Hawai_i Hire Abilities Project by yaohongm

VIEWS: 1 PAGES: 56

									PUTTING YOUR BENEFITS TO WORK:

A guide to disability work incentives




      Disability is NOT a full-time job




           It ALWAYS pays to work
                                         Table of Contents

Introduction/Overview ........................................................................... 1
SSI Work Incentives ............................................................................... 2
      What is SSI? .................................................................................. 2
      Who is Eligible for SSI? ............................................................... 2
      When Should I Apply For SSI? ................................................... 3
      What Happens When I Go To Work? ........................................ 4
      1619 A and B ................................................................................. 5
      Special Benefits ............................................................................. 6
      SSI 1619 A Earned Income Exclusion ($1 for $2) ..................... 7
      SSI 1619 A $1 for $2 Program Worksheet ................................. 8
      Impairment-Related Work Expenses (IRWE) .......................... 9
      Blind Work Expenses ................................................................. 10
      Plan For Achieving Self Support (PASS) ................................. 12
      Continuation of Benefits – Section 301 ..................................... 14
      Expedited Reinstatement of Benefits (EXR) ............................ 15
      Averaging .................................................................................... 16
      Property Essential to Self-Support (PESS) .............................. 16
      Housing Benefits and Work ....................................................... 16
SSDI Work Incentives .......................................................................... 18
      What is SSDI? .............................................................................. 18
      Who is Eligible for SSDI? .......................................................... 18
      When and How Should I Apply For SSDI? ............................. 19
      What About Health Insurance? ................................................ 20
      SSDI and Medicaid Eligibility Worksheet ............................... 21
      What Happens When I Go To Work? ...................................... 22
      What Happens to My Welfare Check? Worksheet ................. 23
      Trial Work Period (TWP) ......................................................... 24
      Impairment-Related Work Expenses (IRWE) ........................ 25
      Subsidy ......................................................................................... 26
      Extended Period of Eligibility ................................................... 27
      Unsuccessful Work Attempt ...................................................... 27
      Averaging .................................................................................... 28
      Unincurred Business Expenses .................................................. 28
      Housing Benefits and Work ....................................................... 29
      Glossary of Terms and What They Mean ................................ 30
      Work Incentives Fact Sheet ....................................................... 32
      PASS Plan Application ............................................................... 34
      Benefits Planning Resources ...................................................... 48
How Employment Affects Your Disability Benefits
  from Social Security, Medicaid and Medicare

So you receive SSI and you have Medicaid coverage or SSDI and Medicare.
And now everyone is telling you “Don’t get a job or they’ll take away your
benefits.” Are they right? Well, read through this booklet and find the
answers for yourself.

Here’s a preview:

    You will always have more money by working than by not working
     when you receive SSI or SSDI.

    There are several “work incentives” that may help you pay for things
     you need in order to work.

    You can keep your Medicaid until you earn a decent annual salary (in
     2007, you can earn up to $28,263 a year in Hawai`i).

So, read the booklet and find out the answers and you will agree that
disability does not have to be your full-time job because it always pays to
work!

This guide is divided into three sections. The first section looks at SSI work
incentives. The second section focuses on SSDI work incentives. And the
final section provides additional helpful resources for working persons with
disabilities. I hope you will find this guide beneficial to your work and
recovery goals and I look forward to your feedback for future editions.
Mahalo

                              Edward Suarez
                       Adult Mental Health Division
                      esuarez@amhd.health.state.hi.us
                              808-733-4489




                                       1
                           SECTION I:

            SSI WORK INCENTIVES
                                What is SSI?


SSI stands for Supplemental Security Income.

It is money that the Social Security Administration (SSA) gives a person
who has a disability and has very little income.

SSI money is supposed to be used to help pay for shelter (rent. utilities),
food, and clothing.

The most money that a person on SSI will get is $623/month ($934 for a
couple) in 2007. (This amount goes up a little bit each year). Some people
get less than this, because they have some other income or their family helps
them with their shelter, food, and clothing costs.

SSI is different from SSDI, which stands for Social Security Disability
Insurance and is covered separately in this guide in Section II.


                           Who is Eligible for SSI?


To receive SSI you must:

    Be a US citizen, and

    If you are 18 or older, your disability must limit your ability to work,
     at least at the time you are applying for SSI, and



                                       2
    Have a limited amount of income (this is money you get from anyone
     during a particular month), and

    Have very few resources (this is money or other things you already
     have). You must have no more than $2000 worth of countable
     resources that are listed in your name when you apply. Your car, your
     house and household goods are not counted.

                 When and How Should I Apply For SSI?

Although this booklet is mostly about working AFTER you start getting SSI,
here are a few pointers, in case you haven’t yet become eligible for SSI:

    A person can apply for SSI at any time. If you apply and get turned
     down, you can apply again later, if things change.

    To apply, you can call your local Social Security office (look in the
     phone book or go on SSA’s web site, www.ssa.gov for the phone
     number) or call toll free at 1-800-772-1213 (TTD; 1-800-325-0778) to
     make an appointment. The other way to file an application is to go to
     the office and wait for your turn to speak with someone.

    You will receive an application form and a disability form to complete
     with the SSA representative at your appointment. The claims
     representative at the local office will tell you how to send the form to
     them, rather than having to come in, if you would rather do this.

    You can speed things up by bringing certain papers with you. You do
     not have to have all of these before sending in an application. Just
     bring what you have.

When SSA finishes making a decision about whether you qualify for SSI,
they will send you a letter to tell you. You will then start getting monthly
checks, and the first one will be for the 3-6 months you had to wait for them
to process your application. These checks can be automatically deposited
into your bank account or, if you don’t have an account, SSA will send you
checks. If your letter says that you are not eligible for SSI, it will explain
why. If you do not agree, the letter will tell you how to appeal (argue) the
decision.



                                      3
                   Can I get both SSI and SSDI?

If you get SSDI that is lower than the SSI Federal Benefit Rate (FBR) for
that year ($623 per month in 2007), you can also receive enough SSI to
bring the total of the two benefits up to the SSI FBR plus $20. For example,
this year the SSI FBR is $623 per month. If you were getting SSDI of only
$300 per month, you would be eligible for $343 in SSI in 2007. People who
receive both SSI and SSDI are called “concurrent recipients” and, because
they get Medicaid and Medicare, are also called “dual eligibles”.

One more thing: if you get an SSDI check that is larger than the SSI FBR,
you might still be eligible for some assistance from Medicaid, either (1) if
your combined income (SSI, SSDI, and countable income from work) is less
$2,045 per month, or (2) you can spend-down to the medically needy
program standard ($469 in 2007), and/or (3) your income qualifies you for
Medicaid assistance with your Medicare monthly premium under
MedQUEST’s QMB, SLMB or QI-1 programs.

                   What Happens When I Go To Work?

OK. Now let’s look at what happens when a person who has been receiving
SSI and Medicaid goes to work. Since SSA wants you to try to work, they
give you many opportunities to do this without taking you off of SSI. There
are also people called “Benefits Specialists” in your community that can sit
down with you and explain how working will work for you. You can call
your local SSA office to find out how to contact the benefits specialist
nearest you. They will meet with you as often as needed and there is not
charge to you for this.

There are many employment supports in the SSI system that help you
continue receiving your SSI and/or Medicaid while you work. Some of
these supports may even increase your net (after taxes) income to help you
cover special expenses. The SSI employment supports that you will read
about in this booklet are:

   1619 A&B
   Earned Income Exclusion
   Impairment Related Work Expense
   Blind Work Expense
   Plan for Achieving Self Support

                                      4
   Continuation of Benefits – Section 301
   Expedited Reinstatement (Easy Back On)
   Averaging
   Property Essential to Self-Support
   Housing

You’ll see each of these SSI employment supports explained on the next few
pages.




                                    5
                      1619 A and B Work Incentives

Did anyone ever tell you that if you work more than 10-15 hours a week,
you’ll lose your SSI and Medicaid? Well, they are wrong!! A few years ago,
a law was put in place (all over the USA) that protects a person who is on
SSI and Medicaid who wants to do better by working more. When you
work, SSA counts less than half of your wages when they calculate how
much your SSI check will be. As long as you still could get even 1 penny of
SSI, when they do this calculation, you are protected by the first part of this
law, called 1619 A. This means that you will always have more money by
working than if you just had your SSI. It also means you can continue to
work and earn money for as many years as you want to, and SSA will not
stop sending you your SSI check.. Instead, SSA will simply reduce your SSI
check about $1 for every $2 you earn. Also, your MEDICAID continues for
as long as you stay in 1619 A.

Now, imagine that you begin working and earning so much money that
when they count a little less than half, it reduces your SSI check to 0! (In
2007, this won’t happen until your gross income from work reaches $15,
972 per year.) Now, will they close your file and stop your Medicaid. NO!
Instead you are now protected by the second part of this law, called 1619 B.
This law says that SSA will keep your file open, just stop sending a check
each month. This way, if your hours get reduced or you quit or lose your
job, you can just notify SSA and they’ll start your checks coming again,
right away, without having to reapply.

Another wonderful thing that 1619B does is that it protects your Medicaid
eligibility. So, even if, normally, in your state, they would stop your
Medicaid when you made this much money, this protected status will keep
you eligible for Medicaid!! You still can’t have more than $2000 in
resources, but you can earn up to $28,263/year (in 2007) and not have to
worry about losing your Medicaid, even if you also decide to accept
insurance coverage provided by your employer! Our local Medicaid office,
Med-QUEST in the Department of Human Services refers to the 1619B
program as the Qualified Severely Impaired Individuals (QSII) program.




                                      6
Special Benefits for Individuals Eligible Under Section 1619 (a) or (b)
Who Enter a Medical Treatment Facility

If you are eligible under section 1619, you can receive an SSI cash benefit
for up to 2 months while in a Medicaid facility or a public medical or
psychiatric facility, such as Hawai`i State Hospital.

What happens if you enter a such a facility? Usually, if you enter a Medicaid
facility where Medicaid pays more than 50 percent of the cost of care, your
SSI payment is limited to $30 per month, plus any state supplement, minus
any countable income. However, if you enter a Medicaid facility while you
are eligible under section 1619, your benefit will be figured using the full
Federal Benefit Rate ($623 a month in 2007) for up to 2 months.

What happens if you enter a public medical or psychiatric facility?
Usually, if you are in a public medical or psychiatric facility, you are not
eligible to receive an SSI payment. However, if you enter a public medical
or psychiatric facility while you are eligible under section 1619, your SSI
cash benefits can continue for up to 2 months. For this provision to apply,
the facility must enter an agreement with SSA that will allow you to keep all
of the SSI payment.




                                      7
               1619A Earned Income Exclusion ($1 for $2)

Now, here is some more really great and important news about SSI. SSA
does not count most of your income from a job when they figure how much
your SSI check amount will be.

They exclude (do not count) the first $65 of you wages in any month (if you
don’t have any other income, they exclude 85 instead of 65). Then, they
only count half of the rest of your wages. This means they count less than
half!

Here’s an example:

You’ve been getting $623/month of SSI. You get a new job, earning $600
per month at your job.

600 (wages)
-85 (exclusions)
515 / 2 =
257.50 (wages they count)

 623.00 (how much SSI you get if you have no earnings)
-257.50 (wages they count from your job)
 365.50 (your new SSI check amount)

Each month, you now have:

 600.00 (wages from your job)
+365.50 (your new SSI Check)
$965.50 (Your new total monthly income)

AND you still have your Medicaid! Plus, there are other work incentives
below that you might also be eligible for. On the next page is a worksheet
with more examples of this SSI 1619A or $1 for $2 program and instructions
to help you determine how working will impact your SSI and overall
income.




                                     8
                         SSI 1619A $1 for $2 Program*

Your work income             Your SSI check                Your total income

    $0 per month                      623                             623

       100                            615                             715

       200                            565                             765

       300                            515                             815

       400                            465                             865

       500 ($6.25/hr/PT)              415                             915

       600                            365                             965

       700                            315                             1,015

       800                            265                             1,065

       900                            215                             1,115

       1,000                          165                             1,165

       1,100                          115                             1,215

       1,300 ($17/hr/PT)                15                            1,315

*If your only income is from SSI and work, SSI subtracts $85 and then half of your gross
(before taxes) income when they adjust your SSI check. For example, $500/month - $85
= 415/2 = 207.50. $623 – 207.50 = 415.50, so your total income is 500 + 415.50 =
915.50. *You can figure this out for yourself, using the following formula:
623 – [(Your gross work income – 85) / 2] = Your adjusted SSI income.
Your gross work income + Your adjusted SSI income = Your total income.



                                             9
            Impairment-Related Work Expenses (IRWE)

What if you pay for things that you need in order to work that are needed
because of your disability? SSA has a special employment support to help
you pay these costs! It’s called impairment-related work expense (IRWE,
for short). Any month that you are working you can use this work support,
no matter how many months or years your job lasts. You get “credit” for
these expenses every month that you have expenses that meet the rules.

These rules are listed here:
  1. The item or service you’re paying for helps you to work, AND
  2. You need the item or service because of your disability, AND
  3. You pay the cost yourself; not someone else (like parents or Medicaid
      or Vocational Rehabilitation, etc) and no one pays you back, AND
  4. The cost is “reasonable” (this means is the standard cost in your
      community)

BUT, you have to talk with your claims representative at SSA and they have
to agree with you that the expense you have meets all the rules. They will
also tell you if they need any “proof”, such a letter from your teacher, or
receipts or something.

Here’s a list of some of the items or services that some people on SSI have
used. Remember, everyone is different, so what would be an “approvable”
expense for one person, may not be for someone else! It’s very
individualized:

   Special door-to-door transportation
   Assistive technology
   Medications needed to control your disability
   Attendant care services
   Medical services and diagnostic procedures
   Job coach services

These are just a few examples. There are many more. Talk with you claims
representative when you start your job, to see if there are IRWE’s that
qualify for you!

Here’s how IRWE’s help you get extra SSI to help pay the costs:



                                      9
You’ve been receiving $623.00 SSI each month. You get a job earning
$800/month. You have to pay $200/month for door-to-door transportation,
because you use a wheelchair and cannot take the public bus. Here’s what
happens with your SSI:

 800.00(you wages from your job)
 -85.00 (SSI exclusions)
 715.00
-200.00 (your IRWE)
 515.00 /2 = 257.50 (how much of your wages that SSA counts)

  623.00(your SSI before you started working)
 -257.50 (the amount of wages that SSA counts)
 $365.50 (your new SSI check amount. This is $100 more than if you
didn’t tell SSA about your transportation cost, so they are giving you half of
the $200 cost back!)

Here’s what you’ll have altogether:

$800.00 (wages)
+365.50 (your SSI check)
1165.50 (total) AND you still have your MEDICAID!

But, remember, you MUST pay your $200 transportation bill, because SSA
will want to see your receipt later! One last thing about IRWE’s…. If your
costs change later (go up or down or you have a new IRWE), tell SSA
RIGHT AWAY so they can adjust your check to agree with this new
information.

                           Blind Work Expenses

Blind Work Expense (BWE) is an employment support ONLY for people on
SSI who are blind. The way it works is that deducts ALL work expenses,
whether they are due to your disability or not. This means that people who
are blind are able to keep receiving a higher SSI check when they go to work
than other people on SSI.

Just as with IRWE, you must tell SSA about any work expenses you will
have when you start working. The expenses must be paid by you and not be



                                      10
reimbursed. They must be reasonable in price (standard amount in your
community).

You can continue to use this employment support for as long as you
continue to work and as long as you still have the expenses. Then, if these
expenses change over time, you’ll need to inform SSA with each change in
amount or type of BWE.

You’ll also need to save receipts, pay stubs, or other form of “proof” that
you had the expense.

Listed below are some examples of work expenses that be counted as BWE:

   Taxes (federal, state, local)
   FICA (social security taxes)
   Fees (union dues, parking fees, etc)
   Transportation
   Assistive Technology
   Reader Services
   Job Coaching
   Meals eaten during work hours
   Guide dog expenses

Here’s how BWE affects your SSI:

You have been receiving an SSI check for $623.00 each month. You take a
job earning $800.00 a month. You have taxes and FICA taken out of your
pay and they total $200/month. Also, you spend $100/month for lunches
that you eat in the cafeteria at work. Then, you spend $50.00/month for a
bus pass to go to and from work. These expenses all count as BWE and they
make a total of $350. Here’s what happens:

$800 (wages from your job)
 -85 (exclusions)
715/2= 357.50 (SSA counts only this much)

 357.50 (wages that SSA counts so far)
-350.00 (your Blind Work Expenses)
  7.50 (SSA will only count this much of your wages!)



                                      11
623.00 (how much SSI you got before going to work)
 -7.50 (how much of your wages SSA counts)
615.50 (your new SSI check amount)

So, here’s what you’ll have each month, altogether:

$800.00 (wages from your job)
+615.50 (your SSI check)
$1415.50 ( your total monthly income) AND you still have MEDICAID!

Remember, though; you must pay for your bus pass and lunches and keep
receipts. You’ll also need your pay stubs to document the taxes and FICA
that were withheld from your pay. SSA will want to see these.

                 Plan For Achieving Self Support (PASS)

This a GREAT work incentive, that allows to save money to pay for
expenses you have or will have in order to reach a career goal. For instance,
you if need to get a certification or a degree in order to do the type of work
that interests you, or you need to buy a car to travel to and from work, PASS
is a way to help pay for expenses. There are many more examples of how
you can use PASS, but first, let’s look at how it works.

The PASS rules allow SSA to exclude any unearned income (such as an
allowance or child support or other money besides wages) that you get. This
means they don’t count it when they calculate how much SSI you are
eligible for. They can also exclude any wages you get to allow you to use
this money now or in the future for approved expenses related to your career
goal. You could also use PASS to help save a “resource” you have, such as
savings bonds or a money gift you get as a birthday gift or graduation gift
towards your career goal expenses (without this in place, you will not get
SSI any time you have more than $2000 worth of money).

If you receive SSI now or could qualify for SSI and you have a career goal
you have not yet achieved, you can have a PASS. Also, you can use this
work incentive now, later, or more than one time in your life. It’s a very
flexible employment support, which can help you to continue to grow,
career-wise.




                                      12
In order to get a PASS approved, it must:

       Be designed just for you. What your friend writes or gets
        approved may not work for you, because everyone is different.

       Be in writing. Someone can help you write it, but you will need to
        sign it. If you’re under 18 or you have a representative payee, they
        will need to sign it, also.

       Have a specific career goal that it seems reasonable to think you
        can do.

       Have a timeframe in mind (and on paper) for how long it will take
        you to reach this career goal. This timeframe can be changed later,
        if something comes up that slows you down.

       Show how much the goods and services are that you need to reach
        your goal. These are your expenses. Then, you must show which
        expenses you will pay for.

       Show what money you will use to pay the expenses related to your
        career goal (it can’t be your SSI).

       Show how the money you will use will be set aside to pay for the
        expenses (such as a separate bank account).

       Be submitted to SSA and get approved before you start.

       Be reviewed by SSA every few months to check on your progress.

      Let’s look at an example:

      Alyssa is 21, a senior in high school, and she plans to become a
      licensed practical nurse someday. To do this, she will need to finish
      getting her diploma, apply to nursing school and get accepted, go
      through 2 years of schooling and get her degree. She then will have to
      pass a state test to get “certified” and then get a job as a nurse and
      complete the probationary period before becoming a permanent
      employee. She thinks this will all take her about 5 years, because she
      plans to go to school part time and work part time. She currently

                                     13
receives SSI ($623/month) and works part-time at the hospital
cafeteria. (she’s been using the student earned income exclusion
which excludes up to $5,910 in annual earned income, but this will
end this summer, when she reaches her 22nd birthday). Alyssa
enrolled with Vocational Rehabilitation, and they said they will help
with her school expenses (after she applies for a PELL grant).
However, Alyssa needs to buy a car to get back and forth to classes,
which are 20 miles from her home. There is no public transportation
to and from the university.

Alyssa writes a PASS (with her teacher’s help) to use the money from
her job as the hospital to pay $300 car payments for the next 3 years.
Here is what happens with her SSI check:

700 (wages from her job)
-85 (money that SSA doesn’t count)
615 /2= 307.50 (wages that SSA counts)

 307.50 (countable wages)
-300.00 (car payment)
  7.50 (all that SSA counts of Alyssa’s wages)

623.00 (SSI Alyssa would get if she had no other money)
 -7.50 (what SSA counts of her wages)
615.50 (Alyssa’s SSI new check amount)

When Alyssa meets her career goal of becoming a permanent
employee as a licensed practical nurse, the PASS will end. BUT, she
will probably be making more than $24,000/year, if she’s working full
time! If she earns this much, she would then stop getting an SSI
check, but she would STILL GET TO KEEP HER MEDICAID!!

Sounds good, right? There is a PASS specialist that answers
questions for you about this employment support and can even help
you complete the application form, which is included in this booklet.
To find your PASS specialist’s contact information call SSA at 1-800-
772-1213.




                               14
      Here is what Alyssa has while working towards her career goal:

       700.00 (wages from her job)
      +615.50 (SSI)
      1315.50 (total spendable income)
      -300.00 (her car payment)
      1015.50 (money to live on each month) AND she still has Medicaid!

      Remember, Vocational Rehabilitation and Pell Grants are paying for
      her school expenses! You can find a blank PASS application to use
      for yourself on page 34 of this guide.

                  Continuation of Benefits – Section 301

You can continue getting SSI benefits even after SSA determines that
you are no longer disabled, if you are participating in a program consisting
of the Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency Program or another approved
program of vocational rehabilitation services, employment services, or other
support services (such as DVR or One-Stop Employment Offices) AND
SSA determines that your completion or continuation in the program for a
specified period of time, will increase the likelihood that you won’t need SSI
again in the future.

      Expedited Reinstatement of Benefits (EXR) – Easy Back On

Well, as you can see, most people on SSI can earn a lot more than they think
they can and still receive some SSI and/or their Medicaid. However, if you
continue to work and get promotions and raises, eventually, you could
possibly earn so much money that you no longer qualify for 1619 B and
Medicaid. At that point, SSA will close your file and your Medicaid
coverage will end. If this happens, you’re still VERY MUCH better off then
when you were only getting SSI and Medicaid each month because you have
a steady job and probably an employer-provided health insurance plan.

But, what if, later, you lose or quit this job, or your pay falls below SGA
($900 per month in 2007) and you still have a disability? Well, if this
happens within 5 years of when SSA closes your file, you can very easily
return to SSI and Medicaid. You must notify SSA of your job loss or pay
cut and complete a couple of forms. SSA would then hurry up the process

                                      15
of re-approving you for benefits. While they are doing this, though, SSA
will send you SSI checks, as if you were already approved. This can last up
to six months, while they are processing the new paperwork. This is called
expedited reinstatement, or “easy back-on” (that’s a good name for it,
don’t you agree?). This is a very new employment support, so you may be
the first among your friends on SSI to learn about it!

Now, have you ever thought of being self-employed or running your own
business? It’s a good idea and you can get help to do it. Also, if you are or
plan to be self-employed, you can use the PASS as well as the following
options to help you manage your business and disability benefits.

                                  Averaging

If you are self-employed or run a business for example your earnings or
work activity may vary from month to month. Earnings that fluctuate from
month to month can be averaged to help avoid over and underpayments from
SSA. Averaging the “countable earnings” you report to SSA over a number
of months helps them make an accurate SGA determination. If your
countable earnings, when averaged, indicate SGA, you may be considered to
have engaged continuously in SGA during the period being averaged.

                Property Essential to Self-Support (PESS)

Another useful thing to know if you are self-employed, is that SSA does not
count some resources that you need to be self-supporting when they decide
if you are eligible for SSI. For example, they don't count property such as
tools or equipment that you use for work. Or, if you have a trade or business,
they don't count property such as inventory.

                        Housing Benefits and Work

Okay. So, let’s say you put some of this information in this guide to work
and get a job and maintain your benefits. What about your housing. If you
are in federally subsidized housing, such as Section 8, there are limits to how
much income you can have and still qualify for your housing benefit. This
year (2007) the gross income limit for an individual in Section 8 housing is
$24,950 a year (that’s about $2,080 a month, $26/hour in part-time/20-hour
a week job or $13/hour in a full-time job 40 hours a week). Plus, don’t
forget that you can still apply your PASS and any IRWEs in order to keep


                                      16
your housing benefit -- the same way you can with your SSI and Medicaid
benefits. In addition, you can use the HUD Disability Allowance, the Earned
Income Deduction and a new program call the Family Self-Sufficiency
(FSS) program.

The HUD Disability Allowance lets you deduct $400 from your annual
adjusted income so that amount doesn’t count towards the $24,950 income
limit mentioned above. You can also get an Earned Income Deduction
(EID), which allows your Housing Benefits program to disregard or ignore
100% of your income for the first year and 50% of your income the second
year. For more information and an application, see www.nhlp.org public
housing information section.


Family Self-Sufficiency (FSS) is a new program that does a really nice
thing. For every dollar that your Section 8 increases due to increased income
from working, this HUD program run by the City and County of Honolulu
will deposit a dollar in a special savings account for you each month. For
example, if you were unemployed but then you got a job earning
$1200/month, your rent would go up $400/month (1/3 of your increased
income) but at the end of the year you would have $4,800 to use as you
want, for a car, self-employment, housing, etc. For more information on FSS
call the City and County of Honolulu Department of Community Services at
527-5311.




                                     17
                         SECTION II:

          SSDI WORK INCENTIVES
                               What is SSDI?

SSDI stands for Social Security Disability Insurance.

It is money that the Social Security Administration (SSA) gives a person
who has a disability. SSA “insures” persons based on the FICA (Federal
Insurance Contribution Act) contributions they paid while working.

SSDI money is supposed to be used to help pay for shelter (rent, utilities),
food, and clothing.

The amount of money that a person on SSDI will get depends on how long
they worked and how much they earned and paid in FICA taxes.

SSDI is different from SSI, which stands for Supplemental Security Income
and was covered earlier in this guide.

                         Who is Eligible for SSDI?


To receive SSDI you must:

    Be a US citizen, and

    If you are 18 or older, your disability must limit your ability to work,
     at least at the time you are applying for SSDI, and

    Have a work history of approximately 10 years, during which you
     paid FICA taxes.




                                      18
                    When and How Should I Apply For SSDI?

Although this booklet is mostly about working AFTER you start getting
SSDI, here are a few pointers, in case you haven’t yet become eligible for
SSDI:

    A person can apply for SSDI at any time. If you apply and get turned
     down, you can appeal and/or apply again later, if things change.

    To apply, you can call your local Social Security office (look in the
     phone book or go on SSA’s web site, www.ssa.gov for the phone
     number) or call toll free at 1-800-772-1213 (TTD; 1-800-325-0778) to
     make an appointment. The other way to file an application is to go to
     the office and wait for your turn to speak with someone.

    You will receive an application form and a disability form to complete
     with the SSA representative at your appointment. The claims
     representative at the local office will tell you how to send the form to
     them, rather than having to come in, if you would rather do this.

When SSA finishes making a decision about whether you qualify for SSDI,
they will send you a letter to tell you. You will then start getting monthly
checks, and the first one will be for the 3-6 months you had to wait for them
to process your application. These checks can be automatically deposited
into your bank account or, if you don’t have an account, SSA will send you
checks. If your letter says that you are not eligible for SSDI, it will explain
why. If you do not agree, the letter will tell you how to appeal (argue) the
decision.

                    Can I get both SSI and SSDI?

If you get SSDI that is lower than the SSI Federal Benefit Rate (FBR) for
that year ($623 per month in 2007), you can also receive enough SSI to
bring the total of the two benefits up to the SSI FBR plus $20. For example,
this year the SSI FBR is $623 per month. If you were getting SSDI of only
$300 per month, you would be eligible for $343 in SSI in 2007. People who
receive both SSI and SSDI are called “concurrent recipients” and, because
they get Medicaid and Medicare, are also called “dual eligibles”.




                                      19
One more thing: if you get an SSDI check that is larger than the SSI FBR,
you might still be eligible for some assistance from Medicaid, either (1) if
your combined income (SSI, SSDI, and countable income from work) is less
$2,045 per month, or (2) you can spend-down to the medically needy
program standard ($469 in 2007), and/or (3) your income qualifies you for
Medicaid assistance with your Medicare monthly premium under
MedQUEST’s QMB, SLMB or QI-1 programs.

                   What About Health Insurance?

Once you have received SSDI benefits for 2 years, you will be given
Medicare coverage, which generally pays 80% of the cost of medical care
and prescriptions. However, coverage offered by Medicare is not as
comprehensive as Medicaid and it requires you pay premiums, deductibles
and co-insurance costs. But, if your income is low enough, you may qualify
for some of the following Medicaid programs.

First, you may qualify for Medicaid health insurance if the total of your
SSDI benefit amount AND your countable income from work is less than
$980 a month. Here is an example of how to do this calculation. Let’s say
Kaleo earns $585 a month from work and $690 a month from SSDI. Does he
qualify for free Medicaid? Let’s check. First, you subtract the earned income
exclusions from his earned income from work (585 – 85 = 500) and then you
divide that result by 2. This gives us $250 (500 / 2). Combining this amount
($250) with the amount of Kaleo’s SSDI check ($750) gives him countable
income of $1000, which is over the monthly income limit of $980 for free
Medicaid. (See the next page for more examples and instructions how to
figure this out for yourself.)

So, Kaleo does not qualify for free Medicaid. What should he do if
Medicare is not enough to cover his treatment needs and he really needs
Medicaid? Well, he can either decrease his earnings from work, so he can
qualify for free Medicaid OR, he can try to qualify for the Medically Needy
Medicaid Spend-Down program. To qualify as Medically Needy in this
example, Kaleo would need to have treatment costs (medication, doctor
visits, etc) of $582 per month that would bring his countable income ($1000)
down to the Medically Needy standard of $469 each month to qualify for
limited Medicaid assistance.




                                     20
                  SSDI and Medicaid Eligibility Worksheet

If your SSDI is                             Your gross wages
                                            (from work) can be

       $0 per month                                 $2,045 per month

              100                                                 1,845

              200                                                 1,645

              300                                                 1,445

              400                                                 1,245

              500 ($6.25/hr/PT)                                   1,045

              600                                                    845

              700                                                    645

              800                                                    445

              900                                                    245

              980 ($12.25/hr/PT)                                        0


*If you receive SSDI income, you can qualify for Medicaid coverage in Hawaii, as long
as your SSDI income is less than $980/month. The chart above shows how much you
can earn from work in addition to your SSDI and still qualify for Medicaid. For example,
if you get $900/month from SSDI, your gross income from work must be less than
$245/month in order to qualify for Medicaid MedQUEST coverage. You can figure this
out for yourself with the following formula: Subtract $85 from your gross work income
(before taxes), then divide the result by 2. Then add that result to your SSDI income. If
the total is less than $980, then you qualify for Medicaid benefits. Example: ($500 –
85)/2 = 207.5 + SSDI of 770 = 977.5.



                                           21
Another type of program you may qualify for is one of the Medicaid
supplemental assistance programs that help you pay your share of Medicare
costs. Remember, Medicare only covers 80% of most of your treatment
costs. The other 20% could be covered for you by the Qualified Medicare
Beneficiaries (QMB) program if your income is not more than 100% of the
Federal Poverty Level ($940 per month for an individual and $1265 per
month for a couple in 2007). Remember that these income limits are for
2007 but increase slightly every year. To qualify, you also cannot have
resources of more than $4,000 ($6,000 for a couple). If you qualify,
Medicaid will pay your Medicare Part B outpatient premium ($93.50 per
month in 2007) and any deductibles and co-pays.

If you have too much income to qualify for QMB, you may still qualify for
another program for Specified Low-Income Medicare Beneficiaries
(SLMB) if your income is not more than 120% of the Federal Poverty Level
or $1,128 per month ($1,518 for a couple) in 2007 and your resources are
not more than $4,000 ($6,000 for a couple). This program will pay your
Medicare Part B outpatient premium ($93.50 per month in 2007) only.

If you have too much income to qualify for SLMB, you may still qualify for
yet another program, the Qualified Individuals (QI-1) program, if your
income is not more than 135% of the Federal Poverty Level or $1,269 per
month ($1,708 for a couple) in 2007. There is no limit on the amount of
resources you can own to qualify for this program but it is a first-come, first-
served program and can help you pay part of your monthly Medicare Part B
premiums.

                    What Happens When I Go To Work?

OK. Now let’s look at what happens when a person who has been receiving
SSDI and Medicare goes to work. Since SSA wants you to try to work, they
give you many opportunities to do this without taking you off of SSDI.
There are also people called “Benefits Specialists” in your community that
can sit down with you and explain how working will work for you. You can
call your local SSA office to find out how to contact the benefits specialist
nearest you. They will meet with you as often as needed and there is not
charge to you for this. One of the first questions people have is “What
happens to my welfare check?” On the next page is a worksheet to help you
calculate how much of your welfare check will remain based on your earned
(work) and unearned (SSDI) income.

                                       22
                     What Happens to My Welfare Check?
                     Work, Welfare (AABD) and SSDI*

Work Income                  Welfare                      Adjusted Welfare
(per month)
    $0                         418                           418 – SSDI = ________

    100                        418                           418 – SSDI = ________

    200                        418                           418 – SSDI = ________

    300                        392                           392 – SSDI = ________

    400                        341                           341 - SSDI = ________

    500                        290                           290 – SSDI = ________

    600                        239                           239 – SSDI = ________

    700                        188                           188 – SSDI = ________

    800                        136                           136 – SSDI = ________

    900                          85                           85 – SSDI = ________

 1,000                           34                           34 – SSDI = ________

*You get to keep some of your welfare check even if you are working. DHS only counts 36%
of $200 less than 20% of your earned income. But your SSI/SSDI income cannot be more
than your welfare check or you will not be eligible for welfare benefits. For example, if
you earn $500/month, DHS will first subtract 20% or $100, leaving $400. Next they subtract
$200, leaving $200. Then they subtract 36% or $72, leaving $128, which they subtract from
your $418 welfare check. If you have no other income, like SSI or SSDI, you will still get
welfare in the amount of $290/month. Otherwise, your total SSI or SSDI income is subtracted
from $290. So if you only get $200/mo. from SSDI, for example, then your welfare will be
$90/month. If you get SSI, your unearned income will most likely be too high ($623 or
$415/mo.) to get any welfare.



                                          23
There are several work incentives in the SSDI system that help you continue
receiving your SSDI and/or Medicare while you work. Some of these supports
may even increase your net (after taxes) income to help you cover special
expenses. The SSDI work incentives that you will read about in this booklet are:

   Trial Work Period
   Impairment Related Work Expense
   Subsidy
   Extended Period of Eligibility
   Unsuccessful Work Attempt
   Averaging
   Unincurred Business Expenses
   Housing

You’ll see each of these SSDI work incentives explained on the next few pages.

                          Trial Work Period (TWP)

If you have SSDI and go to work, you will be allowed a trial work period (TWP)
of 9 months, during which your earnings from work do not affect your SSDI
benefits at all. During your TWP, there is no limit to the amount of income that
you can earn per month, however, your SSDI may be terminated at the end of
your TWP if your work income equals Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA)
level ($900 per month in 2007).

A trial work month is any month in which a person earns more than a set
minimum ($640/month in 2007). If you earn less than this minimum amount, you
can remain on SSDI as long as you remain disabled.

Keep in mind, however, that the TWP does not have to be 9 months in a row.
Let’s say that the last time you worked was four years ago and you worked 4
months in that job, earning SGA all 4 months. If you go back to work again now,
you can earn SGA for 5 more months before your TWP runs out.

At the end of the TWP, SSA reviews your work history to determine if you are
earning SGA ($900 gross monthly income in 2007) and if you continue to meet
disability criteria. If you are not making SGA, your benefits should continue.

If SSA determines that your work is SGA and you are not disabled after your
TWP ends, then you continue to get your SSDI benefits for a 3-month grace
period (including the month in which the review took place, plus SSDI benefits
                                     24
for an additional two months). Therefore, once your TWP starts, you have a total
of 12 months before your SSDI checks end: 9 months of TWP plus 3 months of
extended grace period.

             Impairment-Related Work Expenses (IRWE)

What if you pay for things that you need in order to work that are needed because
of your disability? SSA has a special employment support to help you pay these
costs! It’s called impairment-related work expense (IRWE, for short). Any
month that you are working you can use this work support, no matter how many
months or years your job lasts. You get “credit” for these expenses every month
that you have expenses that meet the rules.

These rules are listed here:
  1. The item or service you’re paying for helps you to work, AND
  2. You need the item or service because of your disability, AND
  3. You pay the cost yourself; not someone else (like parents or Medicaid or
      Vocational Rehabilitation, etc) and no one pays you back, AND
  4. The cost is “reasonable” (this means is the standard cost in your
      community)

BUT, you have to talk with your claims representative at SSA and they have to
agree with you that the expense you have meets all the rules. They will also tell
you if they need any “proof”, such a letter from your teacher, or receipts or
something.

Here’s a list of some of the items or services that some people on SSDI have
used. Remember, everyone is different, so what would be an “approvable”
expense for one person, may not be for someone else! It’s very individualized:

   Special door-to-door transportation
   Assistive technology
   Medications needed to control your disability
   Attendant care services
   Medical services and diagnostic procedures
   Job coach services

These are just a few examples. There are many more. Talk with you claims
representative when you start your job, to see if there are IRWE’s that qualify for
you! One important note: if you get SSDI benefits, have completed your TWP
and are having a review to determine if you are earning at the level of SGA,
                                      25
IRWEs can be used at that time to lower the amount of gross earnings, possibly
below the level of SGA. If your income minus the IRWEs is found to be under
SGA, the SSDI benefits may continue.

                                    Subsidy

This work incentive is similar to the IRWE and it allows you deduct the cost of a
job subsidy (such as a DVR on-the-job training subsidy or a Transitional
Employment or Supported Employment Job Coach) that assists you on the job.

SSA defines a subsidy as “a support that person receives on the job which results
in more pay than the actual value of work.” Thus work is considered subsidized if
the worker is able to perform the job only when he or she receives the extra
support. Examples of a subsidy or special condition include job coaching, extra
supervision on the job or a reduction of tasks as compared to other workers.

Because subsidies are considered work incentives, the value of subsidies and
special conditions can be deducted from a person’ gross income when
determining if income is above the level of SGA ($900/month in 2007). With the
inclusion of a subsidy, a person’s income might fall below the level of SGA, in
which case he or she would receive full SSDI benefits for that month.

SSA can assist an employer to determine the value of subsidies. Unlike IRWEs,
subsidies do not have to be paid out of pocket. Subsidies are considered at the
end of the trial work period when SGA is reviewed.

Let’s say you’ve been receiving $845.00 SSDI each month. You get a job
earning $900/month and you’ve held it for 9 months, which would trigger the end
of your TWP and the beginning of your grace period before your cash benefits
stop. But you have a job coach that comes to help you on the job once a week
and they are paid $200/month by Clubhouse or Steadfast or DVR to provide this
service for you. Here’s what could happen with your SSDI if you applied to SSA
for a subsidy consideration:

 900.00 (your wages from your job)
-200.00 (your subsidy – the cost of job coaching)
 700.00 (the amount of your income that SSA compares to SGA of 900.00)

Now, look at the difference between applying for job subsidy and not applying.

With Job Subsidy:
                                     26
$845.00 (your SSDI)
+900.00 (your wages)
1,745.00 (total) This is your income plus you still have your Medicare.

Without Job Subsidy:

$0 (your SSDI)
+900.00 (your wages)
900.00 (total) This is your income plus you can keep your Medicare for about 8
more years.

                          Extended Period of Eligibility

If your earnings are at SGA but your impairment has not improved after your
TWP has ended, you will enter an extended period of eligibility (EPE) for 36
months. You will not receive SSDI payments during this time, except during any
month that your income falls below the level of SGA. It is important that you
know that during the EPE, you do not have to re-apply or go through a waiting
period of you stop working. All you have to do is contact SSA and demonstrate
that your earnings are less than SGA for your cash benefits to be reinstated.

Now, have you ever thought of being self-employed or running your own
business? It’s a good idea and you can get help to do it. Also, if you are or plan to
be self-employed, you can use the PASS as well as the following options to help
you manage your business and disability benefits.

                          Unsuccessful Work Attempt

An unsuccessful work attempt is an effort to do substantial work, in employment
or self-employment, that you stopped or reduced to below the SGA level
($900/month in 2007) after a short time (6 months or less) because of:

      Your impairment; or

      Removal of special conditions (i.e., work accommodations) related to your
       impairment and essential to the further performance of your work.

When SSA makes an SGA decision to determine if your disability payment
continues or ceases because of your work, they do not count earnings during an
unsuccessful work attempt.
                                      27
During the extended period of eligibility, SSA considers unsuccessful work
attempt(s) as part of their SGA decision(s) for months up to and including the
month (if any) in which they cease your disability payment.

During the trial work period, or after the month (if any) in which SSA ceases
your disability payment, they do not consider unsuccessful work attempts
because they only have effect when we make an SGA decision.

                                    Averaging

When your earnings or work activity varies from month to month, it may be
necessary to average the “countable earnings” you report to SSA over a number
of months in order to make a fair SGA determination. Earnings that fluctuate
from month to month are averaged. If your countable earnings, when averaged,
indicate SGA, you may be considered to have engaged continuously in SGA
during the period being averaged.

                         Unincurred Business Expenses

"Unincurred business expenses" refers to self-employment business support that
someone provides to you at no cost to you. In deciding whether you are working
at the SGA level, SSA will give you a deduction for unincurred business
expenses from your net earnings from self-employment. Examples of unincurred
business expenses include when a Vocational rehabilitation agency gives you a
computer that is used in as part of your business or a friend works for your
business as unpaid help.

For an item or service to qualify as an unincurred business expense:

      It must be an item or service that the IRS would allow as a legitimate
       business expense if you had paid for it; and
      Someone other than you must have paid for it.

One way to identify an unincurred business expense is that the Internal Revenue
Service (IRS) does not allow you to deduct the cost for income tax purposes
because someone gave you the item or services.




                                      28
                          Housing Benefits and Work

Okay. So, let’s say you put some of this information in this guide to work and get
a job and maintain your benefits. What about your housing. If you are in federally
subsidized housing, such as Section 8, there are limits to how much income you
can have and still qualify for your housing benefit. This year (2007) the gross
income limit for an individual in Section 8 housing is $24,950 a year (that’s
about $2,080 a month, $26/hour in part-time work of 20 hours a week or
$13/hour in a full-time job 40 hours a week). Plus, don’t forget that you can still
apply your PASS and any IRWEs in order to keep your housing benefit. In
addition, you can use the HUD Disability Allowance, the Earned Income
Deduction and a new program call the Family Self-Sufficiency (FSS) program.

The HUD Disability Allowance lets you deduct $400 from your annual adjusted
income so that amount doesn’t count towards the $24,950 income limit (for
2007) mentioned above. You can also get an Earned Income Deduction (EID),
which allows your Housing Benefits program to disregard or ignore 100% of
your income for the first year and 50% of your income the second year. For more
information and an application, see www.nhlp.org public housing information
section.

Family Self-Sufficiency (FSS) is a new program that does a really nice thing.
For every dollar that your Section 8 increases due to increased income from
working, this HUD program run by the City and County of Honolulu will deposit
a dollar in a special savings account for you each month. For example, if you
were unemployed but then you got a job earning $1200/month, your rent would
go up $400/month (1/3 of your increased income) but at the end of the year you
would have $4,800 to use as you want, for a car, self-employment, housing, etc.
For more information on FSS call the City and County of Honolulu Department
of Community Services at 527-5311.




                                      29
                                Terms and What They Mean

Blind Work Expenses (BWI): If you are blind, when they determine your SSI and Medicaid
eligibility and payment amount, SSA does not count earned income that you use to meet
expenses in earning the income.

Break-Even Point (BEP): This is the dollar amount of total countable income (after
applicable exclusions and deductions are applied) that will reduce the SSI payment to zero and
it is the point at which you are eligible for continued Medicaid, under 1619 B protection.

Countable Income : The amount of money left after SSA has subtracted all available
deductions from your total gross income. They use this amount to determine your continued
eligibility for SSI and to decide your cash benefit amount.

Deeming: The process of considering some of the income and resources of your parent or
spouse to be your income and resources when you are applying for or receiving SSI .

Gross Income: Income received from work, before taxes or any other deductions are made.

Impairment-Related Work Expenses (IRWE): SSA deducts the cost of items and services
that you need to work because of your impairment (e.g., attendant care) when they calculate
your SSI cash payment amount.

Income: Income could be Earned income (money received from wages, including from a
sheltered workshop, self-employment and royalties) or Unearned income (money received
from all other sources such as gifts, prizes, etc).

Medicaid: Medical coverage provided to a person by the state title XIX program. You must
be disabled and financially needy for the type of Medicaid protection offered by 1619B.

Plan For Achieving Self-Support (PASS): Under an (SSA) approved PASS, you may set
aside income and/or resources over a reasonable time which will enable your to reach a work
goal to become financially self-supporting. You then can use the income and resources that
you set aside to obtain occupational training or education, purchase equipment, establish a
business, etc. Money set aside under a PASS in not counted when SSA decides SSI eligibility
and payment amount.

Resources: These are anything you own, such as a bank account, stocks, business assets, real
property, etc, that you could use for your own support and medical expenses. Some resources
are not counted, such as your house you live in or your car you need for going to work or
medical appointment or things you need in order to work. SSI also does not count the first
$2000 of countable resources.

Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA): SSA and Medicaid evaluate work activity of persons
applying for or receiving disability benefits. They use earnings guidelines to evaluate work
and determine if it is “substantial”, and whether you can be considered disabled under the law.
Earnings averaging over $780/month generally demonstrate substantial gainful activity. After
you are already receiving SSI, SGA does not matter.
                                            30
SSA: Social Security Administration. This is a federal administration with an office near you.
They take your application for SSI and also help you to manage changes in your SSI over time.


SSI: Supplemental Security Income, funded by Federal income tax, is a minimal monthly
payment to people with disabilities or aged who are financially needy.

SSDI Social Security Disability Insurance, funded by the FICA taxes paid by all workers, to
insure them against disability by providing monthly disability payments to people with
disabilities who paid into the system while working 10 or more years.

Ticket to Work: You may receive a ticket from SSA that you can take to an approved service
provider of your choice called an “employment network.” The employment network (EN)
provides you with vocational rehabilitation, employment and other support services to assist
you to go to work and remain on the job. You can find a list of ENs in your area online at
http://www.yourtickettowork.com.




                                           31
        2007 SSI AND SSDI WORK INCENTIVES
When you have     You qualify for… You are eligible     And that means…
SSI and earn…                      if you are…

From $85 to       SSI -1619 A        A worker with      Your SSI benefits check is
$1,331 gross      status             a disability who   reduced one dollar for
income per                           has SSI            every two dollars you
month from work                      benefits.          earn. Your SSI checks
($15,972                                                stop if you earn $1,331 or
per year)                                               more a month from work.

$1,331 to         SSI - 1619 B       A worker with a    You stop getting SSI
$2,355 gross      status or DHS      disability who     checks but you can keep
income per        Qualified          needs Medicaid     your health coverage
month ($28,263    Severely           in order to work   benefits from Medicaid.
per year)         Impaired                              Also, if you lose your job
                  Individual                            during the next 5 years,
                                                        Expedited Reinstatement
                                                        of Benefits (EXR) or Easy
                                                        Back On program lets you
                                                        get right back on SSI
                                                        benefits.
When you have You qualify for…       You are eligible   And that means…
SSDI and                             if you are…
earn…
$640 or more     SSDI - Trial Work   A worker with a    Earning $640 or more a
gross income per Period (TWP)        disability who     month for a total of 9
month ($8 or                         has SSDI           months in the last 5 years,
more an hour                         benefits           tends your TWP. If you’re
for at least 20                                         earning $900 or more a
hours a week)                                           month at the end of your
                                                        TWP, your SSDI will stop.
$900 or more      SSDI – 3-Year      A worker with a    Your SSDI benefits stop
gross income      Extended           disability who     but can restart if your
per month         Period of          has SSDI           earnings drop below
($10,800 or       Eligibility        benefits           $900/month within 36
more per          (EPE)                                 months. You can keep
year) for any 9                                         Medicare for 7 more
months in the                                           years. If you earn over
last 5 years.                                           $2,045 gross income a
                                                        month, you must be able
                                                        to “spend down” to $469 a
                                                        month to keep Medicaid.




                                     32
$28,263
                                         $
                                  $28,263 per year =           You continue to get health
Income limit for 1619B            $2,355 per month             insurance benefits from
                                  = $15 per hour (FT)          Medicaid under SSI’s 1619B
                                  (40 hours/week) or           program (known at
$24,950                           $29 per hour (PT)            MedQUEST as the Qualified
HUD housing income limit          (20 hours a week)            Severely Impaired Individuals
                                                               program - QSII)


$15,972
                                                               You can earn up to $15,972
Income limit for 1619A            $15, 972 per year =          per year from work, and still
                                  $1,331 per month =           get SSI cash benefits
                                  $8 per hour (FT)             because you keep $1 of your
                                  $17 per hour (PT)            SSI check for every $2 you
                                                               earn from work.

$12,564
                                  $12,564 per year =            You’re food stamps
Income limits for Welfare         $1,047 per month =            stopped when your
                                  $6.54 / hour (FT)             income (from work, SSI,
                                  $13.09/hour (PT)              SSDI, etc.) hit $720/mo.


$10,800
                                  $10,800 per year =           After 9 months of TWP,
Substantial Gainful               = $900 per month =           your SSDI eligibility ends if
Activity (SGA) level              $5.63 / hour (FT)            your current earnings are
                                  $11.25 / hour (PT)           $900 or more a month.
   $8,640
  Income limit for Food Stamps

$7,680
                                  $7,680 / year                 Any month (during the past 5
Trial Work Period level           = $640 / month                years) you earn $640 or more
                                  = $4 / hour (FT)              counts toward your 9-month
                                  = $8 / hour (PT)              SSDI Trial Work Period
                                                                (TWP).
For more information, call or email Ed Suarez at 453-6941 or esuarez@amhd.health.state.hi.us



                                          33
                                                                                                Date Received

       PLAN FOR ACHIEVING SELF-SUPPORT

        In order to minimize recontacts or processing delays, please complete all questions
        and provide thorough explanations where requested. If you need additional space
        to answer any questions, use the Remarks section or a separate sheet of paper.



                                                    Name_____________________________________SSN
_______________________________

                                    PART I — YOUR WORK GOAL


A.     What is your goal? (Show the specific job you expect to have at the end of the plan. If you do not
       yet have a specific work goal and will be working with a vocational professional to find a suitable
       job match, show “VR Evaluation,” be sure to complete Part II, question F on page 4.
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________

       If your goal involves supported employment, show the number of hours of job coaching you will
       receive when you begin working __________ per week/month (circle one).

       Show the number of hours of job coaching you expect to receive after the plan is completed.
       __________ per week/month (circle one).

B.     Describe the duties you expect to perform in this job. Be as specific as possible (standing, walking,
       sitting, lifting stooping, bending, contact with the public, writing reports/documents, etc.)
       ________________________________________________________________________________
       ________________________________________________________________________________
       _________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________

C.     How did you decide on this work goal and what makes this job attractive to you?
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
D.     If your work goal does not involve self-employment, how much do you expect to earn each month
       (gross) after your plan is completed?     $__________/month




Form SSA-545-BK (2/99)
                                                    Page 1




                                                  34
E.     If your work goal involves self-employment, explain why working for yourself will make you more
       self-supporting than working for someone else.
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       __________________________________________________________________________

       NOTE: If you plan to start your own business, attach a detailed business plan. At a minimum the
       business plan must include the type of business; products or services to be offered by your business;
       a description of the market for the business; the advertising plan; technical assistance needed; tools,
       supplies, and equipment needed; and a profit-loss projection for the duration of the PASS and at
       least one year beyond its completion. Also include a description of how you intend to make this
       business succeed.

F.     Did someone help you prepare this plan?  YES  NO If “NO,” skip to G.
       If “YES,” show the name, address and telephone number of that individual or organization.
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________

       May we contact them if we need additional information about your plan?             YES       NO

       Do you want us to send them a copy of our decision on your plan?                   YES       NO

       Are they charging you a fee for this service? YES  NO
       If “YES,” how much are they charging? ____________________________

G.     Have you ever submitted a Plan for Achieving Self Support (PASS) to Social Security?
        YES NO If “NO,” skip to Part II. If “YES,” complete the following:

       Was a PASS ever approved for you?            YES       NO                                     If
       “NO,” skip to Part II.
       If “YES,” complete the following:

       When was your most recent plan approved (month/year)?_____________________________
       What was your work goal in that plan?____________________________________________

       Did you complete that PASS?              YES  NO
       If “NO,” why weren’t you able to complete it? ____________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________

       If “YES,” why weren’t you able to become self-supporting?__________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________

       Why do you believe that this new plan you are requesting will help you go to work?
       __________________________________________________________________________


Form SSA-545-BK (2/99)
                                                   Page 2




                                                 35
                      PART II — MEDICAL/VOCATIONAL BACKGROUND

A.     What are your disabling illnesses, injuries, or conditions?_____________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________

B.     Describe any limitations you have because of your disability (e.g., limited amount of standing or
       lifting, stooping, bending, or walking; difficulty concentrating; unable to work with other people,
       difficulty handling stress, etc.) Be specific. ________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________


       In light of the limitations you described, how will you carry out the duties of your work goal?
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________

C.     List the jobs you have had most often in the past few years. Also list any jobs, including volunteer
       work, which are similar to your work goal or which provided you with skills that may help you
       perform the work goal. List the dates you worked in these jobs. Identify periods of self-
       employment. If you were in the Army, list your Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) code; for
       the Air Force, list your Air Force Specialty (AFSC) code; and for the Navy, Marine Corps, and
       Coast Guard, list your RATE.

             Job Title                       Type of Business                       Dates Worked
                                                                            From                 To




Form SSA-545-BK (2/99)
                                                  Page 3




                                                 36
D.     Circle the highest grade of school completed.

       0    1     2       3   4   5   6       7   8   9     10   11   12   GED or High School Equival.

       College:       1       2   3       4       or more

       1.       Were you awarded a college or postgraduate degree?             YES  NO
                When did you graduate?_________________________
                What type of degree did you receive? (B.A., B.S., M.B.A., etc.) ___________________
                In what field of study?__________________________________________________

       2.       Did you attend special education classes?           YES          NO
                If “NO,” skip to E. If “YES,” complete the following:

       Name of school _________________________________________________________

       Address_____________________________________________________________________
       Dates attended: From ________________________  To _________________________
       Type of program_____________________________________________________________

E.     Have you completed any type of special job training, vocational school?  YES            NO
       If “NO,” skip to F. If “YES,” complete the following:

       Type of training _____________________________________________________________
       Date completed ______________________________________________________________
       Did you receive a certificate or license?                                      
YES     NO
       If “NO,” skip to F. If “YES,” what kind of certificate or license?
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________

       If “YES,” attach a copy of the evaluation and skip to Part II (page 5). If you cannot attached a copy,
       complete the following:

       When were you evaluated or when do you expect to be evaluated or when was the IWRP or IEP
       done or when do you expect it to be done? _____________________________

       Show the name, address, and phone number of the person or organization who evaluated you or will
       evaluate you or who prepared the IRWP or IEP or will prepare the IWRP or IEP.
       ___________________________________________________________________________




Form SSA-545-BK (2/99)
                                                            Page 4




                                                          37
                                          Part III — Your Plan

I want my Plan to begin
________________________________________________________(month/year)
and my Plan to
end____________________________________________________________(month/year)

List the steps, in sequence, that you will take to reach this goal. Be as specific as possible. If you will
be attending school, show the courses you will study each quarter/semester. Include the final steps to
find a job one you have obtained the tools, education, services, etc., that you need.

                                  Step                                       Beginning          Completion
                                                                               Date                Date
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________
   ____________________________________________________                   ______________       ____________


Form SSA-545-BK (2/99)
                                                   Page 5




                                                 38
                                        PART IV — EXPENSES

A.     If you propose to purchase, lease, or rent a vehicle, please provide the following additional
       information:

       1.    Explain why less expensive forms of transportation (e.g., public transportation, cabs) will not
             allow you to reach your work goal.
             ______________________________________________________________________
             ______________________________________________________________________
             ______________________________________________________________________
             ______________________________________________________________________
             ______________________________________________________________________

       2.    Do you currently have a valid driver’s license?                                           
             YES  NO
             If “YES,” skip to 3. If “NO,” complete the following:

             Who will drive the vehicle?________________________________________________
             How will it be used to help you with your work goal?____________________________
             ______________________________________________________________________
             ______________________________________________________________________
             ______________________________________________________________________
             ______________________________________________________________________

       3.    If you are proposing the purchase a vehicle, explain why renting or leasing are not sufficient.
             ______________________________________________________________________
             ______________________________________________________________________
             ______________________________________________________________________
             ______________________________________________________________________

       4.    Explain why you chose the particular vehicle. (Note: the purchase of the vehicle should be
             listed as one of the steps in Part III.)
             ______________________________________________________________________
             ______________________________________________________________________
             ______________________________________________________________________
             ______________________________________________________________________
             ______________________________________________________________________
             ______________________________________________________________________
             ______________________________________________________________________
             ______________________________________________________________________




Form SSA-545-BK (2/99)
                                                  Page 6




                                                 39
B.    If you propose to purchase computer equipment or other expensive equipment, please explain why a
      less expensive alternative (e.g., rental or a computer or purchase of a less expensive model) will not
      allow you to reach your goal. Explain why you need the capabilities of the particular
      computer/equipment you identified. Also, if you attend (or will attend) a school with a computer
      lab for student use, explain why use of that facility is not sufficient to meet your needs.
      ___________________________________________________________________________
      ___________________________________________________________________________
      ___________________________________________________________________________
      ___________________________________________________________________________
      ___________________________________________________________________________

C.    Other than the items identified in A or B above, list the items or services you are buying or renting
      or will need to buy or rent in order to reach your work goal. Be as specific as possible. If schooling
      is an item, list tuition, fees, books, etc. as separate items. List the cost for the entire length of time
      you will be in school. Where applicable, include brand and model number or the item. (Do not
      include expenses you were paying prior to the beginning of your plan; only additional
      expenses incurred because of your plan can be approved.)

      NOTE: Be sure that Part III shows when you will purchase these items or services or training.

      1.    Item/service training ___________________________________Cost $ _____________

            Vendor provider _________________________________________________________

            How will this help you reach your work goal? _________________________________
            ______________________________________________________________________

            How did you determine the cost? ___________________________________________
            ______________________________________________________________________

            Why wouldn’t something less expensive meet your needs? _______________________
            ______________________________________________________________________
            ____________________________________________________________________

      2.    Item/service training ___________________________________Cost $ _____________

            Vendor provider _________________________________________________________

            How will this help you reach your work goal? _________________________________
            ______________________________________________________________________

            How did you determine the cost? ___________________________________________
            ______________________________________________________________________

            Why wouldn’t something less expensive meet your needs? _______________________
            ____________________________________________________________________


Form SSA-545-BK (2/99)
                                                   Page 7



                                                 40
       3.    Item/service training ___________________________________Cost $ _____________

             Vendor provider _________________________________________________________

             How will this help you reach your work goal? ________________________________
             ____________________________________________________________________

             How did you determine the cost? __________________________________________
             ____________________________________________________________________
             Why wouldn’t something less expensive meet your needs? _______________________
             ____________________________________________________________________
             ______________________________________________________________________

       4.    Item/service training ___________________________________Cost $ _____________

             Vendor provider _________________________________________________________

             How will this help you reach your work goal? _________________________________
             ____________________________________________________________________

             How did you determine the cost? ___________________________________________
             ____________________________________________________________________

             Why wouldn’t something less expensive meet your needs? _______________________

             ____________________________________________________________________________
             _________________________________________________________

       5.    Item/service training ___________________________________Cost $ _____________

             Vendor provider ________________________________________________________

             How will this help you reach your work goal? ________________________________
                                                ______________________________________________
             ______________________

             How did you determine the cost? ___________________________________________
             _____________________________________________________________________

             Why wouldn’t something less expensive meet your needs? _______________________
             ____________________________________________________________________
             ____________________________________________________________________




Form SSA-545-BK (2/99)
                                              Page 8



                                            41
D.     If you indicated in Part II (page 4) that you have a college degree or specialized training, and your
       plan includes additional education or training, explain why the education/training you already
       received is not sufficient to allow you to be self-supporting.
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________

E.     What are your current expenses each month (rent, food, utilities, phone, property taxes,
       homeowner’s insurance automobile repair and maintenance, public transportation costs, clothes,
       laundry/dry cleaning, charity contributions, etc.)?
       $__________/month


       If the amount of income you will have available for living expenses after making payments or
       saving money for your plan expenses is less than your current living expenses, explain how you
       will pay for your living expenses.
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________
       ___________________________________________________________________________




Form SSA-545-BK (2/99)
                                                   Page 9



                                                 42
                             PART V — FUNDING FOR WORK GOAL


A.      Do you plan to use any items you already own (e.g., equipment or property) to reach our work goal?

         YES  NO
        If “NO,” skip to B.
        If “YES,” complete the following:

        Item_______________________________________________________________________
        Value______________________________________________________________________
        How will this help you reach your work goal?______________________________________
        ___________________________________________________________________________

        Item_______________________________________________________________________
        Value______________________________________________________________________
        How will this help you reach your work goal?______________________________________
        ___________________________________________________________________________


B.      Have you saved any money to pay for the expenses listed on pages 6-8 in Part IV? (Include cash on
        hand or money in a bank account.)         YES  NO If “NO,” skip to C.


C.      Do you receive or expect to receive income other than SSI payments? YES       NO
        If “NO,” skip to F.
        If “YES,” provide details as follows:

                   Type of Income                  Amount            Frequency (Weekly, Monthly, Yearly)




D.      How much of this income will you use each month to pay for the expenses listed in Part IV?
        ___________________________________________________________________________
        ___________________________________________________________________________
        ___________________________________________________________________________

Form SSA-545-BK (2/99)
                                                 Page 10




                                                43
E.      Do you plan to save any or all of this money for a future purchase which is necessary to complete
        your goal?
        YES  NO If “NO,” skip to F.
        If “YES,” how will you keep the money separate from other money you have? (If you will keep the
        savings in a separate bank account, give the name and address of the bank and the account
        number.)
        ___________________________________________________________________________
        ________________________________________________________________________________
        ______________________________________________________________________
        ___________________________________________________________________________

F.      Will any other person or organization (e.g., Vocational Rehabilitation, school grants, Job
        Partnership Training Assistance (JTPA) pay for or reimburse you for any part of the expenses listed
        in Part IV or provide any other items or services you will need?
                                                     YES  NO If “NO,” skip to Part VI.


                                                                                     When will the item/
                Who will pay                 Item/service             Amount        service be purchased?




                                 PART VI — REMARKS
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________

                                      PART VII -- AGREEMENT

If my plan is approved, I agree to:
       Comply with all of the terms and conditions of the plan as approved by the Social Security
        Administration (SSA);
       Report any changes in my plan to SSA immediately



Form SSA-545-BK (2/99)
                                                  Page 11



                                                 44
       Keep records and receipts of all expenditures I make under the plan until asked to provide them to
        SSA.
       Use the income or resources set aside under the plan only to buy the items or services shown in the
        plan as approved by SSA.

I realize that if I do not comply with the terms of the plan or if I use the income or resources set aside under
my plan for any other purpose, SSA will count the income or resources that were excluded and I may have to
repay the additional SSI I received.

I also realize that SSA may not approve any expenditures for which I do not submit receipts or other proof of
payment.

I know that anyone who makes or causes to be made a false statement or representation of material fact in an
application for use in determining a right to payment under the Social Security Act commits a crime
punishable under Federal Law and/or State Law. I affirm that all the information I have given on this form
is true.

Signature ________________________________________Date_____________________________

Address___________________________________________________________________________
                                          ______________________________________________
_____________________________
                                          ______________________________________________
_____________________________

Telephone:
                                                    Home___________________________________

                                                    Work___________________________________




Form SSA-545-BK (2/99)
                                                    Page 12


                                                   45
                                      PRIVACY ACT STATEMENT


The Social Security Administration is allowed to collect the information on this form under section 1631 (e)
of the Social Security Act. We need this information to determine if we can approve your plan for achieving
self-support. Giving us this information is voluntary. However, without it, we may not be able to approve
your plan. Social Security will not use the information for any other purpose.

We would give out the facts on this form without your consent only in certain situations. For example, we
give out this information if a Federal law requires us to or if your Congressional Representative or Senator
needs the information to answer questions you ask them.


         PAPERWORK REDUCTION ACT NOTICE AND TIME IT TAKES STATEMENT

The Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 requires us to notify you that this information collection is in
accordance with the clearance requirements of section 3507 of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. We
may not conduct or sponsor, and you are not required to respond to, a collection of information unless it
displays a valid OMB control number. We estimate that it will take you about 120 minutes to complete this
form. This includes the time it will take to read the instruction, gather the necessary facts and fill out the
form.




Form SSA-545-BK (2/99)
                                                    Page 13




                                                  46
                            OUR RESPONSIBILITIES TO YOU

We received the plan for achieving self-support (PASS) on ______________________________________.
Your plan will be processed by Social Security employees who are trained to work with PASS.

The PASS expert handling your case will work directly with you. He or she will look over the plan as soon
as possible to see if there is a good chance that you can meet your work goal. The PASS expert will also
make sure that the things you want to pay for are needed to achieve your work goal and are reasonably
priced. If changes are needed, the PASS expert will discuss them with you.

Your may contact the PASS expert toll-free at 1-______________________________.


                YOUR REPORTING AND RECORDKEEPING RESPONSIBILITIES


If we approve your plan, you must tell Social Security about any changes to your plan. You must tell
us if:

 Your medical condition improves.

 You are unable to follow your plan.

 You decide not to pursue your goal or decide to pursue a different goal.

 You decide that your do not need to pay for any of the expenses you listed in your plan.

 Someone else pays for any of your plan expenses.

 You use the income or resources we exclude for a purpose other than the expense specified in your plan.

 There are any other changes to your plan.

You must tell us about any of these things within 10 days following the month in which it happens. If you
do not report any of these things, we may stop your plan.

You should also tell us if you decide that you need to pay for other expenses not listed in your plan in order
to reach your goal. We may be able to change your plan or change the amount of income we exclude so you
can pay for the additional expenses.

YOU MUST KEEP RECEIPTS OR CANCELLED CHECKS TO SHOW THAT EXPENSES YOU
PAID FOR AS PART OF THE PLAN. You need to keep these receipts or cancelled checks until we
contact you to find out if you are still following your plan. When we contact you, we will ask to see the
receipts or cancelled checks. If you are not following the plan, you may have to pay back the some or all of
the SSI you received.



Form SSA-545-BK (2/99)
                                                    Page 14




                                                  47
 BENEFITS PLANNING RESOURCES




       HELP YOU STAY ON TARGET
SSA Information Line: 1-800-772-1213

SSA Web Site: www.ssa.gov

My State SSA Office:    Honolulu District Office
                        Address: 300 Ala Moana Blvd, Room 1-114, Honolulu,
                        HI 96850
                        Phone: 808-541-3600

My Local Claims Representatives:

Kapolei District Office
563 Farrington Highway, Suite 201, Kapolei, HI 96707
808-674-2477

Kauai Office
4334 Rice Street, Suite 105, Lihue, HI 96766
808-245-6709




                                    48
Maui Office
2200 Main Street, Suite 125, Wailuku, HI 96793
808-244-6800

Hawai’i Office
1178 Kinoole Street, Hilo, HI 96720
808-933-7054


My PASS Cadre:            San Diego PASS Cadre
My PASS Specialist:       Address: 1333 Front St, San Diego, CA 92101
                          Phone: 1-888-674-6250


My Benefits Specialist: Name: Teekea Butoaia
                        Address: 414 Kuwili St, Suite 102, Honolulu, HI 96817
                        Phone: 808-522-5407

                          Name: Howard Lesser
                          Address: 900 Fort Street Mall, Suite 1040, Honolulu, HI
                          96813
                          Phone: 808-949-2922

My Medicaid/MedQUEST Case Worker:

Phone:

•Oahu      587-3521
•Hilo      933-0339
•Kona      327-4970
•Maui      243-5780
•Molokai   553-1758
•Lanai     565-7102
•Kauai     241-3575

My One-Stop Employment Locations for job search assistance (resume
writing, interview skills, internet access, message center with telephones, e-mail,
fax, copy machines), personal career planning (assessment of your skills and
training needs), training opportunities (computer and job skills training) and
library resource center (newspapers, books, magazines, brochures, training tips,
reference materials and education resource information):
                                      49
Oahu

Website: www.oahuworklinks.com




  Princess Ruth Keelikolani Building
  830 Punchbowl St., Rm. 112
  Honolulu, HI 96813
  Telephone: 586-8700
  Dillingham Shopping Plaza
  1505 Dillingham Blvd., Rm. 110
  Honolulu, HI 96817
  Telephone: 843-0733 ext.225
  Makalapa Community Center
  99-102 Kalaloa St., 2nd Flr.
  Aiea, HI 96701
  Telephone: 488-5630
  Waipahu Civic Center
  94-275 Mokuola St., Rm. 300
  Waipahu, HI 96797
  Telephone: 675-0010
  Kapolei Civic Center (limited services)
  601 Kamokila Blvd., Rm. 588
  Kapolei, HI 96707
  Telephone: 692-7630
  Waianae Neighborhood Center
  85-670 Farrington Hwy., Rm. 6
  Waianae, HI 96792
  Telephone: 696-7067
  Kaneohe
  45-1141 Kamehameha Hwy.

                                        50
Kaneohe, HI 96744
Telephone: 233-3700
Waialua Shopping Center
67-292 Goodale Ave.
Waialua, HI 96791
Telephone: 637-6508




                          51
Big Island

Website: www.1stop4youths.com




   Hilo
   1990 Kinoole St.
   Hilo, HI 96720
    Telephone: 981-2860
   Fax: 981-2880
   Kona (limited services)
   74-5565 Luhia St., Bldg. C Bay 4
   Kailua Kona, HI 96740
   Telephone: 327-4770

Maui


Website: www.worksourcemaui.com




   Wailuku
   2064 Wells St., Ste. 108
   Wailuku, HI 96793
   Telephone: 984-2091




                                 52
Molokai (limited services)
55 Makaena Pl., Rm. 4
Kaunakakai, HI 96748
Telephone: 553-1755
Lanai
Telephone: (808)984-2091


Kauai

Website: www.workwisekauai.com




Lihue
3100 Kuhio Hwy., Ste. C-9
Lihue, HI 96766
Telephone: 274-3060




                             53

								
To top