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Scissors

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Scissors Powered By Docstoc
					                 by
The Shoreline Occupational Therapy Staff
              last updated May 2004
                                Contents
•   What Problems Do You See?
•   What is the Progression for Holding
    Scissors and Cutting?
•   Planning a Cutting Task
•   What is the Progression When
    Executing a Cutting Task?
•   Activities Which Support Hand
    Development
•   Activities Which Support Thumbs In
    Upward Position
•   Activities That Support Finger Control
    For Holding Scissors
•   Activities Which Support Using Both
    Hands
•   References and Resources
    What Problems Do You See?
• Thumb down and/or fingers splayed
• Scissors close to palm vs. in fingers
• Jagged cutting and poor control of opening
  and closing of scissors
• Paper and scissors are resting on the table
  throughout the cutting task
• Child has difficulty controlling paper and
  scissors at the same time
• Child doesn’t know where to start first cut
• Child cuts without ever rotating paper
Do you see this?

 thumb down           on joint




    two hands      fingers splayed
                                   Child cuts without ever letting go of the paper.
                                   Notice that both hands are at the right of midline.


Or this?

Child uses table for support.
Child’s thumbs are down for both
the working and holding hand.




                                        Child cannot figure out
                                        how to get to the shape
                                        without a marker line.
                     Why?
• Scissors are “sprung”- blades do not meet
• Finger and hand control are immature
   – Using whole hand to cut versus using thumb and
     first two fingers to control scissors
   – Using the table to support themselves because
     they have limited control in the fingers
• Poor Motor Planning
   – Lack of specific instruction on how to approach
     and execute cutting task
   – Some children with motor planning problems need
     more opportunities with specific instruction
      Progression for developing control of scissors
                         Part 1

• Child demonstrates interest in scissors
• Child experiments with opening and closing scissors,
  not necessarily cutting paper(hand position may vary)
• Child orients scissor blades to paper to begin
  snipping (hands do not rest on table)
      Progression for developing control of scissors
                         Part 2

• Child gains more finger control with the scissors
  positioned toward fingertips
• Child begins to cut in a forward motion across a 4-
  inch strip of paper without adjusting holding hand
Progression for developing control of scissors
                   Part 3
          • Child uses one hand to adjust paper
          while the other hand controls the
          scissors, cutting across an 8-inch wide
          piece of paper
          • Move holding hand forward as the
          scissors pass
       Progression for developing control of scissors
                          Part 4
• Child cuts forward on a line
• Child cuts turning corner(s)
   – Cutting past the shape/line to the edge of the paper before
     rotating object (Note: We don’t teach this, they just do it…
      however, we will sometimes structure a project this way to teach
      those that can’t break down the steps for organizing the sequence
      on their own.)
    – Rotate object (the paper, not the scissors) to cut around the
      corner
        Progression for developing control of scissors
                           Part 5
•   Child cuts out straight-line shapes (square, triangle)
•   Child cuts out curved-line shapes (circle, oval)
•   Child cuts out simple shapes (heart, moon)
•   Child cuts out complex shapes (star, hand)
•   Notice that the two hands must shift between the tasks of moving and holding.
    For example, one hand holds while the other opens and closes the scissors
    blades, then the scissors hand must hold while the holding hand shifts position
    on the paper.
         Planning a Cutting Task
 Pick up scissors with thumb in small hole and fingers in large
  hole
 Hold onto the piece you want to keep when you cut
 If there is more than one shape on the sheet, cut shapes apart
  from each other
 Cut out each shape
 If the child can’t figure out how to get to the shape with the
  scissors, the child could draw a line to the shape from the edge
  of the paper
 Child pre-plans where there are corners/curves
    What is the progression when
     executing a cutting task?
• Thumbs point upward for both the paper-holding hand and
  scissor-holding hand
• Looks ahead to plan size of cuts and speed of cutting
• Begins cutting task
• Keeps scissors pointed forward and rotates paper with
  helping hand when turning corners or curves
    –   (Does not turn scissors)
• Takes smaller snips (i.e, when turning corners)


 Right-handed: cut in a counter-clockwise direction around shape.
 Left-handed: cut in a clockwise direction around shape.
Activities Which Support Hand
          Development
• Lying on your stomach, supported on
  forearms while playing games or doing
  class work
• Playing on bars (hanging, swinging)
• Playing with clay
• Turning a jump rope for peers
• Chair push-ups when seated at desk
• Working on upright surfaces such as the
  chalkboard or easel
Activities Which Support Thumbs
        In Upward Position
 • Playing card games, especially being the dealer
 • Hole punch
 • Squirt bottle for watering plants
 • Snapping fingers
 • Games with small pieces to manipulate
   (Tricky Fingers or tiddly winks)
 • Turning a key in a lock or on a wind-up toy
Activities That Support Finger
Control For Holding Scissors
•   Eye droppers
•   Tongs
•   Clothes pins
•   Pennies in bank
•   Pegs
•   Unifix cubes
•   Opening bottles, jars
Activities Which Support Using Both
               Hands
   •   Stringing beads
   •   Lacing cards
   •   Cooking activities (cutting,stirring etc.)
   •   Ripping, tearing, crumpling paper
   •   All dressing activities. Try a dressing
       relay race
         References and Resources
• Klein, Marsha, Pre-Scissor Skills, Therapy Skill Builders,
  1987
• Knight and Gilpin Decker, Hands at Work and Play,
  Therapy Skill Builders, 1994        (activities only)

Web pages
• http://www.neelb.org.uk/cass/earlyyears/downloads/De
  veloping Scissor Skills.pdf

				
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posted:3/21/2012
language:English
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