarks,
2000, Benchmark # 6, p .91).
                 + Able to put a set of directions in order.


  •  Writing:
          o Students will be able to convey a personal message
through e-mail. (Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6,
p. 103).
                + Hi Sally, I just learned how to make stress balls
and I thought I'd write to you and tell you how it's done.

Culture/Content:

  •   Students will be expected to select, read, and view with
      understanding a an article about relieving stress through
      stress balls.
  •   Students will be expected to interpret, select, and combine
      information in order to make it sensible.
  •   Students will be expected to respond personally to an article
      about how stress balls can be used to reduce stress.
  •   Students will be expected to create texts collaboratively by
      putting a text in order and independently by writing an e-mail
      to a friend about a strategy used to reduce stress.

      Atlantic Canada English Language Arts Curriculum High School,
(1998), New Brunswick Department of Education.

General
Language
Education:

  •   Students will be able to convey their opinions in a coherent,
      effective fashion.
  •   Students will be able to work in groups to carry out a task.
  •   Students will be able to use reading comprehension techniques
      such as looking at the word in context with the rest of the
      sentence, sounding the word out, asking a friend, making
      predictions, underlining new words while continuing to read the
      text for meaning, and paraphrasing.
  •   Students will be able to use sentence ordering as a way of
      measuring their reading comprehension.

Activity:
Pre-Activity: (15 minutes)
As students come in, have soft music playing in the background.
(sounds of nature without words would be ideal) If you have a
fountain bring it in to the class and plug it in. Create a relaxing
mood within the class in any way possible. Get each student to write
down three things they like to do to relieve stress. Students then
find a partner who they haven't worked with very much. They stand
back on to each other and pretend they are on the phone. They will
begin and end the conversation as if they were on the phone. This
will get them used to having an English phone conversation. The
students will role play two friends who are in separate cities. One
friend will play the stressed out friend and the other friend will
try to help the other by telling them what he or she does to reduce
stress. Then the students will reverse roles and have a new phone
conversation where the other students is the helpful friend.
Activity:      (30 minutes)
When all the phone conversations have ended, the teacher will get
each partner to report back the three things that their friend does
to relieve stress. The teacher will write the sentences on chart
paper exactly how they are said by the student. Then the teacher
will go over them with the class to correct grammatical errors. This
is teaching grammar in context. After everyone has reported back and
all errors have been corrected, the teacher will make a final list
of all the things the class likes to do to relieve stress and he or
she will mark the number of people in the class that enjoy each
activity. This survey will be photocopied and given to the students
so they have a list of ideas from most popular to least popular that
they can use to reduce stress.

Post-Activity:       (45 minutes)
Students will put into practice one effective stress relieving
strategy. They will make stress balls. These balls once finished can
be kept at school, home, or anywhere where tense discussions or
situations arise. They are to be held in the hand and squeezed to
relieve tension. Students will use a cooperative learning strategy
for this activity.

First the teacher will discuss the students background knowledge of
stress balls by asking these questions and asking for volunteers to
answer:

  •   Have you ever heard of a stress ball?
  •   What is a stress ball?
  •   Why would we use a stress ball?
  •   How does a stress ball work?

After this short discussion, students will read about why stress
balls are effective in relieving stress. Students will be put in
groups of four. Each students will be given a different paragraph of
the explanation. A copy of all the paragraphs of the explanation are
located in Appendix D. The students will take turns reading their
paragraphs out loud in their groups and then they will
collaboratively put the paragraphs in order from beginning to end.
Then they will paraphrase the three main points contained within the
article to the teacher and each say what they thought of the
article.

Once the paragraph is put together correctly and taped onto a piece
of paper, the students will go to the teacher and get the directions
for making the stress ball. The directions will be cut up so that
they are all out of order. Students will need to comprehend the
directions correctly in order to put them in order to stick them
onto the construction paper. See Appendix E1 for a copy of the
instructions. Students will be reminded of these strategies when
trying to comprehend a text:

  •   Look at the word in context with the rest of the sentence.
  •   Sound the word out. You might recognize the word if you say it
      aloud.
  •   Ask a friend. They are often happy to help.
  •   Make predictions (guess what you think it could mean)
  •   Underline words you don't understand and continue reading the
      text for meaning.
  •   Paraphrase what you read. It doesn't always matter if you
      understand each word as long as you understand the gist of what
      you are reading.

These strategies will be left on the overhead projector as the
students work.

After a group thinks they have the directions in order, they will
show it to the teacher. If all the instructions are in the proper
order they will be given the materials they need to make the stress
balls.

Homework: Students will write an e-mail to a friend explaining in
their own words how to make a stress ball. Students will print the
e-mail off and put it in their portfolio for evaluation.

Evaluation:          To evaluate this lesson, I will be using a
performance checklist which will be based on my informal
observations of the students throughout the unit. This will be a
form of formative evaluation because it will give me a chance to see
if the student is experiencing success, needing extra help, feeling
unengaged, etc. (See Appendix Afor checklist.) The post-activity of
putting the sentences in order will give me a good indication of
their reading comprehension. I will use this to modify and improve
my next lessons. I will also be checking the portfolios to see if
homework is being completed on time.

Materials:
  •   tape
  •   cornstarch or flour
  •   helium strength balloons
  •   construction paper
  •   permanent markers
  •   funnels
  •   overhead projector


Resources:
  •   Milner, Joseph, and Lucy Milner. Bridging English. New Jersey:
      Merrill Prentice Hall, 2003.
  •   Herrell, A. Fifty Strategies For Teaching English Language
      Learners. Ohio: Merrill, 2000. (Ch14)
  •   Richard Amato, Patricia. Making it Happen. New York: Longman,
      1996. (Ch.4 & 12)
  •   Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000.
  •   Atlantic Canada English Language Arts Curriculum High School,
      (1998), New Brunswick Department of Education.
  •   http://familycrafts.about.com
  •   http://www.goaskalice.columbia.edu/1896.html

Appendix:
  •   Appendix A: Performance Checklist
       •     Appendix E1

   How To Make a Stress Ball
   This fun craft that helps relieve stress
   Difficulty: Average
   Time Required: 20 minutes

   Here's How:

                 o   Get a small round balloon. Do not use water balloons;
                     they are too thin. Use balloon designed for helium.
                 o   Draw a face or write your name on the balloon.
                 o   Blow up the balloon until it is about 4-5 inches around,
                     but do not tie it.
                 o   Pinch the top of the balloon shut an inch or 2 from the
                     hole.
                 o   Place a funnel inside the opening of the balloon while
                     pinching it shut.
                 o   Fill the top of the funnel with cornstarch.
                 o   Slowly let go of the top of the balloon so the
                     cornstarch can slide into the balloon.
                 o   Continue adding cornstarch to the funnel until your
                     balloon is filled to about 3 inches.
                 o   Pull up tightly on the opening of the balloon and pinch
                     out any extra air.
                 o   Tie the balloon closed as near to the cornstarch as you
                     can.
                 o   You can decorate your stress ball with stickers or
                     permanent markers if you like.

   Tips:

                 o   This project is easier to make with 2 people!
                 o   You might need to tap the funnel or stir the cornstarch
                     occasionally to keep it moving into the balloon.
                 o   If you decorate your stress ball watch what kind of
                     markers you use. Some markers will leave stains on your
                     hands when you are squeezing the stress ball.

   What You Need:

                 o   Balloons
                 o   Funnels
                 o   Corn Starch or flour
                 o   Markers




   o       Appendix E2


How Can Stress Balls be Used to Relieve Stress?
"Stress balls are those slightly-smaller-than-tennis-ball sized things
that you squeeze to decrease muscular and overall tension. When you
make a fist, with or without a stress ball in your hand, you're
creating muscle tension. When you release your grip, muscular
relaxation follows. Try it right now: make fists, squeeze a little bit,
and hold for a few seconds. Okay, relax them, and feel the tension
leave your hands and fingers. Wait a moment and do the same thing
again; this time, breathe in when you tense your hands, and exhale when
you let them relax a few seconds later. If you try this two or three
times, squeeze a little harder each time as you go along. This process
is called progressive muscular relaxation, and can be done with every
muscle group in your body. Because acute muscle tension is followed by
relaxation when you release whatever muscle area you're working on,
this stress management exercise can flush out a huge amount of muscle
tension from your head to your toes.

"Back to your balls: whether they know it or not, people using stress
balls are practicing what can be a very powerful stress management
tool. A lot of folks are playing with their balls while in meetings and
on the phone. They'd probably relax even more if they took a few
minutes just to tense, release, and relax, focusing only on the parts
of their bodies that will soon feel better."

From Go Ask Alice http://www.goaskalice.columbia.edu/1896.html



         Lesson 6: Resume Writing: Lets get started!

Outcomes:

Communicative/
Experiential:

     •    Students   will be able to design their own resume.
     •    Students   will be able to conduct interviews with native English
          speaking   people.
     •    Students   will be able to research current resume trends.

Language:

     •   Speaking:
           o Students will be able to ask for and provide information in
an interview related to daily activities. (Canadian Language
Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 63).
                 + Can you tell me how long a current resume should be?
                 + In your experience how long do you spend looking at a
resume before or during an interview?
                 + Should my resume give personal information such as my
social insurance number, my weight, or my telephone number?
           o Students will be able to take phone messages with three to
five details (Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p.
62).
                 + He can meet with me on Thursday at 4:00? That's
perfect.
                 + Oh, Mrs. Jones will be out of town tomorrow, is there
another time I could interview her?
           o Students will be able to participate in small group
discussion on non-personal familiar topics and issues: express
opinions, feelings, obligation, ability, certainty.(Canadian Language
Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 63).
                + This looks like a good resume web-site, I'll print it
off for you to look at.
                + Do we have enough questions?


     •  Listening:
          o Students will be able to identify specific factual details
and inferred meanings in dialogues containing openings and closings.
(Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 79).
                + Yes I'd like to leave a message.
                + What you have shared with us has been very helpful.
We now know what to include in our resumes.
          o Students will be able to demonstrate comprehension of
details and speaker's purpose in suggestions, advice, encouragements
and requests.(Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p.
79).
                + Thanks for the advice, we will definitely use it when
we make our own resumes.
                + That's a good idea, we'll have to find the answer to
that question for sure.


     •  Reading:
          o Students will be able to identify factual details and some
inferred meanings in moderately complex formatted texts containing
advice, requests, specifications.(Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000,
Benchmark # 6, p .91).
                 + able to understand the advice given for resume
writing on the Internet
                 + able to understand any handouts the employer might
give students to help them with their research.
          o Access/locate/compare two or three pieces of information in
a CD-Rom electronic reference source.(Canadian Language Benchmarks,
2000, Benchmark # 6, p .91).
                 + able to find resume tips on CD-ROM or the Internet


     •  Writing:
          o Students will be able to take notes from an oral
presentation or a page of written information.(Canadian Language
Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 103).
                 + able to take notes during the interview or during the
Internet research.
          o Students will be able to convey business massages as
written notes.(Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p.
103).
                 + able to write their own resumes that could be used in
a real interview.

Culture/Content:

     •   Students will be expected to speak and listen to explore,
         extend, clarify, and reflect on their thoughts, ideas,
         feelings, and experiences related to resume writing
     •   Students will be expected to communicate information and ideas
         effectively and clearly in an interview.
     •   Students will be expected to interact with their classmates
         using sensitivity and respect, considering the situation and
         purpose of the activity.
     •   Students will be expected to select, read, and view with
         understanding a range of literature, information, media, and
         visual texts in order to get a better understanding of current
         resume trends.
     •   Students will be expected to interpret, select, and combine
         information, using a variety of strategies, resources, and
         technologies in order to gain an understanding of how to write
         a good resume.
     •   Students will be expected to use writing to explore, clarify,
         and reflect on their thoughts, feelings, experiences, and
         learnings concerning resume writing.
     •   Students will be expected to collaboratively research effective
         resume strategies and then they will create their own resumes
         for future use.
     •   Students will be expected to use a range of strategies to
         develop effective writing and other ways of representing, and
         to enhance clarity, precision, and effectiveness such as peer
         editing.

General
Language
Education:

     •   Students will be able to research current resume trends by
         using the Internet or by conducting interviews.
     •   Students will be able to underline the importance and benefit
         of peer editing in writing.
     •   Students will use sample resumes as models for creating their
         own.

Activity:
Pre-Activity:     (25 minutes)
Explain to the students that they have already learned some short-term
stress management techniques such as prioritizing, agenda use,
assertiveness, journal expression, music, and stress balls. Now tell
them that it would also be useful to have some long-term strategies for
dealing with stress. Resume writing is an example of a long-term
strategy because it will cut down on the amount of stress that a person
will have over a period of time by helping him or her get a job. After
explaining what a resume is, students will be put into groups of 4.
Each group will be given a ball of play-doh. They will have 20 minutes
to design figures that demonstrate the types of information that they
think should be included in a resume. For example, a hockey stick could
be designed to show that extra-curricular activities should be in a
resume. A cross could represent a person's CPR skills, etc. A
spokesperson from each group will explain the figures to the class. One
figure should represent a question that they have about resumes and
another should demonstrate how resume writing can help manage or
prevent stress. Then each team will take turns explaining their figures
to the class.

Activity:   (1 full 90 minute class and 65 minutes that will remain in
this class after the pre-activity)
Students will be given the choice between interviewing a minimum of two
local employers or using the Internet to investigate current resume
trends. They will do this research using the same groups that they were
in for the pre-activity. Students will cite the sources they used in
their research using examples prepared by the teacher. The students
will begin by spending the remaining 65 minutes of this class
brainstorming questions that they would like answered regarding resume
writing.

In the next class, the groups will proceed with the research on the
Internet or schedule interviews with the chosen employers. There will
be phone books available for finding an employer to interview. The
interviews can be conducted during class time either by phone or in
person. If this is not possible, the groups will either have to do the
interviews after school hours or do their research using the Internet.

During the interviews and the Internet research, each student will take
detailed notes on the information that is being discovered. These notes
will eventually be placed in the portfolios for evaluation. The
students will have until the next class to get their research and
interviews done. If interviewing is chosen, each student must ask at
least two questions. If the Internet is chosen each student must find
at least one web site related to resume trends.

Post-Activity:    Class 1 (20 minutes)- The rubric of how the resumes
will be marked will be explained at the beginning of the class. The
students will have a chance to make suggestions to improve the rubric
once it has been explained. This makes sure that the student's needs
are accommodated and lets them know that their opinions are valued.
Also the teacher will bring in a few examples of well written resumes
so that students get a sense of what one looks like and what kind of
language is required.

Class 1 (70 minutes)- The remaining class   time will be used for the
students to draft and edit their resumes.   Students will have another
class to work on their resumes if needed.   There will be dictionaries
and a thesaurus available for students to   use.

Class 2 (30 minutes) Students will have this time to finish up the
drafts of their resumes.

Class 2 (60 minutes) students will get into partners and edit their
friend's resume. If the teacher notices a common question or error, he
or she will explain the concept to the class as a whole. There will be
dictionaries and a thesaurus available for students to use. At the
beginning of lesson 7 the teacher will collect each finished resume
along with the group's research evidence. This due date will be
announced and written on the board.

Homework: Students will finish their resumes and have them ready to
pass in next class. Students will also do an assessment for each of
their group members and themselves (see Appendix F), which will be
given to the teacher with the resume.

Evaluation:       Resumes will be evaluated using the attached rubric.
Students will also do an assessment for each of their group members and
themselves. Notes taken during the interview or the research on the
Internet will be put in the students' portfolios to monitor how
effective their time was spent. Of course the performance checklist
will also be used to record informal observations of the students as
they interact. These methods will give the teacher feedback on the
students' participation and performance within the group so there is a
more holistic evaluation rather than just the final product.

Materials:
     •   5 containers of play-doh
     •   Some phone books for students to look up companies' phone
         numbers.
     •   Dictionaries
     •   A thesaurus
     •   Some grammar resource books
     •   Some model resumes for students to go by

Resources:
     •   Self and Group Assessment sheet [ED 3561, 2002]
     •   Horowitz, S. (2000) Accurate Writing & More. [Online]. http://
         www.accuratewriting.com/trends.shtml
     •   Lore, N (2000) Resume Writing: How to Write a Masterpiece of a
         Resume. [Online]. http://rockportinstitute.com/resumes.html

Appendix:
     • Appendix A: Performance Checklist
     • Appendix F
     •
  Group Presentation Self & Peer Assessment
  Using the following scale, rate your own participation and
  contribution to your group as well as that of the other group
  members.

     1. poor - did not participate in group discussion, did not ask any
  questions or find any valuable web sites(depending on how you did
  your research), did not cooperate with other group members, did not
  come to group meetings that took place outside of class;
     2. satisfactory;
     3. average;
     4. good;
     5. GREAT - gave this group research project their 100%!
  Participated in group discussions, asked questions during the
  interview or found at least one valuable web site (depending on how
  you did your research), cooperated with other group members, came to
  all group meetings that took place outside of class.

  Your Name:
  Rating:
  Comments:




  Group Member:
  Rating:
  Comments:
Group Member:
Rating:
Comments:




Group Member:
Rating:
Comments:




   1. What did you learn from this experience?




   2. What would you have done differently?




   3. How do you feel about this group work experience




  Lesson 7: Interview/presentation Skills: Don't
                 Stress about it!

Outcomes:
Communicative/
Experiential:

   •   Students will   play a true or false game that educates them on
       interview and   presentation skills.
   •   Students will   write a response to an interview question and
       present it in   a mock job interview.

Language:

   •   Speaking:
           o Students will be able to participate in small group
discussion on non-personal familiar topics and issues: express
opinions, feelings, obligation, ability, certainty.(Canadian Language
Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 63).
                 + Able to talk about their interview and presentation
skills.
           o Students will be able to ask for and provide information
in an interview related to daily activities. (Canadian Language
Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 63).
                 + Able to provide a response to an interview
question.
           o Students will be able to open, maintain and close a short
routine conversation.(Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark #
6, p. 63).
                 + Able to carry on a formal conversation during the
mock interview.


   •  Listening:
           o Students will be able to understand a set of instructions
when not presented completely in point form: sequence/order must be
inferred in the text.(Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark #
6, p. 79).
                 + After you have explained your text to your partner
listen to what your partner has to say.


   •  Reading:
          o Students will be able to identify factual details and
some inferred meanings in moderately complex formatted texts
containing advice, requests, specifications.(Canadian Language
Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p .91).
                + Able to understand the interview tips and the
presentation tips well enough to be able to explain the gist of them
to another person.


   •  Writing:
          o Students will be able to write one or two paragraphs to:
relate a familiar sequence of events, tell a story; provide a
detailed description and comparison of people, places, objects, and
animals, plants, material, or routines. (Canadian Language
Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 103).
                + Able to write a response to an interview question.
          o Students will be able to take notes from an oral
presentation or a page of written information.(Canadian Language
Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 103).

             Take notes during the mock interview.

Culture/Content:

   •   Students will be expected to speak and listen to explore,
       extend, clarify, and reflect on their thoughts, ideas,
       feelings, and experiences related to interviews and
       presentations.
   •   Students will be expected to communicate information and ideas
       effectively and clearly, and to respond personally and
       critically in an interview setting.
   •   Students will be expected to use writing to explore, clarify,
       and reflect on their thoughts, feelings, experiences in order
       to prepare for a real interview.
   •   Students will be expected to read with understanding a piece of
       literature related to interview and presentation skills.
   •   Students will be expected to interact with their classmates
       using sensitivity and respect, considering the situation is
       preparing students for a real life scenario.

General
Language
Education:

   •   Students will use rehearsal as a way of easing the stress of
       public speaking or formal interviews.
   •   Students will be able to play a true and false game to remember
       key interview and presentation tips.
   •   Students will be able to use discussion to learn about a new
       subject.
   •   Students will use complete sentences to practice new
       vocabulary.
   •   Students will use modelling to learn the proper way of saying
       something.
   •   Students will use a mock interview to prepare them for similar
       real life situations.

Activity:
Pre-Activity:   (1 class)
Collect finished resumes

Test the students background knowledge of interview skills and
presentation skills by playing "Who wants to be a good presenter."

Break the students up into two or four groups and tell them to make
up a name for their group. Ask them true or false questions from this
list to see how much the students already know about these areas:

   1. When you go to an interview it is okay to wear sandals. F
   2. When you make a handout for a presentation, try to fit as much
information on it as possible. Even making the print smaller would be
a good idea. F
   3. When you go to an interview, you should not make eye contact
with the interviewers. F
   4. When making a presentation you should always use visuals. T
   5. At an interview, you should never talk negatively about a past
employer. T
   6. When speaking during an interview or a presentation you should
be careful to stick to the point. T
   7. You should not ask questions during an interview. F
   8. You should never admit that you don't know something during a
presentation. F
   9. It is okay to use slang during an interview. F
  10. When preparing a presentation, stick to what you are used to,
do not experiment with new things like power point or videos. F
After the game is over ask the students if they were surprised at how
much or how little they knew about interview and presenting
etiquette.

Then do a Think-Pair-Share activity where students are broken up into
four groups. Two groups read the presentation tips sheet (see
Appendix G) and two groups read the interview tips sheet (see
Appendix H). One interview group will be called the yellow group and
the other interview group will be called red. One group of
presentation people will be called green and the other group that is
reading the presentation tips will be called the purple group. This
will be important for the next activity. Each person in each group
will get a copy of their respective tip sheets. They will first read
it over individually and then they will discuss it within their
groups. They will take turns reading a tip out and then explaining
what they think it means or why this is a good tip. Other people can
make comments as they see fit. Remind students to play close
attention in the discussion because each individual will be required
to share the tips to a person from the other group without the help
of their classmates.

After each group has finished discussing their sheets, the groups
will split up. People from group the red group will pair up with
someone from the green group. People from group the yellow group will
pair up with someone from the purple group. This way a person who
studied the interview tips will be paired up with someone from the
presentation tips group. Each partner will take turns explaining his
or her sheet to the other person.

The teacher will then conduct another game of true and false, but
this time the groups will be red and green team against the yellow
and purple group. The twist will be that only the red and yellow
group will be able to answer questions about presentation tips and
only the green and the purple groups will be allowed to answer
questions about interview tips. This will test how well the partners'
have explained their sheet to the other person and it will create a
little more fun and excitement. Use the tip sheets to make up true
and false questions.

A good way of getting students to practice the vocabulary and forming
proper sentences is to ask them to give their true and false answer
in the form of a complete sentence. Ex: No it is false that you
should where sandals to an interview. If they say it incorrectly,
model the correct way of saying it by repeating their sentence.
Congratulate them on their progress.

Activity:       (1 class)
Give each person a list of possible interview questions (Appendix I)

Go over the questions to make sure everyone understands what the
question is asking.

Each student must choose a question and prepare an answer to it. The
teacher will send around a master question sheet and each student
will sign their name next to a different question. Students will
write their answer down and practice reading it while occasionally
looking up to make eye contact.
As students are working, go around and help those who need it and
conference about any errors that are present. The teacher will
involve the student in the correction. Avoid not giving the answers
to the student ask him or her what the problem is and how to correct
it. Advise students that next day there will be a mock interview
where the teacher will ask the questions and the person with the
answer to the question will respond.

Post-Activity: (1 class)
There will be a mock interview where the teacher will ask the
questions and the person with the answer to the question will
respond. The teacher will carry on a brief but formal conversation
with each student before the question is asked. This will simulate
what would happen in a real interview.

Students will take notes on what each person says during the
interview. These notes will be placed in their portfolios for
evaluation after the interview is done. The notes will also provide
students with a resource of answers to the interview questions that
they can use to prepare themselves for an interview.

This will be a stressful activity for students but it will be a long
term stress reliever because when they go into an actual interview
they will feel more prepared and comfortable having already
participated in a mock interview. Also they will have time to
rehearse their answers so that when they have to do it in front of
everyone, they will be ready.

Homework: Students will use their journals to express their feelings
about how they did with their interview question.

Evaluation:           To evaluate this lesson, I will be using a
performance checklist which will be based on my informal observations
of the students throughout the unit. This will be a form of formative
evaluation because it will give me a chance to see if the student is
experiencing success, needing extra help, feeling unengaged, etc.
(See Appendix Afor checklist.). I will use this to modify and improve
my next lessons. Portfolios will also be used for formative and
summative evaluation. In this lesson, the notes taken by the students
will measure the students comprehension, attentiveness, and note
taking ability.

Materials:
  •       Copies of all the handouts

Resources:
      •    Activators Handout [ED 3561, 2002]
      •    http://content.monster.com/jobinfo/interview/sweat/
      •    http://content.monster.com/jobinfo/interview/questions/
      •    http://www.fpm.wisc.edu/support/PresentationTips.htm
      •    Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000.
      •    Atlantic Canada English Language Arts Curriculum High School,
           (1998), New Brunswick Department of Education.
Appendix:
      •    Appendix A: Performance Checklist
      •    Appendix G

Presentation Tips
Experiment and try new things.
Rooms often have capabilities other than what most people use them
for.

ALWAYS HAVE A BACKUP PLAN!!
You can do everything in your power to make sure that problems do not
arise, but sometimes things go wrong. Try to have an "alternate no
AV" lecture planned, if the system should go down.

Check out the room ahead of time.
Before your first lecture, check out the room, and make sure it has
everything you need. This will avoid unwanted surprises the first day
of class.

Use visuals.
Visuals help people stay engaged in what you are saying and makes
your points clearer. Make sure they are clear, easy to read, and big
enough for everyone to see.

Use color to influence mood and emotion.
The colors for type, illustrations and backgrounds influence the way
they are perceived. Here is a basic guide to using color in your
presentations:
Red –– excitement, alert Green –– growth, Yellow –– confidence,
warmth, wisdom Purple –– dignity, sophistication, White ––
professionalism, new, innocence, Blue –– truth, trust, justice, Black
–– authority, strength Orange –– action, optimism, Brown ––
friendliness, warmth Grey –– integrity, maturity

Apply appropriate type styles for readability.
For hand-outs, overheads, or take-home material print the paragraph
copy in a clear type style that is easy to read. No more than 4
points on a page.

Include photographs to inject realism.
The more true to life you make the issue you are presenting, the
better your audience will understand and identify with it. Remember
the impact you can add by using photos, real objects, or videos of
people on location.

Speak loud enough so that everyone can hear and understand you and
make eye contact with your audience.

  •       Appendix H

Interview Tips

              o   Find out the standard dress for the organization.
              o   Dress on the conservative side.
              o   Arrive early.
              o   Bring extra resumes, note pad, pen.
          o   Be sure you know how to pronounce your interviewer's name
              correctly.
          o   Be polite to everyone you meet there. They all count.
          o   Be personable as well as professional.
          o   Do not chew gum, smoke, swear or use slang.
          o   Be aware of body language, vibes, reactions——use your
              instincts to keep things on course.
          o   Feel free to ask for clarification before answering a
              question.
          o   Take some time to formulate your answers before you
              speak.
          o   Answer all questions honestly, but in the best, most
              positive light.
          o   Do not bad mouth old employers.

Research, Rehearse and Relax
No matter how well qualified you are for a job or how articulate you
are about your strengths and experience, there is nothing that can
replace preparation. Once you have practiced asking and answering
questions, the next step is to relax and remind yourself that:

          o   There is no question you cannot answer
          o   You are well suited to the position
          o   You would be an asset to the company.

Visualize yourself sitting in the interview feeling serene and
confident. Get a good night's sleep before the interview, arrive a
few minutes early, take a few deep breaths and seize the day.

          o   Research the Company
          o   Rehearse Your Presentation
          o   Relax and Project Self-Confidence

http://content.monster.com/jobinfo/interview/rrr/


  •   Appendix I
  •   Interview Questions

    * Tell me about you!
      Keep your answer to one or two minutes; don't ramble. Use your
resume summary as a base to start.

    * What do you know about our company?
      Do your homework before the interview! Spend some time online
or at the library researching the company. Find out as much as you
can, including products, size, income, reputation, image, management
talent, people, skills, history and philosophy. Project an informed
interest; let the interviewer tell you about the company.

    * Why do you want to work for us?
      Don't talk about what you want; first, talk about their needs:
You would like to be part of a specific company project; you would
like to solve a company problem; you can make a definite contribution
to specific company goals.

    * What would you do for us? What can you do for us that someone
else can't?
      Relate past experiences that show you've had success in solving
previous employer problem(s) that may be similar to those of the
prospective employer.

    * What about the job offered do you find the most attractive?
Least attractive?
      List three or more attractive factors and only one minor
unattractive factor.

    * Why should we hire you?
      Because of your knowledge, experience, abilities and skills.

    * What do you look for in a job?
      An opportunity to use your skills, to perform and be
recognized.

    * Please give me your definition of a .... (the position for
which you are being interviewed).
      Keep it brief -- give an action- and results-oriented
definition.

    * What was the last book you read? Movie you saw? Sporting event
you attended?
      Talk about books, sports or films to show that you have balance
in your life.

    * What is the toughest part of a job for you?
      Be honest. Remember, not everyone can do everything.

    * Are you creative?
      Yes. Give examples.

    * How would you describe your own personality?
      Balanced is a good word to use, but remember the type of
company you are interviewing at. Some companies may want someone who
is aggressive and a go-getter.

    * What are your future goals?
      Avoid, "I would like the job you advertised." Instead, give
long-range goals.

    * What are your strengths?
      Present at least three and relate them to the company and job
you are interviewing for.

    * What are your weaknesses?
      Don't say that you don't have any. Try not to cite personal
characteristics as weaknesses, but be ready to have one if the
interviewer presses. Turn a negative into a positive answer: "I am
sometimes intent on completing an assignment and get too deeply
involved when we are late."

    * How do you resolve conflict on a project team?
      Explain that communication is important, and that you would
first you discuss the issues privately.

    * What was the most difficult decision you ever had to make?
      Try to relate your response to the prospective employment
situation.

    * What would you do if you had a problem with someone you were
working with. How would you handle that situation?
      Speak with that person about the problem. Set up a time to sit
down and talk to that person. If this does not work arrange to have
an outside mediator to sit down and discuss the problem with the two
of you.

    * What would you do if your friend showed up from out of town and
you are scheduled to work?
       Tell my friend that I have to work but I'll be home in a few
hours.

    * If you were a fruit what fruit would you be and why?
      Use your imagination. Think of qualities that you possess that
can be related to a fruit. Ex: Hard = hard working, disciplined Soft=
kind, easy to get along with



      Lesson 8: Budgeting: How to make money last

Outcomes:
Communicative/
Experiential:

  •   Students will be able to make up a budget scenario which will be
      used to get the public involved in understanding how budgets can
      be helpful in reducing stress.
  •   Students will be able to create their own budget planning sheet.

Language:

  •  Speaking:
          o Students will be able to participate in small group
discussion on non-personal familiar topics and issues: express
opinions, feelings, obligation, ability, certainty.(Canadian Language
Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 63).
                + We think Joe could save money by...
                + A budget is a good idea because it keeps you from
overspending.
                + Buying shampoo would go under drug store items.
          o Students will be able to indicate partial comprehension
(Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 62).
                + I'm not sure I understood this sentence. What do
you think it means?
                + I don't understand what we are supposed to be
doing. Can you explain?
          o Students will be able to make a simple suggestion;
provide reason (Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p.
62).
                + I think joe should stop going to so many movies and
start renting movies.
                + If Joe wants to buy Christmas gifts for his family,
he will have to cut back on his spending because his expenses are
more than his income.


  •  Listening:
           o Students will be able to demonstrate comprehension of
details and speaker's purpose in suggestions, advice, encouragements
and requests.(Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p.
79).
                 + Able to understand teacher when he or she makes a
comment about where the things on the list should be categorized.
           o Students will be able to understand a set of instructions
when not presented completely in point form: sequence/order must be
inferred in the text.(Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark #
6, p. 79).
                 + After you have written your scenario, exchange it
with another group for proofreading.


  •  Reading:
          o Students will be able to identify factual details and
some inferred meanings in moderately complex formatted texts
containing advice, requests, specifications.(Canadian Language
Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p .91).
                + Able to understand the scenario enough to fill in
the budget planning form.


  •  Writing:
          o Students will be able to fill out moderately complex
forms. (Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 103).
                + Able to fill out budget planning form
          o Students will be able to write one or two paragraphs to:
relate a familiar sequence of events, tell a story; provide a
detailed description and comparison of people, places, objects, and
animals, plants, material, or routines. (Canadian Language
Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 103).
                + Able to write a scenario describing the spending
habits and the income of a make-believe person.


Culture/Content:

  •   Students will be expected to speak and listen to explore,
      extend, clarify, and reflect on their thoughts, ideas, feelings,
      and experiences related to budget making.
  •   Students will be expected to communicate information and ideas
      effectively and clearly, and to respond personally and
      critically in the discussion of budget making.
  •   Students will be expected to use writing to explore, clarify,
      and reflect on their thoughts, feelings, experiences and
      learnings by creating a story describing someone's spending
      habits and income.
  •   Students will be expected to read with understanding a text
      about someone's spending habits and sources of income 5.
      Students will be expected to respond personally to a sample
      budget by discussing how they think they are useful.
General
Language
Education:

  •   Students will be able   to work in groups to carry out a task.
  •   Students will be able   to use models to grasp how to make a
      budget.
  •   Students will be able   to move with rhythm to understand the
      rhythm of English.
  •   Students will be able   use visual scaffolding to understand new
      vocabulary.
  •   Students will be able   to use partner work to help each other
      understand a text.
  •   Students will be able   to draw upon what they learned to make
      their own budget.

Activity:

Pre-Activity:   (45 minutes)
On an overhead projector, the teacher will put a copy of the list
found in Appendix J. Give each student a copy of the budget planner
found in Appendix K. Then the teacher will go through the list in
Appendix J and ask students where each sentence belongs. For example:
I am going to the movies tomorrow night would be categorized under
entertainment. Working at the library 10 hours a week would be
characterized as a part-time job. The visuals will serve as support
for understanding any new vocabulary. Make sure each student has a
chance to respond. Ask them to respond in a complete sentence. This
activity will promote engagement for the next activity, introduce
them to vocabulary involved in budget making, and get them thinking
about what kind of things are involved in making a budget.

Activity:        (45 minutes)
Give each student a copy of Appendix L. This sheet will be read out
loud by the whole class. Students will stand up and read the sheet
with rhythm. This means that they will move a part of their body as
they read the stressed syllables. For example you could bend your
knees every time you read a stressed syllable. This will help
students learn the rhythm of the language. The teacher should model
rhythm often when reading something aloud by moving with the rhythm
of the language.

When the sheet has been read with rhythm, ask for volunteers to tell
you what each point on the sheet says about how to go about making a
budget. If there are words or phrases that the students do not
understand, explain it to them.

Once students understand what is involved in making a budget, tell
them to get out their copy of the budget planner (Appendix K) Also,
give each student a copy of the budget scenario (Appendix M). In
partners, students will fill in Joe's budget and calculate if he
needs to cut back in his spending in order to have money to buy
Christmas gifts. Tell them to work with pencils in case they need to
erase something. Be sure to explain that you divide loans and
scholarships up into an 8 month period so that you know how much you
have per month. Tell people to double-check their calculations. The
teacher will circulate to help people who are having problems with
the language or the calculations.

When all groups have finished their calculations, have a class
discussion about the answers that people came up with.

  •   How much monthly income is Joe getting?
  •   How much is Joe spending each month?
  •   What could he do to save money?
  •   What do you think about all the expenses involved in university
      life?
  •   Do you think making a budget is worth the time it takes to make
      it?
  •   Did you know that most computers have programs where you can
      revise your budget in minutes?
  •   How could using a budget planning sheet be a long-term strategy
      to coping with stress?

Post-Activity: (1 class)
In groups of three, students will make up budget scenarios (1
paragraph long) for the public to complete in lesson 9 when people
come for the open house rotary. This rotary will be a display of all
the strategies we have learned in this unit of ways of coping with
stress.

Students will use their budget planning sheet to make up their
scenario. Students must write in complete sentences and they must
pass in a key to the teacher listing all the sources of income and
all the expenses so that he or she knows if the character in their
scenario needs to cut back on spending. Each student must write the
scenario so that in the end there are three copies of each scenario.

When students have finished writing their scenarios, they will
exchange theirs with another group and they will practice on each
other. The groups will make any corrections in spelling, grammar, or
punctuation that they remark. These corrections will be circled so
that groups know what they need to change in their second draft of
the scenario.

Each group will pass in one copy of the final scenario to the
teacher. The teacher will choose random sentences within the texts
that were passed in and so a syntax synergy activity. This means he
or she will choose a sentence that is in the wrong order and write it
on the board. Ex: I have a big loan student. Then he or she would
tell one student to write the first word of the sentence on a piece
of paper and another person to write the second word on a piece of
paper and another person to write the third word... In the end each
word of the sentence should be written on a separate piece of paper
where the students can all see it. The paper will be taped on the
board in the incorrect order. The teacher will ask for a volunteer to
come up and fix the error. Reaffirm that in some languages (like
French) this is the correct syntax but in English it is student loan,
not loan student. You could do several sentences in a short amount of
time if you assign everyone in the class a word from an incorrect
sentence that is written on the board.

The teacher will keep the scenarios until the next lesson when
students start preparing for the rotary. The remaining copies of
drafts and final budget scenarios will be placed in the student's
respective portfolio. After the rotary, the student who passed in his
or her first draft and final draft will put it in his or her
portfolio for evaluation.

Homework: Students will make a budget for themselves for the next
month. The budget will list the student's sources of income and his
or her expenses. At the bottom there should be a balance. This budget
planning sheet will be placed in the student's portfolio for
evaluation.

Evaluation:           To evaluate this lesson, I will be using a
performance checklist which will be based on my informal observations
of the students throughout the unit. This will be a form of formative
evaluation because it will give me a chance to see if the student is
experiencing success, needing extra help, feeling unengaged, etc.
(See Appendix Afor checklist.). I will use this to modify and improve
my next lessons. I will also be using the portfolios as a way of
keeping track of how well the students are grasping the concepts and
the language that is being learned in class. In this lesson, the
portfolios will be used to store a copy of both budget scenario
drafts and the personal budgets that will be completed for homework.

Materials:
  •   Overhead projector
  •   Tape
  •   Blank paper
  •   Calculators

Resources:
  •   Herrell, A. Fifty Strategies For Teaching English Language
      Learners. Ohio: Merrill, 2000. (Ch 45 & 47)
  •   CIBC National Student Centre: A Guide to Student Credit, 2002.
  •   Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000.
  •   Atlantic Canada English Language Arts Curriculum High School,
      (1998), New Brunswick Department of Education.

Appendix:
  •   Appendix A: Performance Checklist
  •   Appendix K:

                     Budget Planner
                      Aug.   Sept.   Oct.   Nov.   Dec.   Jan.   Feb.   Mar.   Apr.
Income


Scholarship
Bursaries
family Support
Loans
Savings
Summer Job
Part-time job
Other


Total Monthly Income


Monthly Expenses


Rent
Transportation
Car insurance/Repair
Gasoline
Parking
Utilities: Water, Heat,
Electricity
Phone (including long
distance)
Groceries
Laundry
Entertainment
Drug store items
Loan and credit car
payments
Clothing
Christmas Gifts/Birthday
Gifts, etc.
Trips home
Other


Total Monthly Expenses


Total Monthly Income
Less Total Monthly
Expenses
Monthly Balance

    • Appendix L:
    •
  How to Squeeze Every Penny out of Every Dollar you Have.

      * Get as much information as you can on costs. If you have to
  guess at costs, estimate on the high side.
      * Identify all your sources of income and when you expect to
  receive the funds.
    * Determine your fixed costs, such as rent and utilities, and
when they are due.
    * Estimate valuable expenses, such as food, clothing, laundry,
drug store items and entertainment.
    * Don't overlook one-time expenses, such as trips home,
birthday presents, books and course materials. Take advantage of
student discounts whenever possible.
    * Keep your budget current. Review it monthly and revise as
circumstances change.
    * If your expenses are more than your income, you have to cut
back somewhere.

CIBC National Student Centre: A Guide to Student Credit, 2002.

  •   Appendix M:

Budget Scenario

Hi my name is Joe and I need help with my budget. Will you help me?
I live with my friend Mike and we live in a small apartment
downtown. The rent is $700 but that is between the two of us. We
also pay about $120 for heat and light. We buy our groceries
separately so I usually spend about $50 a week. I have no student
loan payments to make because I am a student but I was lucky once
again this year because I was approved for a student loan. They
gave me a $4000 loan. My parents pay for my tuition. They also give
me $20 a week for spending money. I love to watch movies and I
spend probably 25 dollars a week at the cinema. I don't have a car
but I take the bus a lot. This costs at least $ 55 a month. I do my
laundry every two weeks and it costs 12 dollars each time. I hate
how you need to save up quarters for the laundry machine. I live in
Newfoundland but I am going to university in Toronto. I go home
twice a year so I usually save up $80 a month for traveling money.
Our phone bill usually costs $30 a month, plus 20 dollars for long
distance. I won a $300 track and field scholarship this year. My
parents were so proud of me. However, I don't see much of this
money because I sponsor a child from Africa for $50 a month. Also I
have asthma and I spend about $145 a month on my medication. Please
help. I need to know how much money I have left to spend on
Christmas presents.

Thanks,

Joe

If I don't have enough money can you give me some advice on what I
should cut back on.




 Lesson 9: Open House Rotary: lets share what we
                  have learned!

Outcomes:
Communicative/
Experiential:

  •   Students will be able to use the materials that they have
      prepared and the ideas presented in class, to create various
      learning centres for other grade 10, 11, or 12 classes in the
      community, informing them of the types of stressors they can
      expect to encounter and some effective ways of dealing with
      them An open house (class) will take place at a later date.
  •   Students will be able to present stress management techniques
      to other students.

Language:

  •  Speaking:
          o Make a verbal request for an item. (Canadian Language
Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 62).
                + Can I have the materials from lesson 4 please?
                + Does anyone have a blue marker that I could
borrow?


  •  Listening:
          o Demonstrate comprehension of details and speaker's
purpose in suggestions, advice, encouragements and requests.
(Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 79).
                + Able to understand what the teacher is saying
during the one-on-one conferencing.
                + Able to use the advice given by the teacher in
the meeting to make corrections in his or her text.


  •   Reading:
           o Follow a set of common everyday instructions (up to ten
steps) when not presented in point form: sequence/order must be
inferred. (Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p .
91).
                 + Able to understand rotary preparation direction
sheet


  •  Writing:
          o Write one or two paragraphs to: describe a simple
routine, or process, to provide a detailed description, or to
compare objects. (Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark #
6, p. 103).
                + Person #1: will be responsible for writing a
paragraph explaining current resume trends and how we gathered our
information.
                + Person # 2: Will be responsible for writing a
paragraph about why having an up-to date resume is an important
long-term stress management strategy.

Culture/Content:

  •   Students will be expected to use a range of strategies to
      develop effective writing and other ways of representing, and
      to enhance clarity, precision, and effectiveness such as
      revising, editing, reading aloud, etc.
  •   Students will be expected to use writing and other ways of
      representation to explore, clarify, and reflect on their
      thoughts, feelings, experiences, and learnings concerning
      coping with stress, and to use their imaginations to create
      learning centres for the public.
  •   Students will be expected to individually create easy- to-
      follow, grammatically correct texts for their learning centres
      while paying attention to the audience that will be coming to
      visit their centres.

      Atlantic Canada English Language Arts Curriculum High School,
(1998), New Brunswick Department of Education.

General
Language
Education:

  •   Students will be able to improve their writing skills though
      peer revising and editing.
  •   Students will be able to use the writing process to improve
      their writing skills.
  •   Students will be able to use checklists to organize their
      writing.
  •   Students will be able to use reading aloud as a strategy for
      recognizing errors in their writing.
  •   Students will be able to use dictionaries, thesauruses, and
      grammar resource books to expand their vocabulary.

Activity:

Pre-Activity:       This lesson will consist of six classes so I
will explain how things will run in each class. This lesson will
allow for a lot of differentiation in abilities. Each student will
be assigned a different job according to their language
proficiency, yet they will all be provided with the tools they need
to complete their task. For example the students who are capable of
writing a more complicated paragraph will be assigned to writing
tasks that require more in-depth explanations like the one in
lesson 8. Students who work faster than others could be assigned to
a job where there is more than one job to do. Those who need the
assurance of having someone else on their team will be assigned to
a job where someone else is working on a similar task for that
particular center. This way, they can complete their own writing
and still have someone who can help them if it is needed. Those who
are slower writers can be given a job that requires a shorter text.
The groups are designed to give 25 students specific jobs. More
jobs can be created if necessary. In the end, all the students'
work will come together to make up a rotary full of both short-term
and long-term stress management learning centers and everyone will
feel proud of their contribution to a published work. The long-term
and short term strategy booths will be physically separated and the
teacher will get students who finish early to make signs saying
short-term stress management strategies and long-term stress
management strategies.

Class 1: Introduction to how the rotary will be put together:
Say: The unit is almost finished and it is now time for us to
gather everything that we have done and learned from this unit and
share it with others through the creation of an open house rotary.
As I have said before, this rotary will consist of learning centers
designed and run by you. People will be invited to come from other
classes and other local schools to learn from you. You should be
very proud of yourselves for the work you have done. I cannot wait
for others to see and learn from your hard work. However, the work
is not over yet. We still have to design our centers, explain how
we got our information, and summarize the information that was
gathered throughout this unit. You will all have to be patient and
work efficiently for this to work. Don't hesitate to come see me
with questions that you have about your job because I will often be
asking for your help as well.

I have broken the lessons down into jobs that have to be done for
each lesson. Some lessons require the work of just two people, and
some require more than that. However, you will all be writing a
text individually. You will each be given a direction sheet telling
you what your job is. Please read the directions carefully more
than once. Then ask me any questions that you are left with.(See
Appendices N to U for direction sheets- if this were a real class
the names of the students would be written in the place of Person #
1, 2 etc. on the direction sheets. This way, students would know
exactly what their responsibilities are when they got their sheet).

In each lesson, there are things that the students must collect
from the teacher before they can start writing or preparing their
centers such as work done by their classmates in earlier classes or
decorating materials. To prevent chaos, the teacher should organize
this pickup by asking students to come up to the front one group at
a time. The items should be in a box of some kind so that students
will not lose the items contained within it. Remind students that
these items are very important and cannot be misplaced.

Students plan to write: Give out the paragraph checklist (see
Appendix V) and tell them to use this checklist at each stage of
their writing. Depending on how much time the explanation takes and
how many questions are asked, the students may not have a lot of
time to start planning their first drafts in this class. However,
should at least have time to brainstorm about what they will put
into their first drafts. For homework they can make an outline of
the points they will make in their paragraphs.

Activity:     Class 2: Students will use this class to write the
first draft of their paragraphs.
They will finish their paragraphs for homework. The first draft
will be saved on a disk as "draft #1" and printed out. All drafts
must be double spaced to leave room for revision and editing.

Class 3: Revising:
Give the students the Revising Rubric (see Appendix W). The teacher
will go over it in detail by asking students to give examples of
what each point means from their own writing. The teacher will
provide explanations when needed. Then students will go back and
revise their own paragraphs. They will make the corrections by hand
(not on the computer) so that the teacher can see the corrections
that were made. Remind students that this is the same rubric that
will be used to evaluate their final drafts once they are finished.
For homework students will make the corrections to their electronic
version of their paragraph, save it on a disk as "draft # 2," and
print off the revised copy for next class. Students will put all
drafts in their portfolio for evaluation.

Class 4: Editing:
Give the students the Editing Rubric (Appendix X). Go over each
question one by one, getting students to give examples of what the
question is asking from their own texts. The teacher will provide
explanations when needed. Then students will go back and edit their
own paragraphs for the second time. They will make the corrections
by hand (not on the computer) so that the teacher can see the
corrections that were made. Remind the class that this is the same
rubric that will be used to evaluate their final drafts once they
are finished. For homework students will make the corrections to
their electronic version of their paragraph, save it on a disk as
"draft # 3," and print off the revised copy for next class.
Students will put all drafts in their portfolio for evaluation.

Class 5: This class will be used to do some peer revision and
editing.
Get students to line up in order of tallest to shortest. Tell each
student to look behind him or her. This will be the person who will
be peer revising his or her writing. The person at the front will
revise the writing of the person at the back of the line.) Give
each person the Revision Helper sheets (See Appendix Y) and tell
students they have thirty minutes to revise that person's work.
Tell them to put their name at the bottom of the page so the
teacher will know who revised it when it comes time for evaluation.
When thirty minutes is up, students give back paragraphs with the
revision helper sheet stapled to it. Remind students that the
revisions are just suggestions and the advice does not have to be
taken if they disagree with the suggestion. Students should go to
the computer lab and make the necessary changes and save the draft
as "draft #4 on their disk. They should print off a copy of their
revised draft and bring it back to class. They should put their
draft that was peer revised along with the revision helper sheet
into their portfolio.

Once the paragraphs have all been revised by a peer, it will be
time to do some peer editing. Get the class to line up in order of
their birthdays. Tell each student to look behind him or her. This
will be the person who will be peer editing his or her writing. The
person at the front will editing the writing of the person at the
back of the line.) Give each person the Editing Helper sheet (See
Appendix Z) and tell students they have thirty minutes to edit that
person's work. Tell them to put their name at the bottom of the
page so the teacher will know who edited it when it comes time for
evaluation. When thirty minutes is up, students give back
paragraphs with the editing helper sheet stapled to it. Remind
students that the corrections are just suggestions and the advice
does not have to be taken if they disagree with the suggestion.
Students should go to the computer lab and make the necessary
changes and save the draft as "draft #5 on their disk. They should
print off a copy of their edited draft and bring it back to class.
They should put their draft that was peer edited along with the
editing helper sheet into their portfolio.
Class 6: This class will give students an opportunity to decorate
and finish any other jobs that are left to be done in their part of
the consumer handbook. Ex: Get centers set up and decorated, make a
sign for short-term and long-term stress management strategies.
While this is happening, I will be doing end-point conferencing
with each student.

This is where the teacher will spend 7-10 minutes with each student
individually, to see what goals have been achieved since the last
in-depth conference that took place in lesson 4. The teacher will
have looked through the student's portfolio, performance checklist,
and learning centre in order to get an idea of how the student has
improved and what challenges still exist. Making notes of what the
students need to improve on will make it easier to plan the next
unit. It will also help the student see how he or she is improving
and on what he or she needs to focus. The teacher will summarize
the student's strengths and weaknesses before the conference and
then during the conference, together with the student, set some
goals for the next unit.

The second part of this conference will be for students to show the
latest draft of their paragraphs to the teacher for final
discussion. The students will quietly read the paragraph aloud to
the teacher. This will allow any remaining errors to become
evident. The teacher will explain why the corrections are necessary
instead of just going in and correcting the text without the input
from the student. At the end of the conference, all errors will
have been noted and the writing will all be ready to be published.
After their conference, students will go to the computer lab and
make any final corrections that came up in the conference. They
will save this on a disk labelling it "final draft." They will
print it off and bring it back to class. Students will make sure
all the drafts of their paragraph are in their portfolio except
their final draft which will be placed on the table of their
learning centre for the public to read.

As the teacher is conferencing, the rest of the class should be
setting up their learning centres. Each centre should have a table
and some chairs for the students to sit on. You might need a larger
area to set up the centres such as the gymnasium. Also, some
lessons have jobs other than writing the paragraph. The students
assigned to these lessons should finish this before they start
decorating.

The teacher will send out invitations by mail or e-mail to other
schools and classes inviting them to the open house rotary.

Evaluation:         To evaluate this lesson, I will be using the
revision and writing rubrics, and the paragraph checklist. They
will be given a formal mark on their writing. I will be taking into
consideration the progress they made in their drafts. Have they
corrected a lot of mistakes? Are they paying attention when they
revise and edit or are they just skimming through it? Also, an
overall mark for participation will be given for this unit by
looking at the student's performance checklist and the work in
their portfolios. The one-on-one conferencing will be another
important part of my evaluation for this unit. However, this will
not be used to gather a formal mark, but rather to give the student
guidance, confidence, and reassurance for the future, while showing
me the student's needs so I can plan for the future.

Materials:
  •   Bristle board
  •   Balloons
  •   Markers
  •   Construction paper
  •   Stencils
  •   Computers
  •   Tape
  •   Poems that were written in lesson 1
  •   Copy of the prioritization activity that we did in the pre-
      activity in Lesson 2
  •   A non-see through bag
  •   Anne Frank: The Diary of a Girl.
  •   Supplies for making stress balls (see lesson #5)
  •   Some exceptional sample resumes that students have put
      together
  •   Interview and presentation tip sheets (see lesson 7)
  •   Budget scenarios that were written by students in lesson 8
  •   Thesauruses
  •   Dictionaries
  •   Grammar resource books
  •   Play-doh

Resources:
  •   Conferencing in Creative Writing Handout [ED 5353, 2002]
  •   Herrell, A. Fifty Strategies For Teaching English Language
      Learners. Ohio: Merrill, 2000. (Ch1 & 50)
  •   Richard Amato, Patricia. Making it Happen. New York: Longman,
      1996. (Ch.4)
  •   Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000.
  •   Atlantic Canada English Language Arts Curriculum High School,
      (1998), New Brunswick Department of Education.
  •   White, Dorinda. Writers' Reminders: A Guide to Keeping Your
      Writing Sharp. 2002.
  •   MultiSource Activity Sheet. Prentice-Hall Canada Inc. 1993

Appendix:
  • Appendix A: Performance Checklist
  • Appendix N:
What is stress, what is making us stressed, and what does stress do
to us?
Group 1: 3 People (Lesson 1)
Your job is to make a learning center explaining:

   1. What does the word "Stress" mean?
   2. What are you stressed about right now and what gets you
stressed in general?
   3. In your experience, what happens to a person when they become
stressed?
   4. What stressors do you experience in Canada that you would not
experience in your country?
Each person will be responsible for preparing the answers to one of
the questions. The answers are posted around the classroom on the
chart paper. You can use these in your presentation, but you must
also accompany it with a written paragraph that people will be able
to read as they come to your center.
All Group Members:
The poems that people wrote related to stress in lesson one should
all be visible at your center.

See the teacher for your supplies.

After all the above work is done, decide on two group members to
decorate your learning center. There is bristle board, markers,
construction paper, and balloons available for you to make your
center look more inviting. Feel free to write key points in bold
letters.

The other person will be responsible for making a sign for your
center. Your title can be the same as the one above if you want.

Good Luck!

  •   Appendix O:

Prioritizing, Organizational Skills and Agendas
Group 2: 3 People (Lesson 2)
Person #1: You will be responsible for preparing a prioritizing
activity like we did in lesson 1. There is a copy of this activity
with your supplies. The activity should be one in which students
who come to your center can participate in to understand the
importance of prioritization. Your activity can be similar to the
one we did in class but you should write it in your own words and
use different vocabulary.

Person #2: You will be responsible for explaining some good
organizational strategies such as to-do lists, goal setting, taking
time for yourself, etc. You will write a paragraph about this and
have some visual examples to show people at your center. You can
use the notes that you took during the guest speaker lecture in
lesson 2 to help you.

Person #3: You will be responsible for writing a paragraph about
how agendas can help to keep you organized. Have an agenda there to
show students all the features they contain. This is important
because many people do not know how to properly use their agendas
or all the helpful information they contain. Be sure to include:

    * When should agendas be used?
    * What is in an agenda?
    * Where you can get an agenda?
    * Why they are helpful in coping with stress (planning ahead,
prioritizing, staying organized and on schedule)?

All Group Members:
After all the above work is done, decide on two group members to
decorate your learning center. There is bristle board, markers,
construction paper, and balloons available for you to make your
center look more inviting. Feel free to write key points in bold
letters.

Decide on one person to make a sign for your center. Your title can
be the same as the one above if you want.

Good Luck!

  •    Appendix P:

Assertiveness Training: How can I say no?
Group 3: 4 People (Lesson 3)
Examples of four assertive ways of saying no are:

   1. The pleasant no
           * Would you like to take over my shift Friday night? I
have a date.
           * That's awesome that you have a date, but I'm going to
have to say no thanks. I already have plans.
   2. The conditional no.
           * Come to the movies with me, you work too much.
           * I can't, I'm broke right now, but if you wait till
9:00, I'll go for a walk with you.
   3. The sleep on it no
           * Would you mind tutoring me in math? I'm fed up with my
professor.
           * Let me think about it and I'll let you know by tomorrow
afternoon.
   4. The alternative solution no
           * Can you give me a drive to the mall?
           * I don't have any gas in my car, but I can help you
figure out the bus route. with you.

Each person in this group will be responsible for writing a
paragraph about a different way of assertively saying no. Be sure
to include:

      *   When your method should be used.
      *   Why it is important to be assertive.
      *   How being assertive will help you cope with stress.
      *   Examples

All Group Members:
After having read your explanations, the public will be invited by
you to practice one of these strategies using the skit in a bag
activity. The instructions to this activity are:

   1. The visitor picks an object from a bag (which all group
members have filled with random household items.
   2. Group members will take turns asking a question to the
visitors
   3. The visitor will respond using one of the methods you have
explained to them in your paragraphs. They will incorporate the
object into the conversation just to make the activity more
interesting and fun.

Each group member should bring five things to put in the bag for
this activity.
After all the above work is done, decide on two group members to
decorate your learning center. There is bristle board, markers,
construction paper, and balloons available for you to make your
center look more inviting. Feel free to write key points in bold
letters.

Decide on one person to make a sign for your center. Your title can
be the same as the one above if you want.

Good Luck!

  •   Appendix Q:

Journal Writing/Speaking: Get it all out!
Group 4: 4 People (Lesson 4)
Persons 1 & 2 Will be responsible for writing a paragraph on Anne
Frank: The Diary of a Girl. Write about what happened to her and
how she used journal writing to get through the 25 months she spent
in hiding during the second world war.

During the rotary you will also take turns reading excerpts (small
parts) of Anne Frank's journal.

Here is some information that we already talked about but be sure
to include anything else you find interesting about her life or her
experiences:

    * Born on June 12, 1929, Anne Frank was a German-Jewish
teenager who was forced to go into hiding during the Holocaust. She
and her family, along with four others, spent 25 months during
World War II in an annex of rooms above her father''s office in
Amsterdam, the Netherlands.Her diary, saved during the war by one
of the family''s helpers, Miep Gies, was first published in 1947.
Today, her diary has been translated into 67 languages and is one
of the most widely read books in the world.

Persons 3 & 4 Will be responsible for writing a journal entry that
the public can read. They should express:

    * What journal writing does for you.
    * How journal writing can be used to cope with stress.
    * How you feel after writing in your journal.
    * The different types of journals one can keep (cassette,
dance, painting, writing, etc.)

You should also have examples of a few of your past journals to
give the public an idea of what sorts of things people put in their
journals.
All Group Members:
After all the above work is done, decide on two group members to
decorate your learning center. There is bristle board, markers,
construction paper, and balloons available for you to make your
center look more inviting. Feel free to write key points in bold
letters.

Decide on one person to make a sign for your center. Your title can
be the same as the one above if you want.
Good Luck!


  •   Appendix R:

Take Time for Yourself: What do you like to do?
Group 5: 4 People (Lesson 5)
Persons 1, 2, & 3 will write a paragraph about what they like to do
to relieve stress and why. Each person should describe at least
three activities. Together, these students will also make a list of
other activities that the class came up with in their survey. You
can use the list that the teacher photocopied in lesson 5 to help
you make a the list.

When students come to you learning centre, ask them to add to our
class list of things to do to relieve stress by adding their own
strategies.

Person # 4 will write a paragraph describing what stress balls are
and why they can be used to relieve stress.
All Group Members:
All group members will be given a copy of lesson 5 appendix C: the
instructions to making stress balls. You will be responsible for
helping the visitors make their own stress balls so make sure you
are comfortable with the directions.

Also you will be responsible for bringing in or obtaining from the
teacher soft relaxing music. This will be played while the visitors
are making their stress balls.

After all the above work is done, decide on two group members to
decorate your learning center. There is bristle board, markers,
construction paper, and balloons available for you to make your
center look more inviting. Feel free to write key points in bold
letters.

Decide on one person to make a sign for your center. Your title can
be the same as the one above if you want.

Good Luck!

  •   Appendix S:

Resume Writing: Let's get started.
Group 6: 2 People (Lesson 6)
Person # 1: Will be responsible for writing a paragraph explaining
current resume trends and how we gathered our information.

Person # 2: Will be responsible for writing a paragraph about why
having an up-to date resume is an important long-term stress
management strategy.
All Group Members:
Play-doh will be available from the teacher. You can use this at
your center to get people warmed up and thinking about resumes. You
can do what we did in lesson 6, get the public to design play-doh
symbols of information that belongs in a resume. Ex: hockey stick =
extra-curricular activities.
Copies of some well-written resumes, designed by your classmates,
will be available from the teacher. You can use these as examples
to demonstrate and explain to the public what a good resume looks
like.

After all the above work is done, choose one group member to
decorate your learning center. There is bristle board, markers,
construction paper, and balloons available for you to make your
center look more inviting. Feel free to write key points in bold
letters.

The other person will make a sign for your center. Your title can
be the same as the one above if you want.

Good Luck!


  •   Appendix T:

Interview/Presentation Skills: Don't stress about it!
Group 7: 2 People (Lesson 7)
Person # 1: You will be responsible for making up and writing true
and false questions from the interview tip sheet. You will ask your
questions to the visitors that come to your learning center. You
should have at least 10 questions.

You will also be responsible for writing a paragraph about what we
did in this lesson to prepare students for interviews and
presentations. Comment on how you feel now about interviews and
presentations compared to how you felt before.

Person # 2: You will be responsible for making up and writing true
and false questions from the presentation tip sheet. You will ask
your questions to the visitors that come to your learning center.
You should have at least 10 questions.

You will also be responsible for writing a paragraph about what we
did in this lesson to prepare students for interviews and
presentations. Comment on how you feel now about interviews and
presentations compared to how you felt before.
All Group Members:
You should also make a list of some of the interview questions that
typically come up in interviews. If the visitors choose, they can
act as the person being interviewed and you can ask them a question
or two and then give them advice about what would be a good answer.

After all the above work is done, choose one group member to
decorate your learning center. There is bristle board, markers,
construction paper, and balloons available for you to make your
center look more inviting. Feel free to write key points in bold
letters.

The other person will make a sign for your center. Your title can
be the same as the one above if you want.

Good Luck!
  •   Appendix U:

Budgeting: How to make money last.
Group 8: 3 People (Lesson 8)
Person #1: You will be responsible for writing a paragraph about
why budgeting is a good long-term stress management strategy.

Person # 2: You will be responsible for writing a paragraph about
how a budget works. (How do you make a budget?)

Person # 3: You will be responsible for writing instruction for our
visitors to follow to complete a budget planning sheet using the
scenarios that your classmates prepared in lesson 8. Be sure to
give step by step instructions and use examples whenever possible.
Ex: My car needs new windshield wipers. They cost $20. This would
be categorized under "Car insurance/Repair" on the budget planner
sheet.

You will also be responsible for writing a paragraph explaining how
learning how doing a budget has affected your own personal life or
how it will affect it in the future. Be specific. Are you planning
a trip? Are you saving up for something?
All Group Members:
At your center, visitors will be given a budget planner sheet and
asked to fill it in according to the budget scenario that you give
them. This will teach them what a budget planner sheet looks like
and how to go about making one. Be sure to use different scenarios
as different visitors come to your center.

After all the above work is done, decide on two group members to
decorate your learning center. There is bristle board, markers,
construction paper, and balloons available for you to make your
center look more inviting. Feel free to write key points in bold
letters.

The other person will be responsible for making a sign for your
center. Your title can be the same as the one above if you want.

Good Luck!


  •   Appendix V:

  Paragraph Checklist

      1. Have I given my paragraph a title? __________

     2. Have I made an outline of the points I want to make in the
  body of my paragraph before starting to write? ________

     3. Have I started my paragraph in a way that will get people
  interested in what I have to say? _________

     4. Have I connected the sentences and ideas so that they seem
  related e.g.: however, because, therefore, hence, but,
  furthermore, so, then, etc.? ________
     5. Have I supported my ideas with examples and details?
  __________

      6. Have I presented my ideas in a logical order? ___________

     7. Have I started a new paragraph when I started talking about
  a new topic? ___________

     8. Have I ended my paragraph by tying all of my ideas
  together? _______

     9. Have I covered everything that the directions told me to
  cover in my paragraph? _________

    10. Have I typed up my paragraph and saved it on a disk?
  _________



  •   Appendix W:

  Revising Your Writing Rubric
  The word revising comes from a Latin verb meaning "to see";
  revising means "looking at something again."When you revise, look
  at your writing as a critic. (Multisource, 1993)

  KEY: Y= YES, S= SOMEWHAT, N= NO

  Each yes = 2 marks
  Each somewhat = 1 mark
  Each no = 0 marks
    1. Is your overall purpose clear?        Y       S       N
    2. Is your language and content appropriate for your audience?
               Y      S      N
    3. Have you kept the same tone from beginning to end?
  Y       S      N
    4. Will the opening grab the reader?           Y       S      N
    5. Is every idea supported with details?             Y      S
  N
    6. Do all sections support the main idea of the paragraph?
               Y      S      N
    7. Do ideas appear in logical order?           Y       S      N
    8. Does each sentence have a clear purpose?          Y      S
  N
    9. Are all ideas logically connected?          Y       S      N
  10. Have you chosen the best words? Should any be replaced?
               Y      S      N
  11. Is unnecessary repetition avoided?           Y       S      N
  12. Is the title interesting and informative?          Y      S
  N
  13. Does the ending feel like a conclusion?            Y      S
  N

  Go back to your draft. Insert, delete, change, and move until you
  have corrected all the problems you can see.

* You should always revise before you do any editing.
      •   Appendix K:

Editing Your Writing Rubric
Once you feel that a piece of writing says what you want it to say, it
time to apply the final polish. You don want your reader to hesitate
even once because of a misspelled word or missing punctuation. Mark any
errors directly on the page. You can circle items, cross items out,
underline, draw arrows, or make notes in the margins. (Multisource,
1993)

KEY: Y= YES, S= SOMEWHAT, N= NO

Each yes = 2 marks
Each somewhat = 1 mark
Each no = 0 marks
  1. Are all words spelled correctly, especially words that have
homonyms (its, it's, their, there, they're)?           Y       S      N
  2. Are verbs active and vivid?           Y      S      N
  3. Have you used a variety of sentences? (e.g.: long, short, simple,
complex)           Y      S      N
  4. Are cliches, overused words and phrases avoided?        Y      S
N
  5. Is every sentence complete?           Y      S      N
  6. Have all run-on sentences been corrected?         Y       S      N
  7. Do all verbs agree with their subjects? Do all pronouns agree with
their antecedents?             Y      S      N
  8. Does every sentence end with proper punctuation?        Y      S
N
  9. Does every sentence and every proper noun begin with a capital
letter?            Y      S      N
10. Are commas used correctly? Are they used between items in a series,
with non-restrictive clauses and in introductory phrases, and with
dates? Have all unnecessary commas been removed?             Y      S
N
11. Are apostrophes used correctly in possessives and contractions?
             Y       S      N
12. Are small numbers written as words? Are larger numbers written as
numerals?          Y      S      N


      •   Appendix Y:

Revision Helpers

   1. Here's what we liked about your writing:




   2. This is a phrase, or a sentence that I thought was extremely
powerful or well written:
   3. In my opinion, this is the weakest section of your writing:




   4. Here is a suggestion of what I think you need to do to fix this:




   5. This is a word that I think is over used:




   6. Here are some words that mean the same thing that you might
consider using:




   7. Here is another possible opening sentence for your paragraph:




   8. Here is another possible closing sentence for your paragraph:



      •   Appendix Z

Editing Helper Sheet

   1. I have underlined words that I think are spelled wrong. I have
corrected them using a dictionary.

   2. I have circled letters that I think should be capitalized.

   3. I have put an arrow beside an action word that was not conjugated
properly. I have listed my suggestion below:

   4. I have put a square above spaces where commas should go. I have
put them there because there seems to be a pause required in the
reading in order to make it sound right.
   5. I have put a star above pronouns that do not agree with their
antecedents. I have listed my suggestions below.
      Ex:   She looks like a person who spoils their dog. * incorrect
              They look like people who walk their dog. * correct




 Lesson 10: Evaluation and Reflection: Celebrating
                      Stress.

Outcomes:

Communicative/
Experiential:

      •   Students will be able to complete a unit evaluation sheet.
      •   Students will be able to give a compliment to each person in
          the class.

Language:

      •  Speaking:
          o Students will be able to participate in small group
discussion on non-personal familiar topics and issues: express
opinions, feelings, obligation, ability, certainty.(Canadian Language
Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 63).
                + In a circle students will individually describe their
favourite and least favourite way of coping with stress


      •  Listening:
          o Students will be able to demonstrate comprehension of
details and speaker's purpose in suggestions, advice, encouragements
and requests.(Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p.
79).
                + Able to understand positive comments being given to
them by their classmates.


      •  Reading:
          o Students will be able to follow a set of common everyday
instructions (up to ten steps) when not presented in point form:
sequence/order must be inferred. (Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000,
Benchmark # 6, p .91).
                + After everyone has written something about everyone,
the class will take turns going around the class reading what they
wrote for a particular person.


      •  Writing:
          o Students will be able to fill out moderately complex forms.
(Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p. 103).
                + Able to fill out unit evaluation sheet.
          o Students will be able to convey a personal message through
a short note. (Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000, Benchmark # 6, p.
103).
                + On a slip of paper you will write what quality or
characteristic or talent that you think each unique person brought to
the group. Think about each person individually and why you are happy
that they were in the class during this unit and be prepared to read
what you write.

Culture/Content:

      •   Students will be expected to communicate information and ideas
          effectively and clearly, and to respond personally and
          critically to what they learned in this unit.
      •   Students will be expected to interact with their classmates
          using sensitivity and respect, considering the situation and
          purpose of the activities.
      •   Students will be expected to speak and listen to explore,
          extend, clarify, and reflect on their thoughts, ideas,
          feelings, and experiences by participating in some reflection
          activities and by completing a unit evaluation sheet. Atlantic
          Canada English Language Arts Curriculum High School, (1998),
          New Brunswick Department of Education.

General
Language
Education:

      •   Students will be able to use examples to understand how to do
          an activity.
      •   Students will be able to use reflection activities as a way of
          realizing what has been learned throughout the unit.
      •   Students will be able to use realia (a funeral) to motivate
          themselves to use the stress management strategies that they
          have learned in this unit.
      •   Students will be able to use the smile envelope activity to
          lower their affective filter.
      •   Students will be able to share their positive comments with
          each other in order to learn other ways of giving compliments.

Activity:
Pre-Activity:     (45 minutes)
Put these directions on the overhead projector (See Appendix AA for
printable directions):

We are going to do an activity called the Smile envelope. You will each
be given 30 slips of paper. For each person in the class, including the
teacher, please write this phrase on a slip of paper: "Person's name,
what you brought to the class in this unit was..."

For example one slip of paper might say: Don, what you brought to the
class in this unit was your keen sense of how to decorate our learning
centre.

You will write what quality or characteristic or talent that you think
each unique person brought to the group on a separate piece of paper.
Think about each person individually and why you are happy that they
were in the class during this unit. How did they help you or the class
in general to learn, have fun, communicate, etc. In other words how was
the class bettered by having that person around. Write a comment for
each person and be ready to read it out to the class.

Please do not say that you cannot think of at least one good thing to
say about everyone. This activity is meant to be a team builder where
you will all be recognized for contributing to this unit and everyone
has made this unit successful, so think of an honest yet positive
comment for everyone.

After everyone has written something about everyone, the class will
take turns going around the class reading what they wrote for a
particular person. For example we might start at the front of the class
with Bill, so everyone would read what they wrote about Bill and then
pass their slips of paper to him so he could put all the nice comments
about him in his smile envelope. Then we would continue reading our
comments about the person sitting next to Bill.

You can choose to put your names on the slips of paper or not. It's up
to you.

Having students give each other supportive comments will help establish
an environment where the students are aware of everyone's strengths and
weaknesses and are supportive of them. This will lower the affective
filter, allow students to have more fun, and learn the language faster.

Activity:   (30 minutes)
In a circle students will individually describe their favourite and
least favourite way of coping with stress. They will then write down
all of their stressors and put them in a bottle provided by the
teacher. We will then go outside and have a stress funeral outside
where all the stressors will be buried. The burying of the bottle will
represent the students' putting their stress to rest because now they
have the strategies to cope with it so that it doesn't control their
lives.

Post-Activity:    (15 minutes)
Students will then fill out a unit plan evaluation sheet that will help
me organize the next unit. (See Appendix BB for evaluation sheet.)

Homework: Students will read aloud or silently for 20 minutes in
English.

Evaluation:       The student performance evaluation for this unit has
already been completed. This lesson will be an evaluation of how the
unit was organized. When the students fill in the unit evaluation
sheet, I will know what needs to be changed, what they liked, and what
I should not repeat. It is important to get the students' input if I
want them to be engaged in what we do in class. If they are not
engaged, they will not learn. This lesson will also allow students to
do a self evaluation; they will realize what they learned, what they
did well, and what they need to keep working on. Sometimes when
students are not given an opportunity to reflect on what they have
learned and experienced, they do not realize their improvement.

Materials:
    •   About 30 slips of paper for each student (depends on how many
        people are in the class. Need a slip for each person in the
        class, including the teacher, for each student.
    •   envelope for each student and one for the teacher that says
        smile envelope.
    •   a bottle to bury the stressors
    •   a shovel to bury the bottle.

Resources:
    •   Richard Amato, Patricia. Making it Happen. New York: Longman,
        1996. (Ch.13)
    •   Herrell, A. Fifty Strategies For Teaching English Language
        Learners. Ohio: Merrill, 2000. (Ch 36)
    •   Newstrom, J and Edward Scannell. The Big Book of Team Building
        Games. U.S: Mcgraw Hill Companies Inc., 1998.
    •   Canadian Language Benchmarks, 2000.
    •   Atlantic Canada English Language Arts Curriculum High School,
        (1998), New Brunswick Department of Education.

Appendix:
    •   Appendix AA: Smile Envelope Instructions
    •   Appendix BB: Unit Plan Evaluation Sheet

				
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