Docstoc

Head Start

Document Sample
Head Start Powered By Docstoc
					                                         Head Start
                                      state collaboration offices




A n n u A l S tAt e P r o f i l e S
  Januar y-D ecember 2006
table of Contents


Introduction ............................................................................................v




Program Accomplishments by State .............................................ix




Collaboration with Regional Offices ..........................................343




Office of Head Start Contact ........................................................371




Index .....................................................................................................373
                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   v




Introduction


Head Start and early Head Start
are comprehensive child development
programs that serve children from birth
to age five, pregnant women, and their
families. Child-focused programs, their overall
goal is to promote school readiness by enhancing
the social and cognitive development of low-
income children and their families.

The Head Start program is administered by the Office of Head
Start [organizational structure change from Head Start Bureau
to Office of Head Start, effective May 23, 2006], administra-
tion for Children and Families (aCF), department of Health
and Human Services (dHHS). Grants are awarded by the
aCF regional Offices and the Office of Head Start’s ameri-
can Indian alaska Native and Migrant and Seasonal Program
Branches directly to public agencies, private community and
faith-based organizations, Indian tribes, and school systems
for the purpose of operating Head Start programs at the com-
munity level.

The Head Start program has a long tradition of delivering
quality, comprehensive services designed to foster healthy
development in low-income children. Head Start grantee and
delegate agencies provide a range of individualized services in
the areas of education and early childhood development; medi-
cal, dental, and mental health; nutrition; and parent involve-
ment. In addition, Head Start collaborates with an array of
community partners to provide services that are responsive and
appropriate to each child and family’s developmental, ethnic,
cultural, and linguistic heritage and experience.

all Head Start programs must adhere to the Head Start Pro-
gram Performance Standards, which define the services to be
provided to the children and families they serve. The Perfor-
mance Standards constitute the expectations and requirements
that Head Start grantees must meet. They are designed to en-
sure that Head Start goals and objectives are implemented suc-
cessfully, that the Head Start philosophy continues to thrive,
vi |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       and that all grantee and delegate agencies maintain the highest possible quality. The 1998 reauthorization of
       the Head Start act established requirements, applicable to all Head Start grantees serving three- to five-year-
       old children, to build on and expand current efforts to improve and document program quality and effective-
       ness through a renewed emphasis on assessing, tracking, and utilizing data on program and child outcomes.

       a total of 909,201 infants, toddlers, and preschoolers were served by Head Start in FY2006. Head Start
       and early Head Start programs are found in all 50 states, the district of Columbia, Puerto rico, the Virgin
       Islands, the Outer Pacific Islands, and in some 150 tribal nations. Since its inception in 1965, Head Start has
       served more than 23 million children.


       The Head Start-State Collaboration Offices
       despite its Federal-to-local program structure, the Head Start community recognizes that the states play
       an important role in the formulation and implementation of policies and initiatives that affect low-income
       children and their families. Collaboration on behalf of children and families is one of Head Start’s highest
       priorities.

       Since 1990, the Head Start Bureau, now the Office of Head Start, has funded Head Start-State Collaboration
       Office grants to create the capacity to support the development of multi-agency and public/private partner-
       ships at the state level. These partnerships are intended to—

       ♦ Help build early childhood systems and enhance access to comprehensive services and support for all
         low-income children.

       ♦ encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs, services, and
         initiatives, augmenting Head Start’s capacity to be a partner in state initiatives on behalf of children and
         their families.

       ♦ Facilitate the involvement of Head Start in state policies, plans, processes, and decisions affecting the
         Head Start target population and other low-income families.

       Head Start-State Collaboration funds are used to ensure the coordination of Head Start services with health
       care, welfare, child care, education, community service activities, family literacy services, activities relating to
       children with disabilities, and services to homeless families. as states continue to expand their investment in
       coordinated services for young children and their families, many collaborate extensively with Head Start in a
       variety of ways. The Head Start-State Collaboration Offices play many roles in the development and enhance-
       ment of state-level efforts to build early childhood systems through linkages, coordination, and integration of
       policies and services.


       Priority Areas and Implementation
       In the 1998 reauthorization of the Head Start act, Congress outlined priority areas for the Head Start-State
       Collaboration Offices. They are charged with facilitating coordination of Head Start services with a complex
       array of other services.

       There are eight areas to which the State Collaboration Offices are to pay particular attention—

       ♦ Promote access to timely health care services.

       ♦ encourage collaboration with welfare systems.
                                                                                     AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   vii




♦ Improve the availability and affordability of quality child care services.

♦ expand partnerships with school systems.

♦ Collaborate with existing community services activities.

♦ Strengthen family literacy services.

♦ Increase opportunities for children with disabilities.

♦ Support access for homeless children.

although the Head Start-State Collaboration Offices are expected to address all of the priority areas over the
course of their grants, they are not required to address all of the eight areas each year.

The Head Start-State Collaboration Offices have demonstrated clearly the value of establishing a presence
at the state level. each state develops a comprehensive five-year plan to determine goals and objectives that
guide the work of its Collaboration Office. Collaboration Offices have found that engaging many stakehold-
ers in a strategic planning process, including key state agencies, the state Head Start association, Head Start
grantees, and other early childhood organizations, foundations, and businesses, has contributed to the cred-
ibility of the Collaboration Office and the success of collaboration efforts.

In addition to the involvement of all relevant stakeholders in the planning and agenda-setting process, the
experience of the Head Start-State Collaboration Offices indicates that those most successful in fostering
working partnerships and facilitating a more coordinated approach to planning and service delivery are influ-
enced strongly by:

♦ Their level of autonomy and access to the Governor’s office.

♦ The skills and experience of the Collaboration director.

♦ a willingness to work in partnership with the state Head Start association and the Head Start and early
  childhood communities.

The Head Start-State Collaboration Offices have established themselves as an effective single point of contact
in each state for informing the Head Start community about state planning and programs. Likewise, the Col-
laboration Offices are an important resource for state agencies seeking Head Start information and services.
effective partnerships continue because the interests and needs of both Head Start and the states are addressed.

Our knowledge about child development and quality early childhood services increased dramatically over
the past several years, resulting in unexpected funding opportunities and shifts in programmatic priorities at
the Federal and state levels. as a result, effective Head Start-State Collaboration Offices have developed the
capacity to work with partners to adjust plans accordingly and to respond to inquiries in a timely manner. This
flexibility is based on strong relationships and effective systems for data management and communications
with the Head Start community.

Lastly, the Governor and other high-level officials must provide strong, ongoing support in developing
initiatives involving various state agencies. This level of support is proving to be essential in creating mutually
beneficial changes in service delivery systems.
viii |     Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         Funding History of Head Start-State Collaboration Offices
         aCF funded the first wave of Head Start-State Collaboration grants in 1990. twelve states were awarded
         competitive grants at that time: Kentucky, Maine, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsyl-
         vania, South Carolina, South dakota, texas, and Virginia. In 1992, aCF funded a second wave of the Head
         Start-State Collaboration Offices in alaska, California, Colorado, Iowa, Georgia, Maryland, Minnesota, New
         Mexico, North Carolina, and Vermont.

         The report of the advisory Committee on Head Start Quality and expansion, issued in december 1993,
         specifically mentioned the Head Start-State Collaboration grants and recommended that: “[dHHS] should
         carefully consider placing these grants in Governors’ offices to help ensure greater coordination with all
         services for young children. In addition, any new collaboration projects should be developed with sustained
         involvement of representatives of the Head Start community in the planning and decision-making process.”
         Based on the recommendations offered by the advisory Committee, as well as the recognized need to sustain
         a visible presence in each state, aCF expanded funding to facilitate collaboration in specific areas.

         In 1996 and 1997, Head Start-State Collaboration grants were awarded to the 28 remaining states, plus the
         district of Columbia and Puerto rico. In 2001, Collaboration Coordinators were added for the american
         Indian alaskan Native and the Migrant and Seasonal farmworker populations. In addition to annual funding,
         supplemental funding also has been made available periodically to the Head Start-State Collaboration Offices
         on a competitive basis for innovative activities and special projects in defined categories. Limited to $50,000,
         these seed funds have been instrumental in engaging new and existing partners in strategic efforts to:

         ♦ develop and enhance professional development opportunities.

         ♦ Promote comprehensive, unified planning around service delivery systems for young children and their
           families.


         Achievements in Collaboration
         The following sections of this publication highlight the achievement of the Head Start-State Collaboration
         Offices in 2006. The main section is a compilation of reports from the State Collaboration Offices, identifying
         their accomplishments in each of the priority areas, as well as describing new partnerships and unique activi-
         ties. an additional section of the report summarizes state accomplishments regarding collaboration with the
         aCF regional Offices.
program accomplishments
                by state
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS              |   1




                                      alabama


Collaboration Director                Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                      areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
linda Hampton
                                      plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Alabama Dept. of Children’s Affairs
2 north Jackson Street                Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Suite 602                             services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Montgomery, Al 36104                  are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Phone: 334-223-0714                   at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
fax: 334-223-0712
                                      in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
linda.hampton@dca.alabama.gov         The State Collaboration Office is located in the department
www.children.alabama.gov              of Children’s affairs with the Office of School readiness and
                                      works closely with OSr on best practices. The department has
                                      combined all early care and education functions in the same
Lead Agency Contact
                                      location for improved collaboration and consultation.
Richard Dorrough
                                      The Early Care and Education Collaborative was organized
Commissioner
                                      in FY2006 to strengthen partnerships among state agencies
Phone: 334-223-0502                   responsible for the design and implementation of services to
fax: 334-240-3054                     children birth to five, avoid duplication, and reduce the number
richard.dorrough@dca.alabama.gov
                                      of meetings in realizing mutual goals. Quarterly meetings are
                                      held in addition to ongoing planning and communication on
                                      specific initiatives and issues. Members include the depart-
ACF Regional Contact                  ment of Children’s affairs-Office of School readiness (State
                                      Pre-kindergarten); Head Start-State Collaboration Office;
fannie Jenkins                        department of Human resources-Child Care Licensing divi-
HS & Y Program Specialist             sion; department of education-division of Special education
uS Dept. of Health and Human          and title I; department of rehabilitation Services—early
Services                              Intervention; department of Mental Health/Mental retar-
                                      dation-Office of Children’s Services; and the department of
Office of Head Start
                                      Public Health-division of Family Services.
Region IV
Atlanta federal Center                Specific outcomes of the Collaborative include:
61 forsyth Street, nW
Suite 4M60                            ♦ Presentations at state and regional conferences improved
                                        awareness and gained significant buy-in for early care and
Atlanta, GA 30303
                                        education, including pre-kindergarten proliferation.
Phone: 404-562-2852
fax: 404-562-2983                     ♦ Joint efforts to solicit grants and comply with Federal
fannie.Jenkins@acf.hhs.gov              requirements has resulted in a small but quality pre-kin-
                                        dergarten program; solicitation of state funding for Head
2 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




         Start; and the organization of an early education Collaborative to give vision and leadership to an emerg-
         ing system.

      ♦ a resource center jointly sponsored by Head Start and child care in rural alabama is now accessible to
        community family and center child care providers and parents.

      ♦ twelve percent of Head Start grantees receive OSr funds, increasing the number of children receiving
        comprehensive services to more than 300. Models have been identified across the State for combining
        state and Federal dollars. Head Start grantees are encouraged to respond to OSr requests for proposals
        and partner with child care for other program options and funding.

      ♦ Utilization of County Children’s Policy Councils locally in addressing program and community needs has
        resulted in inclusion of Head Start as a community resource. Child care and other low-income issues are
        included in annual assessments submitted to the State Council for recommendations to the Governor and
        Legislature.

      ♦ Sharing and disseminating information via Web sites, newsletters, listservs, meetings, and conferences has
        increased cross-training opportunities, access, and additional program and parent resources.

      ♦ Membership on advisory boards and committees provides opportunities to influence service delivery op-
        tions and share best practices across programs. transition, disabilities, parent involvement, and oral health
        practices within Head Start are included in pre-kindergarten policies. teacher qualifications in pre-kinder-
        garten emphasize the need to obtain college degrees in Head Start. Child care is improving as a result of
        both pre-kindergarten and Head Start, specifically in the areas of health, oral health, and disabilities.

      ♦ Alabama’s Early Learning Guidelines were developed through collaborative efforts for children birth to five
        and reflect the Head Start Program Performance Standards, pre-kindergarten, and NaeYC Standards.


      Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
      your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
      Health Care
      ♦ Participation in the State’s Oral Health Coalition and Chair of the education and awareness subcommit-
        tee has allowed Head Start and pre-kindergarten programs to receive Medicaid’s Smile Alabama curricu-
        lum, valued at $15,000. Identification of additional Medicaid providers in rural and underserved areas has
        increased access to services. Information to the oral health community on Head Start and young children
        has improved parent/dentist relationships and raised awareness of the role of parents in the healthcare de-
        livery system. Statistics show a decrease in the number of children experiencing tooth decay in Head Start,
        although there have been no significant increases in resources. effective partnerships at the state and local
        levels are making a difference. OSr surveys revealed more than 30% of pre-kindergarten children have
        oral health problems, confirming the need to include oral health in pre-kindergarten policies and curricula.

      ♦ The SCO surveyed health issues affecting Head Start children and their families. results show referrals
        and follow-up; education and awareness to include information on available resources; dental services for
        non-english speaking families; chronic health disorders such as diabetes, asthma, obesity, tube feeding;
        and administering medication. In response to this survey, resources were identified through the alabama
        department of Health and disseminated for use in Head Start.
                                                                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS        |   3




♦ a grant to the State association helped organize a Health Forum for all health and disability managers.
  a state plan was developed for sharing resources and best practices under the leadership of the region IV
  t/a contractor. additional regional meetings are scheduled in the coming year. This will be the first time
  line staff has participated directly in state issues.

♦ The Lee County, aL Head Start experienced difficulty in providing 234 children with exams and treat-
  ment within the 45-day requirement. The State Medicaid agency identified an alternate provider near the
  Georgia line to address this issue.

Homeless
♦ Young children have been included in the State’s chronically homeless plan to eradicate homelessness by
  2010. Children were not included in the plan prior to SCO appointment to the State’s Homeless acade-
  my and Governor’s taskforce. Partners include HUd, aL Office on Faith-Based and Community Service,
  department of education, non-profit providers, and businesses.

♦ Hurricane Katrina presented unique problems for alabama’s Gulf Coast area. The State Collaboration
  Office became a part of the Federal disaster response team with daily reports on the condition of affected
  Head Start grantees. Impact, recovery, and preparedness reports were provided to the State Homeland
  Security, departments of emergency Management, Children’s affairs, and economic and Community
  affairs. HHS included services for children in their disaster response plan for the first time. This allowed
  dissemination of information and support to displaced families and programs. The Mobile program, with
  support from various agencies, was able to prepare for a Federal review, obtain NaeYC accreditation,
  and reach full enrollment during its recovery phase. Bayou La Batre Head Start was totally destroyed but
  received state and Federal assistance to rebuild and continue services.

Disability Services
♦ The SCO provided a grant to the department of rehabilitation Services to plan the early Intervention/
  Preschool Conference. More than 80 Head Start staff and parents received materials and identified re-
  sources for improved awareness and access. Other attendees included child care and pre-kindergarten.

♦ Head Start is represented on the Interagency Coordinating Council which consists of departments of
  Human resources, education, Mental Health/Mental retardation, Insurance, transportation, alabama
  Institute for the death and Blind, various associations, advocates, local providers, and parents. This col-
  laboration allows for identification of resources, expanded services, cross training, and referrals.

♦    Head Start has been added to the alabama department of education’s Preschool Special education’s
    OSeP plan to address intervention and transition. State standards have been developed for children with
    special needs that reflect Head Start and pre-kindergarten standards.

Community Service
♦ Caa and Head Start signed an agreement for Caa of alabama to assist and support the HS association
  with grant writing, conference planning and advocacy. The goal is to build capacity and increase awareness
  of Head Start across the State.

♦ Community action and Head Start obtained a voting seat on the State Children’s Policy Council with
  representation by JCCeO insuring input of both organizations at the state level.
4 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      ♦ The alabama Child Care Workforce Study included Head Start for the first time in its annual assessment,
        resulting in higher education levels, earnings, and experience, and more accredited programs. The alabama
        Partnership produced the report and has begun partnering with Head Start through its local affiliates.

      Education
      ♦    Special education, title I and even Start are located in aSde and are active partners in the Early Care
          and Education Collaborative.

      ♦ The number of Head Start teachers earning degrees has increased by 20% due to partnerships with two-
        and four-year institutions.

      ♦    alabama State University is tracking Head Start, child care, and pre-kindergarten children through third
          grade and offering incentives for parent participation. Child care and title I programs are also included in
          the tracking for additional comparative data.

      ♦ alabama is developing a Professional development System with input from the aL department of
        Higher education, Postsecondary education, the early care and education community, and Head Start’s
        t/ta representative. dHr is coordinating this effort as part of the Good Start, Grow Smart Initiative.

      Literacy
      ♦ The department of education’s Parent and Community Involvement is utilizing portions of the Head
        Start Program Performance Standards in its state guidelines.

      ♦ Fifty percent of all Head Start grantees utilize the eLLCO in identifying literacy-rich environments,
        which helps in standardizing assessment of program quality.

      Welfare
      ♦ a single parent survey in Head Start, Child abuse and Neglect grantees, and Churches identified priority
        needs and resulted in the development of a resource list and inclusion in the alabama resource Man-
        agement System. Partners included Child Support and enforcement, Children’s trust Fund, the State’s
        Healthy Marriage grantee, and others.

      ♦ Grant provided to the aHSa to organize a Family Service forum involving 28 of 31 programs to develop
        a state plan to address professional development for FSW. Medicaid provided current trends and informa-
        tion.


      Describe additional activities and successes in the past year
      ♦ State Collaboration director recognized as “Woman of the Year” for socialization activities initiated
        between early Head Start, Montgomery Public Schools, and the Zeta Phi Beta sorority for more than 80
        teen mothers.

      ♦ Co-sponsored Head Start’s 40th anniversary Celebration with alabama State University’s School of
        education. More than 400 early educators, ta Network, vendors, state and local partners attended. es-
        timated donations of space, training, entertainment, printing, advertising, and the like totaled more than
        $25,000.
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS         |   5




♦ an e-newsletter is produced and disseminated annually by the State Collaboration Office that highlights
  state and local partnerships, state initiatives and resources.

♦ a SCO disaster Preparedness Plan was developed in response to Katrina. The Head Start Disaster Pre-
  paredness Manual, developed with support from Johnson and Johnson by UCLa, was disseminated to all
  Head Start grantees.

♦ The SCO director was selected as a Senior National Governor association/Zero to Three Fellow in its
  Leadership academy. The focus is on personal leadership development, systems building strategies, and
  best practices. This experience has been invaluable.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
The Migrant and Seasonal Head Start program is included in the State MOU for disability Services. Mi-
grant Head Start receives all information disseminated to Head Start and early Head Start. The association
is encouraged to solicit memberships, improve communication, and provide appropriate sessions and experi-
ences at state conferences. an earlier State Hispanic advisory Committee organized by the SCO was not
supported by state agencies or the administration.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
upcoming year?
Focus on pre-kindergarten and Head Start is proving to be challenging in accomplishing other goals and ob-
jectives. all areas impact children and families and have been nurtured over the years. Not attending to these
areas jeopardizes relationships that also drive the work of the Collaboration Office. Identifying outcomes in
all priority areas appear to remain an expectation. However, FY2007 work plans will concentrate on priorities
identified by the Office of Head Start.
6 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                           AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS              |   7




                                 alaska


Collaboration Director           Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                 areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Paul S. Sugar
                                 plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
AK Department of education and
early Development
                                 Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
801 West 10th Street             services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Suite 200                        are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
PO Box 110500                    at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Juneau, AK 99811-0500            in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
Phone: 907-465-4862
                                 The alaska Collaboration worked with the State department
fax: 907-465-2806                of Health and Social Services (H&SS) to complete the early
paul_sugar@eed.state.ak.us       Childhood Comprehensive Systems (eCCS) planning process
                                 and to begin dissemination and implementation of the plan.
ACF Regional Contact             regular workgroups met via audio conference and regional
                                 and state-level meetings were held in 2006. Head Start has
Julianne Crevatin                multiple members on the committees including a member
                                 from the Collaboration Office. The eCCS draft was completed
Office of Head Start
                                 in december 2005 with the final publications out in late spring
Region X                         of 2006. The Collaboration and eCCS Offices gave joint and
2201 Sixth Avenue                individual presentations on the Early Learning Guidelines and
                                 the eCCS plan at statewide and regional conferences and
Suite 300, MS-70
                                 trainings throughout 2006.
Seattle, WA 98121
Phone: 206-615-3637
                                 Five year plan Outcome 4 Goal 3
fax: 206-615-2574
jcrevatin@acf.hhs.gov            We dedicated funding and hired an education assistant posi-
                                 tion (housed in eed) to work with the State Head Start
                                 grants, the alaska Head Start-State Collaboration Office, the
                                 alaska Community Preschool Project, and Preschool Certi-
                                 fication. The position was vacant through much of the fall of
                                 2006, with our current assistant being hired in November of
                                 2006.


                                 All outcomes and goals

                                 The Collaboration Office worked with the eed Commis-
                                 sioner’s Office, other state departments, tribal entities, school
                                 districts, Head Start, preschool practitioners, business lead-
                                 ers, philanthropic foundations, and legislators to continue the
                                 planning process for the alaska pre-kindergarten initiative,
8 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




      Ready to Read, Ready to Learn. We provided information and support to the task Force through 2006, with
      the recommendations published in September. The Collaboration Office is represented on the task Force
      implementation team and on the early Childhood Leadership umbrella group (as well as Head Start grant-
      ees and the State Head Start association). The Collaboration Office also presented information on the task
      Force recommendations at the joint and individual presentations mentioned above.


      Outcome 4 Goals 1 and 3

      as for supporting local level collaborations, we continued to develop and implement initiatives and pilots to
      create alaskan models in urban, rural, and remote settings. By utilizing local level professional development,
      some specific curriculum and approaches, and multiple funding sources as incentives, we are seeing more local
      partnerships and collaboration.

      In alaska, most everything done concerning early Care and education involves child care, child care licens-
      ing, eCCS, and Infant Learning Programs from the alaska department of Health and Social Services; the
      alaska HSSCO; the State Head Start grant program; and the 619 special education program and other
      topic specific staff in the alaska department of education and early development; the University of alaska
      system; the Child Care resource and referral network; Head Start grantees, the Federally contracted t/ta
      system for alaska’s Head Start; the System for early education development (Seed); the alaska associa-
      tion for the education of Young Children; and now representatives of Best Beginnings (the implementation
      arm of the Ready to Ready, Ready to Learn task Force).

      In 2006, we saw the beginning implementation of the Ready to Read, Ready to Learn task Force recommenda-
      tions and the creation of a public/private collaborative approach to pre-kindergarten in alaska. We planned
      for a guidance council for this new group and the development of a system that could integrate it with the
      HSSCO early Learning Leadership Council to integrate our existing eCe efforts. In late 2006, the imple-
      mentation team, the early Learning Council, and a smaller leadership umbrella group made up of members
      from both councils were formed.

      as for specific work with the Child Care Office in the alaska department Health and Social Services, we
      continued or began the following activities:

      ♦ Inclusion of the Child Care resource and referral agencies in the development and dissemination of
        Head Start traveling training kits for use with all early childhood providers in communities where the kits
        are used. These kits were developed and disseminated starting in 2004, with at least one new set covering
        a new topic provided annually through 2006. We plan to continue the development of kits with follow-up
        training and technical assistance provided each year, depending on funding.

      ♦ Preliminary implementation of alaska’s Early Learning Guidelines. The department of education and
        early development Head Start-State Collaboration Office and the Child Care Office provided the lead-
        ership and funding for this project in collaboration with Part B 619 Special education. Upon completion
        of the committee work, the public review and comment process, and approval of the Commissioners of the
        departments of Health and Social Services and education and early development, the alaska Board of
        education and early development endorsed the Early Learning Guidelines in June of 2006.

      ♦ Participation in region X child care audio conferences.

      ♦ regular and frequent meetings between the Child Care administrator and the Head Start-State Collabo-
        ration Office.

      ♦ Inclusion of the Child Care administrator in the alaska Head Start Leadership Council meetings.
                                                                                     AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   9




♦ Inclusion of child care programs in collaborative models for the alaska Community Preschool Project
  along with school districts, Head Start, even Start, and Parents as teachers.

♦ Joint participation on the System for early education development Council, the alaska Strengthening
  Families Initiative team, the early Childhood Comprehensive Services grant team, the alaska Pre-kinder-
  garten initiative (Best Beginnings), and all levels of the new leadership councils.

♦ Inclusion in the 2006 Special Needs; Special relationships Colloquium bringing together child care, Head
  Start, Special education Part B 619, Part C Infant Learning, school districts, and parents to discuss part-
  nerships, approaches, and state, regional, and local solutions to four specific topics of concern.


Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.

Health Care
♦ Continued involvement in the State Oral Health advisory Committee.

♦ Participated in committee and workgroup meetings.

♦ Published the results of an open mouth survey of Head Start children in a statewide sample.

♦ Began the follow up to the fall 2005 Head Start Oral Health Summit on the Cavity Free Kids Curriculum
  and began local training and implementation.

♦ Began data gathering and interviews for the Cavity Free Kids summary and follow up document.

♦ Began review of information for oral health brochure creation.


         1. Continued the Community Initiative Pilot Health Round Up

         This alternative model deals with the changing face of health care delivery for predominantly native
         communities in our state. Many communities are losing Public Health Nursing child health screen-
         ing capabilities due to cutbacks in state funding. The Native Health Corporations are picking up
         the service provision; however, many do not currently have the capacity to travel to all of the com-
         munities to be served. It is projected that it will take two to three years for this to develop. In the
         mean time, we have developed a partnership with Head Start, Public Health Nursing, the Yukon /
         Kuskokwim Health Corporation, the Head Start Collaboration, denali Kid Care, reach Out and
         read, the Bethel Lions club, the Bethel VFW Ladies auxiliary, the Bethel Police and Fire depart-
         ments, and other local volunteers. The objective is to provide a Bethel-based Health round Up for
         up to six of the surrounding villages serving Head Start children and families. This round Up will
         allow the existing infrastructure to provide the other Y/K delta communities with onsite screening
         while preparation continues towards the full local implementation by the native health corporation.
         This project will serve as a model of collaboration for other Head Start programs that may encoun-
         ter difficulties in meeting the Federal health screening requirements due to the State Public Health
         Nursing cutbacks and the development needs of the Native Health Corporations expected to provide
         the service. This is the final year of collaboration support for this project. Local and regional systems
         will take over the program for 2007.
10 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




                 2. Development of the Alaska Head Start Physical Activity and Nutrition (PAN) Manual and
                 training kits for the Head Start and Child Care. The first round of training for Head Start Health
                 Providers took place at the 2006 Alaska Health Summit. We project the first round of local col-
                 laborative trainings and PAN manual dissemination to take place in 2007.

       Outcome 1

                 3. Continued involvement in building infrastructure and capacity of Behavioral and Mental
                 Health Services

                     ♦ Began planning meetings for the 2007 Safe Families Safe Homes multi-system collaboration
                       on working with children and families exposed to violence.

                     ♦ Continued work on the Strengthening Families Initiative and began planning for additional
                       cadres of early care and education program participants.

                     ♦ Worked with the eCCS Mental Health Committee on a plan to change state processes for
                       funding early Childhood Mental Health services including consultations. The following
                       groups participate in the workgroup: Head Start, Child Care, Part C/Infant Learning Pro-
                       gram, Part B (Special education), ePSdt, dSdS, OCS/CaPta, title IV e, and Medic-
                       aid.

                     ♦ Began planning for a multi-system standardization of the screening process used for ePSdt
                       well child visits.


       Outcome 1 Goal 2

       Welfare
       ♦ Beginning in July 2003, taNF dollars were no longer used for Head Start purposes. The State continues
         to utilize its taNF funding in other areas. In the restructuring of State government, the alaska depart-
         ment of Health and Social Services created the Office of Children’s Services (OCS) within the welfare
         section.

       ♦ The Collaboration Office worked with OCS in the initial pilot implementation of the Strengthening
         Families Initiative. We ensured that at least one Head Start would be selected for the Strengthening
         Families pilot, as well as at least one rural/remote community. Pilots received training and some funding
         during 2006 with additional monthly conference calls. Planning for additional rounds of implementation
         of the Strengthen Families Initiative took place in 2006 with new eCe program selection, as well as a
         Legislative awareness session set for 2007. We continue to work to rebuild connections to welfare.


       Outcome 6

       Child Care
       See page 8.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS         |   11




Outcome 3 Goals 1, 2 and 3


Outcome 3, Goal 2 and Outcome 4, Goals 1 and 3

Education

        1. Early Learning Guidelines project (see page 8).

        2. Improved collaboration with the Division of Teaching and Learning Support.

        3. Closer ties established with the Office of Special Education.

             ♦ Presentation to the State Conference of Special education directors on Strengthening Head
               Start and Lea collaboration efforts. Head Start disabilities Coordinators participation in
               the State Special education directors Conference in September 2006.

             ♦ Held an informational breakfast meeting with Head Start disabilities Coordinators and
               school district Special education directors.

             ♦ Facilitated collaborative efforts between individual Head Start programs and school district
               Special education programs.

             ♦ Continued Head Start Staff eligibility to take department of education and early de-
               velopment online course work on IePs and the IeP process, Working with Children with
               disabilities, and Children with Fetal alcohol Syndrome disorders; we continue to work for
               additional joint trainings and course work.

             ♦ Held the first early Childhood statewide colloquium called Special Needs; Special relation-
               ships (see page 9).


Outcome 2, Goal 1

        4. Closer ties established with the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) section.

             ♦ Continued presentations at a variety of statewide and regional conferences for Head Start,
               child care, and educational entities on the continuity of Federal approaches regarding Head
               Start, child care, and schools through NCLB, Head Start requirements and reauthorization,
               and Good Start, Grow Smart, the Early Learning Guidelines, and other state eCe initiatives.


Outcome 5

        5. Began meetings with the new manager of the State McKinney Vento Homeless Education
        grant programs.

             ♦ Introduction to existing systems and initial planning for multi-system work.

             ♦ First multi-system face-to-face is projected for 2007.
12 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       Outcome 5

                6. Secured additional funding for the Reach Out and Read (ROR) Initiative, incorporating
                information on literacy development into the well child visits (and giving a book to each child)
                provided through four regional or sub-regional Public Health Nursing offices, two Native Health
                Corporations, and a Family Practice clinic in Anchorage. Implementation continued through
                2006.

                      ♦ alaska has more than doubled the number of clinics providing this service.

                      ♦ Further funding secured through a US department of education grant as part of the alaska
                        Community Preschool Project


       Outcome 1 and Outcome 4

                7. 2006 saw the demise of Alaska Head Start’s e-rate eligibility. The new language that allows 21
                states eligibility in the program has removed us from the list.

       Outcome 5, Goals 5 and 6 and Outcome 4, Goal 3

                8. The Alaska Community Preschool Project (ACPP)

                      ♦ We are finishing the final funded year of this pilot project in seven urban, rural, and remote
                        communities around alaska. Some include school district and Head Start collaboration,
                        other districts with even Starts, Parents as teachers, child care, or just schools. all must
                        provide a balanced approach providing opportunities for play and exploration, mediated
                        learning experiences, and teacher directed instruction. They incorporate a dialogic reading
                        program and Feuerstein’s Instrumental enrichment-Basic into their existing program. to
                        date, 250 children are currently being served. almost 80 teachers, classroom aides, specialists,
                        and administrators have been trained in Mediated Learning experiences through five rounds
                        of intensive five-day training (with monthly follow up audio conferences) in Feuerstein’s
                        Instrumental enrichment–Basic. data on the project is available upon request.

       Community Services
       ♦ alaska has only one Community action agency (Caa) which is actively involved in almost all projects
         the Collaboration Office supports.

       ♦ established relationships with other non-Caa community agencies through participation in the alaska
         Faith-Based and Community Initiative and through state, regional, and local initiatives.

       Family Literacy Services
       ♦ Both even Start and the reach Out and read programs either provide Family Literacy Services or links
         to programs that provide such services.

       ♦ Shared training in Mediated Learning and Feuerstein’s Instrumental enrichment for early childhood and
         in dialogic reading.
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   13




♦ Planned for a Family Literacy strand at the 2007 alaska Head Start Leadership Conference with a post-
  conference day of training provided through the National Head Start Family Literacy Center in California.

Services to Children with Disabilities
♦ aside from the above mentioned efforts with Special education (Idea Part B), we continued to work
  with Health and Social Services (H&SS) on a Memorandum of agreement around the Individuals with
  disabilities education act Part C. Implementation pending in 2006-2007.

♦ Continued support and involvement in the alaska transition training Initiative. Three regional training
  and planning sessions were held around the State.

♦ Shared training for school districts, even Start, and Head Start programs in Mediated Learning and
  Feuerstein’s Instrumental enrichment Basic. Continued ongoing planning and implementation for
  expanding these training efforts to include school district kindergarten teachers and staff, along with ad-
  ditional early Childhood program teachers and staff. Implementation to take place in 2006 and 2007.


Outcome 2, all Goals

Services to Homeless Children and Families
See the education Section (page 11).


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
Through the implementation of eCCS, the System for early education development (Seed), the Early
Learning Guidelines, the Ready to Read, Ready to Learn, the Governor’s Office and eed support, the State
Collaboration Office, and/or Head Start grantees are involved in virtually all active early Childhood projects
at the state level. The recent efforts in developing the alaska pre-kindergarten initiative have multiple Head
Start representatives working on the planning and first steps, with expanded participation implemented in
2006.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
We continue to build on the work facilitated by the region X Office to strengthen the relationship with the
alaska Head Start association. Collaboration with Head Start programs, school districts, and community
organizations are continuing and, in some cases, expanding. again, additional state resources were focused on
language, literacy, math, science, cognition, and school readiness, as well as funding for professional develop-
ment, safety issues, and the implementation of an aCF initiative response process targeting assistance to
specific aCF priorities. Lastly, we have seen some success in articulating the braided funding approach of the
State in its support of Federally-funded Head Start grantees.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
as there are significantly higher populations of alaska Natives, asian and Pacific Islanders in alaska, we
support our Hispanic population in much the same way as we support other populations with culturally and
linguistically unique needs. We celebrate and incorporate cultural diversity with specific involvement and
activities, provide as much home language use in the day-to-day activities, as well as home communications
as possible, and utilize these connections to strengthen english language development.
14 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
       coming year?
       aside from continuing ongoing projects, we need to be more intentional in our efforts with the welfare
       system. While the Strengthening Families Initiative brought us back into the welfare system office, we still
       need to expand our efforts there. The same goes for community services. While we work well with the Caa
       and other individual community programs, our work with faith-based and other community organizations
       needs to continue to expand and develop on a local and regional level. We will work to develop regional and
       local partnerships to meet the goals of those specific activities. We look to a greater involvement in the Best
       Beginnings initiative and in the work integrating the existing state and private early care and education efforts
       with new initiatives and partners, moving the Collaboration Office closer to working for all of alaska’s chil-
       dren and families, including Head Start rather than a Head Start program reaching out to others who serve
       children and families.
                                                                             AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               |   15




                                    american Indian/
                                    american Native

Collaboration Director
                                    Note: The current American Indian/Alaska Native Head Start-
Brian D. f. Richmond                State Collaboration Office Specialist was appointed to the position
AIAn-tAn /Academy for educational   in April 2006. This report profiles accomplishments of the AIAN
Development                         Collaboration Office from April through December 2006.
1875 Connecticut Avenue, nW
Room #1036-n
Washington, D.C. 20009-5721         Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
Phone: 202-884-8609                 areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
fax: 202-884-8660                   plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
brichmon@aed.org
                                    Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
www.ece.aed.org
                                    services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
                                    are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Lead Agency Contact
                                    at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Angie Godfrey                       in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
AIAn-tAn Director                   an overarching goal of the american Indian/alaska Native
Phone: 202-884-8386                 (aIaN) Collaboration Office is to establish and enhance col-
fax: 202-884-8660                   laborative efforts to support american Indian/alaska Native
                                    Head Start programs in the 27 states in which aIaN grantees
agodfrey@aed.org
                                    are located. Some of the states in which aIaN grantees reside
                                    have HSSCO directors who are cognizant of the unique
ACF Regional Contact                challenges of rural, underserved, indigenous populations and
                                    have taken dynamic steps to reach out, welcome, and actively
Georgey Sparks                      include the aIaN grantees in the support provided to state-
AIAn Branch Chief                   based grantees. Other HSSCO directors have been less proac-
American Indian-Alaska native
                                    tive in this regard. The aIaN Collaboration Office encourages
Program Branch                      all HSSCO directors to meet and converse with the aIaN
                                    grantees in their respective states to learn about their collab-
Office of Head Start
                                    orative needs.
1250 Maryland Avenue, SW
8th floor                           In 2006, the aIaN Collaboration Office developed strong
Washington, DC 20024                connections with some of the HSSCO directors in those
                                    states with aIaN grantees to network and access available
Phone: 202-205-8539
                                    state-based resources. resources from other Federal-and
fax: 202-401-5113                   foundation-based sources were also investigated to help sup-
georgeline.sparks@acf.hhs.gov       port aIaN grantees.
16 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
       your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
       Health Care
       ♦ aIaN Collaboration director (aIaN-Cd) corresponded with representatives of HrSa in response to
         their need for input regarding the Secretary’s National advisory Committee on rural Health and Human
         Services that is preparing a paper on Head Start and rural health.

       ♦ aIaN-Cd provided the deputy director of HrSa’s Office of rural Health Policy with information on
         three health indicators pertaining to american Indian/alaskan Native Head Start children as compared
         to children in the other Head Start regions; the data infers that aIaN children and families could benefit
         from additional resources.

       ♦ aIaN-Cd informed them of the four aIaN programs in North dakota (the study site mentioned) that
         might be able to provide them with useful input.

       ♦ aIaN-Cd informed the President of the National Indian Head Start directors association (NIHSda)
         that the National advisory Committee on rural Health and Human Services would be holding a meeting
         in North dakota, and the deputy director for rural Health Policy had extended an invitation for aIaN
         grantees to attend.

       ♦ aIaN-Cd met with the aI-taN Health Specialist to discuss strategies for increased collaboration
         between the Indian Health Service (IHS) and the aI-taN on the oral health initiative. aIaN-Cd
         reviewed the Oral Health Forum action plan, discussed the use of the BdI Logic Model, and created a
         preliminary logic model to be used for future discussion.

       ♦ aIaN-Cd contacted the director of the Indian Health Service Head Start Program at the request
         of aI-taN’s Local Specialist for California who reported that a local clinic was questioning why they
         should spend so much time with Head Start children. The IHS-HS director said that if the grantee had
         “compacted or contracted” IHS funds, then the proper follow-up to obtain coverage might be through the
         tribal Council; she offered to follow-up directly with the Local Specialist.

       ♦ aIaN-Cd met the Health and disabilities Specialist for the Winnebago Head Start program at the
         Northwest Indian HS conference and spoke with her briefly about mental health issues. She requested
         follow-up contact information for Faith Spotted eagle, a guest speaker at one of the NIHSda confer-
         ences, who spoke about intergenerational trauma and “red rage.”

       ♦ aIaN-Cd shared with the aI-taN Health listserv (of 134 subscribers) information on a new health re-
         source available from the american Public Health association—“The Healthy You,” a monthly one-page
         download on important topics (available through: http://www.apha.org/publications/tnh/).

       ♦ aIaN-Cd sent health care-related information (e.g., grant notices from IHS, SaMHSa) to the ameri-
         can Indian technical assistance Network (aI-taN) local specialists to share with their aIaN grantees.
                                                                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   17




Welfare
♦ aIaN-Cd attended a conference session on “Collaboration with State and Tribal TANF,” then conferred
  with presenter to seek clarification on taNF-related questions.

♦ aIaN-Cd provided taNF assistance information (TANF: Final Rule—Questions and Answers) as
  requested by Local Specialist for Oklahoma.

♦ aIaN-Cd sent welfare-related information (e.g., Child Welfare Information Gateway; Interim Final
  Regulation Implementing the Next Phase Of Welfare Reform; Senate Finance Committee hearings on child
  welfare; Federal register notices regarding taNF reauthorization; proposed regulations concerning child
  support enforcement program/medical support) to the aI-taN local specialists to share with their aIaN
  grantees.

Child Care
♦ aIaN-Cd participated in the 2006 annual Child Care conference held in Washington, d.C.

♦ attended session on “Building Partnerships with Head Start,” then conferred with the presenters to
  introduce oneself and ask questions about child care/Head Start collaboration and the NCCIC materials
  promoting collaboration.

♦ Networked with director of Karuk Child Care, and former staff member of QUILt (Quality in Linking
  together early education Partnerships) who shared information about QUILt and offered the use of
  those existing resources.

♦ Met with one of the Child Care Program Supervisors within Navajo Nation and discussed possible future
  collaboration efforts, once Navajo Nation Head Start is back up and running.

♦ aIaN-Cd spoke with Head Start director for Northern Cheyenne about his need for collaboration with
  Child Care, to improve enrollment and coverage for children living on Northern Cheyenne reservation.

♦ aIaN-Cd sent child care-related information (e.g., Federal register notices: payment and reimburse-
  ment rates in the Child and adult Care Food Program; National average Payments in the school lunch,
  special milk, and school breakfast programs) to the aI-taN local specialists to share with their aIaN
  grantees.

Education
♦ aIaN-Cd responded to a request by aI-taN Local Specialist for Washington State to search for a
  foundation grant that would support the purchase of materials for a grantee’s program. a database search
  yielded one promising candidate: the dorothea Haus ross Foundation whose purpose is “to advance
  the moral, mental, and physical well-being of children of all races..., to aid and assist in providing for the
  basic needs of food, shelter, and education of such children by whatever means and methods necessary...,
  to prevent by medical research or otherwise the mental and physical handicaps of children.” They sup-
  port requests for “equipment” and have “Child development” and “Native americans” listed among the
  foundation’s fields of interest.
18 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       Community Services
       ♦ aIaN-Cd completed work on editing Five Steps to Community Assessment for American Indian/Alaska
         Native Head Start Programs, a group effort of the aI-taN staff after many months work. after printing,
         this resource will be ready for distribution to all aIaN grantees to promote a promising practice of com-
         munity assessment (including identification of community resources for collaborative support of aIaN
         Head Start programs).

       ♦ aIaN-Cd shared information on collaboration between a local bank and the California Head Start
         association, using the Community reinvestment act of 1977 (12 U.S.C. 2901), which resulted in a
         partnership that benefits Head Start children and families. The same partnership could be developed
         with NIHSda or within any aIaN community where a reputable banking institution is located. an
         article detailing the information can be found at www.frbsf.org/publications/community/invest-
          ments/0311/article1c.html.

       Family Literacy Services
       ♦ aIaN-Cd sent Local Specialists information on an easy-to-use grants program for funding to support
         reading, arts, and family violence prevention.

       ♦ aIaN-Cd spoke with former staff member of reading Is Fundamental (rIF) to learn about the different
         programs available through rIF to support family literacy for american Indian children and families. He
         also inquired about appropriate individuals within rIF to approach concerning collaboration on literacy
         for aIaN grantees.

       ♦ In preparation for meeting with reading Is Fundamental, aIaN-Cd contacted former aI-taN staff
         member to request a copy of her resource list “Native american Books for Younger Children” which iden-
         tifies both native and non-native authors of Native american-centered children’s literature.

       ♦ aIaN-Cd and aI-taN Literacy Specialist met with reading Is Fundamental representative to discuss
         their “Family of readers” program and the process for additional aIaN Head Start grantees to access
         those literacy resources. Currently, approximately 22 aI grantees and one aN grantee are benefiting from
         the Family of readers program. Staff will work with rIF to identify best practices for accessing those
         resources, then share the information with other aIaN Head Start grantees who are interested in partici-
         pating.

       ♦ aIaN-Cd was contacted by representative of WGBH “Between the Lions” program, as WGBH/Boston
         is looking to create additional resources for aIaN children to focus on reading and science in preschool.
         WGBH representative needed basic demographic information for aIaN Head Start population; aIaN-
         Cd provided her with overall numbers of children served taken from region XI PIr data.

       ♦ aIaN-Cd sent information on “educating Preschool english Learners,” as requested by aIaN-taN
         Local Specialist that was distributed by the California Head Start-State Collaboration Office and printed
         in the fall 2006 issue of Bridges. aIaN-Cd also shared her contact information for the Literacy Specialist
         for the Migrant and Seasonal HS taC-12, whose area of specialty includes preschool second-language
         acquisition.
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   19




Services to Children with Disabilities
♦ OK Local Specialist requested information on writing inter-agency agreements (Ias) with respect to dis-
  abilities services. aIaN-Cd provided him with an on-line resource containing samples of inter-agency
  agreements and a checklist relating to Ias and disabilities.

♦ aIaN-Cd received a call from a Head Start Program Manager in Washington State requesting as-
  sistance regarding collaboration with Lea to provide services to children with disabilities. She has been
  trying to get the Lea to work with them to provide follow-up after children have been screened using the
  dial 3 instrument. although they are not far away from the School district, they have yet to receive the
  support they need (e.g., speech therapy and some occupational therapy), even though they have a written
  interagency agreement.

♦ aIaN-Cd reviewed the interagency agreement, consulted with the aI-taN disabilities Specialist, and
  then spoke with the Head Start Program Manager and the disabilities Manager to determine the distance
  between the program and the Lea, the availability of resources, the history of the school district provid-
  ing services, and whether or not the Lea knows of its obligation to provide services under the Individuals
  with disabilities education act.

♦ aIaN-Cd held a conference call with the Head Start director and the aI-taN disabilities Content
  Specialist where the disabilities Specialist walked her through different scenarios to prepare her for her
  meeting with the local school district.

♦ aIaN-Cd shared information with Local Specialists on dept. of education funds to “support the use of
  technology and media services for children with disabilities.”


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
♦ aIaN-Cd, working with aIaN grantees in 27 states, does not have direct influence in any one state’s
  policies, plans, processes or decisions. However, during an annual meeting of the HSSCO directors, the
  aIaN-Cd helped to lead a discussion on issues of isolation and accessibility of the aIaN grantees and
  the possibility for enhanced collaboration with tribal grantees. Individuals discussed the importance of
  building a personal, face-to-face relationship with the tribes leading to increased trust; and the proper pro-
  tocol for on-site visits. Participants also talked about strategies for increasing aIaN participation in the
  State HS associations. Sovereignty rights of the tribes and the need to be aware of the history of State-
  tribal relations was also emphasized. Hopefully, this information will be reflected in the development of
  the states’ policies, plans, processes and decisions.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
♦ aIaN-Cd led two discussion forums on grant writing at the Northwest Indian Head Start Coalition
  conference in South dakota. approximately 20 individuals attended the forums and shared information
  on resource development. (Major barriers to grant writing included: a) not having enough time; b) not
  having enough human resources to assist in grant writing; and c) having interference/creative input from
  persons not familiar with the language and purpose of the grants.)

♦ aIaN-Cd met with the Northern Plains Head Start directors association to share information on
  the role of the aIaN-Cd and contrast that with the role of the Sd HSSCO. The SdHSda executive
  director shared insights from the SdHSd’s meeting and offered to coordinate and fund a statewide needs
  assessment that could be broken out by counties.
20 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
       families in your State
       Out of 25,911 children enrolled in region XI during the 2005-2006 program year, approximately 1,147
       children (4.43%) are listed as being of Hispanic or Latino origin, according to corrected data from the PIr.
       Of these, 385 children (1.49% of total) are reported being from families whose primary language at home
       is Spanish. (This is in contrast to the 1,380 children (5.33% of total) whose families speak primarily Native
       american languages at home.)

       ♦ aIaN-Cd shared Five Steps to Community Assessment for American Indian/Alaska Native Head Start Pro-
         grams with Migrant and Seasonal taC-12 staff members. taC-12 has requested to use/adapt appendix
         C: Guide to Using excel to Help analyze your Quantitative data for use in their Introduction to Data
         Analysis Handbook. The handbook is to be distributed to all Migrant and Seasonal Head Start grantees.

       ♦ aIaN-Cd made a presentation on Developing Service Plans, a Resource Manual for AIAN Head Start
         Grantees to all Migrant and Seasonal taC-12 and american Indian ta staff during a joint quarterly
         meeting of the ta networks. Constructive feedback was received and was incorporated into a final version
         of the manual. Migrant and Seasonal taC-12 staff asked for permission to be able to use the manual with
         their own grantees.


       How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
       coming year?
       Pending availability of aCF funds to support aIaN collaboration work, the aIaN Collaboration Office
       intends to hold a collaboration forum at the National Indian Head Start directors association 2007 confer-
       ence, conduct a collaboration needs assessment, and utilize those results in the development of a handbook
       that illustrates specific examples of aIaN collaboration best practices.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               |   21




                                        arizona


Collaboration Director                  Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following areas. Where
                                        possible, indicate the goals from your work plan and the desired and
Jennifer Johnson                        actual outcomes.
Governor’s Office for Children, Youth
and families                            Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
1700 West Washington Street             services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Suite 101                               are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Phoenix, Arizona 85007
                                        at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
                                        in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
Phone: 602-542-2391
jjohnson@az.gov                         Arizona Early Education Funds (AEEF)
                                        In 2004, Gov. Janet Napolitano launched the arizona early
Lead Agency Contact                     education Funds (aeeF) to target private funds toward the
                                        objectives identified in the School readiness action Plan. The
Jennifer Johnson                        arizona early education Funds were created as part of the
Governor’s Office for Children, Youth   Governor’s School readiness action Plan to build the capacity
and families                            of local communities to provide quality early childhood educa-
                                        tion. The funds were established at the arizona Community
jjohnson@az.gov
                                        Foundation in partnership with the Community Foundation
                                        for Southern arizona and the United Way of tucson and
                                        Southern arizona for the purpose of funding statewide in-
ACF Regional Contact                    novations and building capacity at the local level.

Joe Voytek                              In addition to its emphasis on statewide innovations, aeeF
Region IX                               was tasked with raising private donations and galvanizing the
Administration for Children and         business community in support of quality early childhood
families                                care and education at the local level. aeeF is helping build
Department of Health and Human          a statewide early education infrastructure by providing seed
Services                                money to support the creation of regional partnerships or
                                        expand the capacity of partnerships that already exist. These
50 united nations Plaza
                                        regional partnerships are meant to mobilize entire communi-
San francisco, CA 94102                 ties around quality early care and education, and are made up
Phone: 415-437-8471                     of local stakeholders including parents, child care providers,
fax: 415-437-8438                       health professionals and representatives from public schools,
                                        business, local government, philanthropy, the faith community,
jvoytek@acf.hhs.gov
                                        and law enforcement.

                                        Modeled after the North Carolina Smart Start effort, each
                                        regional partnership identifies early care and education fund-
                                        ing priorities based on local needs and assets. Partnerships
                                        must demonstrate how they are improving child outcomes as
22 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       measured by specific indicators. accountability, evaluation, and continuous program improvement are inte-
       grated throughout the system.

       The intent of the regional partnership model is to promote the incentive for collaboration, to overcome the
       fragmentation of early childhood education often existing in local communities, and to build capacity. In
       phase two, funding will become available to implement those strategies identified as priorities to enable
       children in that region to begin school healthy, safe, and ready to succeed. technical assistance is an integral
       component of the new strategy, supporting communities to help themselves using an asset-based community
       development model. The goal is to improve outcomes for communities through the creation of long-term
       partnerships and investments in a system of early childhood education, rather than simply to support dispa-
       rate programs.

       Having raised $2 million in its first year, the aeeF launched a request for Partnership Proposals (rFP)
       in March 2006 and shared this information with early childhood education and resource and referral agen-
       cies and organizations, as well as community representatives. Five pre-proposal Learning Summits were held
       statewide with mandatory attendance for applicants in an effort to provide information on current School
       readiness Board projects – the basis for the aeeF – and to answer questions on the rFP process. Head Start
       representatives attended all five summits. regional Partnership applications for funding were due May 1,
       2006. Funding was awarded in July 2006. Head Start was well represented on all regional partnership councils.

       By funding this network of regional partnerships, aeeF began building the infrastructure necessary to dis-
       tribute the funds raised by Proposition 203. When that public funding becomes available, aeeF will turn its
       attention toward supporting innovative pilot initiatives throughout the state.


       Quality Rating Expansion Team
       HSSCO Priority Areas: Education, Child Care
       The purpose of the Quality rating expansion team is to design and develop the infrastructure for a quality
       rating system. a quality rating system currently was implemented via the United Way of tucson and South-
       ern arizona (UWtSa) First Focus on Kids. Forty-six centers, including two Head Start programs, actively
       participated. all participating centers received their initial ratings and are at various stages in the development
       of individual Quality Improvement Plans. Information concerning barriers to improving quality, as well as the
       most valued resources, is continuously reported to both the Quality rating expansion team and the Quality
       rating Level Indication team of the School readiness Board.

       The School readiness Board’s Quality rating expansion team, comprised of representatives from the
       departments of Health Services, economic Security, and education; the Office of Strategic Planning and
       Budget; the School readiness Board; and the HSSCO, continued to meet to address the infrastructure and
       funding needs for statewide implementation of a quality rating system.

       The Quality rating Level Indicators team was convened to create the framework and criteria for the quality
       rating model. to accomplish this task, the team reviewed research and models from other states. Particular
       attention has been given to state models that integrate Head Start program attributes such as Performance
       Standards and the use of the Program review Instrument for Systems Monitoring (PrISM) as a possible
       quality rating level identifier. Head Start grantees, the Head Start association director, and the HSSCO
       director serve as members of this team.
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   23




HSSCO Priority Areas: Education, Child Care

The Professional development and articulation team, which is comprised of the articulation and Scholar-
ships Subcommittees, has as its purpose providing professional development scholarships, maintaining the
early Childhood emergent Leaders program, and creating articulation pathways for early childhood students
and practitioners at various entry points of their career education. Work has been completed on developing
and integrating strategic steps for an early childhood scholarship program and in regard to operating within
the governance framework for public college and university early education programs to develop articulation
guidelines and agreements among arizona institutions of higher education.

The Statewide early Childhood education Scholarships (SeedS) expanded, making grants available in the
three arizona counties of Mohave, Yavapai, and Pima. With the expansion to Mohave County, these scholar-
ships have provided professional development opportunities to students enrolled in the Career and technical
education Program at the secondary school level. The SeedS program also continues to provide funding
opportunities to teachers taking coursework via a network of five community colleges (Mohave Community,
Yavapai, Pima, arizona Western, and Cochise colleges).

With initial funding made possible via the HSSCO Supplemental Funding, the early Childhood emergent
Leaders Project graduated 27 Fellows in its first year. Gov. Napolitano attended the graduation ceremony
held at the State Capitol and announced ongoing financial support for the program through a public/private
partnership and investment in early education. Chase, a JP Morgan Company, committed $250,000 to fund
two additional years of this highly successful early childhood education professional development program.
The first of these two years of funding began in September. renamed the Chase early education emergent
Leaders Program, it will graduate 24 Fellows in June.


Proposition 203—First Things First for Arizona’s Children

In November 2006, arizona voters passed Proposition 203, also known as First Things First, a citizen’s initia-
tive that funds quality early childhood development and health through a new tax on tobacco products. The
Proposition created a new state level board known as the arizona early Childhood development and Health
Board, which will oversee the distribution of an estimated $150 million in tax revenues each year. Staff from
the Governor’s Office, division for School readiness and the HSSCO provided staff support during the end
of 2006 between the time that the initiative passed and First Things First staff were hired. This included input
on the nine-member board and staffing the initial meetings of the board.

The mission of First Things First is to increase the quality of and access to early childhood programs includ-
ing Head Start to ensure a child entering school arrives healthy and ready to succeed. This mission will be
achieved through regional grants tailored to the specific needs and characteristics of the communities within
each region, as well as statewide grants to support early childhood quality and professional development.

The seven priorities of First Things First align with the School readiness action Plan and the priorities of the
HSSCO, and one of the first actions of the Governor-appointed early Childhood development and Health
Board was to adopt the School readiness action Plan as a framework for action and to convene workgroups
on health, professional development, and quality to pick up where the School readiness Board workgroups
left off.

First Things First will build on the work of the SrB and aeeF by implementing priorities identified in the
School readiness action Plan and building on the strengths of the regional Partnerships created by the
arizona early education Funds. Both child care quality and professional development, which were top priori-
ties of the School readiness Board, are now priorities of the First Things First initiative. Progress continues
to be made on creating the infrastructure to support the implementation of a statewide quality rating system,
24 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       building on the work that was begun by the School readiness Board. In addition, First Things First is in the
       process of developing a set of professional development recommendations which build on the work of the
       School readiness Board, which for the past several years has funded scholarships to childhood practitioners
       throughout the state.


       Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
       your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
       Health Care
       ♦ distributed 30 Child Care Health and Safety Manuals for use with Head Start and other child care
         providers.

       ♦ With the arizona Health Care Cost Containment System (aHCCCS), the department of Health
         Services, and the academy of Pediatrics, training was provided to 130 physicians to provide developmental
         screening for children at risk of developmental delays.

       ♦ State of arizona, Office of Oral Health train the trainer Program – With funding received from the
         robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the State of arizona’s Office of Oral Health conducted “train the
         trainer” education to Head Start Programs throughout arizona. This model continues to strengthen Head
         Start’s abilities to provide up-to-date education to staff and parents.

       ♦ Head Start Oral Health Initiative Grant (region XII, Migrant Seasonal HS arizona dental Hygienists
         association and the State Office of Oral Health) – Chicanos Por La Causa, a Migrant Seasonal Head
         Start grantee, has received a grant from the Office of Head Start for $65,000 for a three-year period. Proj-
         ect includes collaboration with the arizona dental Hygienists association and the State Office of Oral
         Health. affiliated dental Hygienists are screening, triaging, referring, and applying fluoride varnish to
         children in the program. The first round of screenings was conducted in august and September, reaching
         200-300 children. It is planned that January and February screenings will reached 400 children.

       ♦ arizona dental Hygiene association—In September 2006, the arizona Head Start association presented
         to the arizona dental Hygienist association. The presentation was titled “Head Start 101” and provided
         the dental hygienists with some basic information about the oral health requirements for Head Start
         programs, and the needs and challenges facing Head Start programs. Several dental hygienists have sought
         out Head Start programs in their local communities to provide education to staffs and families, onsite
         screenings, and preventative care such as fluoride varnish as the result of this presentation.

       Welfare
       ♦ The HSSCO director serves on the Governor’s task Force on earned Income tax Credit (eItC), which
         is charged with increasing opportunities for low-income families to access the eItC, other tax credits, and
         free tax filing assistance via Volunteer Income tax assistance sites. The eItC is one of the largest anti-
         poverty programs in the country and, when coupled with proven financial educational strategies, has been
         credited with lifting more children out of poverty than any other Federal aid program.

       ♦ The HSSCO provided materials and information regarding the benefits of eItC to grantees for distri-
         bution to parents and staff in an effort to increase the participation of Head Start and other low-income
         families.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   25




♦ In 2006 the eItC program garnered an estimated $12.8 million for more than 57,000 arizona families,
  an increase of 80 percent over the amount claimed in 2003.

Child Care
♦ The state secured $400,000 to increase department of Health Services’ licensing staff to reduce monitor-
  ing caseloads and to reduce backlog of annual inspections of child care facilities.

♦ The HSSCO serves as a member of the School readiness Board’s Quality rating expansion team, which
  includes representatives from the departments of Health Services, economic Security, and education; the
  Office of Strategic Planning and Budget; and the School readiness Board. The team meets to address the
  infrastructure and funding needs for statewide implementation of a quality rating system.

♦ The HSSCO and the Head Start association directors and Head Start grantees serve as members of
  the Quality rating Level Indicators team, convened to create the framework and criteria for the quality
  rating model. to accomplish this task, the team reviewed research and models from other states, directing
  particular attention to state models that integrate Head Start program attributes such as Program Perfor-
  mance Standards and the use of the PrISM as a possible quality rating level identifier.

♦ twelve additional Child Care Health Consultants were trained, bringing the total number to 47 consul-
  tants in arizona available to support child care quality.

♦ an additional 25 child care trainers were trained on increasing the knowledge and skills of child care staff
  in the areas of children’s oral health and healthy weight.

♦ State child care licensing staff were trained on best practices to support mental and emotional health of
  infants and young children in child care.

Education
♦ With initial funding made possible via HSSCO Supplemental Funding, the early Childhood emergent
  Leaders Project graduated 27 fellows in its first year. Gov. Napolitano attended the graduation ceremony
  and announced ongoing financial support for the program via a public/private partnership. Chase, a JP
  Morgan Company, has committed $250,000 to fund two additional years of this highly successful early
  childhood education professional development program. The renamed Chase early education emergent
  Leaders Program graduated 26 Fellows in June 2006.

♦ The Statewide early Childhood education Scholarships (SeedS) was expanded, making grants avail-
  able in Mohave, Yavapai, and Pima counties. With the expansion to Mohave County, these scholarships
  have provided professional development opportunities to students enrolled in the Career and technical
  education Program at the secondary school level. The SeedS program continued to provide funding op-
  portunities to teachers taking coursework via a network of five community colleges (Mohave Community,
  Yavapai, Pima, arizona Western, and Cochise colleges).

Community Services
♦ Car seat distributions and inspections were provided on an ongoing basis via the Kith and Kin Project,
  which held seven 4-hour distribution events from december 2005 to February 2006. Individual appoint-
  ments were made, allowing providers to receive one-on-one training on the proper use and installation of
  car seats as well as car seats for their children and the children in their care.
26 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       Family Literacy Services
       ♦ The arizona Parents Kit for families of children, birth to three, was funded and released in 2006 by Vir-
         ginia G. Piper Charitable trust in partnership with the arizona School readiness Board. The kits, which
         were distributed to parents of newborns in Maricopa County, included parenting videos, a parent resource
         guide identifying key community services that provide support services and programs to parents and chil-
         dren, and a children’s book.

       ♦ The HSSCO and the Head Start association provided information for the Parent resource Guide with
         directors of HSSCO and Head Start association serving on the development Committee through-
         out the project. early Head Start and Head Start programs are well represented in the publication as a
         resource for families in addition to Head Start association contact information. as next steps, the School
         readiness Board and Piper trust explore funding and possible methods for statewide distribution. The
         HSSCO currently is working with the executive Committee of the HSa to identify and locate the neces-
         sary resources.

       ♦ The arizona Parents Kit for families of children, birth to three, released in 2005 and distributed to new
         mothers in hospitals throughout Maricopa County, includes parenting videos and a resource guide. The
         latter identifies key community services offering support and programs for parents and children.

       Services to Children with Disabilities
       ♦ The HSSCO and grantees participate actively in arizona’s early Childhood Inclusion Coalition, working
         collaboratively to access services and develop systems of service for children with disabilities. The purpose
         of the arizona early Childhood Inclusion Coalition is to expand high quality inclusive opportunities for
         all young children and their families via collaborative partnerships, increased public awareness, supportive
         policies, and coordination of technical assistance and training.

       Services to Homeless Children and Families
       ♦ The work plans of the HSSCO and the Head Start association for next year specify goals and objectives
         regarding services to homeless children and families.

       ♦ Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes and decisions.

       ♦ The HSSCO and the School readiness Board share mutual priorities set by Gov. Napolitano and the state
         agencies. a HSSCO priority is to create effective policy direction and methods to improve the coordina-
         tion, quality, and delivery of early care and education services and state government functions, including
         child care, preschool and family support services, and programs aligned with the 10 action Steps of the
         School readiness Board’s Five-Year Plan to coordinate early child education functions between State
         agencies, Head Start, and tribes.

       ♦ The HSSCO director and Head Start association representatives, including grantees and delegates,
         participated in the development of state policies and plans through participation in the School readiness
         Board and its workgroups and through involvement with other projects in the community. The HSSCO
         communicates all opportunities for participation on the School readiness Board and community commit-
         tees to the Head Start association executive Committee, Board, and director.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS         |   27




Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
♦ a copy of the department of education’s early Learning Standards Manual was distributed to each tribal
  Head Start Program.

♦ State School readiness Board staff members (Head Start-State Collaboration director Jennifer Johnson
  and Senior Policy advisor for Professional development, alicia Smith) went on a half-day visit to the
  tohono O’odham Nation Head Start centers. They discussed issues, resources, and programs with Victoria
  Hobbs, division Manager.

♦ The Head Start-State Collaboration director attended the tribal Head Start Programs’ association Board
  of directors meeting.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
The passage of Proposition 203 will open a myriad of opportunities for early childhood education in arizona
and enhancing collaborations with Head Start in 2007 and beyond.
28 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                            AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               |   29




                                   arkansas


Collaboration Director             Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                   areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Ann Patterson
                                   plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Arkansas Head Start
State Collaboration Office         Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
1400 West Markham                  services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Suite 406                          are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
little Rock, AR 72201              at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 501-371-0740
                                   in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 501-370-9109                  The arkansas Better Chance for School Success (aBCSS)
ann@arheadstart.org                funding increased to $60 million through state general revenue
                                   in 2005. The arkansas Head Start-State Collaboration Office
                                   (HSSCO) continued to work with the arkansas Head Start
Lead Agency Contact
                                   association, arkansas advocates for Children and Families,
                                   arkansas Kids Count Coalition, arkansas early Childhood
tonya Russell, Director
                                   association, Invest early Coalition, and other early childhood
Division of Child Care and early   advocates to support and enhance collaborative efforts. The
Childhood education
                                   increase in state funding provided for a total of 18,731 children
Arkansas Department of Human       being served in state-funded pre-kindergarten programs in
Services                           2006, along with 9,950 Head Start children also being served
Phone: 501-682-0494                throughout the State.
fax: 501-683-6060
tonya.russell@arkansas.gov         ♦ an early Childhood Partnerships workgroup, imple-
                                     mented in September 2005 and continued in 2006, worked
                                     to address specific issues around local collaboration with
ACF Regional Contact                 state-funded pre-kindergarten, resulting in a potential
                                     loss of Head Start children to the state-funded programs
Carlton B. Reid                      (arkansas Better Chance for School Success). Workgroup
Region VI ACf                        members include representatives from the division of
DHHS                                 Child Care and early Childhood education, Commu-
                                     nity action agencies, Head Start programs, educational
1301 Young Street
                                     Cooperatives, private providers of state-funded pre-kinder-
Room 937                             garten programs (center-based and home-based), HIPPY,
Dallas, tX 75202                     arkansas advocates for Children and Families, and the
                                     arkansas Head Start-State Collaboration Office. The group
Phone: 214-767-8850
                                     met routinely and was a part of legislative committee meet-
fax: 214 767-2038                    ings. Work continues in this area with support from a wide
creid@acf.hhs.gov                    range of partners.

                                   ♦ Worked in conjunction with the arkansas Head Start
                                     association in developing a position paper, “Quality early
30 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




          Childhood education Collaboration,” adopted in November. The expansion of state pre-kindergarten
          programs has opened up a range of opportunities for Head Start, however, with these opportunities have
          also come challenges. The goal of the position paper is to strengthen collaboration between State pre-kin-
          dergarten and Head Start by offering recommendations that could be used to enhance coordination at the
          local level, while maximizing both Federal and state resources. The position paper was shared with State
          legislators, state agency and partner organizations, government and elected officials, community leaders,
          and the early childhood community.

       ♦ Participated in various conference calls with HSSCO directors regarding State pre-kindergarten and Head
         Start issues and concerns with Pre-K Now, National Head Start association, and Office of Head Start.
         also participated in Pre-K Now satellite downlink on State pre-kindergarten services in September.

       ♦ Participated in Invest early Steering Committee meetings to discuss 2007 State legislative agenda on
         early childhood education in arkansas. Meetings also held with arkansas advocates for Children and
         Families regarding Head Start and early childhood education collaboration, as well as other issues and
         services pertaining to low-income children and families.


       Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
       your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
       Health Care
       ♦ Continued leadership role in collaborative effort with division of Child Care and early Childhood edu-
         cation and division of Behavioral Health Services with the arkansas early Childhood Mental Health
         Initiative. Funding continued in 2006 for three pilot projects with Community Mental Health Centers
         (CMHC) that are working with arkansas Better Chance programs, arkansas Head Start programs, and
         other state quality approved early education programs to provide early childhood mental health consulta-
         tion and education services for young children, families, and caregivers.

       ♦ Monthly conference calls continued in 2006 with CMHC early childhood specialists and clinicians. These
         calls are a cooperative effort among the division of Child Care and early Childhood education, division
         of Behavioral Health Services, and the arkansas HSSCO to enhance information and education relating
         to early childhood development and early childhood mental health issues.

       ♦ Selected to serve on the arkansas System of Care Stakeholders Planning Committee, a group of families,
         consumers, advocates, community collaborators, providers of services, and state agencies who advise and
         assist the department of Health and Human Services in the development of an effective “system of care”
         for behavioral health services to children and families in arkansas. Served as member of the Governing
         and Finance Subcommittee and the Medicaid Workgroup. Proposed legislation to be filed on behalf of
         the Stakeholders Planning Committee in an effort to reform children’s mental health services in arkansas
         during the upcoming 2007 State legislative session.

       ♦ active participation in arkansas Oral Health Coalition meetings; HSSCO director continued to serve
         as Chair of the Coalition in 2006. annual Governor’s Oral Health Summit held in July; HSSCO direc-
         tor emceed the event. assisted with Oral Health Coalition outreach and education event during opening
         night of arkansas travelers Baseball in april.

       ♦ Participation in national workgroup with five other Head Start-State Collaboration directors and State
         dental directors Network to develop ongoing communication process and mechanism to share informa-
                                                                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   31




   tion, initiatives, and resources that will unite Head Start and State dental Offices in an effort to increase
   services for children age five and under.

Welfare
Continued work with arkansas Coalition for economic Security (aCeS) in addressing earned Income tax
Credit education Initiative and other priorities identified by the Coalition. aCeS worked in coordination
with Give arkansas a raise Now, an interfaith coalition of churches and community groups to educate the
public on the need to increase the State minimum wage. In april, arkansas became the first state among our
southern neighbors to increase the minimum wage by $1.10 to $6.25/hour. In august, “The State of Work-
ing arkansas,” an educational forum on the economic climate in arkansas and the implications for working
families was held; Jared Bernstein, economist with the economic Policy Institute and author of All Together
Now: Common Sense for a Fair Economy, was the featured speaker.

Child Care
♦ Governor’s Summit for extra Learning Opportunities held in March. The Summit was sponsored by the
  arkansas Out-of-School Network (aOSN) with support from the National Governor association for
  Best Practices and the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation. The purpose of the Summit was to identify new
  stakeholders and partners, collect information on existing out-of-school time programs, and develop a plan
  for quality out-of-school care. arkansas HSSCO director facilitated small group discussions during the
  Summit and is a member of the aOSN. Worked with Quality Standards Committee for Out-of-School
  programs, as well as members of Public education and awareness Committee for aOSN. attended meet-
  ing in July with National League of Cities representative for arkansas, public officials, and child advocates
  regarding quality after school programs and activities for children and youth in arkansas.

♦ active participation in arkansas early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Initiative; serving on Social
  emotional Health–Medical Homes Joint Committee. also attended meetings of the Parent Support
  and Family education Workgroups. Worked closely with the State Project director for aeCCS Initia-
  tive in preparing for national meeting between HSSCO directors and SeCCS directors held in January
  2007. Participated in conference call with Child Care Bureau and HSSCO directors in June on update on
  SeCCS and Mental Health System of Care.

♦ Participated in planning activities and statewide celebration of arkansas Children’s Week held in april. a
  number of Head Start programs were involved in local activities in support of arkansas Children’s Week.

Education
♦ Participated as invited guest in roundtable event and press conference in March for releasing report by
  Southern education Foundation (SeF) on “Miles to Go: Pre-Kindergarten in arkansas” at Fair Park
  early Childhood education Center, Little rock School district. Other guests included State legislators,
  arkansas advocates for Children and Families, division of Child Care and early Childhood education,
  Winthrop rockefeller Foundation, arkansas Chamber of Commerce, and other dignitaries.

♦ an annual publication by the National Institute on early education research (NIeer) that assesses the
  quality standards of State pre-kindergarten programs found arkansas to have one of the best pre-kinder-
  garten programs in the nation. arkansas allows any willing provider that meets State quality standards to
  be a part of the arkansas Better Chance for School Success pre-kindergarten program; ten Head Start
  grantees also provide state-funded pre-kindergarten services.
32 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       Community Services
       ♦ Member of arkansas Kids Count Steering Committee. regional forums hosted throughout arkansas
         during the fall. Sponsored arkansas Kids Count Pre-Legislative Conference in November. Governor-
         elect Mike Beebe addressed the conference at the opening session.

       ♦ as a member of the arkansas Crisis response team, assisted in preparation for Second National NOVa
         (National Organization for Victim assistance) Crisis responder training held in Little rock in Novem-
         ber. arkansas HSSCO was recognized as a participating sponsor of the event. twenty-one states and four
         countries were represented at the conference.

       ♦ Governor’s Family Friendly awards luncheon held in april. Served on host committee and assisted with
         registration and other details.

       ♦ Met with representative from arkansas Children’s Hospital (aCH) to explore options of outreach and
         educational resources from aCH to Head Start, early Head Start, and Migrant and Seasonal Head Start
         programs throughout the State. aCH representative met with Head Start directors and staff in May and
         has now made available on-line information for arkansas programs.

       Family Literacy Services
       ♦ Participated in arkansas state-level team for “reading and talking together: Promoting research Based
         Practices in Parent-Child Interactive Literacy activities” professional development training for southern
         region states, sponsored by the U.S. department of education, held in Nashville, tN, in January.

       ♦ Continued dissemination of Cd-rOM that is made available to early childhood education providers for
         reproduction of english and Spanish versions of “Getting ready for Kindergarten: a Calendar of Family
         activities,” which allows for personalization on the calendar of the local program. The calendar is a col-
         laborative effort between the arkansas department of Human Services, division of Child Care and early
         Childhood education, and the arkansas Head Start-State Collaboration Office.

       Services to Children with Disabilities
       ♦ Worked collaboratively with partners in expanding the eCHO (early Childhood Hearing Outreach)
         project through the National Center for Hearing assessment and Management, Utah State University,
         to arkansas as a cooperative effort among early Head Start, Migrant and Seasonal Head Start, arkan-
         sas Children’s Hospital, and the arkansas department of Health and Human Services eHdI Program.
         Six arkansas early Head Start programs, as well as the delegate agency for Migrant and Seasonal Head
         Start, were chosen through an rFP selection process to participate in this collaborative effort. The goal
         of this project, funded by aCF, Office of Head Start, is to initiate a concentrated state-based effort to
         enhance the capacities of Migrant Head Start and early Head Start grantees to conduct objective hearing
         screenings for children birth to three years of age and to ensure that appropriate follow-up diagnostic and
         intervention services are provided for children who do not pass the screening. activities began in October
         and will run through September 2007. HSSCO director serves on State eCHO team.

       ♦ The Head Start-State Collaboration Office coordinated process with Child Care Law Center National
         Inclusion Project and arkansas partners (arkansas Head Start association, division of Child Care and
         early Childhood education, Special education Part B, division of developmental disabilities Part C,
         Partners for Inclusive Communities) to bring to the State information about the legal frameworks of the
         ada and Idea as they pertain to child care and early childhood education. One-day forum was held in
         November with over 100 participants in attendance.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   33




♦ In January, a collaborative networking meeting was held to provide opportunities for Head Start, educa-
  tional Cooperatives, and school districts to meet and discuss the updated state MOU agreement. as a part
  of this meeting, each Head Start program and Part B participant developed a plan of action to address
  barriers or concerns that currently exist at the local level. a follow-up meeting was held in September to
  discuss implementation of their plans and note local successes.

♦ Collaborative effort with Part C in updating current state MOU agreement among early Head Start, Mi-
  grant and Seasonal Head Start, arkansas Head Start association, Head Start-State Collaboration Office,
  and department of Health and Human Services division of developmental disabilities Part C. Signa-
  tures obtained and MOU distributed to appropriate parties in February. In November, a collaborative net-
  working meeting was held to provide opportunities for early Head Start and Migrant and Seasonal Head
  Start to meet with Part C early Intervention staff and discuss the state MOU. Head Start programs were
  also invited to participate in this meeting. Plans of action were developed to address barriers and concerns
  that exist at the local level.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
♦ active member of arkansas Homeless Coalition and Homeless Policy academy. Both policy academy
  groups (Chronically Homeless and Homeless Families with Children) voted to merge efforts in May;
  quarterly meetings began in July. State Homeless Conference held in September. Participated in vari-
  ous meetings to plan for “stand down” which was held at Philander Smith College in Little rock in
  September. There were 115 women, 200 children, 177 non-veteran men, and 174 veteran men for a total
  of 666 homeless. There were 268 registered volunteers, bringing the total of 934 people involved in the
  stand down. Homeless Outreach dinner held in Little rock in November. The dinner was a collaborative
  effort among faith-based organizations, churches, the arkansas democrat and republican parties, and
  service providers, including the arkansas Homeless Coalition. Three hundred dinners were served to men,
  women, and children. Various activities were available for children, along with distribution of backpacks,
  blankets, and other items for those in attendance.

♦ Served on review team for McKinney-Vento homeless grants for arkansas department of education.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes and decisions.
♦ Hosted meeting with Higher education, education, Child Care, and Head Start in February regarding
  issues pertaining to proposed language in the Head Start reauthorization act that would require Head
  Start teachers to meet the State pre-kindergarten qualifications of a P-4 license. Survey sent to Head Start
  directors to collect data on proposed impact of such legislation. Worked with State pre-kindergarten lead-
  ership to address potential issues should legislation be enacted. attended arkansas Board of education
  meeting in September where discussion occurred on proposed changes in teacher qualifications for State
  pre-kindergarten.

♦ State regulations now allow for pre-kindergarten teachers in classrooms, other than public school settings,
  to hold a Bachelor’s degree in early childhood education, child development, or related degree.

♦ Co-sponsorship of early Childhood Summit on “a Focus on Brain development and the early Child-
  hood Years” in collaboration with Community Outreach for Legislative affairs (COLa) and in conjunc-
  tion with the arkansas Senate Interim Committee on Children and Youth and the House Interim Com-
  mittee on aging, Youth, Legislative and Military affairs, held in October. State legislators, Head Start
  directors and staff, child care and pre-k providers, and child advocates were among the participants.
34 |       Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       ♦ representative from arkansas School Boards association met with arkansas Head Start directors to
         discuss Head Start potential participation by sponsoring local activities for the arkansas Study Circles
         Project “Building Bridges for early Learning Birth to School.” This process promotes schools and com-
         munities to work together so every child will start school eager to learn and ready to succeed through
         public dialogue and problem solving. Several Head Start programs in arkansas expressed interest in the
         process and worked with the Study Circles Project.

       ♦ Participated in newly established workgroup focusing on transportation issues for state-funded pre-kin-
         dergarten in arkansas. Workgroup also includes representatives for local Head Start programs.


       Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
       ♦ Continued coordination and collaborative efforts throughout 2006 with state and local agencies, orga-
         nizations, and programs in response to the needs and services for Hurricane evacuees who relocated to
         arkansas in fall 2005.

       ♦ Co-sponsored, participated, and presented workshops at numerous State conferences in 2006.

       ♦ Collaborative effort with arkansas Commission on Child abuse, rape and domestic Violence in co-
         sponsoring a Forum on “endangered Children in arkansas” held in February. Over 130 participants from
         Head Start, child care, education, child welfare, law enforcement, juvenile justice, child advocates, mental
         health, substance abuse prevention, and others attended the one day event. evaluations were very positive,
         and efforts will be made to continue similar events of interest with aCCardV. The next forum, tenta-
         tively scheduled for spring 2007, will focus on domestic violence and drug related concerns for children
         and families, particularly in the area of methamphetamine use.

       ♦ Continued participation with the arkansas Center for Health Improvement (aCHI) Health Insurance
         round table. aCHI and members of the round table developed strategies to expand health insurance
         coverage and increase the quality of health care services in arkansas. In March, the Governor announced
         that arkansas had received approval of a Federal waiver that will provide health coverage to thousands of
         arkansans working in small businesses. The program will provide a health coverage option for businesses
         with fewer than 500 employees who have not provided group health insurance as a benefit for the 12
         months prior to enrollment.


       Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
       families in your State.
       ♦ Served on “Welcome the Children” advisory Committee; the project is funded by the division of Child
         Care and administered by Partners for Inclusive Communities. Using research-based training materials,
         the primary goal is to provide training and technical assistance to help early childhood providers, includ-
         ing Head Start, and other educators understand cultural issues, learn strategies to support Latino children,
         and make appropriate referrals of children who exhibit possible developmental delays. First annual state
         conference, “Celebrating Cultural Harmony,” was held in May 2006, and the HSSCO was a co-sponsor.

       ♦     Worked in collaboration with arkansas advocates for Children and Families, division of Child Care and
            early Childhood education, and arkansas Head Start association in sponsoring one-day workshop to
            address issues of access to quality early childhood education services for immigrant families. The meeting,
            held in april, brought together a broad-based group of people to explore opportunities for enhanced col-
            laboration in eliminating barriers among the immigrant community in our state.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   35




How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
♦ The arkansas Head Start-State Collaboration Office is pleased with the progress achieved during the past
  year and throughout the previous years of the project. The HSSCO continues to work with the challenges
  and opportunities that encourage local collaboration between Head Start and the arkansas Better Chance
  for School Success programs.

♦ due to rich collaborative partnerships that have emerged during the past several years via the arkansas
  HSSCO, tremendous positive interaction exists among the department of Health and Human Services
  division of Child Care and early Childhood education, arkansas Head Start association, and the State
  Collaboration Office, as well as ongoing interaction with local directors and staff of arkansas Head Start,
  early Head Start, and Migrant and Seasonal Head Start programs.

♦ Flexibility affords the arkansas Head Start-State Collaboration Office a strength that focuses on many
  opportunities unique to arkansas and enhances our ability to build comprehensive early childhood sys-
  tems through linkages, coordination, and integration of policies and services. We continue to broaden our
  partnerships with education, Special education, Health, Childcare, Welfare, Homeless advocates, disabil-
  ity Services, Community Services, and Child abuse and domestic Violence organizations through routine
  and special activities targeting the HSSCO priorities.

♦ an evaluation compilation of the 2006-2007 arkansas Head Start-State Collaboration Office is available
  from the HSSCO. The project utilizes information in the evaluation report to plan and focus future direc-
  tion for the arkansas Head Start-State Collaboration Office.
36 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                              AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               |   37




                                     California


Collaboration Director               Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                     areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
nancy Remley, Director
                                     plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
nremley@cde.ca.gov
                                     Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Michael Zito, Coordinator            services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
mzito@cde.ca.gov                     are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
                                     at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Lead Agency                          in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.

California Department of education
                                     Currently the California department of education (Cde)
                                     administers, through annual contracts, to school districts,
1430 n Street                        county offices of education, proprietary and non-profit organi-
Suite 3410                           zations, county welfare departments, colleges and universities
Sacramento, CA 95818                 and cities, approximately 2,000 contracts to over 800 agencies
                                     serving 230,000 preschool aged children. California’s Head
Phone: 916-323-9727
                                     Start system, the nation’s largest, serves over 104,000 chil-
fax: 916-323-6853                    dren and their families through a system of 220 grantee and
www.cde.ca.gov/sp/cd/re/chssco.asp   delegate agencies. Over half of California’s Head Start grantees
                                     and delegate agencies are also Cde early care and education
                                     program contractors. even given the enormous number of
ACF Regional Contact
                                     California’s children and families in subsidized early education
                                     programs, we continue to serve less than half of the State’s eli-
Kristen Hayes, Program Specialist
                                     gible low-income children. Barriers to effective communication
Department of Health and Human       and collaboration also remain.
Services
Administration for Children and      There is an increasing need to have local Head Start agen-
families
                                     cies participate in local planning for the integration of child
Office of the Regional               development programs for low-income families. California is
Administrator/Head Start             investing significant resources in its efforts to braid child devel-
90 7th Street                        opment services into a more integrated service delivery system.
ninth floor                          State initiatives in the field have created:
San francisco, CA 94103
                                     ♦ The Child Care and development Local Planning Coun-
Phone: 415-437-8440
                                       cils (LPC), which coordinate early care and education at
khayes@acf.hhs.gov                     the county level and conduct local needs assessments that
                                       are used by the State to allocate all new preschool funding.

                                     ♦ The California Preschool Instructional Network, instituted
                                       two years ago by the Cde, which provides programs with
                                       research-based instructional strategies for language and
38 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




          literacy and for teaching english learners effectively, as well as collaboration on special education and
          inclusion strategies.

       ♦ California First Five, created by the Children and Families act of 1998, which is designed to provide, on a
         community-by-community basis, all children prenatal to five years of age with a comprehensive, integrated
         system of early childhood development services. State and county commissions develop plans and admin-
         ister funding for services.

       ♦ The desired results developmental Profile (drdP): an observation tool developed by Cde for state-
         funded programs to utilize to assess child progress. The drdP is one of the processes developed by Cde
         to ensure programs deliver quality services to families.

       ♦ The Centralized eligibility List (CeL), available in each of California’s counties, which is intended to
         provide eligible families with equitable access to state-subsidized child care and development services
         and to provide participating child development agencies and other providers of subsidized child care and
         development services with efficient and equitable access to information about the families who are eligible
         for child care subsidies.

       Head Start is one of the stakeholders participating at the State and local levels in these initiatives. The Cali-
       fornia Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO) has developed strong partnerships with the region
       IX Office staff and technical assistance Network (taN); the California Head Start association (CHSa);
       the State departments of education, Health Services, Social Services, and developmental Services; First Five
       California; and others to assist in our collaborative efforts. The initiatives and projects described below would
       be impossible without the active participation of these and other partners.

       For example, over the last two years the HSSCO was part of a Federal-state-local collaboration among First
       Five, state and local commissions, Head Start (both the region IX Office and State association), and the
       Cde to assist local universal preschool efforts in nine counties. This collaboration has produced two products:

       ♦ The Matrix of Child Care and development Programs, which includes the major programmatic require-
         ments of Cde, Head Start, and First Five universal preschool programs.

       ♦ Guidance for California department of education Child Care and development Contractors and Head
         Start Grantees and delegates Participating in First Five Power of Preschool Pilots, a report detailing guid-
         ance from Cde, region IX, and First Five to local programs braiding funding streams.

       The HSSCO is also facilitating a workgroup examining barriers to Head Start programs participation in the
       county CeLs, particularly the impact on full-day, full-year partnerships between Head Start and State pre-
       school programs. a range of solutions, including regulatory changes, are being developed.


       Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
       your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
       Health Care
       The Head Start Oral Health Workgroup has overseen the development of an interagency agreement between
       the California department of Health Services Childhood Health and disabilities Program and region IX.
       The region IX technical assistance Network (taN) was instrumental in this project.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   39




Worked with the State department of Social Services Community Care Licensing, the CHSa, region IX
Office and taN staff, the California Child Care Health Program, and a local Head Start health specialist on
a one-day roundtable for Head Start health specialists on health and safety best practices. Over 160 Head
Start health specialists and local partners were trained.

Child Care
♦ Facilitated a workgroup of representatives from region IX Office, Cde, Ca Head Start association, and
  First Five to develop guidance to local Head Start and Cde-funded programs braiding funding to pro-
  vide universal preschool in selected communities across California. The report is now in use statewide.

♦ Published an issue of the Bridges Journal that focused on California’s Child Care Block Grant funded
  quality projects, which are available to all state-funded and Head Start programs.

♦ Facilitated the development of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between region IX and Cali-
  fornia’s Community Care Licensing division. The MOU focuses on ways to increase communication and
  collaboration between region IX Office and California’s Community Care Licensing division during the
  transfer of licenses between grantees to ensure that services to families are uninterrupted.

Disabilities
♦ Co-presented with the region IX disabilities specialist, “Head Start 101” to California’s Special education
  program administrators and introduced them to the Cde/Head Start Part B Interagency agreement.

♦ Was asked to represent Head Start at meetings of the State Interagency Coordinating Council for Part C
  services under the Idea.

♦ Worked with the region IX, taN, and State department of developmental Services to update the Part
  C Memorandum of Understanding.

♦ Facilitated the inclusion of The Head Start Child Outcomes Framework into Cde’s new assessment tool
  for children with disabilities, the desired results access.

Welfare
developed a joint letter to grantees from HSSCO and the California department of Child Support
Services on child support resources available to families from dCSS.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
acting in concert with the Ca Head Start associations, the HSSCO has helped to ensure that Head Start is
at the table during the development of policies that impact preschool-aged children. For example, Head Start
is represented on the State advisory Committee for the California Preschool Instructional Network and the
State Interagency Coordinating Council for children with disabilities. The Ca Head Start association was
a major player in support of Proposition 82, which would have created universal preschool in California. The
Ca Head Start association and CSSCO have also been involved in numerous ad hoc workgroups that have
developed state policies such as those implementing the CeL program and developed interagency agreements
with the departments of Health Services and developmental Services and the committee that developed
guidance on how to braid funding from various programs to create local universal preschool initiatives.
40 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
       families in your State.
       ♦ The HSSCO is a member of the Head Start Partnership Project at California State University, North-
         ridge. The partnership is grant-funded to increase educational opportunities to Latino teaching staff as
         they work towards higher degrees.

       ♦ The HSSCO facilitated the addition of english language learner measures into the State’s desired
         results developmental Profile in use by Head Start programs.


       How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
       coming year?
       The work accomplished provides a foundation for future efforts.
                                                                      AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               |   41




                             Colorado


Collaboration Director       Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                             areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Darcy Allen-Young
                             plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Lead Agency                  Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
                             services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
lt. Governor’s Office
                             are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
130 State Capitol            at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Denver, CO 80203             in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
Phone: 303-866-2087
fax: 303-866-5469
                             In January 2007, Gov. Bill ritter and Lt. Governor Barbara
                             O’Brien were sworn into office. The decision was made at
molly.bolin@state.co.us      this time to continue the work of the Colorado Head Start-
                             State Collaboration (HSSC) project in the office of the Lt.
Lead Agency Contact          Governor. However the previous director was not retained.
                             In February 2007, the Lt. Governor hired her Chief of Staff,
Bruce n. Atchison            who took over the responsibilities of the HSSCO for the
Phone: 303-866-2086          interim and has since hired a new Colorado HSSC director.
                             This report is based on conversations with the President of the
bruce.atchison@state.co.us
                             Colorado Head Start association, Head Start directors, and
                             other stakeholders in the early childhood community regarding
ACF Regional Contact         accomplishments of the HSSCO in 2006.

Al Martinez                  Colorado has pushed hard in 2006 to move towards building
1961 Stout Street            a system of early childhood. as a member of the Colorado
Room 920                     early Childhood State Systems team, the HSSCO continued
                             its work to help build early childhood systems and access to
Denver, CO 80294             comprehensive services for all low-income children. efforts
Phone: 303-844-1172          focused on developing deeper and more effective collaborations
                             between Head Start programs in the State, the Colorado Head
                             Start association (HSa), the regional Office, state programs,
                             and other early childhood state-system building partners. Key
                             partners included the early Childhood State Systems team
                             (eCSSt), the Colorado early Childhood Summit, the early
                             Childhood and School readiness Commission, the local early
                             Childhood Councils (previously the Consolidated Child Care
                             Pilots), and of course the Head Start association.

                             In 2006, the State’s early Childhood Comprehensive Systems
                             (eCCS) Project (funded through Maternal and Child Health
                             and the Colorado department of Public Health and environ-
                             ment) has transitioned into its implementation phase. as part
42 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       of this transition, the original entity driving the work, the State Systems team, has delegated activities to a
       newly evolving entity—Smart Start Colorado. The original vision was that Smart Start Colorado would become
       the heart of the State’s early childhood system. However, in 2006, the School readiness Commission (a legis-
       lated body to address the State’s early childhood system and school readiness) sunsetted, and in their absence
       the Lt. Governor’s Office has initiated moving forward on the development of an early childhood system
       for the State. The Lt. Governor has brought the Smart Start director position into her office, along with the
       HSSCO director and another staff person, to oversee the work of setting up a systemic governance structure
       for early childhood in the State. The future of Smart Start Colorado will be determined as this system is devel-
       oped and institutionalized. The HSSCO director will be instrumental to ensuring the Head Start programs
       across the State continue to be involved in the process and are a component of the final structure.

       The HSSCO has been deeply involved with this systems development work, while simultaneously striving to
       include direct involvement on the part of local Head Start providers. recognizing the critical role played by
       the early Childhood State Systems team, Smart Start Colorado, and the School readiness Commission, the
       HSSCO director served on both the executive Committee of the State Systems team and the Interview
       Committee for hiring the first Smart Start director. In addition, the HSSCO provided financial support to
       fund a meeting facilitator for the State Systems team. Local Head Start providers continue to serve on vari-
       ous State Systems team task forces, maintain a permanent seat on the State Systems team, and serve on the
       Smart Start Colorado advisory Board (now out of the Lt. Governor’s Office). In addition, very early in 2006,
       the Smart Start Colorado Office of Professional development was created to develop an integrated and com-
       prehensive system of professional and workforce development for early childhood providers, and the HSSCO
       director has served on their advisory board.


       Additional highlights relating to these activities are specified below.
       ♦ The HSSCO worked to engage Head Start parents and providers in educating local officials on the im-
         portance of the local early Childhood Councils to help promote the involvement of Head Start programs
         in their local early childhood communities. In 2006, the Consolidated Child Care Pilots were expanded
         legislatively from 17 local programs to 31, the name was changed from the Pilots to Local early Child-
         hood Councils, and now these programs involve 58 of Colorado’s 64 counties. Head Start representation
         on local councils was put into the legislation, and where there is a local Head Start in a community there is
         a seat on the local early Childhood Council. There has been great momentum to provide support for this
         work statewide, and as a part of this work, the HSSCO director visited with rural Head Start grantees
         as much as possible to encourage their involvement and participation. The Councils continue to identify
         existing barriers to effective collaboration within local communities and identify State support when/if it
         becomes available. also, the HSSCO director worked to ensure Head Start representation on the local
         Organizational Structure Workgroups so that this critical voice would be heard.

       ♦ The HSSCO communicated information to local Head Start programs via an email distribution list, ar-
         ticles in the statewide CHSa newsletter, and visiting at least one-third of all Head Start grantees last year.

       ♦ The HSSCO collaborated with representatives from the Colorado department of education, Colorado
         department of Human Services, and the Colorado department of Public Health and environment to
         ensure direct communication to Head Start grantees about the results Matter Initiative, a new assessment
         approach using child, family, and system outcomes data to inform early childhood practices and policy, the
         Policy Matters Project, and other initiatives being coordinated through State departments. The HSSCO
         director had regular meetings with all of these State department representatives, as well as attended all
         of the HSa meetings to keep them informed.

       ♦ Working with the Head Start association, the HSSCO completed a statewide comparison of the early
         Childhood Standards. The depth of information provided in this report was so great that the collaborative
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   43




   partners found it difficult to create a meaningful publication for stakeholders. Therefore, a partnership was
   formed with the larger early childhood community to publish this report online in a user-friendly way, and
   in late ’06, this was accomplished.

♦ The HSSCO worked with the Head Start association and hosted the 2006 region VIII Head Start
  training Conference. an extra day, Opening the Circle, was added to the Conference schedule in an effort
  to share best practices from Head Start programs with other early childhood providers in the State and to
  stimulate a collaborative dialogue between Head Start and the larger early childhood community.


Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
Health Care
♦ The HSSCO continues to advocate for a comprehensive approach to building a state system of early child-
  hood that includes children’s physical, mental, and dental health. The HSSCO director has also met with
  representatives from the regional Offices of aCF and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, along
  with the Colorado department of Health Care Policy and Financing, to identify strategies for ensuring
  that Medicaid services are being effectively provided to Head Start children and families.

♦ The HSSCO has become more involved with the State Oral Health Coalition to support its work in serv-
  ing low-income children and their families and children with special health care needs.

Welfare
♦ The HSSCO has worked with the Colorado Works Program and the temporary assistance for Needy
  Families (taNF) administrator to identify ways for local communities to effectively pursue Federal funds
  that support responsible fatherhood activities.

♦ The HSSCO supported the CHSa region VIII Head Start Growing Together conference which included
  numerous workshops on how local Head Start programs can support families’ efforts of welfare to work
  and education. Over 700 participants from six states attended the conference.

♦ The HSSCO served on the Child Care assistance Program (CCaP) task Force that is working to ensure
  effective service delivery of the Child Care and development Fund so that families and programs receive
  the right benefits at the right time. These activities include involving the business community in support-
  ing early childhood programs, developing a parent toolkit to help parents navigate the CCaP program, and
  identifying strategies for ensuring greater access by CCaP-eligible families to community early childhood
  education providers. This task Force continues to meet and is doing a final report in the summer of 2007.

Child Care
♦ The HSSCO director served as co-chair of the Colorado early Childhood Summit, which is a formal
  consortium inclusive of representatives from a wide variety of early childhood/child care providers: the
  Colorado association for the education of Young Children, the Colorado Child Care association, the
  Colorado association of Family Child Care, the Colorado alliance for Quality School age Programs, the
  Colorado division for early Childhood, the Colorado early Childhood Professional Coalition, and the
  Colorado Family resource Network. In addition, the HSSCO provided funding in 2006 to support the
  annual retreat for members of the Summit to develop a strategic plan for their role within the larger early
  childhood system.
44 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       ♦ The HSSCO director served on the CCaP task Force that is working to ensure effective service delivery
         of the Child Care and development Fund so that families and programs receive the right benefits at the
         right time.

       ♦ The HSSCO coordinated a legislative breakfast in which Lt. Governor Norton and several State repre-
         sentatives and Senators participated.

       ♦ Head Start was publicly honored in the House and the Senate Chambers and the HSSCO director
         coordinated getting a proclamation signed by the Governor that was presented.

       Education
       ♦ The HSSCO participated in statewide meetings to present the work of the State Systems team and Smart
         Start Colorado as part of shopping the concept of an integrated comprehensive system of early childhood.

       ♦ The HSSCO worked with representatives from the Colorado department of education to ensure direct
         communication to Head Start grantees about their results Matter Initiative.

       ♦ The HSSCO served on the State Systems team Professional development task Force. With the creation
         of the Office of Professional development in early 2006, the HSSCO director now serves on the advi-
         sory Board for this office.

       Community Services
       ♦ The HSSCO has a strong working relationship with the Governor’s Commission on Community Service,
         and each shares information on training opportunities that would benefit their respective programs. Now
         housed in the Lt. Governor’s Office the staff of the Governor’s Commission on Community Service will
         become an even stronger partner with the HSSCO and local programs.

       ♦ The HSSCO has worked to foster greater collaboration between Head Start and Community action Pro-
         grams in the State, including support for the Colorado Community action agency association’s (CCaa)
         annual system building conference for Head Start and CCaa providers.

       Family Literacy Services
       ♦ The HSSCO director served on the planning team and was directly involved in the solicitation and selec-
         tion of conference presenters for the 2006 region VIII Head Start conference. Included in the conference
         were multiple trainings focusing on family literacy services for family service workers, education specialists,
         home visitors, and parents. Over 100 workshops were available.

       Services to Children with Disabilities
       ♦ as the executive order signed by the Governor transferring administration of the Federal Part C Program
         from the Colorado department of education to the department of Human Services moved forward, the
         HSSCO was involved with sharing updated information on the transition with Head Start programs via
         an email distribution list and by organizing presentations from the Colorado departments of education
         and Human Services to early childhood stakeholder groups. Meetings with the department of Human
         Services occurred in 2006 to ensure a smooth transition and that there would not be a loss of services to
         families.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   45




♦ The HSSCO director met with representatives from the Colorado department of Health Care Policy
  and Financing to identify strategies for ensuring that Medicaid services are provided effectively to Head
  Start children and families.

♦ The HSSCO worked actively to improve oral health outcomes for low-income children in the State and
  continues to be involved with the State Oral Health Coalition, which is striving to upgrade service deliv-
  ery to children with special health care needs.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
♦ The HSSCO continued to work with the Cooperative extension Offices of Colorado State University to
  share information with Head Start programs regarding education and training leading toward a Family
  development Credential for family service workers. as part of the training, students would gain informa-
  tion about working with families that are homeless and in crisis situations.

♦ The HSSCO partnered with the department of education to ensure that the department possessed cur-
  rent and accurate information about Head Start programs in the State when serving children and families
  that are displaced by natural disasters such as wild fires. This work was initiated in the aftermath of Hur-
  ricane Katrina.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
as the new ritter/O’Brien administration gets underway and an entire team of early childhood systems
development staff is being assembled in the Lt. Governor’s Office, the involvement of the HSSCO director
will become even more influential than it has been in the past. a priority of the HSSCO has always been to
facilitate the involvement of Head Start programs in statewide early childhood system building efforts. Many
of these activities are highlighted throughout this report. Some of the more significant accomplishments
over the past year include: representation from Head Start on the early Childhood and School readiness
Commission and doing several presentations to the Commission; serving on the Steering Committee for the
early Childhood State Systems team; serving on and promoting the inclusion of Head Start programs on
the advisory Board of the Smart Start Colorado Office of Professional development; supporting the work of
a statewide comparison of early childhood standards that used Head Start Program Performance Standards as
the benchmark; serving as co-chair of the Colorado early Childhood Summit and supporting the CHSa
involvement in the Summit; organizing the annual Head Start Legislative Breakfast at the State Capitol; and
working to obtain a proclamation signed by the Governor and a resolution signed by the General assembly
recognizing the importance of Head Start in Colorado.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
The work of Smart Start Colorado was intense last year, producing considerable results. These included creating
a Web site to engage the larger community on statewide system building efforts in early childhood education
(www.smartstartcolorado.org); awarding funding to create the Smart Start Colorado Office of Professional
development; developing an online needs assessment toolkit for local communities to access demographic
information pertinent to the early childhood environment both within their communities and statewide;
partnering with the Head Start association and the HSSCO to finalize the comparison of early childhood
standards; and conducting a variety of stakeholder meetings to get feedback on the direction the State is
headed in their State systems work.

The HSSCO has been a partner with the Colorado HSa and other early childhood and education stakehold-
ers in updating the State’s Comparison of early Childhood Standards Project. Over the past year, this work
has drawn attention from a variety of groups, most importantly that of the early Childhood and School
46 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       readiness Commission and the Outcomes and evaluations task Force of the early Childhood State Systems
       team. Many individuals who are involved actively in developing a statewide early childhood system look to
       these standards as a foundation upon which to build the larger components of the system. The HSSCO di-
       rector anticipates that these standards will come to be used extensively in larger system-building activities over
       the course of the next several years.

       as co-chair of the Colorado early Childhood Summit, the HSSCO director helped to set meeting agendas,
       schedule meeting presenters, and maintain an updated legislative tracking log on early childhood bills intro-
       duced during the Colorado legislative session. Members of the Summit were particularly excited to restore
       this partnership with the HSSCO and pleased with the quality of work provided by the HSSCO.


       Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
       families in your State.
       The HSSCO has worked with the Colorado Works Program (taNF administrator) to identify ways for local
       communities to effectively pursue Federal funds that support healthy marriage and responsible fatherhood
       activities.

       The HSSCO actively supports the Colorado State University as it strives to create an online baccalaure-
       ate degree program in human development and family studies with an emphasis in early childhood educa-
       tion. Funded by a grant from the Head Start Bureau (now Office of Head Start), this program is targeted to
       improve the quality of professional development opportunities available to Head Start teachers and staff that
       work largely with Hispanic children and families in the State.

       The HSSCO continues to serve on the Child Care assistance Program task Force that is working to improve
       a family’s ability to access child care services through the Child Care and development Fund. Included in
       these activities has been the development of a parent toolkit in both english and Spanish to enable parents to
       navigate the Child Care assistance Program.


       How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
       coming year?
       In 2006, the HSSCO worked to solidify its position in critical statewide early childhood system building
       activities. In 2007, the HSSCO will become a component of a larger early childhood team working to impact
       systemic change out of the executive branch of Colorado government. Our work plan remains the same, and
       our ability to implement it with greater outcomes for Head Start/early childhood stakeholders has escalated.
       The intent is to continue to strengthen the relationship between the regional Office, the Head Start associa-
       tion, the State, and the HSSCO. darcy allen-Young will be the new HSSCO director who brings years of
       experience as a Head Start Grantee administrator in Colorado, along with experience in the Colorado State
       department of education, early childhood special education, established relationships with the Head Start
       association members, and experience with local early childhood councils and systems building work. We are
       excited to move this important work forward.
                                                                            AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               |   47




                                   Connecticut


Collaboration Director             Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                   areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Grace Whitney, PhD, MPA
                                   plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Ct Department of Social Services
25 Sigourney Street                Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Hartford, Ct 06106                 services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Phone: 860-424-5066                are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
fax: 860-424-4960                  at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
grace.whitney@ct.gov
                                   in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
www.headstart.state.ct.us
                                   Goal

Lead Agency Contact                Low-income children will receive quality early care and educa-
                                   tion in a variety of settings linked with comprehensive services
Michael Starkowski                 through a statewide multidisciplinary system of consultation
Commissioner                       and on-site technical assistance that supports the unique needs
Phone: 860-424-5008                of each child; that ensures access to the multiple disciplines
                                   required to ensure healthy development and inclusion: educa-
fax: 860-424-4960                  tion/special education, physical/oral/mental health, nutrition,
michael.starkowski@ct.gov          social services/family support/family engagement; that reflects
                                   the lessons learned from Head Start; and that includes all
ACF Regional Contact               Head Start component coordinators.

tom Killmurray
                                   Accomplishments
Administration for Children and
families                           ♦ Continued efforts to build capacity of interdisciplinary
Region I                             consultation/technical assistance resources by providing
JfK federal Building
                                     policy assistance to state training team, developing pilot
                                     design and funding plan with state partners; attending
Room 2000                            National resource Center on Health and Safety in Child
Government Center                    Care Think tank to explore connection between heath and
Boston, MA 02203                     mental health consultation; presenting interdisciplinary
                                     model at State early Childhood Comprehensive Systems
Phone: 617-565-1104
                                     (SeCCS) grantee meeting; developing policy brief and
fax: 617-565-2493                    cost analysis on interdisciplinary consultation for Ct early
tom.killmurray@acf.hhs.gov           Childhood education (eCe) Cabinet; and continuing to
                                     work on system development in Ct, integrating Head Start
                                     in design and planning. Funded the creation of a side-by-
                                     side document of health requirements in various eCe
                                     systems to ease comparison for policy makers and began an
48 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




          initiative to connect resources that can support a coordinated infrastructure for child care health consul-
          tants and infant toddler specialists.

       ♦ Continued to inform Head Start grantees of all training opportunities, including annual Healthy Child
         Care New england collaborative training, and of networking opportunities related to the comprehensive
         services provided by Head Start managers and specialists.


       Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
       your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
       Health Care

       Goal

       all children in early childhood programs have access to the full range of health services and are cared for in
       healthy and safe early care settings that are connected with and supported by community health professionals.


       Accomplishments

       ♦ The HSSCO continues to act as a key resource for including the blueprint of Healthy Child Care america
         into state plans and activities, including state implementation of SeCCS, especially in the area of capac-
         ity building for a system of child care health consultation. developed state profile for a national database
         of child care health consultation state resources and activities and submitted public hearing testimony to
         the Ct department of Public Health on proposed changes to state child care regulations, which resulted
         from extensive work by Healthy Child Care Ct to better align state regulations with National Health and
         Safety Standards for out-of-home care.

       ♦ Helped coordinate american asthma Foundation’s training for Head Start health managers in Ct and
         continued efforts to connect Head Start with various state health resources and training.

       Welfare

       Goal

       Head Start parents who experience barriers to stable employment will be able to receive services and sup-
       ports in Head Start that lead to successful employment, through partnerships with the departments of Social
       Services and Labor.


       Accomplishments

       ♦ Continued to share state taNF data with Head Start/early Head Start grantees and to dialogue with
         new taNF administrator to expand opportunities for collaboration. Helped implement a pilot with one
         Head Start grantee (New Haven) to better inform taNF families of how to access Head Start services.
                                                                                      AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS         |   49




Child Care

Goal

all Head Start children needing full day, full year child care will have access to a child care option that meets
their needs for quality and consistency. Low-income children will be more likely to receive quality child care
linked to comprehensive services.


Accomplishments

Several of the specific collaborations related to this priority area have included:

♦ Working with State Child Care administrator and the Ct Child Care directors’ Forum to sponsor a
  two-stage resiliency initiative through which over 300 early childhood professionals received training on
  the devereux early Childhood assessment (deCa) program.

♦ Working with State Child Care administrator and the department of Social Services (dSS) Commis-
  sioner to develop a “hub services’” design to use state-funded child care centers as community hubs for
  child development and family support services.

♦ Working with State Child Care administrator, the dSS Commissioner, and eCe Cabinet in the devel-
  opment of a state strategic plan for infant toddler care.

♦ Working with State Child Care administrator, the dSS associate Commissioner, and the State
  McKinney-Vento Liaison to design and fund a survey of care needs of young children in shelters and
  to create budget option and policy for the State legislature to address these needs.

Education

Goal

Head Start and School readiness (State pre-kindergarten) work collaboratively at both the state and lo-
cal levels to provide quality early care and education programs, linked with the full array of comprehensive
services that meet the range of needs of low-income children, reimbursed at a rate sufficient to cover the cost
of providing quality care.


Accomplishments

♦ attended all eCe Cabinet meetings and provided policy analysis of various policy issues to the Ct Head
  Start association (Ct HSa) representative and to dSS Commissioner who are both Cabinet members.
  Provided policy brief and cost analysis framework for Cabinet priority on interdisciplinary consultation.

♦ regularly attended quarterly State department of education (Sde) Head Start advisory meetings and
  remain available to region I and Ct Head Start association should they wish to use the HSSCO as a
  resource in relating with Sde on Head Start matters. Sat in on one meeting of Sde, region I, and Ct
  Head Start association.

♦ Within the efforts to building a statewide interdisciplinary consultation system for early care, continued
  efforts to tie Preschool Benchmarks and Infant toddler Guidelines to education consultation component.
50 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       Community Services

       Goal

       National and community services activities reflect collaboration with early care and education, including
       Head Start.


       Accomplishments

       Worked collaboratively with Community Services Block Grant (CSBG) staff at dSS to ensure Head Start
       participation in the evolving ‘”one front door” for access to economic supports through local Community
       action agencies, entitled Human Services Infrastructure (HSI) and CSBG staff attended cluster technical
       assistance session on Head Start Self-assessment sponsored by region I HSQI.

       Family Literacy Services

       Goal

       Children and families will have a range of resources available to them for the development of literacy skills
       and attainment of early childhood education.


       Accomplishments

       Worked with the dSS Commissioner’s work group examining early literacy programs, e.g., reach Out and
       read, for statewide implementation. Connected with teach for america for placements in the state.

       Services to Children with Disabilities

       Goal

       a statewide multidisciplinary system of consultation and on-site technical assistance is available to early
       care and education programs that support the unique needs of each child, that ensures access to the multiple
       disciplines required to ensure healthy development and inclusion: education/special education, physical/oral/
       mental health, social services/family support/family engagement, that reflects the lessons learned from Head
       Start, and that includes all Head Start component coordinators.


       Accomplishments

       ♦ Coordinated a meeting of early Head Start, region I HSQI and Part C (Ct Birth to 3 System) to review
         state Memorandum of Understanding and to discuss ways to work more closely together in supporting
         families.

       ♦ Worked with department of Children and Families to ensure that Head Start children have full access
         to the statewide network of early childhood mental health consultants and began discussions to establish
         more systemic connections that ensure all children in foster care ready access to Head Start services.
                                                                                      AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   51




Services to Homeless Children and Families

Goal

Young children who are homeless have access to health, early care and education, and any special services they
may need.


Accomplishments

♦ Coordinated and designed project with McKinney-Vento State Liaison, State Child Care administrator,
  and Office of School Nutrition/Child and adult Care Food Program to jointly fund a statewide survey to
  better understand the needs of young children in shelters and their families. Fifteen shelters and 30 fami-
  lies were interviewed, and results will be shared widely and inform state policy. HSSCO funds totalling
  $5,000 went to this $20,000 project.

♦ Created competitive grant opportunity for Head Start and early Head Start grantees for small grants
  to strengthen local collaborations to better connect children in shelters with Head Start. Seven grants of
  $5,000 were awarded to local grantees. Projects will provide models for state policy consideration.

♦ Contracted with Ct Coalition to end Homelessness for a staff person to coordinate activities related to
  homeless children and to convene local forums across the State for staff of shelters, Head Start, and other
  early care and education providers, and local McKinney-Vento Liaisons.

♦ Continued to collaborate with national colleagues in homeless education on a pre-conference session
  on young children experiencing homelessness at the annual meeting of the National association for the
  education of Homeless Children and Youth and convened a panel during the conference “Head Start 101”
  for which three Ct grantees presented their working collaborations to increase enrollment of homeless
  children in Head Start. HSSCO funds were used to support travel expenses for panel presenters.

♦ Continued to support dSS deputy Commissioner to maintain a work group on young homeless children,
  providing information and policy input as needed. Coordinated a visit by legislators to model Head Start
  site serving children experiencing homelessness.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
Goal

Head Start and early Head Start are seen as valuable partners in state policymaking and in planning efforts
at the state and community levels and are effective advocates for the needs of low-income children and their
families. Head Start, as a system of services in the State, provides high quality, effective services and serves as
a model comprehensive child development program for children birth to five and pregnant women and their
families in Connecticut.


Accomplishments

♦ Continued to make available to policy makers copies of two HSSCO publications: 2003 Head Start in
  CT Program Profile and Side-By-Side of State Early Care and Education Regulations and Requirements.
52 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       ♦ regularly attend meetings of the Sde Head Start advisory, Ct Head Start association, and Head Start
         component managers and coordinators to share information, to learn about their needs, to help identify
         strategies for Head Start involvement and nominate Head Start representation, to formulate positions for
         Head Start participation, and to connect Head Start with opportunities to influence policies and practices
         that effect low-income children and families.

       ♦ Continued to utilize email to widely disseminate event announcements and to share information on
         opportunities for providing input, e.g., Ct’s SaMHSa mental health transformation grant town hall
         meeting, care coordination work group, local oral health coalitions, statewide nutrition training, Parent-
         ing education Credential and Ct Parents Plus, state child care regulations hearings, eCe Cabinet local
         forums, Help Me Grow networking meetings, state plans, etc.


       Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
       Goal

       The Head Start works with state partners in building an early care and education professional development
       system capable of providing a quality work force for early care and education programs in the State.


       Accomplishments

       ♦ although Head Start was not represented on the State legislature’s Higher education and Workforce
         task Force, the HSSCO kept the Ct Head Start association and region I HSQI informed of this
         group’s activities and gathered data from grantees to provide testimony on the resources, needs, and con-
         cerns of Head Start.

       ♦ Through Ct Charts-a-Course, the State’s early care and education professional development system
         provided funds for system building activities, specifically the creation of a statewide professional develop-
         ment database directory that will coordinate activities of staff working toward degrees and that can be a
         resource for staff to monitor their own progress, directors to monitor staff progress and access credentials
         of new staff being hired, and state policy makers to target capacity building efforts; and further piloting of
         academic supports to increase the success of staff seeking degrees, e.g., on-site study groups and individu-
         alized guidance.


       Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
       families in your State.
       The Ct HSSCO continued to support the State’s early childhood professional development system, Ct
       Charts-a-Course, in its implementation of a five-year Head Start professional development grant that aims
       to provide concurrent eSL and early childhood education to Hispanic early Head Start, thereby increas-
       ing employment opportunities for parents and community residents and increasing the capacity for staffing
       classrooms with providers of children’s own language and culture. also pertaining to staff professional devel-
       opment, the HSSCO worked closely with Head Start grantees to collect and report data on the number of
       Hispanic families being served by Head Start and the professional development needs of staff in Head Start
       programs for use by the State legislature’s Higher education task Force in its development of a state plan for
       the Governor’s eCe Cabinet. Funded printing of a Spanish version of a child development text for distribu-
       tion in early Head Start programs in the state.
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   53




How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
The current work plan for the Ct HSSCO, for the period 2/1/06 through 1/31/11, is formatted to address
the items listed above. The work plan includes goal statements, objectives, activities, and anticipated outcomes
in each of the eight priority areas and in each of the additional HSSCO focus areas, e.g., collaboration with
regional Office on national and regional priorities, facilitating the involvement of Head Start in the develop-
ment of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions, and helping to build early childhood systems and access
to comprehensive services for all low-income children. The work plan was developed in collaboration with the
Ct Head Start association and key community partners using results obtained from an evaluation of the Ct
HSSCO in 2005. Progress is reported annually in the Ct HSSCO grant continuation application and nota-
tions are made that document any changes needing to be made to the five-year plan. a selection of HSSCO
activities aimed at attaining the goals and objectives in the five-plan are shared with the region I Office at
least quarterly and are presented annually in the HSSCO annual State Profile report. at this time no major
changes have been made to the plan.
54 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                       AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               |   55




                              delaware


Collaboration Director        Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                              areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Betty Richardson
                              plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Department of education
401 federal Street            Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Suite 2                       services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Dover, De 19901               are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Phone: 302-735-4210           at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
fax: 302-739-2388
                              in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
brichardson@doe.k12.de.us     Linkages to Connect Partners in excellence (PIe) to Positive
                              Behavior Support (PBS) in Schools
Lead Agency Contact
                              ♦ The Head Start Collaboration director was appointed
Martha toomey                   to the department of education’s Connection to Learn-
Phone: 302-735-4210             ing action team to forge linkages between PIe and early
                                childhood programs in local school districts and Positive
fax: 302-730-2388
                                Behavior Support (PBS) schools. The Collaboration direc-
mtoomey@doe.k12.de.us           tor is working cooperatively with PBS staff to plan for PBS
                                schools to be trained on the PIe curriculum in the summer
ACF Regional Contact            of 2007.

ed Vreeswyk                   ♦ PIe is an early childhood mental health initiative that has
Region III, ACf-HHS             been piloted in community based programs for the past
                                three years. delaware was chosen as a pilot state by the
150 South Independence Mall
                                Center on the Social and emotional Foundations of early
Suite 864                       Learning (CSeFeL), a joint initiative funded by the Office
Philadelphia, PA 19106          of Head Start and the Child Care Bureau. Nemours has
Phone: 215-862-4040
                                assumed leadership to complete and pilot a full early child-
                                hood mental health model.
fax: 215-861-4070
evreeswyk@acf.hhs.gov
                              Mental Health
                              Priority Area: Health

                              Long term Support for PIe transitions to Nemours

                              ♦ as reported previously, delaware was selected as one of
                                six national pilots in 2004 for the Partners in excellence
                                (PIe) initiative, a jointly funded effort by the Head Start
                                and Child Care Bureaus to reduce behavior problems
                                using evidenced-based practices. technical assistance was
56 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




          provided by CSeFeL. Support for the initiative ended September 2006. Nemours Health and Prevention
          Services will provide ongoing support. transition began in June 2006.

       ♦ Thirteen programs representing 32 Head Start, child care, and state pre-kindergarten sites and serving
         1,600 children completed one full year piloting a delaware model that consisted of professional develop-
         ment opportunities and technical assistance support for classroom staff, mental health consultants, and
         managed care organizations. The full model consisting of family support, mental health consultation, and
         refined technical assistance will be developed and tested by Nemours Health and Prevention Services.

       ♦ This effort was enhanced through a $100,000 supplemental grant to the Head Start-State Collaboration
         project.

       Comprehensive Professional Development System Planning
       Priority Area: Education Opportunities

       development of a Coordinated Comprehensive Professional development System

       ♦ delaware First...again, delaware’s professional development system, convened over 60 stakeholders,
         inclusive of three Head Start representatives and the Head Start-State Collaboration director, to revisit
         and make recommendations for updating the system in March 2005. There was an overwhelming request
         for a comprehensive system to meet the needs of all early care and education programs that prompted the
         Office of early Care and education to include comprehensive professional development as part of the
         State’s early childhood plan, early Success.

       ♦ In an effort to merge planning processes, the deputy Secretary of education charged the Office of early
         Care and education and the Head Start-State Collaboration Office with the responsibility to work with
         stakeholders to merge the two processes.

       ♦ In March 2006, a workgroup of leaders from child care, state pre-kindergarten, Head Start association,
         Office of early Care and education, and the State Collaboration Office set the stage to conceptualize a
         coordinated, comprehensive professional development system that would meet the needs of a broad range
         of early care and education programs. This concept included broadening the delaware First’s Competen-
         cies for teaching and learning to address competencies suitable to programs embracing levels of compre-
         hensive up to Head Start; drafting preliminary Core Knowledge and Competencies that would address a
         broad range of competencies suitable for Head Start staff; and infusing Head Start positions in the exist-
         ing career lattice draft. This work will serve as the foundation for creating the comprehensive system.

       ♦ draft comprehensive competencies were complete. expert review will take place in 2007; Head Start
         teaching and learning positions have been included in the delaware First Career Lattice.

       Oral Health
       Priority Area: Health

       Creating the Infrastructure to Move the Oral Heath agenda

       ♦ resumed state-level planning activities with the division of Public Health for the development of a Steer-
         ing Committee that created the structure for a delaware Oral Health Coalition. This steering Committee
         set priorities, created an action plan and operational procedures. Children’s issues from the Head Start
         Forum held in June 2005 were included in the broad-based community approach. dHSa has designated a
         representative to serve on the Steering Committee. Formal coalition kickoff occurred in april 2007.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS         |   57




♦ The Oral Health forum resulted in an official report of proceedings and a preliminary focus on building
  relationships with local dentists via health advisory committees. all health committees report a linkage
  with the dental community. two health advisory committees participated in the dental community’s Give
  Kids Smile activities.

State Policy Change Announcement
Once the only state excluding dental as a CHIP benefit, delaware has a made a policy change to include
dental.

Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (ECCS) Planning Activities
Priority Area: Health

Coordinated efforts with eCCS

♦ The Head Start-State Collaboration director served on the eCCS advisory Committee and chaired the
  Social emotional Workgroup until the fall of 2006. Since eCCS goals expanded PIe goals for children
  0-2, committee work was consolidated with that of the State Core PIe team. two members from the
  eCCS subgroup were added to the State team to fulfill this effort. eCCS fiscally supported the PIe ta
  process. Joint efforts will continue to engage the managed care community in training on the PIe process
  and the clinical version of the deCa assessment tool.


Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
Health Care
Promoted linkages between Head Start/State Pre-Kindergarten and the robert Wood Johnson Covering
Kids and Families Initiative. Co-sponsored a Family Service Cluster on enrollment on Medicaid, Chip, and
CHaP enrollment with aaP (day 1) and Creating Family Partnership agreements with the region III ta
system (day 2).

Welfare
assisted division of Social Services with information needed for expanded outreach to taNF families state-
wide.

Child Care
Co-sponsored a cross-system curriculum training cluster inclusive of Head Start, state pre-kindergarten, and
child care.

Education
Promoted Head Start participation in Head Start Scholars Mentoring Program and continued involvement
on the Head Start Scholars advisory Committee. Five programs participated in the mentoring, and 14 Head
Start teachers participated in the Scholars Project.
58 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       Community Services
       Finalized Community action/dHSa agreement for enhanced Head Start/Caa relationships. Signatures
       were completed in May 2007. The state-level agreement will serve as the foundation for local agreements.

       Literacy Services
       ♦ twenty Head Start teachers participated in a six module early Steps to Literacy Initiative as part of the
         Head Start Scholars Project.

       ♦ Coordinated with Caliber to present Steps to Success literacy mentoring program to Head Start grantees.

       Services to Children with Disabilities

       IDEA: Early Childhood Outcomes (Building Blocks)

       delaware’s Child Outcomes Steering Committee and Child Indicator Workgroup culminated activities. Head
       Start curriculum and assessment tools have been added to an approved state list for reporting outcomes to the
       US department of education. Three Head Start programs participated in pilot of curricula and assessment
       processes. Head Start programs are working locally to eliminate duplication of assessments for children dually
       served by Leas and Head Start/State Pre-Kindergarten.


       Expanding Opportunities for Inclusion

       appointed to serve on a newly formed state team to address issues related to inclusion and services to children
       with disabilities in a natural setting. The disabilities Specialist for the ta system is part of the team. Child
       care and early Head Start are also members. Several goals from the Collaboration office long-range plan have
       been included in the action planning for this group.

       Services to Homeless Children and Families
       advocated and provided contact information to education Homeless Coordinator for Head Start participa-
       tion in homeless meetings with shelters and districts. at least one program is actively participating.


       Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes and decisions.
       Head Start was represented in the following state plans and processes throughout the year:
                                                                                     AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS        |   59




  Major Head Start Involvement (2006) * New

 System Building Activity          Key Agency          Head Start         Collaboration Project         Both

  Delaware early Care
  and education Council                DOe                 X


  Wilmington early Care         City of Wilmington         X                       X
  and education Council                                                        (temporary)


  Coordinated Professional
  Development System                   DOe                                                               X


  *Project RelAte
  Advisory Committee                  DeCC                 X


  eCCS                                DHSS                                          X


  IDeA Child Indicator
  Workgroup                            DOe                                                               X


  Community Action
  Planning Activites                  fSCAA                                                              X


  *Oral Health
  Steering Committee                   DPH                                                               X


  StARS Quality
  Rating System                        DOe                 X




Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
No targeted activity to report.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
Collaboration is a process. This report describes status of work. all work cited is part of the five-year plan.
Serving as interim representative on the Wilmington early Care and education Council was an added re-
sponsibility but advanced an effort originally targeted for 2008 in our five-year plan.
60 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                            AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               |   61




                                   district of Columbia


Collaboration Director             Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                   areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
lindsey t. Allard
                                   plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
early Care and education
Administration
                                   Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
District of Columbia Department    services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
of Human Services
                                   are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
717 14th Street nW
                                   at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Suite 450
                                   in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-727-8113                The district of Columbia Head Start-State Collaboration Of-
                                   fice (dC HSSCO) highlights of the 2006 year begin with the
fax: 202-727-8164
                                   hosting of a successful Center for Social emotional Founda-
lindseyt.allard@dc.gov             tions for early Learning training of trainers Series. The Proj-
http://dhs.dc.gov                  ect Coordinator was also involved with the launch of the dC
                                   Play Blocks fundraising for early care and education initiative;
                                   materials to highlight the Collaboration Office’s activities were
Lead Agency Contact
                                   developed, and an important partnership with the department
                                   of Housing Lead Initiative Office was put into action.
Barbara ferguson Kamara
Administrator
                                   Other major activities included the first Head Start Hot topic
early Care and education           series, with a special focus on access to disabilities services,
Administration                     which was attended by all Head Start programs in the district.
Phone: 202-727-1839                an early Childhood Mental Health task force was estab-
fax: 202-727-8164                  lished, and several committees were developed through which
                                   a work plan for the development of a system of care for young
Barbara.kamara@dc.gov
                                   children’s mental health was created. The dC HSSCO received
                                   a grant from the association of State and territorial dental
ACF Regional Contact               directors to complete follow-up activities to the Oral Health
                                   Forum in 2004.
Burma Paige-Stokes
Administration for Children and    The final months of the 2006 program year finished with a
families                           busy schedule and an exciting plan for the coming year. Our
Region III                         office completed a comprehensive strategic planning process.
150 South Independence Mall West
                                   The HSSCO also attended the early Childhood Networking
                                   Meeting: Implementing Comprehensive Systems for early
Suite 864                          Childhood in reston, Va. Leading up to and during that meet-
Philadelphia, PA 19106             ing, several objectives for the upcoming year were focused on,
Phone: 215-861-4042                including our continuing work in early childhood mental health
                                   and developing a system for interdisciplinary consultation.
Burma.paigestokes@acf.hhs.gov
62 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       January also gave way to several new developments due to recent political shifts, such as the installment of the
       district of Columbia’s new Mayor, adrian Fenty, and his release of a 100 day plan for the city. In response to
       that plan, the HSSCO worked alongside the early Care and education administration to craft action items
       and outcomes that are in alignment with mayoral priorities.

       The HSSCO is working across agencies to provide support and facilitate collaboration between Head Start
       and pre-kindergarten in the district of Columbia. Some district accomplishments achieved through this year
       are:

       ♦ Several Head Start programs are grantees of the Pre-Kindergarten Incentive program (which provides
         public school funding for pre-kindergarten in community-based settings).

       ♦ Head Start programs are facilitating dual enrollment with selected dC Public Charter Schools. The Head
         Start-State Collaboration Office partnered in the Preschool Services Collaboration Forum, hosted by the
         United Planning Organization (UPO). The purpose of the forum was to:

                       ♦ Clarify the various service options available to 3-to 4-year-olds and explore ways of offering
                         the services that match the needs of families.

                       ♦ to provide Charter School leadership and other early Childhood Providers with informa-
                         tion regarding programs and services available to Head Start eligible children and families in
                         the district of Columbia.

                       ♦ to inform Charter School leadership about the advantages of incorporating Head Start
                         services with your existing childhood development programs for 3-4 year olds.

       ♦ The dC Head Start programs offer slot purchase options/agreements located with high-quality, commu-
         nity/center-based providers.

       ♦ Currently, emerging collaborative structure is being crafted between the United Planning Organization
         and the district of Columbia Public Schools to reduce competition amongst programs that serve 3- to
         5-year-old children (Head Start and pre-kindergarten).


       Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
       your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.

       Health Care

       Focus

       Oral Health Program Continuation and Mental Health enhancement for Children and Staff


       Objective 1.1

       to increase the capacity of dC Head Start programs to prevent early childhood caries, as well as identify and
       treat all Head Start children with oral health problems prior to school entry.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   63




♦ The Head Start-State Collaboration Office received a grant from the association of State and territorial
  dental directors to hold a Forum on Systemic access to Oral Health Services. The focus and goals of the
  forum were to work out a partnership with Small Smiles for Head Start and pre-kindergarten children, to
  ease the process of children moving between managed care and Small Smiles, and to get a clear defini-
  tion of the oral health services for children under age five that are covered by managed care. Small Smiles
  dental Clinic recently opened its doors in Washington, d.C. This national chain operates pediatric dental
  clinics that serve children on Medicaid. This clinic is the first of its kind in dC and is providing many
  children from the community the opportunity to get the treatment that is so often not available in the
  district. Invitees from Head Start, public schools, child care, and Medicaid were in attendance.


Objective 1.2

to increase services and access to services that will improve early childhood mental health.

♦ The Center for Social emotional Foundations for early Learning (CSeFeL) facilitated a five-day train-
  ing series for certified trainers on working with programs around the issues of challenging behaviors in
  young children. Participants each chose a Head Start program to which they were to provide six hours of
  in-kind training. The coordinator made a presentation about the effort to the (CSeFeL) Board of direc-
  tors. The purpose of this initiative was to build the training capacity of the eCe field in the district on
  the area of social-emotional development.

♦ The HSSCO convened an early Childhood Mental Health task Force. The group worked together with
  stakeholders to envision a system of care and the planning for early childhood mental health. The HSSCO
  worked with the Georgetown National technical assistance Center on Children’s Mental Health to en-
  gage the group throughout the past year. approximately 30 stakeholders from over 20 organizations have
  been participating. after engaging in several activities around needs, priorities, and goals for future work,
  four work teams were developed. The work teams were organized into broad areas. The areas and leaders
  are: System design, Service and Support delivery, training and Workforce development, and Funding.
  a work plan was developed as a result of documents produced by the teams, and a strategic agenda will
  continue to be moved forward in 2007.

Other Health Related Activities
The dC HSSCO partnered on a Lead Prevention initiative, where information was shared widely. about
$4 million in grant money was made available to conduct home screenings for lead prevention.

School Readiness

Focus

Unified School readiness approach and dC HSSC Supplemental Grant on Head Start/Joint Community
action agency (Caa) activity.


Objective 2.1

to ensure Head Start collaboration and participation in planning and implementation of all district of
Columbia school readiness initiatives, particularly those related to alignment of standards, NaeYC accredita-
tion, and high-quality environments in all pre-kindergarten classrooms.
64 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       ♦ The project coordinator participated on the Steering Committee of the 4th annual Universal School
         readiness Conference. The dC HSSCO involvement with the school readiness citywide initiative has
         ensured that Head Start interests are represented at the planning table for all professional development
         and school readiness ventures. The coordinator also attended the Universal School readiness Stakeholders
         meetings each month, which provide a forum for discussion, with topics ranging from advocacy efforts by
         Pre-K Now to health readiness indicators development, at which the coordinator presented the Program
         Information report (PIr) data on health for the dC Head Start programs, in an effort to develop city-
         wide health readiness indicators for all district.

       ♦ Partnership activities included the coordinator representing Head Start and participating on the Mayor’s
         advisory Committee on early Childhood development’s task Force on Infant and toddler development.
         The project coordinator was also asked to serve as an honorary chair for the “dC Play Blocks Initiative,” a
         public advocacy initiative to raise money for early care and education throughout the district. addition-
         ally, the coordinator participated in a key informant interview as a member of the Supporting Partnerships
         to assure ready Kids (SParK dC) Leadership team.


       Objective 2.2

       to develop a new memorandum of understanding between the dC Head Start association and the Commu-
       nity action agency to serve as a template for service integration into a variety of early childhood programs,
       agencies, and city policies.

       ♦ as a result of a grant awarded to the district of Columbia Head Start association, the district of Colum-
         bia Head Start association (dCHSa) developed a Web site (www.dchsa.org) in order to effectively com-
         municate amongst programs with families and community members. The dCHSa also hired a consultant
         to provide services within a scope of work defined by the dCHSa and the HSSCO. The consultant
         worked with individual Head Start programs to renew their membership with the National Head Start
         association, which fits the vision of promoting school readiness at the national policy level. The admin-
         istrator for the dCHSa was also successful in arranging a meeting between the Head Start directors and
         the then-Office of Head Start director, Channell Wilkins. This meeting allowed us to explore the issue of
         service integration and delivery systems in a changing marketplace.

       Professional Development

       Focus

       Continuation of the annual Citywide training Conference and the early Childhood training Organization
       (eCtO).


       Objective 3.1

       to enable the district of Columbia early Head Start Partnership to assume more training design responsi-
       bilities for the annual Citywide training Conference.

                The 8th annual Citywide training Conference was a success, and the director provided pre-school
                trainings for the participants in requested areas. There was a specific Infant/toddler track of work-
                shops, to be attended only by practitioners who serve children birth through 3-years-old.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS       |   65




Welfare

Focus

dC Fatherhood Initiative Partnership.


Objective 4.1

to initiate a new partnership between dC HSSC and the district of Columbia Fatherhood Initiative
(dCFI) to promote safe, healthy relationships among children and their fathers.

♦ The Men In Action—MIa group met throughout the year to plan a comprehensive technical
  assistance systems approach for Head Start fatherhood initiatives and other citywide fatherhood initia-
  tives. The group brought together agencies and stakeholders working in the fatherhood arena, and played a
  role in various citywide events. The HSSCO also worked closely with our parent agency, the department
  of Human Services, who received a $10 million grant for fatherhood initiatives to explore the possibility
  for the HSSCO to align objectives and leverage additional funding.

Family Literacy

Focus

Increasing Collaboration with Family Literacy Programs


Objective 5.1

to build the capacity of family literacy coaches, mentors, and volunteer readers throughout the district of
Columbia.

♦ The coordinator attended several events hosted by the PNC Bank Grow Up Great team. Strategies for
  deploying volunteers were discussed, and a partnership between the Grow Up Great Initiative and early
  readers Now! has been pursued and initiated.

Community Services

Focus

Conducting analysis to Increase the efficiency of Community Programming, and Continuing to Publicize
Head Start and early Head Start Programs and Services in Community and Governmental Organizations.


Objective 6.1

to ensure the knowledge and best use of community resources connected with the local Community action
agency.

♦ The HSSCO project coordinator worked with the dC Head Start-State technical assistance Specialist
  to detail a new Head Start Hot topic Series for the 2007 program year to focus on publicity, marketing,
66 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




           strategy, and partnerships and to create a strategic marketing plan for the district’s Head Start programs
           in a changing marketplace. as Head Start continues to serve families in a changing and dynamic mar-
           ketplace, the Collaboration Office and the ta Network will continue to provide support and assistance
           on helping dC programs to communicate Head Start’s unique programs and services to families and the
           community at large.

       Homelessness

       Focus

       Facilitating Strong Collaboration Between Head Start, early Head Start and the Programs that Serve Home-
       less Families.


       Objective 7.1

       Increase the number of children and families living in shelters who are enrolled in a Head Start or early Head
       Start program with access to comprehensive services for those children and their families to ensure positive,
       developmentally appropriate experiences.

       ♦ The HSSCO coordinated the Head Start programs to participate in a Homeless Youth Services Fair in
         april 2006. HSSCO materials were disseminated, as well as information allowing the youth to access
         Head Start services for their young children.

       Disabilities Services

       Focus

       Increase the Level and Quality of Services for Children With disabilities


       Objective 8.1

       Increase the level and quality of services provided to children with disabilities, and build family awareness and
       comprehension of disabilities and related issues, in order to support parents as advocates for their children
       across the continuum of care.

       ♦ The Head Start Hot topic Series, sponsored by the Head Start-State Collaboration Office, in partnership
         with the technical assistance Network, was created and held in order to support the programs in bridg-
         ing training they are receiving in accessing services for children with disabilities with the larger policy
         and systems implications. The series brought together directors and management teams to talk about the
         systems and policy issues that relate to serving children with disabilities in accordance with the Head Start
         Program Performance Standards. Workgroups were formed across priority areas. The disabilities technical
         assistance Specialist facilitated one of our meetings, and each of the three groups presented the progress
         that they have made on their work plans. teams have been working on plans in three priority areas:
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS         |   67




1. “Head Start, First” Replacement

Priority Statement

as a Head Start community, we would like to reduce competition through reinstating the “Head Start First”
policy and be poised to meet our 10% opportunities for children with disabilities by stopping the removal of
students who are diagnosed with disabilities from Head Start.


2. “Embrace Advocacy to Empower Action”

Priority Statement

We will continue to advocate for and with parents to strategically influence the system of service to children
with disabilities, and empower themselves and their peers.


3. “One Voice, One Mission”

Priority Statement

We will create a data picture of what we are doing with regard to services to children with disabilities, and
analyze who is being referred for special education in K-12. Through the data, we will determine the “cost of
failure” and posit alternative policy solutions on this issue.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
♦ The project coordinator has played an integral partnership role on the early Childhood Comprehensive
  Systems Steering Committee. The project coordinator was asked to facilitate the early care and educa-
  tion workgroup, as well as chair the health and mental health care consultation workgroup. activities in
  2006 included the project coordinator’s attendance at a two-day national systems meeting with the eCCS
  coordinator and three other members chosen to represent dC on our state team. The team came away
  with several items that we plan to move forward on in the 2007 program year. additionally, the project
  coordinator attended the early Childhood Networking Meeting: Implementing Comprehensive Systems
  for early Childhood, in reston, Virginia.

♦ The early Childhood Mental Health task Force, led by the HSSCO, has been integrated into the Mayor’s
  advisory Committee on early Childhood development, within the Health Promotions Sub-Committee,
  and has generated reports and recommendations for the Mayor’s consideration.

♦ The project coordinator worked with the administrator of the early Care and education administration
  to put forth a goal of prioritizing the Head Start First policy in the next 100 days (as a response to Mayor
  Fenty’s 100 days and Beyond plan for dC), and ensuring that all Head Start slots are filled before placing
  children into other funding streams.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
The HSSCO has worked with all agencies and organizations in the district to ensure that culturally and
linguistically competent services are provided to all low-income children and their families. The HSSCO has
facilitated connections to training and development in the areas of language development and developmen-
tally appropriate services for children for whom english is a second language.
68 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
       coming year?
       The impact of the new mayor’s administration on the current systems work in early care and education is
       proving to be profound. Structures and systems that have been put into place over time are being altered,
       and the community is working to advocate for appropriate resources and programming in order to be able to
       continue to raise the quality of services across our city. additionally, the HSSCO will partner with region III
       on expanding and growing the I Am Moving, I Am Learning initiative, bringing in district wide stakeholders
       and partners. The work plan that the HSSCO is operating from will therefore need to be tweaked in response
       to the dynamic political climate in the district of Columbia.
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               |   69




                                          Florida


Collaboration Director                    Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                          areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
lilli J. Copp
university of north florida
                                          plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
florida Institute of education            Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
600 South Calhoun Street                  services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Suite 202                                 are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
tallahassee, fl 32399                     at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 850-921-3467                       in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 850-488-7099                         The HSSCO continued to be integrally involved in planning
lilli.copp@awi.state.fl.us                efforts surrounding the implementation of the Voluntary Pre-
www.floridaheadstart.org                  kindergarten (VPK) program in Florida. The Collaboration
                                          director sponsored bi-weekly conference calls with Head Start
                                          program directors to discuss implementation strategies and
Lead Agency Contact                       issues of VPK in Head Start.
Cheryl fountain, edD
                                          Monthly meetings between the HSSCO and Florida’s Office
Phone: 904-620-2496                       of early Learning staff were initiated to improve communica-
fax: 904-620-2454                         tion and enhance unified planning in early care and education.
fountain@unf.edu                          The HSSCO also attended the Child Care Bureau’s regional
                                          State administrator’s meeting with representatives of the
                                          Office of early Learning to formulate plans for addressing
ACF Regional Contact                      welfare reform and unified systems planning.
Betty Carroll
                                          These meetings resulted in opportunities for shared profes-
Region IV                                 sional development and identification of common data points
Administration of Children and families   between Head Start and the Office of early Learning. These
uS Department of Health and Human         efforts address the goals of improving child outcomes and
Services                                  quality of child care through highly qualified staff.
Atlanta federal Center
                                          The HSSCO monitors and participates in the school readiness
61 forsyth Street, SW
                                          governance and advisory structures, including the early Child-
Suite 4M60                                hood Standards Workgroup, the School readiness estimating
Atlanta, GA 30303-8909                    Conference, early Learning advisory Committee meetings
Phone: 404-562-2866                       and State Professional development Improvement Committee.
fax: 404-562-2982
                                          In preparation for the Head Start/Pre-kindergarten Partners
betty.carroll@acf.hhs.gov
                                          meeting in January, the HSSCO began meeting with Florida’s
                                          early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (eCCS) planning
                                          grant coordinator.
70 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
       your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.

       Health Care
       ♦ Served as a member of the workgroup that produced Florida’s State Oral Health Improvement Plan
         (SOHIP) to address the oral health needs of a broad spectrum of Florida’s population. also served on the
         early Childhood Caries sub-committee of the SOHIP and sponsored participation of a grantee represen-
         tative to serve on the committee as well.

       ♦ Participated as a team member in the Maternal and Child Health Bureau’s Maternal and Infant Oral
         Health Initiative.

       ♦ Collaborated with the Florida department of Health to convene a second state forum in conjunction
         with the One Goal Summer early Childhood Conference.

       ♦ Worked with Infant Mental Health advocates to facilitate access to Infant Mental Health services by
         children and families in Florida.

       ♦ Served on the task Force for implementation of the State of Florida’s Child abuse Prevention and
         treatment act, ensuring that all children reported for abuse or neglect are screened and assessed by
         the Idea, Part C.

       Welfare
       ♦ distributed information on the earned Income tax Credit, e-rate, and information learned at the Welfare
         Self-sufficiency Network meeting.

       ♦ Completed the development of a Memorandum of Understanding with Head Start, Community action
         agencies, and the Florida departments of Children and Families and Community affairs in collabora-
         tion with Florida’s Strengthening Families Initiative. a first of its kind agreement, it addresses strategies to
         strengthen relationships and marriages.

       ♦ Facilitated a meeting with representatives of Florida association of Community action, (FaCa), the
         Florida department of Community affairs, the Office of early Learning, and some local Head Start
         grantees to meet with a representative of redlands Christian Migrant association who delivered a presen-
         tation on a Family Service Worker Credential program.

       Child Care
       ♦ Continued participation in the implementation of the Voluntary Pre-kindergarten (VPK) program as dis-
         cussed above has facilitated increased numbers of children served through state VPK funds in Head Start
         classrooms. Participation of Head Start in the VPK process has resulted in additional children receiving
         high quality early childhood education services and many of them being served for a full day.

       ♦ Met with staff from the Office of early Learning Child Care resource and referral and disseminated
         information to Head Start grantees on the child care referral process.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   71




Education
♦ Participated in the bi-weekly conference calls with the department of education around the implementa-
  tion of VPK.

♦ disseminated information to the Head Start grantees on the Florida Kindergarten readiness Screening
  tool.

Community Services
♦ Completed the Supplemental Funding project focused on Head Start and Community action agency
  Unified Planning. The project was a framework for the development of a strong collaborative relationship
  with the Florida Community Services Block Grant administrator.

♦ Presented The Head Start Child Outcomes Framework results at the Florida association for Community
  action (FaCa).

Family Literacy Services
♦ The Head Start-State Collaboration Office director provided information on and facilitated collabora-
  tions between Head Start grantees and even Start Programs.

♦ disseminated information from the Governor’s Family Literacy Initiative and Volunteer Florida on the
  listserv.

Services to Children with Disabilities
♦ The Florida Head Start-State Collaboration Office director worked as part of a team that focused on
  inclusion of young children with disabilities with their non-disabled peers. The team, comprised of repre-
  sentatives from the department of Health, the department of education, the agency for Workforce In-
  novation, and Federally-funded technical assistance and training Services project among others, looked
  at three areas around the inclusion of children with disabilities: family involvement, professional prepara-
  tion, and program implementation. as part of this team, the HSSCO director was invited by the Florida
  department of education to present to seventeen school districts on inclusive opportunities in Head Start.

♦ The HSSCO director served on the Florida Inclusion alliance formed by the developmental disabilities
  Council to promote the inclusion of individuals with disabilities across the age spectrum in regular daily
  activities including education, child care, work, and housing.

♦ The HSSCO arranged for a Head Start representative to be appointed by the Governor to the Florida
  Interagency Coordinating Council for Infants and toddlers, the Idea, Part C Interagency Council.

♦ The Collaboration director served on the advisory Group for the technical assistance and training
  Services (tatS) grant to the University of Central Florida.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
♦ Conducted an initial meeting with the department of education Homeless education representative.

♦ Shares information obtained from a listserv on homeless services with the Head Start programs in Florida.
72 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes and decisions.
       Through the involvement of the Florida Head Start-State Collaboration Office, Head Start’s collective voice
       was heard in many policy and planning discussions.

       Head Start was represented by the HSSCO in a statewide Children’s Summit to discuss state planning in a
       variety of areas similar to the eight priorities of the HSSCO. The major outcome of the meeting called for the
       establishment of a statewide Children’s Cabinet out of the Governor’s Office.

        The HSSCO provided current data to the Florida Legislature’s School readiness estimating Conference.
       This legislatively mandated committee reviews current data on children being served in preschool programs
       and provides that information to the Florida legislature to inform appropriations and other legislative activity.
       In order to provide current and accurate information, the Florida HSSCO has initiated a data survey so that
       information can be gathered from Head Start programs from a point in time during the fiscal year.

       The HSSCO director was a key participant in a series of meetings of the Policy Group Matters Workgroup
       to assess Florida’s systems for children’s services in eight key areas.

        The Memorandum of Understanding in support of Florida’s Strengthening Families Initiative served to
       improve the collaborations between signatories and enhance relationships and marriages.

       The HSSCO continued to serve as an advisor to the Healthy Families Florida program, ensuring that Head
       Start is seen as a partner in primary child abuse prevention and family support efforts in Florida.


       Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
       Supplemental funding was provided, and Head Start-State Collaboration Office grant resources were used
       to support professional development. One of these efforts was the development of a searchable statewide
       database of post-secondary credit earning programs in the field of early childhood and child development.
       This data base allows Head Start (and other early education and care staff ) to find credit earning programs
       near them to facilitate their continued education.

       In collaboration with the region IV Head Start staff, the HSSCO facilitated a disaster Planning meeting.
       disaster planning staff from a variety of state agencies were invited to attend a meeting to listen to planning
       efforts for pandemic flu and received a planning notebook with region IV contact information. Future meet-
       ings will be held in the next program year.


       Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
       families in your State.
       Most activities undertaken by this office include coordination of services for Hispanic families as part of
       the regular work plan. The support for Miami-dade’s Hispanic Healthy Marriage-Strengthening Families
       partnership is one. another is the support and facilitation of the involvement of redlands Christian Migrant
       association in Florida’s VPK efforts in the many communities served by this program.
                                                                                       AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   73




How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
Many of the activities begun in 2006 will continue far into the future. The work of the early Childhood
Caries group in Oral Health, Healthy Families Florida, exploring Family Outcomes in conjunction with the
Florida Head Start association research Committee, working with the Florida department of education
to facilitate inclusive activities for children with disabilities, disaster preparedness planning, and collaboration
with community action will continue to be in the work plan for the coming year.

Many of these activities provided a foundation for future work. The plan to guide the work of the Head Start-
State Collaboration Office reflects these solid plans and includes additional objectives for collaboration with
the Office of early Learning, especially in the areas of data collection, analysis, and outcomes for children and
family self-sufficiency.
74 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                           AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               |   75




                                  Georgia


Collaboration Director
                                  The new Georgia Head Start-State Collaboration Director was
John lowery                       hired on July 1, 2006.
Bright from the Start: GA DeCAl
10 Park Place South
Suite 200                         Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
Atlanta, GA 30303                 areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Phone: 404-651-5335               plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
fax: 404-651-7184
John.lowery@DeCAl.state.ga.us
                                  Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
www.decal.state.ga.us
                                  services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
                                  are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
                                  at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Lead Agency Contact
                                  in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
Commissioner Marsha Moore
                                  ♦ Serve as a member of Georgia’s early Childhood Com-
Phone : 404-656-5957                prehensive Systems (eCCS) grant implementation phase
fax : 404-651-7184                  committee (Goal 1, 2, and 3), (3 meetings).
Marsha.Moore@DeCAl.state.ga.us
                                  ♦ Work on the eCCS subcommittee Workgroup that
                                    implements Parent education strategies (Goal 1 and 2),
ACF Regional Contact
                                    (3 meetings).
Bobby Griffin
                                  ♦ Participate with the Georgia Head Start association in its
Region IV ACf
                                    annual Strategic Planning to coordinate goals and objec-
60 forsyth Street                   tives that (include training) with other early education and
Suite 4M60                          care partners (Goal 2 and 3) (5 meetings held bi-monthly).
Atlanta, GA 30303
                                  ♦ Work with the statewide Georgia training and technical
Phone: 404-652-2874
                                    assistance Network (Goal 1, 2 and 3), (2 meetings).
fax: 404-562-2983
bobby.griffin@acf.hhs.gov
                                  Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start
                                  and other appropriate programs. Describe your accom-
                                  plishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
                                  Health Care
                                  Collaborate and coordinate with the department of Health
                                  through quarterly meetings to ensure Head Start children
76 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       receive the services they need to succeed in school (3 meetings).

       Welfare
       Meet with the department of Human resources, department of Family and Children’s Services regularly
       to collaborate on how best to serve low-income families (2 meetings).

       Child Care
       Host quarterly meetings with child care provider associations and groups to address concerns, issues, and
       challenges in local communities (2 meetings each with two different groups).

       Education
       Host meetings with local boards of education, public school systems, and open forums to discuss local
       community education issues (2 meetings).

       Community Services
       Host annual training conference for Head Start Family Services Workers and Pre-Kindergarten resource
       Coordinators to share training opportunities and expand the role and understanding between the groups
       (2 conferences). Bright from the Start manages the Georgia CCr & r agencies, which provide direct super-
       vision for the Navigator teams (eCCS grant system that expands access to community resources) (attended
       2 meetings).


       Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes and decisions.
       ♦ Member of many major advisory groups in Georgia working on policies related to early care and educa-
         tion, including executive Management team, Bright from the Start: Georgia department of early Care
         and Learning and the executive Management Committee (2 meetings), Georgia Head Start association
         (2 meetings).

       ♦ Host quarterly meetings with multiple early education and care providers: pre-kindergarten, private child
         care (profit and not-for-profit), public schools, Head Start, and combinations of the groups (3 meetings).


       Describe one new partnership or unique activity with an existing partnership developed during the
       year and the results of that activity.
       This activity was implemented after January 1, 2007. Facilitate and host our Blended Services Workgroup
       that offers Georgia the opportunity to establish “successful partnerships” intended to create opportunities for
       sharing resources on a local level while maximizing services under an agreement between Head Start, pre-kin-
       dergarten, private child care, school system providers, and the department of Family and Children Services
       (dFCS).
                                                                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS         |   77




Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
♦ The Head Start-State Collaboration Office hosts and facilitates regular meetings between the GHSa
  executive Committee, Bright from the Start: Ga department of early Care and Learning, and key early
  care and education leaders in the State that offers opportunities for Head Start and its partners to share
  priorities, resolve programmatic issues, and set strategic goals (6 meetings).

♦ The region IV aCF Office, with its Office of Head Start and Child Care Bureau offices, continues to
  provide strong leadership and support to benefit all Georgia programs.

♦ Joint presentations at early care and education conferences and meetings, including the Family Services
  Summits, the Georgia Head Start association Fall Conference, resource Coordinator Conference, and
  various training sessions at multiple sites throughout the State, which enables the Collaboration Office
  to expand understanding and improve communication among all the early education and care partners in
  Georgia (3 conferences and 2 meetings).

♦ Participation in State Child Care administrators Conference (1 conference), the region IV training
  and technical assistance Network sessions (2) at the region IV Head Start association Fiscal Manage-
  ment Conference, and the National Head Start/Pre-K Partnership Forum in Washington, dC provided
  Georgia’s early education and care leadership significant opportunities for expanding communication and
  collaboration.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
The current year offers many opportunities to strive for a full-scale, statewide effort to collaborate with all
early education and care providers. The Blended Services Workgroup is a useful group for creating partner-
ships. There is much to do in the next five-year plan and we will provide specific goals and objectives in it.
78 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               |   79




                                        Hawaii


Collaboration Director                  Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                        areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Jacqueline Rose
                                        plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Department of Human Services
Benefit, employment and Support         Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Services Division                       services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
820 Mililani Street                     are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Suite 606                               at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Honolulu, HI 96813-2936                 in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
Phone: 808-586-5232
                                        The 2006 State legislature passed act 259, which extended
fax: 808-586-5180                       the State early Learning task Force for two years, in order to
jrose@dhs.hawaii.gov                    develop a plan for a comprehensive system of early learning
http://hawaii.gov/dhs/self-sufficien-   services for children, age birth to five, beginning with four-
cy/childcare/headstart/                 year-olds. Through the efforts of the HSSCO, both the Head
                                        Start association and the HSSCO were designated members
                                        to the task Force. The early childhood leadership for the task
Lead Agency Contact
                                        Force is committed to the development of a supported system
                                        that reaches children and their families in a variety of settings:
Mr. Punkaj Bhanot
                                        Head Start, private and faith-based schools, family child care,
Acting Assistant Administrator          home visiting, family-child-interaction learning programs,
Phone: 808-586-7083                     family-friend and neighbor care, and junior-kindergarten. The
fax: 808-586-5229                       task Force work is organized into two sub-committees, the
                                        Program and Workforce development (PGWFd) Commit-
pbhanot@dhs.hawaii.gov
                                        tee and the Interdepartmental resources (Ir) committee. The
                                        Head Start association of Hawaii (HSaH) is assigned to the
ACF Regional Contact                    PGWFd and the HSSCO is assigned to the Ir committee.
                                        The work on these committees has been ongoing throughout
Jan len, Regional Program Manager       the year. Though demanding in terms of time and travel, par-
Region IX                               ticipation in the task Force work is a priority of significance
                                        to influence a comprehensive systems approach to deliver-
DHHS, Administration for Children
and families                            ing quality early learning experiences in Hawaii’s developing
                                        system, and to secure an advantaged position for Head Start
Office of Head Start                    in the future early learning state system design and funding
90 7th Street                           opportunities.
ninth floor
San francisco, CA 94103-6710            Through new relationships being developed by participation
                                        in the task Force work, new partnerships are emerging. One
Phone: 415-437-8447
                                        such partnership being forged is with family-child-interaction
fax: 415-436-8438                       learning (FCIL) programs and Head Start on the Waianae
jlen@acf.hhs.gov                        coast for professional development cross-professional learning.
                                        The anticipated outcomes for this partnership are increased
80 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       quality of transition for all children into kindergarten; increased developmentally appropriate and best early
       learning practices in the FCIL, Head Start, and the dOe kindergarten; and increased curriculum alignment
       between the programs.

       additionally, the HSSCO and the HSaH have a strong commitment to strategies that promote the social-
       emotional well-being of Head Start children and their peers from the community who will be attending
       kindergarten with them in their local elementary schools. The focus for this work continues to be the exten-
       sion of social-emotional skills-building for children and their parents through the Second Step curriculum.
       This year the HSSCO, HSaH, and state partners sponsored the Social-emotional School readiness keynote
       at the Hawaii association for the education of Young Children’s annual Conference in October 2006. In ad-
       dition, the HSSCO supported informational workshops that were sponsored by Head Start directors for their
       department of education elementary school principals and community partners on Oahu, Molokai, Kauai
       and Maui.

       The HSSCO continues to participate on the Systems Management team for the ongoing development of the
       early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (eCCS) state plan project selection, and implementation towards
       the goal of increasing partner’s Head Start knowledge and the participation of Head Start in state activities.
       The most successful outcome within the eCCS framework this year was the production of two new Medi-
       cal Home videos which featured Head Start children and an early Head Start child with their families and
       medical home partners.


       Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
       your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
       Health Care
       ♦ Convened the Head Start-State Oral Health team to continue implementation of oral health strategies
         and the evolvement of the State Oral Health Strategic Plan. This team is comprised of Health Specialists
         from each of Hawaii’s seven grantee agencies, community representatives, program Health advisory repre-
         sentatives, and the department of Health dental division partners.

       ♦ Supported local, state, regional, and national linkages with Medical Home Works which features Hawaii
         early Head Start and Head Start programs in video stories promoting medical home best practices.

       ♦ Continued Solutions to Ice: Building Resiliency in Hawaii’s Keiki and Families initiative through a presenta-
         tion on Kauai to 58 cross-professional social service providers. This presentation was in partnership with
         University of Hawaii School of Pediatric residency and the Kauai Good Beginnings alliance early learn-
         ing council. Participants had the opportunity to consider how to incorporate resilience supportive strate-
         gies in each of their agencies service delivery models. They also received the Crystal Methamphetamine
         PowerPoint Cd as a resource for their work.

       Welfare
       Supplied eligible client data through an agreement with the department of Human Services to Head Start/
       early Head Start programs for recruitment and enrollment purposes, so that children and families participat-
       ing in taNF and the State medical, food and financial assistance programs would have the opportunity to
       access Head Start/early Head Start services.
                                                                                     AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS         |   81




Child Care
Supported expansion of the State’s Pre-Plus facilities for preschool on department of education elemen-
tary school campuses. Pre-Plus program providers are contracted by the department of Human Services to
provide quality preschool experiences for four-year-old children, giving priority to low-income children and
children with disabilities. This year four new Pre-Plus facilities were built. Head Start is the contracted pro-
vider for 13 of the 16 programs on Oahu, Maui, and Hawaii islands.

Initialized discussions to reflect on strategies to enhance and address challenges in existing partnerships
between Head Start and community child care providers, to include the department of education.

Education
♦ The Hawaii State P-3 initiative is launched this year. The HSSCO is one of many state partners in this
  eight-year project funded by the Kellogg Foundation.

♦ Partnered with the Head Start association of Hawaii (HSaH) to implement a series of activities to im-
  prove the knowledge base and understanding of social-emotional foundations to early learning and literacy
  (as previously described).

Community Services
enhanced the partnership with the Office of Community Services through development of a collaborative
proposal to increase Head Start/early Head Start services to 338 more children in the State, expending an
additional $500,000 of state general funds appropriated to Head Start by the 2006 Legislature in act 259.

Family Literacy Services
Sponsored information distribution and implementation of Woven Word curriculum for Head Start programs
and partners. Woven word is an early literacy program that supports parents’ engagement in dialogic reading
techniques with their children.

Services to Children with Disabilities
Partnered with Hawaii’s Project, Sequenced transition to education in the Public School (StePS) which
focuses on transition policies and assists in addressing gaps that hinder transition for all children prenatal
to grade 3, including children with disabilities and Head Start/early Head Start children. The HSSCO and
HSaH presented transition practices in Head Start/early Head Start programs on panels at the annual
StePS conference.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
Increased enrollment of children who are experiencing homelessness in the early Head Start program on
Oahu as a result of developing the Waianae Free-to Grow team.
82 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
       ♦ The HSSCO ensures that the voice of Head Start is heard on state issues through building linkages for
         Head Start leaders in state working committees, agency boards, and activities. These include, but are not
         limited to the following: The Good Beginnings alliance; act 259 task Force work committees that sup-
         port grassroots involvement in the subcommittee planning efforts; County Councils for Good Beginnings
         alliance; County Oral Health task Forces; department of Health dental division and early Interven-
         tion Services, Part B 619 Preschool Services; the Sequenced transition to education in the Public School
         (StePS) teams; Hawaii for the education of Young Children (HaeYC); the department of Human
         Services Child Care advisory; Hawaii Careers with Young Children; and the higher education commu-
         nity of universities and community colleges.

       ♦ The HSSCO encourages and supports HSaH involvement in all of these efforts. This year, the HSaH
         took a leadership role in the annual Champions for Children legislative event, the early Learning task
         Force planning efforts, and the Good Beginnings alliance State Board and corresponding County Councils.


       Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
       The HSSCO published an expanded version of the Head Start Partnering to Shape Head Start for the 21st
       Century in Hawaii fact sheet, which is used to educate Hawaii’s Legislators, key policy makers, and collabora-
       tive partners on Head Start programs. The six page publication incorporates success stories written by Head
       Start staff, parents, teachers, former children, and fathers. The details in their short stories speak volumes on
       the positive impacts of Head Start on their lives. This year the number of Fact Sheets distributed to partners
       was increased by 1600.


       Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
       families in your State.
       In addition to the approximately 100 Hispanic families on Oahu in 2005, there is an emerging population of
       Hispanics on the island of Hawaii. to date, the HSSCO has not included specific support to the Head Start
       programs who serve Hispanic families in the work plan. The broad cultural diversity of children and families
       in Hawaii’s Head Start programs is considered in all efforts.


       How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
       coming year?
       These responses are congruent with the HSSCO five-year work plan. The focus for the coming year will be
       the work of the act 259 task Force in the development of an early learning system in Hawaii. This work
       is supported by the Governor, the State legislature, and the department of education Superintendent. The
       HSSCO is at the hub of these efforts and will continue to link Head Start association participation to pro-
       mote inclusion of comprehensive services in the State plan. There will be increasing involvement in the State’s
       P-3 initiative as it unfolds at the community level. The discussions and corresponding activities for enhanc-
       ing current Head Start partnerships will advance. and the focus to increase public and partner’s awareness of
       the value of the Head Start model for delivering high quality early learning and family support services will
       continue.
                                                                      AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               |   83




                             Idaho


Collaboration Director       Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                             areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Carolyn f. Kiefer
                             plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Idaho Department of Health
and Welfare
                             Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
PO Box 83720                 services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
450 West State Street        are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Boise, ID 83720              at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 208-334-4919          in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 208-332-7330
                             The Idaho Head Start Collaboration’s Five Year Grant is closely
kieferc@dhw.idaho.gov        focused on the Governor’s early Care and Learning Initiative,
                             (State early Childhood Comprehensive Systems—SeCCS
Lead Agency Contact          grant) to address the identified systems changes on key issues
                             impacting the lives of Idaho’s young children and families. a
Mary Jones                   major transition occurred in 2006 as the SeCCS grant moved
Phone: 208-334-5523          from the initial planning grant into the implementation phase.
                             an executive Order by Gov. dirk Kempthorne created an
fax: 208-332-7330
                             executive Office of Children and Families, which includes the
jonesm@dhw.idaho.gov         new early Childhood Coordinating Council (eC3). The eC3
                             was consolidated with the Federally mandated Infant toddler
ACF Regional Contact         Interagency Coordinating Council and expanded with mem-
                             bers of the wider early childhood community to represent the
Julianne Crevatin            interest of young children and their families, birth to eight. The
                             Council has created Vision and Mission statements, by-laws,
Agency ACf/HHS Region X
                             committees, a business plan, and Strategic Communication
2201 6th Avenue              Plan.
MS-70
Seattle, WA 98121            The Idaho Head Start Collaboration has remained a commit-
                             ted partner through the transition, planning, development,
Phone: 206-615-2615
                             and new governance structure of the eC3. The Collaboration
jcrevatin@acf.hhs.gov        director serves on the executive Committee and chairs the
                             Public Policy Committee. responsibility continues for the
                             focus areas of Social and emotional development/Mental
                             Health and numerous other strategies and activities identified
                             in the plan.

                             The Idaho Head Start Collaboration is in a difficult position
                             to promote the Head Start and state pre-kindergarten initia-
                             tive. Idaho law prohibits service to children under the age of
                             five in public schools. an exception has been made to serve
84 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       3-to 4-year-olds in the Federally mandated and funded Part B-619 early childhood special education program
       however, typically developing children are legally excluded. While efforts are being made by early childhood
       advocates to promote pre-kindergarten programs, there is a significant group of legislators who oppose both
       pre-kindergarten programs and mandatory child care licensing.

       a leadership transition occurred in 2006 when Gov. Kempthorne was confirmed as U.S. Secretary of the In-
       terior, and Lt. Gov. James e. risch commenced his seven-month administration with refocused priorities for
       children and families. Gov. Butch Otter, sworn in January 2007, has not defined his early childhood agenda.
       Gubernatorial changes impact committees and initiatives through policy priorities, executive orders, changes
       in key department administrators, and appointed chairs.

       despite the apparent challenges, the Idaho Head Start Collaboration has supported the promotion of Head
       Start, child care, and pre-kindergarten systems as follows:

       ♦ Background and foundational work on Early Learning Guidelines.

       ♦ early Years topics on shared concerns and quality issues.

       ♦ Providing supportive research and data.

       ♦ Providing technical expertise related to best practices and quality factors in early childhood programs.


       Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
       your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
       early Years 2006, a statewide early childhood conference, addressed all eight of our national priorities, as well
       as many identified activities in Idaho’s eC3 plan.

       early Years 2006 was held in Boise, November 28-29, 2006. This is the fourth early Years Conference, which
       is held every other year, and the second initiated and sponsored by the Head Start Collaboration with public
       and private agency partners. With budget cutbacks and limits on travel to out-of-state training opportuni-
       ties, early Years has become an important element in early childhood professional development in Idaho. The
       focus was on current research and best practices with goals covering the broad domains of early childhood and
       family services. The continuing conference goals are:

        ♦ to improve knowledge of current research, evaluative techniques and best practices that benefit
          infants and young children.

        ♦ to promote networking and strengthen early childhood partnerships, programs and initiatives
          at community, regional, and state levels.

        ♦ to promote the benefits of prevention and education and enhance the quality of early intervention
          services in Idaho.

        ♦ to strengthen and support families and the unique and diverse populations within Idaho
          communities.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS        |   85




early Years 2006 successfully attracted our maximum capacity, 400 participants, from Idaho and surrounding
states, to five tracks and 30 breakout sessions. topic track included:

♦ Building Family Strengths

♦ Health Safety and Well-Being, (encompassing physical, oral and mental health, nutrition, child abuse
  and neglect, and early intervention).

♦ early Care and Learning (child development, research and educational practice)

♦ Program/Professional development

♦ early Childhood Hearing Loss and Communications Issues

early childhood hearing and communication were an addition this year and reflect our commitment to early
intervention, inclusion, and services for children with special needs.

Keynote addresses were presented by Judith Viorst, children and adult author; dr. Maldonado-duran, child
psychiatrist from The Menninger Clinic; and Mr. Larry edelman, a prominent authority in early intervention.

Session topics as related to the eight Priories:

Health Care
♦ Blood lead poisoning

♦ Methamphetamine toxicity

♦ Oral health—children and maternal

♦ Infant self-regulation

♦ Neurobiological impact of stress

♦ early childhood feeding issues

Welfare
♦ Impact of violence on development, child abuse, trauma, and attachment

Child Care
♦ Challenging children, leadership, personnel preparation, quality improvement

Education
♦ emergent mathematics/blocks, language/early literacy

♦ Problem solving and math thinking, movement and meaning, cultural relevance in readiness
86 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       Community Services
       ♦ Leadership, building the future/systems, organizational sustainability

       Family Literacy Services
       Steps to Success—Literacy Mentoring, language and literacy development

       Services to Children with Disabilities
       ♦ early identification of hearing loss

       ♦ Partnering with parents

       ♦ Communication options

       ♦ Video in early intervention

       ♦ Meeting infant’s potential

       Services to Homeless Children and Families
       ♦ Impact of violence, trauma and attachment, lead poisoning, methamphetamines impact pre and post-natal

       In addition to early Years ’06, the Head Start Collaboration partnered with the Infant toddler (Part C)
       Program and the State department of education (Part B-691) to bring Positive Beginnings, a research-based
       curriculum for addressing difficult behavior in young children, to a train the trainers’ summer institute to build
       capacity for schools, agencies and Head Start programs around the State. The shared work built relationships
       as well as skills.

       The Collaboration director helped create a child development pre-service/in service training module for
       Idaho department of Health and Welfare’s child protection staff. In addition, a Collaboration-funded project
       with Boise State University (BSU) developed a distance learning class in Infant and toddler Mental Health
       for child care providers, Head Start/early Head Start staff, and early intervention and child protection staffs.
       It is now available through several venues, including the Idaho department of Health and Welfare, and can
       be taken for academic credit through BSU.

       additional welfare contributions included serving on the planning subcommittee for readiness and Cultural
       awareness for the National Child Care administrators/tribal Conference in Washington, d.C. in august.
       This session was replicated by the regional NCCIC representative with Idaho tribal and Migrant Seasonal
       Head Start panelist at the early Years Conference.


       Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
       Head Start Collaboration activities to support services to children with disabilities increased during 2006.
       The Office of Head Start funded the Collaboration’s participation at the National Inclusion Conference as a
       member of the Idaho State team which then developed the State plan.

       The Collaboration director, along with representatives of tribal and Migrant Seasonal Head Start, partici-
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   87




pated in the content and signature process for the Interagency agreement for Special education and early
Intervention Services in Idaho. This included getting the appropriate region X and Office of Head Start
signatures. difficulties between a few Idaho school districts and Head Start programs with their referral
process for children with special needs was addressed by a committee from the State department of educa-
tion, representatives from some Head Start programs, and the Collaboration. The work continues to develop a
model for local Interagency agreements and working relationships.

In addition, the Collaboration director served on an ad hoc committee to explore issues of differential diag-
nosis for autism and early childhood mental health with the developmental disabilities team.

The Head Start Collaboration and representatives from Head Start and early Head Start were a part of the
workgroup which developed the Office of Special education early Childhood Outcomes State Plan.

The Head Start Collaboration director continues to serve on the Infant and early Childhood Mental Health
State team for the development and activities of the State Plan. In addition, she served as the early childhood
representative on the statewide Mental Health transformation Work Group to address mental health plan-
ning across ages, agencies, and systems.

The early Childhood Coordinating Council’s plan includes issues of health, mental health, and oral health.
The Collaboration has responsibilities for activities in all of these areas and continues to meet the timelines
for accomplishments with partners. The Collaboration contributed to health action items by providing na-
tional oral health materials (Bright Futures) to primary care physicians through a partnership with the State
Oral Health Project and the Oral Health alliance. Secure Beginnings, Idaho’s early childhood mental health
booklet was included in packets delivered to primary care physicians statewide as part of our early Childhood
Coordinating Council’s Health Work plan.

The Head Start Collaboration is a member of the Consortium for the Preparation of early Childhood Profes-
sionals, composed of representatives from higher education, state agencies, and non-profit agencies to address
professional development articulation and certification. The Consortium developed, and continues to refine,
the early Childhood Blended Certificate, which combines early childhood education and early special educa-
tion at the B.a. and M.a. degree level. Cda and aa degrees, distance learning, and how credits are accrued
and transferred between institutions are important issues for the Consortium and Head Start programs as
they work to increase the qualifications of teachers in rural and urban programs.

Preliminary work continued with key partners in the State department of education Idaho department of
Health and Welfare and the Consortium to prepare for the development of Idaho’s Early Learning Guidelines,
one of 2007’s priorities.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
The Idaho Collaboration’s early childhood mental health materials, Secure Beginnings (published late 2005),
have been widely distributed in Idaho through many partnerships including: Head Start/early Head Start
programs, Child Protection, the Infant toddler Program (Part C), regional Mental Health Councils, and
the Idaho department of Health and Welfare. The initial printing, intended for 1-to 2-year distribution, was
depleted within the first three months due to high demand. a second larger printing was accomplished with
funding from the early Childhood Coordinating Council, and distribution continues. In addition, the materi-
als were listed on the reg. X NCCIC listserv and Natural Allies, a national list serve from University of North
Carolina, with a surprising response from around the nation. to meet the volume of requests, we made an
electronic template of the booklet and bookmark with the Idaho referral information removed so the materi-
als could be used in other areas and by a variety of agencies and programs. We have had over 125 out-of-state
requests for the template.
88 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
       families in your State.
       The director of Migrant and Seasonal Head Start serves on the Collaboration advisory Council. In addition,
       we “bring them to the table” on key issues such as the Interagency agreement for serving children with dis-
       abilities, the development of the Early Learning Guidelines, and in reviewing materials we publish. We invite
       similar participation with our tribal partners.


       How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
       coming year?
       The Idaho Collaboration’s primary work for the coming year will be in the areas of early childhood mental
       health and the development of the Early Learning Guidelines. Both of these priorities are consistent with the
       larger systems plan for the early Childhood Coordinating Council and are included in our Five Year Plan.

       early childhood mental health will address action items and systems work contained in the State Infant early
       Childhood System of Care State Plan which is linked with eC3 Mental Health/Social and emotional Focus
       area. The 2007 priorities include professional development to build capacity for early intervention and treat-
       ment and continued work in prevention and the promotion of healthy development.

       The Early Learning Guidelines project is being lead by an Interagency team from the State department of
       education, the Infant toddler Program, the eC3, and the Head Start Collaboration. Much of the staff work
       will be the responsibility of the collaboration.

       Work will continue in the focus areas of oral health, disabilities and inclusion, and professional development.
       The Idaho Collaboration strives to maintain a degree of flexibility to be able to respond to Office of Head
       Start initiatives and needs within the State of Idaho which impact Head Start programs and early childhood
       efforts.
                                                                           AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               |   89




                                  Illinois


Collaboration Director            Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                  areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Gina Ruther
                                  plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Il Department of Human Services
(DHS)
                                  Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
10 Collinsville Avenue            services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Suite 203                         are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
east St. louis, Il 62201          at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 618-583-2083               in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 618-583-2091
gina.ruther@illinois.gov          IL HSSCO Goal #1:

                                  to facilitate improvement and well-planned expansion of a
Lead Agency Contact               quality system for IL early care and education services to low-
                                  income families with young children.
linda Saterfield
DHS Child Care Bureau Chief       ♦ established the IL early Childhood Collaboration Web
Phone: 217-785-2559                 site www.ilearlychildhoodcollab.org to serve as a resource
fax: 217-524-6030                   to local communities and state policy and lawmakers on
                                    collaboration and IL specific collaborative arrangements.
linda.saterfield@illinois.gov
                                    More than 30 local collaboration programs and 10 com-
                                    munity coalition profiles are posted on the site, which is
ACF Regional Contact                maintained by the IL HSSCO.

Susan Markko                      ♦ assisted the IL early Learning Council (eLC) in planning
Region V ACf                        the October 2006 Governor’s early Childhood Summit
233 north Michigan Avenue           and participated in the Summit.
Suite 400
                                  ♦ Worked with the eLC, region 5 aCF, and the IL Head
Chicago, Il 60601                   Start association (IHSa) on development of a paper about
Phone: 312-353-9695                 expanding community capacity for IL Preschool for all to
fax: 312-353-2629                   ensure data about underserved counties was accurate.
sue.markko@acf.hhs.gov
                                  ♦ Participated on the early Childhood Credentials ad Hoc
                                    group and finalized a recommendation for the administra-
                                    tion of IL early childhood credentials.

                                  ♦ Supported the IHSa on administrative rule proposals for
                                    Preschool for all to ensure collaboration with Head Start/
                                    early Head Start.
90 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       ♦ Provided county collaboration and Migrant and Seasonal Head Start data to the University of IL for the
         IL early Childhood asset Map project (IeCaM; http://iecam.crc.uiuc.edu and advised on the develop-
         ment phase of this project.

       ♦ Facilitated five planning meetings and three panel presentations of the Good Start, Grow Smart state-
         Federal team in working toward smooth expansion of the State pre-kindergarten program via Preschool
         for all.

       ♦ Coordinated with the SeCCS team on Head Start involvement in the State’s all Our Kids (aOK) net-
         works.


       IL HSSCO Goal #2:

       to enhance and expand IL early/Head Start/early care and education partnerships and promote model
       strategies.

       ♦ approved seven new collaboration providers in the dHS Child Care Collaboration Program. Currently,
         more than 13,200 children served in more than 150 agencies are benefiting from this policy program
         created to bridge the policy gaps between child care and Head Start/pre-kindergarten.

       ♦ Participated on an interagency team lead by the IL State Board of education to revise and redevelop the
         Collaborative Support teams initiative, piloted three years ago.

       Provided on-site information and technical assistance to three local teams on improving or initiating collabo-
       ration programs. Provided information and support to about IL early childhood collaboration to three Head
       Start grantees during their PrISM reviews. Provided technical assistance and resources to more than 90 local
       early care and education providers and state partners on a variety of collaboration subjects, including devel-
       oping the infrastructure of community coalitions, collaborative process, specific collaborations (Head Start/
       pre-kindergarten, early/Head Start/child care, early Head Start/ISBe birth-three programs, etc.), disabili-
       ties, and working with the Lea, WIC, taNF, local child welfare agreements, and mental health partnerships.
       distributed an updated memo about non-Federal share and child care funding to all grantees.


       Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
       your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
       IL HSSCO Goal #3:

       to support, improve, and ensure early Head Start’s role in IL health and social service delivery system service
       delivery and planning at state and local levels.

       ♦ Facilitated the launch of the early Childhood Hearing Outreach (eCHO) Project in IL with Northern
         IL University. This project provides training and equipment to do oto-acoustic emissions hearing screen-
         ing of early Head Start children. Secured the participation of five IL grantees, including the City of
         Chicago and the Migrant Seasonal Head Start programs. Worked with the State interagency team to plan
         for expansion of this project.

       ♦ Supported the IL dept. of Public Health Oral Health division’s “Head Start Smiles” data collection proj-
         ect by working with grantees and planning with state partners.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS        |   91




♦ Began development of a statewide Health Services advisory Committee by meeting with Head Start/
  early Head Start staff and parent leaders to develop a plan to bring all health related projects under the
  work of one committee.

♦ Participated on the statewide Interagency Nutrition Council to implement Nutrition Month awareness
  activities at the State Capitol and to share information and resources.

♦ Provided training on the Head Start medical homes project and the recommendations from the final
  report. This project was funded by a planning grant from the IL Chapter of the american academy of
  Pediatrics and the IL HSSCO.

♦ Supported child welfare Head Start local and state collaborations by assisting with development of case-
  worker guidance in selecting quality early childhood settings and “101” training for child welfare on Head
  Start and vice versa, participating in the statewide Community-Based Child abuse Prevention advisory
  Committee, and supporting the development of local written agreements.

♦ Participated on the leadership team and in the evaluation of the Strengthening Families IL project and
  worked with the project’s coordinators to plan a Parent Leadership Summit.

♦ Met with dHS Child Care and aCF region 5 Child Care/Head Start/taNF administrators to discuss
  the Head Start eligibility/taNF related services issues.

♦ Supported Head Start participation in dHS team IL activities, including community Back to School and
  resource Fairs.

♦ Supported Head Start participation in the dHS Individual development account (Ida) program by
  working with the statewide coordinator to distribute information and provide training.


IL HSSCO Goal #4:

to support, improve, and ensure Head Start and early Head Start’s role in literacy and education service
delivery and planning at state and local levels.

♦ Participated in the IL Community College Board adult ed/Family Literacy advisory Council, assisting
  in the development of statewide professional development requirements and plan a new directors’ orienta-
  tion.

♦ Participated on the statewide team to plan the annual IL Family Literacy conference.

♦ Provided training to McKinney-Vento Coordinators on Head Start and child care. Worked to resolve
  enrollment and communication issues in some local areas.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
In addition to eLC work, the IL HSSCO and IHSa worked with the dHS early Intervention Bureau and
the IHSa in recruiting and selecting another Head Start appointee to the Interagency Coordinating Coun-
cil of IL, scheduled to chair that group once the appointment is confirmed; the dHS Child Care Bureau on
Head Start inclusion and placement in the Quality rating/tiered reimbursement System, which will be
implemented in 2007; and an interagency team on quality assurance design systems.
92 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
       families in your State.
       about 27 percent of the early, Migrant and Head Start children served by Illinois grantees are ethnically of
       a Latino origin. The IL HSSCO continues its inclusive approach to all projects, supporting the collabora-
       tion with IL early/Migrant/Head Start services to children and families of all racial and ethnic groups. The
       HSSCO worked closely with the IL Latino Coalition for Prevention to ensure informational and issues links
       between the Coalition and early/Migrant/Head Start, including participating in an interagency meeting with
       the director of the Governor’s Office New americans project and sharing information with all grantees about
       citizenship workshops, IL Latino speakers bureau, and Hispanic Health Fairs. Information about meetings of
       the IL association of agencies and Community Organizations for Migrant advocacy were also shared with
       all grantees.


       How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
       coming year?
       The biggest change in the IL HSSCO’s work plan for 2007 is the implementation of four regional collabora-
       tion forums, funded by supplemental funding. These forums will provide follow up for the statewide forum
       and dovetail with year 2 of state pre-kindergarten/Preschool for all expansion.
                                                                              AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               |   93




                                     Indiana


Collaboration Director
                                     The current Collaboration Director took office on March 27, 2006.
Susan lightle                        There was no Director or activity the first three months of 2006.
Division of family Resources
family and Social Services
Administration
                                     Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
402 West Washington Street
                                     areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Room W386, Mail Stop 02
                                     plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Indianapolis, In 46204
Phone: 317-233-6837                  Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
fax: 317-233-6093                    services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
susan.lightle@fssa.in.gov            are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
                                     at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Lead Agency Contact                  in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.

Zach Main, Director,                 The Office worked closely with the Indiana Head Start associ-
                                     ation; Indiana Bureau of Child Care – CCdF and the Legisla-
Division of family Resources         tive Liaison from BCC; department of education: division of
family and Social Services           exceptional Learners, Homeless Children and Youth, division
Administration                       of Prime time and reading First, division of title 1; Indiana
402 West Washington Street           department of Health, Pediatric dentistry; I.U. School of
Indianapolis, In 46204               education early Intervention Projects; Indiana department of
                                     Child Services: Fatherhood Initiative, Child Support Bureau;
Phone: 317-233-4450
                                     Indiana association for the education of Young Children; and
zach.main@fssa.in.gov                Healthy Families to build a consistent approach to early child-
                                     hood and to ensure ongoing communications.
ACF Regional Contact
                                     The director has worked with and encouraged alignment
Katie Williams, team Administrator   and information exchanges among: Indiana Bureau of Child
ACf, HHS, Region V, Head Start       Care; Indiana department of Child Services; Indiana State
                                     department of education; IdOe early Child Care Systems;
233 north Michigan Avenue
                                     Indiana department of Health; department of Housing and
Chicago, Il 60601                    Community Services; Indiana University School of dentistry;
Phone: 312-886-7272                  Indiana Coalition on Housing and Homeless Issues; Indiana
                                     Community action association; and First Steps; Commission
fax: 312-886-5373
                                     on Hispanic/Latino affairs and; Children’s environmental
kwilliams@acf.hhs.gov                Health.

                                     The Collaboration Office Multi-agency advisory met once
                                     during the year with another meeting held after the year-end
                                     involving representatives of the various state governmental
94 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       agencies that impact Head Start families. The Indiana Head Start association and a local Head Start program
       have representation.

       ♦ Indiana Head Start association prepared an annual report.

       ♦ The Collaboration Office mailed monthly mailings and newsletters as scheduled.

       ♦ Published a quarterly newsletter.

       ♦ Compiled and distributed a monthly information packet.

       ♦ Shared relevant information to the Head Start community on a daily basis.

       ♦ Provided funding for IHSa via contracted services.


       Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
       your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
       Health Care

       Goal

       expand and increase availability to assist families to secure health care services for low-income children and
       families.


       Objective

       Increase program ability to assist families to secure health care services for pregnant women and children
       birth to 5.


       Outcome

       Head Start staff will have opportunities to increase their knowledge, skills and abilities of health issues in
       order to aid, identify, and/or reduce health problems of enrolled children and/or families.

       ♦ Ongoing communication with Karen Yoder, region V Oral Health Contractor, regarding the oral health
         needs of Head Start children.

       ♦ Participated in Oral Health conference calls.

       ♦ Collaborated with Children’s dental Clinics, who serve Hoosier Healthwise children, to distribute infor-
         mation on their facilities in Marion, allen, and Lake counties.

       ♦ disseminated information on childhood obesity through our quarterly Headlines newsletter and monthly
         information packets.

       ♦ Continued to serve as a member of the Indiana Joint asthma Children and Youth Committee and the
         Lead elimination Children and Youth advisory.
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS         |   95




♦ Served on the transition team Social/emotional Committee for Infant & Children mental health.

♦ Served pregnant women through dOe Maternal Health and Happiest Baby pilot program and work-
  shops at the IHSa Conference.

♦ Surveyed local programs on First Steps.

Welfare

Goal

establish sustainable early education linkages with the State’s public assistance services and welfare reform.


Objective

The Collaboration Office continues to promote and build linkages between Head Start/early Head Start
programs and state public assistance agencies.


Outcome

Members of the new administration increase their knowledge of early education and understanding of the
viability of partnerships with the programs.

♦ Published four quarterly newsletters, eight information packet mailings, and daily e-mails to local
  programs provided information on agencies and activities impacting families, including interviews
  with agency heads regarding collaborative efforts, fatherhood issues, and caring for grandchildren.

♦ Contracted with Indiana Head Start association to provide newsletters, Web site maintenance, and
  communication.

♦ Led workshops for Institute for Strengthening Families and the Indiana Head Start association
  Conference.

♦ recruited state agency personnel to provide workshops at the Indiana Head Start association
  Conference.

Child Care
♦ Collaborated with the Indiana Bureau of Child Care and other agencies to develop a statewide Quality
  rating System (QrS) for licensed child care programs. Currently two pilot programs running. Full roll-
  out will begin January of 2008 and take one year.

♦ Funded keynote speaker for the fall 2006 Institute for Strengthening Families.

♦ Served on the transition team for school readiness. This collaborative committee is comprised of repre-
  sentatives from the following agencies:

       ♦ Indiana department of education, division of exceptional Learners
96 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




              ♦ Indiana department of education, education of Homeless Children & Youth
              ♦ Indiana department of education, Prime time/reading First
              ♦ Indiana department of Health, Maternal & Children’s Health Care Services
              ♦ Indiana Family & Social Services administration, First Steps
              ♦ Indiana Head Start association
              ♦ Indiana Head Start-State Collaboration Office
              ♦ Indiana association of Child Care resource & referral (IaCCrr)
              ♦ Indiana University School of education, early Intervention Projects



       Education

       Goal

       Through focus on quality, quantity, and professionalism, improve and increase early childhood education
       services for young children.


       Objective

       Promote and support state and local efforts to set in place professional standards for persons in the early child
       education professions.


       Outcome

       Head Start staff have increased opportunities to improve their knowledge, skills, and abilities.

       ♦ Met monthly with the department of education: early Childhood Comprehensive System (eCCS),
         Sunny Start and Good Start, Grow Smart to promote alignment and collaboration.

       ♦ The Office partnered with the department of Child Services on a local level for increased knowledge and
         collaboration on temporary assistance for Needy Families (taNF) and statewide on fatherhood and
         foster fathers.

       ♦ Funded keynote speaker for the Institute for Strengthening Families.

       ♦ Worked with transition team on the early Learning Foundations.

       ♦ Met four times with IaeYC director to discuss partnering on new initiatives.

       ♦ disseminated daily information on projects, events, and opportunities to local programs.

       ♦ Published education resources in monthly information packets and quarterly newsletters sent to local
         programs.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS       |   97




♦ Contacted state staff to provide training at IHSa Conferences.

♦ Provided legal roundtable at IHSa and Institute for Strengthening Families. Panel included two sitting
  judges, one civil, the other criminal, and the Chief deputy to the Indiana attorney General.

♦ researched and published booklet containing statewide legal aide information including contact informa-
  tion, intake days and hours, financial guidelines, type of cases taken, etc.

♦ Updated and released The History of the Indiana Head Start-State Collaboration Office.

Community Services

Goal

Head Start programs continue to increase their involvement with community service activities.


Objective

Support and promote Head Start programs utilization and involvement with local, state, and Federal commu-
nity service resources and activities.


Outcome

Information regarding community service resources is consistently distributed to local programs.

♦ The Collaboration Office reactivated the Homeless Committee through contact made with the Indiana
  Coalition on Housing and Homeless Issues (ICHHI), the Indiana department of education for Home-
  less Children and Youth, and the Indiana department of Housing and Community Services.

♦ With funding from an MOU between the Collaboration Office and the Homeless Committee, roll-out
  of Leap Frog Leap Pad educational tools was made at Holy Family Shelter, Indianapolis. to date, 169
  Leap Pads have been distributed to homeless shelters across the State. Funding is now being provided by
  outside sources and the collaboration effort is continuing.

♦ Multi-agency advisory Committee has been expanded to include the agencies of the Homeless Com-
  mittee.

♦ Through an MOU with the department of Child Services and temporary assistance for Needy Families
  (taNF), the Office collaborated on a program that reaches out to thousands of fathers and foster fathers
  statewide.

♦ Monthly information packets and Headlines newsletters include financial assistance information from
  various sources including child care subsidies, energy assistance programs, and national relief organiza-
  tions.

♦ Parenting resources and education articles are included in the monthly information packets for dissem-
  ination to parents.
98 |    Head Start State Collaboration Offices




       Family Literacy Services

       Goal

       Build a systemic approach for statewide awareness of and access to family literacy.


       Objective

       to encourage full implementation of family literacy including child development, adult education, parent
       education, and interactive opportunities for parents and children together.


       Outcome

       early childhood education programs receive information and professional development opportunities regard-
       ing family literacy.

       ♦ In collaboration with the transition team, provided funding for family literacy bags that are being distrib-
         uted to libraries, Head Start programs, and homeless shelters across the State.

       ♦ Materials contained in the bags are in both english and Spanish. Bags have become so popular that school
         systems are now asking to purchase them. The program is ongoing and many more will be distributed,
         eventually to every library, Head Start, and shelter in the State.

       Services to Children with Disabilities

       Goal

       Continue and sustain efforts to ensure that children with disabilities will have opportunities to develop to
       their potential.


       Objective

       Promote inclusive programming for children with disabilities.


       Outcome

       early education child and family needs are represented at the state level.

       ♦ director served on transition team (see Child Care for list of participating programs and agencies) which
         has as a focus, the smooth transitioning of children with disabilities. The goal being to meet the needs of
         both the children and their parents.

       ♦ Working with director of First Steps to expand the knowledge of transitioning these children at their
         statewide cluster meetings.

       ♦ Surveyed programs on how they work with First Steps.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS        |   99




♦ Served on the early Childhood Comprehensive System committee on infant and toddler social/emotional
  mental health.

Services to Homeless Children and Families

Goal

Strengthen and improve conditions for homeless families through coalition building.


Objective

ensure homeless children receive needed services as a result of coalitions.


Outcome

Head Start programs will increase the number of homeless children served.

♦ With funding from an MOU between the Collaboration Office and the Homeless Committee, roll-out
  of Leap Frog Leap Pad educational tools was made at Holy Family Shelter, Indianapolis. to date, 169
  Leap Pads have been distributed to homeless shelters across the state. Funding is now being provided by
  outside sources and the collaboration effort is continuing.

♦ Head Start programs and local shelters were encouraged to work together to ensure homeless children
  are made a high priority during recruitment and enrollment.

♦ Multi-agency advisory Committee has been expanded to include the agencies of the Homeless
  Committee.

♦ Began planning participation in the summer homeless conference in 2007.

♦ Began working on a Homeless Committee one-day seminar set for October 2007.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
♦ Collaboration director is keeping Governor’s office and other state officials informed on Federal efforts
  toward reauthorization.

♦ Working with the administrator of the Bureau of Child Care and their Legislative Liaison to keep the
  issues of our children before the legislators.

♦ Began plans for 2007 summit to bring together our partners, state legislators and key policy makers to-
  gether to educate them on early childhood development.

♦ Provided the Bureau of Child Care with Head Start Program Performance Standards, as we collaborate on
  a Quality rating System crosswalk.
100 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
    In collaboration with one of our local programs and Lilly & Company, we were chosen to be a pilot site for
    the Happiest Baby program. at this event, a certified Happiest Baby instructor met with pregnant and new
    moms and dads who are in the early Head Start Program. She instructed them in ways to calm and care for
    their newborn. The goal is to prevent child abuse because of lack of knowledge. The program was funded by
    Lilly, and we hope to offer more of these sessions to additional early Head Start programs.

    The Collaboration director attended the tribal early Care and education Programs and Services conference
    in Michigan. Five representatives from each tribe and local, state, and Federal leaders were invited. The Pota-
    watomi tribe has children in both the Head Start and early Head Start programs. during the conference the
    director met with tom topash, their education director. The Potawatomi have land that crosses the Indiana/
    Michigan border. Numerous telephone calls took place in the month following. The director, in response to a
    request made by Mr. topash at the behest of his tribal Chairman, was able to facilitate a meeting between the
    Potawatomi delegation and the Governor’s office.


    Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
    families in your State.
    Monthly information packets and the quarterly Headlines newsletter contain parent resources and children’s
    pages that can be disseminated to the programs’ participants. These resources include information on immu-
    nizations, safety tips, nutritional information and fun pages, choosing safe toys, and performing the Heimlich
    procedure on children and infants. They produced in both english and Spanish, when translation and/or
    content is available.


    How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
    coming year?
    Programs, events and activities that have worked or are working well will be continued and expanded, in addi-
    tion to those goals, objectives and outcomes planned for funding year 2 in our grant.


    Existing groups and committees that the Coordinator will be serving on during the year:
          ♦ Bureau of Child Care: Quality rating System Committee (QrS)
          ♦ Cross System team
          ♦ department of education: early Childhood Comprehensive System (eCCS)
          ♦ department of education: Sunny Start/early Child Comprehensive System; and sub-committee:
            Infant and toddler Mental Health
          ♦ department of education: Good Start, Grow Smart
          ♦ department of Health: In-Shape Indiana for Kids
          ♦ department of Health: Women, Infants and Children
          ♦ department of Health: Hoosier Healthwise and Medicaid.
          ♦ early and Period Screening, diagnosis and treatment for Lead (eSPdt/Lead)
          ♦ Healthy Families Think tank
                                                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS   |   101




♦ Homeless Committee
♦ Governor’s Interagency Coordinating Council on Infants and toddlers (ICC)
♦ Indiana association for the education of Young Children Committee (IaeYC)
♦ Indiana Community action association (INCaa)
♦ Indiana Joint asthma Coalition (INJaC)
♦ Indiana Head Start association (IHSa)
♦ Indiana Head Start association Board of directors
102 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                               AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   103




                                        Iowa


Collaboration Director                  Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                        areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
tom Rendon
                                        plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Iowa Department of education
400 east 14th Street                    Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Des Moines, IA 50319                    services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Phone: 515-242-6024                     are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
fax: 515-242-6019                       at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
tom.rendon@iowa.gov
                                        in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
www.iowa.gov/educate/content/           Iowa’s main goal in this area was to support early Childhood
view/634/598/                           Iowa (eCI), an early childhood system development effort
                                        supported by the State’s early Childhood Comprehensive
Lead Agency Contact                     Systems Grant. The five goal areas of eCI embrace compre-
                                        hensive services including health, education, family support,
lana Michelson                          and child care. during 2006, the HSSCO Coordinator served
Phone: 515-281-5735                     as co-chair of the Governance, Planning, and administration
                                        component group, as well as serving on the resources and
fax: 515-242-6019
                                        Funding and Professional development component groups
lana.michelson@iowa.gov                 and eCI’s leadership team, the eCI Co-Chairs. The Gover-
                                        nance group completed the eCI Structure and Operational
ACF Regional Contact                    Guidelines document, created a uniform on-line membership
                                        process and developed alignment between the eCCS plan and
Pat Brown                               the wider eCI strategic plan.
Administration for Children and fami-
lies/DHHS                               Iowa’s HSSCO worked with the resources and Funding
                                        group to conduct an audit of the State’s budget with respect to
federal Office Building
                                        spending on children under the guidance of Kay Johnson from
Room 276                                Project tHrIVe. This analysis will help identify coordination
2601 east 12th Street                   needs among state budgeting areas.
Kansas City, MO 64106
Phone: 816-426-2235
                                        In 2006, eCI also assumed control over a long-standing col-
                                        laboration of activity of the Iowa HSSCO and the Iowa early
fax: 816-426-2888                       Care, Health, and education Congress. This annual event, now
pbrown@acf.hhs.gov                      in its 14th year, promotes broad statewide coordination among
                                        human services and health and education sectors at a state and
                                        local level. In 2006, 400 individuals participated, including 40
                                        from Head Start representing 11 (of 18) grantees.

                                        The most significant accomplishment of 2006 was the expanded
                                        access to comprehensive services that came through securing
104 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    support from across early childhood for Gov. tom Vilsack’s comprehensive legislative package dubbed “Iowa
    Strong Start.” The package included many proposals that mirrored strategies in the eCI strategic plan, many
    which will provide direct benefit for Head Start children:

    ♦ New Preschool Initiative: to increase access by Iowa 4-year-olds to a quality preschool experience.

    ♦ Statewide Family Support and Parent education Coordination: to improve the coordination and quality
      of a family and parent support services.

    ♦ Iowa access to Baby and Child dentistry: to increase capacity of communities to provide oral health
      services and improve the oral health status of low income children.

    ♦ Healthy Mental development: to address the social and emotional well-being of birth to 3 children.

    ♦ Quality rating System: to expand the system’s critical infrastructure, technical assistance, and provider
      participation.

    ♦ Iowa Community empowerment: to continue financial support for Community empowerment to con-
      tinue technical assistance to communities and to the system development work of early Childhood Iowa.

    ♦ Shared Visions: to continue funding for Iowa’s state-funded at-risk preschool.

    all of these efforts were funded in some manner during the 2006 legislative session.

    The objective in this area from the Iowa HSSCO work plan was the development of a comprehensive, com-
    pelling and unifying vision for all Iowa’s young children and their families. In a recent survey of 147 Head
    Start and collaboration partners in Iowa, 89 percent thought the office was somewhat or very effective in
    realizing this objective. 1


    Head Start/child care/pre-kindergarten collaborations and Head Start/pre-kindergarten collaborations
    at the state and local levels.
    The Governor’s Smart Start initiative resulted in new funding for preschool scholarship in 2006. Iowa HSS-
    CO Coordinator worked with Community empowerment to ensure rules and guidance for the funding en-
    couraged local areas to direct scholarships to Head Start programs to serve over-income children. The Office
    also set up a meeting among the Community empowerment State Coordinator, Iowa Head Start directors,
    and state Community action agency executive directors to discuss local collaboration concerns. Iowa saw a
    ten-percent increase in the number of local Community empowerment areas using their funding to support
    over-income or wait-listed children within Head Start programs. empowerment also continued its support
    for blended classrooms that include Head Start children.

    during the legislative session, Iowa HSSCO helped draft preschool talking points and coordinate meetings
    to ensure the Iowa Head Start association participated in the planning and advocacy for the new preschool
    proposal. The office coordinated with state advocacy groups, the State Head Start association and Pre-K Now
    to support consistent messages about the importance preschool and the value of Head Start as a collaborative
    partner.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   105




Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
The Iowa HSSCO work plan called for strengthening partnerships between Head Start programs and child
care, community empowerment, public schools, early childhood special education, public health, community
action agencies, and Iowa’s Family development and Self-Sufficiency programs.

In the HSSCO survey, 94 percent of respondents thought the SCO was somewhat or very effective at pro-
moting collaboration between agencies and programs. Here are the percentages of respondents who agreed
that collaboration had been enhanced with these groups:

     ♦ Head Start and Community action agencies 89%
     ♦ Head Start and area education agencies 84%
     ♦ Head Start and Child Care 82%
     ♦ Head Start and Public Health 82%
     ♦ Head Start and early Childhood Special education 80%
     ♦ Head Start and Community empowerment 80%
     ♦ Head Start and the Family development and Self-Sufficiency (FadSS) Program 74%
     ♦ Head Start and preschool/pre-kindergarten 71%


Overall, the survey suggests that most Iowa HSSCO early childhood partners believe the work of the SCO is
enhancing collaboration among key constituencies in the field. The important accomplishments and outcomes
in 2006 under the eight priority areas are listed below.

Health Care
In 2006, the HSSCO began to meet regularly with the Child Health advocacy team at the Iowa depart-
ment of Public Health. access to this team helped the office understand public health initiatives aimed at
children and families and led to a networking session the HSSCO conducted with Head Start Mental and
Oral Health Coordinators.

Iowa HSSCO contributed to the State Nutrition action Plan, outlining a supportive role for Iowa Head
Start programs and reporting on current activities to promote fruit and vegetable consumption and provide
nutrition education to parents and children. It also supported the development of a new Iowa-based maternal
depression screen by the University of Iowa and encouraged Head Start to participate in the initial train-the-
trainer event. Five of the 23 trainers came from Head Start or Community action agencies.


Oral Health

Building off the success of its collaborative work in convening the Head Start/early Head Start Oral Health
Work Group 2003, Iowa HSSCO moved forward in 2006 with a new action plan that resulted in these ac-
complishments:

♦ a new protocol and guidance sheet covering general vs. direct supervision.
106 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    ♦ targeted oral health professionals to sit on Health Services advisory Committees. all agencies now have
      such professionals on their committees.

    ♦ promoted oral health issues to the wider child care and early education community.

    ♦ increased the number of Head Start children receiving fluoride varnishes.

    The most significant development in 2006 in the area of health was securing state-funding for a new state
    dental plan called I-Smiles that will be part of the state’s Medicaid plan. The I-Smiles proposal includes a
    plan to assure a dental home for all children on Medicaid and an increase in Medicaid reimbursement to den-
    tists. It builds an oral health infrastructure to better serve Medicaid children, including those served through
    Head Start, WIC, and Maternal Child Health (MCH, title V) programs, with screenings and arrangements
    for annual examinations and other care coordination between public health and private dental practices.

    Welfare
    Iowa’s Family development and Self-Sufficiency (FadSS) is a taNF and state-funded program that provides
    intensive support for families at risk of welfare dependency. eleven of 18 FadSS grantees also operate Head
    Start programs. With the support of the statewide FadSS coordinators, Iowa HSSCO organized a second
    networking session in 2006 between FadSS and Head Start family support workers. One participant reports
    the programs in her agency have begun working together for the first time because of this session.

    during 2006, the Iowa HSSCO Coordinator provided additional support to FadSS by serving as chair of the
    FadSS Council.

    Iowa HSSCO began conversation with state taNF officials following the release in July 2006 of the new
    taNF regulations. The HSSCO issued clarifications, in conjunction with the Iowa department of Human
    Services, about what services are supported by taNF so programs can more clearly determine eligibility. It
    also contributed to an MOU between the Iowa departments of Human Services and education that includ-
    ed language about the importance of promoting Head Start to children entering the foster care system.

    Child Care
    The most significant accomplishment in 2006 was securing $400,000 funding for a state-funded early Head
    Start pilot initiative. The project is administered by the Iowa HSSCO and awarded grants to three Head Start
    programs and one community-based organization. Projects began in November 2006 and use a home-based
    model, while encouraging partnerships with family child care providers and kith and kin providers.

    In 2006, the Iowa HSSCO Coordinator was appointed as the Iowa department of education representative
    on the State Child Care advisory Council (SCCaC) and served on its executive committee. On the council,
    the Coordinator served as chair of the “systems committee” and developed strategies to increase access to high
    quality providers that accept child care subsidy and increase quality in child care overall. By the end of 2006,
    child care assistance rates increased, and efforts to develop an early childhood professional development sys-
    tem were resurrected. The SCCaC supported expenditures of Quality and I/t earmarks that will fund many
    projects that will benefit Head Start and other low-income children.

    Iowa HSSCO helped Head Start’s address issues related to a new Child Care Quality rating System (QrS)
    that began in 2006 and worked to promote participation in the system. as Iowa’s new Early Learning Stan-
    dards (eLS) were approved and published in 2006, the SCO distributed a document that aligns the eLS with
    the Head Start Child Outcomes Framework.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   107




The Iowa HSSCO continued to show success at increasing the number of Head Start programs receiving
child care wrap-around grants to provide full day care for Head Start children. In 2006-07 grant year, the total
number of grants to Head Start increased 15 percent, serving 20 percent more children (1881 children).

Education
The Iowa HSSCO coordinator is a member of the Iowa department of education’s early Learning team. In
2006, the team released new Quality Preschool Program Standards that some Head Start programs are using
with their classrooms and partners. at least nine Head Start classrooms participated during the 2005-06 pro-
gram year. The HSSCO encouraged participation because it allows Head Start agencies to be active in local
collaboration initiatives around quality and to access funding and training opportunities.

Community Services
No significant activity in 2006.

Family Literacy Services
Iowa HSSCO supported another year of Iowa Public television’s (IPtV) book club project. Pre/post surveys
reveal positive changes in use of dialogic reading strategies by parents and a decline in the amount of time
spent watching tV and videos/dVds.

Services to Children with Disabilities
Iowa’s Idea State Performance Plan calls for a dramatic increase in 3-5 year-olds served in the least re-
stricted environment. Iowa HSSCO promoted Head Start programs as appropriate settings for these chil-
dren, including gathering data to document Head Start’s contributions. The 2006 PIr data that show the
percentage of Head Start children with disabilities increased to 13% (up 2% from 2005). Ninety-six percent
of children with disabilities have IePs or IFSPs (up 2% from 2005). These efforts combined with Iowa’s
participation in 2005 in the expanding Opportunities effort through the National early Childhood technical
assistance Center (NeCtaC). In 2006, the emphasis was on implementing our strategic communications
plan. NeCtaC invited the HSSCO Coordinator to present at the 2006 NeCtaC conference on the plan’s
development.

The most significant achievement in 2006 in the area of children with disabilities was the launch of a collab-
orative project to establish a Program Wide Positive Behavior Support (PBS) system in Iowa. It coordinated
with a 3-year-old School-wide PBS that had established PBS in more than 100 school districts. ten Head
Start programs participated in the first cohort that runs through the 2006-07 program year. The Center for
Social emotional Foundations in early Learning (CSeFeL) has acknowledged Iowa’s efforts at provid-
ing comprehensive training and technical assistance to support programs to implement Program Wide PBS
and, at the same time, build a system capable of delivering the training and assistance on a continual basis.
CSeFeL invited Iowa to participate in a pilot effort to launch statewide Program Wide PBS initiatives in
2007. The Iowa HSSCO Coordinator will be the State lead in this effort.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
No significant services in 2006.
108 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
    Besides the evidence above of Head Start’s involvement in preschool, oral health, child care policy develop-
    ment and planning, Iowa HSSCO expanded or maintained Head Start representation among all the major
    early childhood advisory groups.


    Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
    Iowa Community empowerment is Iowa’s answer to North Carolina’s SmartStart. Iowa HSSCO has made a
    priority to improve empowerment/Head Start relationship, meeting monthly with the State empowerment
    Coordinator and the State empowerment technical assistance team. an analysis of improvement in collab-
    orative activities with Iowa’s 58 local Community empowerment areas (Ceas) indicates that the dramatic
    improvements in collaboration seen in previous years are holding. Specifically, analysis of activities in 2004-05
    shows:

    ♦ 47% (27) of Ceas referenced Head Start data in their report (an increase of 2 Ceas or 8% from 2003-
      04).

    ♦ 47% (27) of Ceas provided a variety of services that supported Head Start children and families (an
      increase of 3 Ceas or 13% from 2003-04).

    ♦ 10% (6) of Ceas provided funding to expand the Head Start day or year (an increase of 2 Ceas or 50%
      from 2003-04).

    ♦ 36% (21) of Ceas reported Head Start as a partner in area-wide collaborations for children (an increase
      of 2 Ceas or 5% from 2003-04.

    ♦ 10% (6) of programs launched or maintained a joint classroom with Head Start (an increase of 2 Ceas or
      50% from 2004-05).


    Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
    families in your State.
    as more Head Start classrooms in Iowa attempt to address the need of Spanish-speaking children, Iowa
    HSSCO helped arrange for an IHSa-sponsored training on teaching in bilingual classrooms, offering the
    training to Shared Visions and even Start teachers across the State.

    The Iowa HSSCO made available certified and “refreshed” National reporting System Spanish language
    assessors. Many programs have only a small number of Spanish-speaking children and have difficulty finding
    Spanish-speaking staff or volunteers who are certified to be assessors.

    Iowa HSSCO also served on an advisory group of the State’s division of Latino affairs in drafting rules and
    an rFP in an effort to develop a certification curriculum and training for translation services.
                                                                                                       AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   109




How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
as a result of writing this profile and surveying the accomplishments of the Office during 2006, the HSSCO
Coordinator will include goals in its new 5-year plan that continue the work reflected above that has break-
through potential for significant system impact or work on critical issues that remains unfinished. While the
new grant will include new goals, more than half will continue work discussed in this profile.




1
    The Iowa HSSCO conducted a survey of 150 early childhood partners in the state in March, 2007 to assess perceptions of the effec-
    tiveness of office activities and recommended priorities for the future.

2
    This analysis is based on the most currently available annual reports and reflects the analysis conducted in 2006.
110 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                          AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   111




                                   Kansas


Collaboration Director             Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                   areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Carolyn Weinhold
                                   plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Kansas Social and Rehabilitation
Services (SRS)
                                   Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
915 SW Harrison                    services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
681-W                              are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
topeka, KS 66612                   at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 785-368-6354                in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 785-296-0146
                                   The Kansas HSSCO has adopted the same five goals as the
Carolyn.Weinhold@srs.ks.gov        Kansas early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (KeCCS)
                                   plan. They are as follows:
Lead Agency Contact

Alice Womack                       Goal 1
Phone: 785-291-3314                ♦ to ensure that all Kansas children have access to health
fax: 785-296-0146                    insurance and medical homes (medical home equals regular
Alice.Womack@srs.ks.gov              source of health care).


ACF Regional Contact               Goal 2

linda norred                       ♦ to fully integrate mental health and social and emotional
Region VII ACf                       development into the early childhood system in Kansas
                                     (mental health and social and emotional development).
601 east 12th Street
Kansas City, MO 64106
                                   Goal 3
Phone: 816-426-2282
fax: 816-426-2888                  ♦ to develop a comprehensive and coordinated early child-
linda.norred@acf.hhs.gov             hood care and education system in Kansas encompassing
                                     Birth – 5 early care and education services.


                                   Goal 4

                                   ♦ to educate and mentor parents about childhood health,
                                     development, and parenting.
112 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Goal 5

    ♦ to promote a system that helps families develop and utilize both intellectual and material resources to
      prepare their children for school and life (family supports).

    Throughout this document the appropriate Goals will be referenced, i.e. Goal 3.


    Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive services for all low-income children.
    Include a description of how you are supporting Head Start/child care/pre-kindergarten collaborations and Head Start/
    pre-kindergarten collaborations at the state and local levels.

    Goal 3

    KS Head Start association and HSSCO have been active members of the early Learning Coordinating
    Council (eLCC) which developed the KeCCS Plan. discussions about the importance of community col-
    laboration and using existing child care and Head Start programs were emphasized in the planning stages of
    the State pre-kindergarten pilot project. Kansas early education Program (KeeP) was involved in advocat-
    ing for state pre-kindergarten and getting Head Start to the planning table.


    Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
    your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
    Health Care

    Goal 1

    ♦ Planned a two-hour training opportunity for foster, birth, adoptive and kinship parents on best oral health
      practices. Partnered with resource and referral, Foster Care contractors, and community leaders. If the
      project is successful, we will encourage a statewide 501C3 to apply for a grant to fund additional trainings.

    ♦ Met quarterly with a blood lead task force. Helped plan strategies to promote appropriate testing of young
      children.


    Goal 2

    ♦ Participating on an early Childhood Mental Health advisory Council that recently advised Kansas to
      purchase an endorsement license from the Michigan association of Infant Mental Health (MI-aIMH).


    Goal 4

    ♦ Continue to partner with KS Head Start association on the Health Literacy for Parents of Young Chil-
      dren project using the book What To Do When Your Child Gets Sick. Fifteen out of 29 Head Start programs
      volunteered to participate in this project modeled after the UCLa/Johnson & Johnson program. KS Head
      Start association raised private dollars to fund the project and HSSCO helped secure a Medicaid match.
      approximately 800 parents participated in the training. The pre- and post-surveys showed a 40% decrease
      in the use of emergency rooms. Fourteen of the programs will repeat the training next year.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   113




♦ Currently working with five pilot sites (health departments and clinics) to train parents on using the same
  book. KS Head Start association raises foundation dollars and Kansas Medicaid matches the amount to
  fund the project. a different curriculum will be used in this project.

Welfare

Goal 2

♦ researched and presented a Social-emotional Screening tool as requested by the Kansas Foster Care Pro-
  gram Manager. The tool was presented to six meetings around the State and is currently mandated to be
  used with all children birth to five years of age who are entering the foster care system. Several Head Start
  programs have opted to use the screening tool. data will be gathered on the number of referrals.


Goal 3

♦ Continued to supply Head Start programs with quarterly lists of families on cash assistance and food
  stamps and young children in foster care. The lists are used for recruiting purposes.

Child Care

Goal 4

♦ The Kansas association of Child Care resource & referral agencies (KaCCrra) participated in the
  planning of the Parent Leadership Conference and included child care issues for the State and Federal
  panel presentation. Child care providers are offered scholarships to attend the event.

Education

Goal 4

♦ Currently planning the 7th annual Parent Leadership Conference for the Capitol Building on October 26th
  and 27th. Funding is provided by the Children’s Cabinet & trust Fund and the Kansas Parent Information
  resource Center (KPIrC). This year we are reaching out to title I parents as well as Head Start parents
  and child care providers. Public speaking, advocacy, and current issues are addressed. This is the sixth year
  of the event and approximately 100 parents are expected to participate.

Community Services

Goal 5

♦ The HSSCO facilitated the Kansas Fatherhood Coalition that meets monthly to plan the annual Father-
  hood Summit and promote the growth of community fatherhood initiatives. The Children’s Cabinet and
  trust Fund and the Kansas Parent Information and resource Center fund the event.
114 |     Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Family Literacy Services

    Goal 5

    ♦ Participated in the review of the ready to Learn project that promotes limited television and maximum
      literacy projects with Head Start parents.

    ♦ Participated in the Kansas SKIP (Supporting Kids of Incarcerated Parents) project. The project will start
      with two pilot programs with ten parents in each pilot. Incarcerated parents will learn parenting skills,
      literacy skills, and communication skills before visiting with their young children. The goal is to support
      a successful re-entry.

    Services to Children with Disabilities

    Goals 4 and 5

    ♦ The HSSCO helps fund the annual Head Start and Children with disabilities meeting.

    ♦ Involved in planning and writing an Inclusion Grant with the Kansas State department of education.

        Services to Homeless Children and Families

    Goal 3

    ♦ Promoting partnerships and MOUs between Head Start programs and Homeless and domestic Violence
      shelters.


    Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
    Participated regularly in SrS policy discussions, the early Learning Coordinating Council (eLCC), and the
    State Interagency Coordinating Council (SICC). The HSSCO was asked to find a tool that could be used for
    young children entering the foster care system because the current tool was not developmentally appropriate.
    after research, a tool from California was recommended. The tool was revised slightly and presented to the
    Children and Family Services (CFS) division of SrS. They liked the tool and after training early childhood
    leaders around the State, SrS decided to require the tool be used for all young children entering the foster
    care system. It is anticipated that a substantial increase in referrals will be occurring because of the tool. This,
    in turn, may lead to increased funding for early childhood mental health.


    Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
    Goals 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5

    ♦ Provided support for expansion of the Kansas early Head Start program. The State Legislature passed
      $1.6 million for 164 additional children. rural counties were targeted by the Governor.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   115




Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
Goals 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5

♦ The HSSCO has promoted providing materials in Spanish at most Head Start and other events. The
  Kansas Fatherhood Summit borrowed head phones and paid two interpreters to provide keynote and
  break-out sessions in Spanish. HSSCO encourages Head Start directors to reward bilingual staff for their
  language skills.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
The work plan for the coming year will be dominated by expansion of the State pre-kindergarten system.
Some school superintendents are very resistant to collaboration with Head Start. There will be ongoing ef-
forts to assist Head Start directors as they attempt to build community relationships. The Kansas rFP states
“approximately 50% of the spaces will be in public schools and 50% of the spaces will be in existing child care
and Head Start programs.” Some superintendents are fearful of the Head Start Program Performance Standards
and are avoiding partnering with Head Start programs.

The Kansas department of education recently hired a new Commissioner of education. KS Head Start
association and HSSCO will be working to develop a relationship with her and to educate her about what a
“comprehensive” quality early childhood program includes.

The Social-emotional Screening tool (SeSt) is being used for young children entering foster care. Several
Head Starts are using the tool for all children. SrS will start gathering data to show the need for more early
childhood mental health services. This process will help Kansas policy-makers justify the use of state dollars
for early childhood services in community mental health centers.
116 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                           AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   117




                                    Kentucky


Collaboration Director              Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                    areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
earl trevor, Director
                                    plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Kentucky Head Start Collaboration
Office
                                    Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Kentucky Department of education    services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
500 Mero Street                     are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
frankfort, KY 40601                 at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 502-564-8341                 in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 502-564-1984
                                    The Kentucky Head Start-State Collaboration Office (KY
earl.trevor@education.ky.gov        Head Start association) participated in the distribution of
                                    Kentucky’s early Childhood Continuous assessment Guide,
Lead Agency Contact                 which provides recommended guidelines and practices in all
                                    areas of assessment. This voluntary guide provides mechanism
Dr. Kim townley, Acting Director    for early care and education programs to measure and docu-
Division of early Childhood         ment child outcomes.
Development
Kentucky Department of education    The HSSCO participated in the distribution of the Kentucky
                                    early Childhood Quality Self-Study, which is designed to as-
500 Mero Street
                                    sist classrooms and programs in self-assessing and planning for
Capital Plaza tower                 continuous improvement.
Room 1710
frankfort, KY 40601                 The HSSCO participated in the distribution of Kentucky Early
                                    Childhood Standards designed to assist parents, early care and
Kim.townley@education.ky.gov
                                    education professionals, administrators, and others in under-
                                    standing what children are able to know and do from birth
ACF Regional Contact                through four years of age.

Reginald Dancil                     The HSSCO helped to complete the 2006-2007 Partnership
Head Start Program Specialist       agreement between Kentucky department of education and
61 forsyth Street S                 region IV administration for Children and Families.
Suite 4M60
                                    The HSSCO continues to assist state and local efforts to fully
Atlanta, GA
                                    enroll and utilize Head Start programs. at present, 170 of
Phone: 404-562-2871                 Kentucky’s 175 school districts fully utilize Head Start 4- year-
fax: 404-562-2871                   old enrollments.
reginald.dancil@acf.hhs.gov
                                    The HSSCO participated in the development of the Kentucky
                                    Interagency agreement for Providing Programs and Services
                                    to all Children.
118 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    The HSSCO gathered december 1 enrollment data from Head Start grantees using the same format as
    Kentucky department of education State-funded preschool. This allows the State to monitor local enroll-
    ment outcomes.


    Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
    your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
    Health Care
    ♦ The Kentucky Head Start Collaboration Office (KY HSSCO) participated in Kentucky’s Kentucky Oral
      Health Strategic Planning Committee.

    ♦ The HSSCO attended Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) Oral Health Institute in atlanta and
      assisted in the rewriting of the State’s oral health plan.

    ♦ The HSSCO helped to develop a partnership between Jefferson County Public Schools early Childhood
      Program, anderson County early Childhood regional training Center and the University of Louisville,
      Kent School of Social Work, which works to foster the social emotional development of children enrolled
      in the Jefferson County Public Schools early Childhood Program. Intensive training to classroom and
      support staff is under way.

    ♦ The HSSCO participates in the Partnership for a Fit Kentucky a public/private partnership, which sup-
      ports the Kentucky department for Public Health’s CdC Obesity Prevention Grant. The focus is on
      promoting nutrition and physically active communities.

    Welfare
    ♦ The HSSCO worked with Cabinet for Health and Family Services to refine the system by which Ken-
      tucky Head Start and early Head Start programs access taNF and Food Stamp lists to assist with
      recruitment efforts. all 32 Head Start grantees accessed the system as part of their recruitment efforts.

    ♦ The HSSCO participated in the first of a series of meetings in which the Kentucky Cabinet for Health
      and Family Services, department for Community Based Services began the development of a strategic
      plan (title IV-B State Plan) to provide services designed to help children safely and appropriately return
      to families from which they have been removed.

    Child Care
    ♦ The Kentucky Head Start-State Collaboration Office (KY HSSCO) supports the Head Start/early Head
      Start Commonwealth of Kentucky partnership in which seven Head Start programs have used state child
      care subsidy dollars to serve Head Start/early Head Start children beyond the regular ½ day of services.

    ♦ The HSSCO supports Head Start’s involvement in StarS for KIdS NOW, Kentucky’s voluntary quality
      rating system for licensed child care centers. Seventeen of Kentucky’s 32 grantees participate in StarS
      for KIdS NOW.
                                                                               AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS       |   119




Education
♦ In the spring of 2006, the Kentucky Head Start-State Collaboration Office (KY HSSCO) presented at a
  series of early Childhood regional training Center Preschool Leadership meetings.

♦ The HSSCO regularly attends Kentucky department of education preschool branch meetings to discuss
  local collaboration issues.

Community Services
♦ The Kentucky Head Start-State Collaboration Office (KY HSSCO) has assisted in the development of
  Kentucky’s system of Community early Childhood Council (CeCC), which brings communities together
  to support issues of importance to children and families.

♦ again this year, the HSSCO assisted in the sponsorship of the highly successful CeCC council retreat

Family Literacy Services
The Kentucky Head Start-State Collaboration Office (KY HSSCO) presented on local collaboration at the
Kentucky even Start Coordinators meeting.

Services to Children with Disabilities
♦ The Kentucky Head Start-State Collaboration Office regularly attends Kentucky Head Start association
  disabilities committee.

♦ The HSSCO fosters the coordination of local disability services through completion of the disabilities
  section of the Local Agreement for Cooperation on Full Utilization of Head Start.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
♦ during 2006, the Kentucky Head Start Collaboration Office issued email reminders to Head Start grant-
  ees of the provisions of the McKinney-Vento Homeless education assistance Improvement act of 2001,
  which requires that agencies must adopt policies and practices to ensure enrollment.

♦ The HSSCO helped to coordinate Katrina evacuee data collection reported from Kentucky to HSS re-
  gional and Federal offices.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
♦ The HSSCO ensured Head Start participation in the development of the Kentucky Interagency agree-
  ment for Providing Programs and Services to all Children.

♦ The HSSCO was instrumental in the development of the 2006-2007 Partnership agreement between the
  Kentucky department of education and region IV administration for Children and Families.
120 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
    families in your State.
    The HSSCO attended Kentucky department of education Limited english Proficiency Workgroup. Over the
    past four to five years, Kentucky has experienced growth in the LeP (Limited english Proficiency) popula-
    tion. although Kentucky has a significant number of schools with low incidence (less than 10 per school
    district) of LeP students, ethical and legal precepts protect the rights of these children.

    In december of 2006, the Kentucky Head Start association began planning a series of trainings dealing with
    the acquisition of Spanish language skills by Head Start staff.


    How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
    coming year?
    One goal of the Kentucky Head Start-State Collaboration Office should be to increase its support for father-
    hood initiatives across the state. at present, OVeC, Jefferson County Schools, and Middle Kentucky river
    Head Starts have strong fatherhood initiatives from which the Head Start community might draw expertise.

    The Collaboration Office should more strongly support local efforts to coordinate services to Hispanic chil-
    dren and families.

    The Kentucky Head Start-State Collaboration Office should enhance its partnerships with faith-based organi-
    zations.
                                                                           AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   121




                                    Louisiana


Collaboration Director              Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                    areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Shannon Hills
                                    plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
louisiana State/Head Start
Collaboration Project
                                    Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
louisiana Department of Social      services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Services
                                    are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Office of family Support
                                    at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
PO Box 94065
                                    in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
Baton Rouge, lA 70804-9065
Phone: 225-219-7527                 ♦ Published and disseminated the Early Learning Guidelines
                                      (eLG) and accompanying Program Standards as frame-
fax: 225-219-4248
                                      works for high quality practices for everyone caring for
shills@hcf.hhs.gov                    infants and toddlers. The guidelines are indicators of what
                                      children at certain ages should be “working on” and contain
Lead Agency Contact                   ideas for child caregivers to arrange the environment. The
                                      guidelines further provide indicators that help caregiv-
Adren Wilson, Assistant Secretary     ers monitor a child’s development. The eLGs are divided
                                      into five basic developmental domains: emotional, social,
Phone: 225-342-3947
                                      motor, communication, and cognitive development. They
Adren.wilson@dss.state.la.us          reflect a relationship-based practice that is individualized to
                                      meet the specific needs of every child. a resource section is
ACF Regional Contact                  provided on how the early Intervention system works and
                                      the point of contact. The eLGs and Program Standards
Gwendolyn C. Jones                    are closely aligned with the expectations in the Louisiana
                                      Standards for Programs Serving Four-Year-Old Children. The
ACf Program Specialist
                                      guidelines and standards provide a good start for caregivers,
ACf Program Specialist                parents, and policymakers.
1300 Young Street
9th floor                           ♦ Head Start programs were provided with information
Dallas, tX 75202                      through Louisiana Head Start association Board meet-
                                      ings and by way of technical assistance Network regard-
Phone: 214-767-2976
                                      ing child care/pre-kindergarten/Head Start initiatives.
fax: 214-767-8890                     extended invitations to all related childcare givers to
gjones@dss.state.la.us                participate in meetings, workshops, and seminars related
                                      to childcare initiatives. Participate in meetings and serve
                                      on committees concerned with improving and enhancing
                                      Head Start/pre-kindergarten/child care collaboration.

                                    ♦ Serves on the department of Social Services Quality
                                      rating Steering Committee. The Committee’s aim is to
                                      develop a Quality rating System for early childhood
122 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




        programs in Louisiana. The Steering Committee works towards developing a system that assess, supports
        improvement of, and communicates the level of quality in the early care education programs in Louisiana.
        Participates in work group sessions particularly the early child care staff qualifications work group.

    ♦ Serves on the Louisiana Children’s Cabinet advisory Board, representing Head Start Collaboration and
      the Head Start association. The Children’s Cabinet advisory Board was established by statue and ap-
      pointed by the Governor. The Board meets monthly in an effort to seek, encourage, and develop ways
      in which collaboratively address issues and needs of children receiving services from the multiple state
      departments.


    Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
    your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
    Health Care
    ♦ Served on the State Interagency Coordinating Council for the early Steps Programs, the Part C Provider.
      This is the Louisiana program for identifying children from birth to three years with potential develop-
      mental delays. The Council works to establish systems to address identification of needed services that can
      be delivered in the natural environment. Composition of the Council include representatives from the de-
      partment of Health and Hospitals, department of education, department of Social Services, resources
      and referral agencies, child care providers and parents of children with delays. Worked with the National
      Child Care Information Center and Center for Social and emotional Foundations for early Learning.
      The Council developed a birth-to-three training session that was cancelled because of Hurricane Katrina.
      as a member of the Louisiana Children’s Cabinet advisory Board, participated in most of the major
      initiatives of the Children’s Cabinet that included:

                  ♦ LaCHIP—health insurance for previously uninsured children;

                  ♦ Nurse Home Visitation—nurses providing comprehensive pre-natal services to first
                    time mothers.

    Welfare
    ♦ Continued to support the Governor’s Solutions to Poverty Initiative, headed by the Office of Family
      Support. Collaborated with this initiative by providing registration for conference participants.

    ♦ Facilitated the presence of state agency staff at Head Start meetings, workshops, and conferences. Con-
      tinued to identify training opportunities for state staff around various agency, Office of Family Support/
      department of Social Services, and Head Start related initiatives.

    Child Care
    ♦ Continue to serve on the Louisiana Quality rating Steering Committee.

    ♦ Serve on the Greater New Orleans rebuild Child Care Collaborative efforts Committee. This Commit-
      tee is a collaborative formed to increase families’ access to quality childcare in the Greater New Orleans
      area. The collaborative has two primary goals:

                  ♦ repair and rebuild child care facilities and capacity in the Greater New Orleans area.
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   123




               ♦ Facilitate technical assistance and training for child care providers to include Head Start in
                 revitalized child care facilities in order to enhance the quality of child care. The rebuilding
                 project is to rebuild quality child care for children and families in New Orleans.

♦ Serve on the Greater advantage Plan Committee (GaP). GaP’s aim is to prepare New Orleans Par-
  ish children to enter first grade ready to learn and fully equipped to move forward. The GaP is working
  towards establishing/developing a model for early Childhood and Family Learning by full integration of
  early child care, family support services, and health and education services.

♦ Continue to research, serve on committees, and develop strategies aimed at co-locating child care, Head
  Start, and pre-kindergarten. This is being accomplished by furthering communication between all con-
  cerned partners.

Education
♦ Serve on articulation development agreement committee for the purpose of furthering discussions and
  dialogue concerning staff qualifications.

♦ Continue to collaborate with the department of education partners and division of Child Care and
  early Childhood education to foster greater education outcomes. Serve on the Greater advantage Plan
  Committee developing plans for Family Learning Center.

Community Services
♦ Participate in statewide meetings aimed at improving access and utilization of the earned Income tax
  Credit.

♦ Serves on the Children’s Cabinet advisory board and participate in monthly meetings and dialogue aimed
  in part at addressing and developing services provided by the department of Youth Services, which has in-
  creased year after year community services funding. Participated in the Office of Family Support’s Intern-
  ship program preparing university students to assist in providing community services.

Family Literacy Services
♦ Continue to participate in Statewide Literacy initiatives sponsored by the department of education.

♦ Continual support of the work performed by the State Library encouraging the Head Start grantees
  partnership agreements with their local library as well as utilizing services offered by the State library.

♦ Provided and distributed reading materials to Head Start grantees in an effort to encourage quality
  family reading

♦ Participated in Solutions to Poverty financial literacy initiatives.

Services to Children with Disabilities
♦ Participate in department of education-sponsored workshop aimed at identifying and addressing the
  needs of children in child care, pre-kindergarten, and Head Start with developmental disabilities.
124 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    ♦ Participated in La Children’s Cabinet advisory Board meetings aimed at further identifying resources
      and providers.

    ♦ at project meetings, continues to encourage and promote inclusive child care.

    ♦ attended developmental disabilities Council meetings, reporting on Head Start and related child care
      activities.

    Services to Homeless Children and Families
    ♦ Serve on and participate in the Statewide Homeless Coalition, which meets quarterly for the purpose of
      addressing needs and strategies for reducing/eradicating chronic homelessness.

    ♦ researching trends and data that indicate the demographics associated with the homeless population.


    Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
    ♦ Serves on various statewide and departmental committees including the universities and community and
      technical colleges aimed at formulating articulation agreements that will lead to teacher certification.

    ♦ Serves on various advisory boards including the Head Start advisory Board that promotes partnerships
      with local agencies in implementing services to children and families.

    ♦ Serves on the Louisiana Children’s Cabinet advisory Board, which meets monthly to support the Louisi-
      ana Children’s Cabinet in its efforts to build public and political will for increased resources toward early
      childhood education, health, and school readiness. The assistant Secretary of the Office of Family Support
      serves as executive director of the Children’s Cabinet.

    ♦ Serves on the Office of Community Services Louisiana relatives as Parents Program (La-raPP). This
      program promotes the creation and expansion of services for grandparents and other relatives who have
      assumed the responsibility of surrogate parenting. Participates in statewide task force consisting of state
      and local agencies and community organizations to assist in identifying and developing an array of direct
      and indirect services for relative caregivers.

    ♦ Serves on the Greater advantage Plan Initiative, which focuses on children 0-5 years old, and providing
      quality “wrap around services” to them and their families.

    ♦ Serves on the Louisiana Child Care Quality rating Steering Committee, which has been working to
      develop such a system that will be available for all child care entities in the State.

    ♦ Serves on the Greater New Orleans rebuild Child Care Committee.

    ♦ actively collaborate with the department of Social Service’s division of Child Care and early Childhood
      education.
                                                                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS             |   125




Describe one new partnership or unique activity with an existing partnership developed during the
year and the results of that activity.
The Greater advantage Plan is a newly formed partnership and initiative that came about out of the need
to develop new and innovative child care strategies in and around the greater New Orleans area. The Plan
committee is comprised of strategic partners that are working collectively to rebuild, revitalize, and co-locate
child care, pre-kindergarten, and Head Start in what is to be a model facility in the devastated city of New
Orleans. The partners include: department of Social Services, Louisiana association of United Way, Orleans
Parish School Board, New Orleans recovery School district, Head Start, and United Way for the Greater
New Orleans area. Because of this effort, a site has been identified and several entities have agreed to provide
resources, including funding resources, to develop this children and family oriented center.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
Continuing in our efforts to support and promote the Governor’s Solutions to Poverty Initiative, the depart-
ment’s Child Care Quality rating System development that is scheduled for implantation in early 2007. as
a result of the recent appointment of the assistant Secretary of the Office of Family Support to the role of
executive director of the Children Cabinet, this will further enhance or improve collaboration efforts and
strategies, as all multiple state government departments actively participate on the advisory board, as does the
Head Start-State Collaboration Office.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
It has been determined in the past, and that determination continues to hold true, that the majority of the
Louisiana Hispanic population resides in the southeastern area of the State. There appears to be an increasing
number of Hispanic families that have moved to Louisiana, particularly in the New Orleans area. The total
Community action Head Start grantee in New Orleans continues to address the needs of that population as
best they can in light of recent occurrences associated with Hurricane Katrina. The Head Start-State Col-
laboration Office has supported the services to Hispanic children by promoting the inclusion of multilingual
materials. This Office will continue to be attentive to the needs of the Hispanic children and families in and
around the State and will continue to research statistics to provide to those interested entities in need of such
data.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
The Head Start-State Collaboration Office will strive to facilitate continued collaboration around the de-
velopment of early childhood systems and all partners connected with children and families. Because of the
ever-increasing need to form new and innovative partnerships, opportunities for the coming year seemingly
are greater. Based on the current year work plan, it will require even more diligence, time, and effort to capital-
ize on opportunities to advance the mission of this office and the Head Start community. Strategies associ-
ated with the work plan will further engage the Head Start association and the Children’s Cabinet to create
a more prolific public awareness of our state needs and the Head Start entity’s role in fulfilling those needs.
Prioritization of the work and the initiatives is necessary in order to accomplish meaningful outcomes.
126 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   127




                             Maine


Collaboration Director       Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                             areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Carolyn Drugge
                             plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Maine DHHS
Marquardt Building           Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
State House Station #11      services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Augusta, Me 04333            are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Phone: 207-287-5014          at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
fax: 207-287-5031
                             in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
Carolyn.drugge@maine.gov
                             Focus Areas 1 and 2: Child Care and Welfare Reform
www.maine.gov/dhhs/occhs
                             Objective 4
Lead Agency Contact
                             Support efforts of the early care and education community to
Brenda Harvey                conceptualize, develop, coordinate, and evaluate strategies to
DHHS Commissioner            implement cross system approaches that maximize fiscal re-
                             sources, blend funds, collaborate on staff trainings, identify and
Phone: 207-287-4223
                             implement appropriate developmental practices, and promote
fax: 207-287-5031            best practice.
Brenda.harvey@maine.gov
                             Focus Area 3: Education
ACF Regional Contact
                             Objective 2
tom Killmurray
                             develop a coordinated system of early care and education in
uSDHHS
                             Maine and implement the Early Childhood Learning Guidelines
ACf Region I Office          across the system.
JfK federal Building
Boston, MA 02203             The Head Start-State Collaboration director is a key leader in
                             the development of the close working relationships that exist
Phone: 617-565-1104
                             between public school pre-kindergarten programs, child care,
fax: 617-565-2493            and Head Start programs.
tom.killmurray@acf.hhs.gov
                             Some examples of collaborative work include:

                             ♦ Continued distribution of Early Childhood Learning Guide-
                               lines for three- and four-year-olds with letter of intro-
                               duction from the Commissioner of Health and Human
                               Services, Commissioner of education, Head Start Collabo-
                               ration director, and Pre-kindergarten Specialist. Guide-
128 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




        lines include a “crosswalk” to Head Start Outcomes and Public School K-12 Learning results. More than
        5,000 copies of the Guidelines and classroom posters have been distributed. The Guidelines are being imple-
        mented in public school pre-kindergarten programs, Head Start, child care, and in teacher training courses
        in higher education. Guidelines available at: http://www.maine.gov/dhhs/occhs/publications.

    ♦ Maine department of education has funded additional training for pre-kindergarten teachers and others
      on the implementation of Early Childhood Learning Guidelines. The training was developed and piloted by
      the Office of Child Care and Head Start. The department of education introduced legislation that will
      require public school pre-kindergarten programs to use the Early Childhood Learning Guidelines.

    ♦ Served on the Public Pre-kindergarten resource Group which developed program standards for pre-
      kindergarten programs, advised on the development of pre-kindergarten community forums, and reviewed
      the application process for new pre-kindergarten programs. The application requires a description of how
      the public school communicated with local child care and Head Start programs as the pre-kindergarten
      program was developed.

    ♦ Created a “Collaborative Funding Work Group” to develop guidance on funding collaborative Head Start,
      pre-kindergarten, and child care programs. Members include: department of education finance and pro-
      gram staff, early intervention staff, region I aCF staff, taNF staff, Head Start Collaboration director,
      and local Head Start and child care directors. The goal is to increase number of collaborative programs as
      directors understand the possibilities of braided funding.

    ♦ Serve on the early Childhood task Force which is chaired by the First Lady Karen Baldacci and funded
      by the early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Grant. The task Force developed a comprehensive early
      childhood systems plan which includes Head Start and child care.

    ♦ Serve on the Invest early task Force which developed a presentation for community groups on the return
      on investment in quality early childhood education, including Head Start. The attorney General is pre-
      senting to Chamber of Commerce groups around the State. Building public will for the support of early
      care and education is critical to future support.

    ♦ Guidelines for Infant and toddler Growth and development – learning guidelines for children 0-3 were
      developed, printed, and distributed through work with the Infant and toddler Initiative. early Head Start
      staff will received training on the implementation of the Guidelines through the early care and education
      professional development system.


    Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
    your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
    Health Care

    Objective 1

    Continue to expand Head Start/child care health partnerships in order to improve children’s and families’
    access to health, educational, nutritional, social, and other services while maximizing resources.

    ♦ Collaborated with the Children’s Behavioral Health division to address the health/mental health needs of
      children in early care and education settings. The goal is to provide behavioral health consultation to Head
      Start programs, child care programs, and families related to the behavioral issues staff are confronting in
      these programs.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   129




♦    a system of technical assistance and consultation has been developed that will serve Head Start and child
    care programs around the state. all early care and education technical assistance providers, including the
    Head Start technical assistance providers, worked together to develop common tools, systems, reporting,
    and clarification of roles and responsibilities.

♦    as Medicaid moves to rate-setting, the Collaboration director has worked to maintain the status of Head
    Start programs as approved Medicaid providers of targeted Case management and minimize the funding
    cuts related to match for targeted Case Management.

♦ Collaborated with the child care program specialist and early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Grant
  director to offer the child care health consultant training developed by the New england Healthy Child
  Care america grantees.


Objective 3

Integrate regional oral health priorities into the State oral health improvement plan.

♦ Collaborated with the Maine Chapter of the american academy of Pediatricians and the Maine dental
  Health director in the development of a successful proposal to aaP for funding for a project to focus on
  training pediatricians and early Head Start personnel in early oral health risk assessment through one-
  hour lunch time training sessions.

Welfare

Focus Areas 1 & 2: Child Care and Welfare Reform

Objective 4

Support efforts of the early care and education community to conceptualize, develop, coordinate, and evaluate
strategies to implement cross system approaches that maximize fiscal resources, blend funds, collaborate on
staff trainings, identify and implement appropriate developmental practices, and promote best practice.

♦ Included taNF in the Collaborative Funding Workgroup to develop guidance on funding collaborative
  Head Start, pre-kindergarten, and child care programs.

♦ Guide on collaborative funding written and will be printed shortly. Will be used by collaboration coaches
  and others as local communities develop community based public pre-kindergarten programs.


Objective 8

Move forward with a Quality rating System and align what is being done in dHHS with dOe.

♦ Piloting newly developed Quality rating Scale in regions of the State. research project set up to deter-
  mine if steps on the rating scale using administrative data are valid.

♦ an accreditation cohort to support Head Start programs working to receive National association for the
  education of Young Children (NaeYC) accreditation has been set up. Programs are receiving technical
  assistance on meeting the new NaeYC guidelines.
130 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Education

    Objective 1

    Collaborate with others to assure that early care and education providers will receive education/training to
    deliver Pre-K services that promote school readiness by enhancing the development of children through edu-
    cational instruction in pre-reading skills, pre-mathematics skills, and language to children and children with
    special needs.

    ♦ Serve on the Child Care Higher education Committee to facilitate and support increasing the availability
      of advanced education and training for child care professionals. Inform higher education on needs of Head
      Start and other early care and education groups for pre-service and continuing education.

    ♦ Supported work by the University of Maine at Farmington to expand program for B.S. in early childhood
      education to southern part of the State. another cohort of providers will begin as the first cohort gradu-
      ates.

    ♦ Beginning a needs assessment on availability of college level courses that meet the requirements of certi-
      fication for early childhood special education and the new Birth to Five teacher certification. a document
      that describes paths to certification and the availability of scholarships will be published.

    ♦ Collaborated with the Child Care Infant and toddler Initiative to assure that the course, Sharing Books
      with Babies, was also available to Head Start staff as well as child care staff.

    ♦ The University of Southern Maine developed a credential program in early Childhood Literacy for
      Master’s level coursework.

    Community Services
    actions: a job description for a VISta volunteer was developed but no appropriate candidate was found.

    Family Literacy Services

    Focus Area 6: Family Literacy

    Objective 1

    to support and increase effective literacy partnerships with the Maine Humanities Council “Born to read”
    program, even Start, and other literacy programs.

    ♦ Supported the Born to read program which provides books to Head Start and child care classrooms and
      collaborates with the retired Seniors program to coordinate trained readers to go to the early care and
      education classroom to read to children. One-hundred five volunteers read to approximately 1,000 chil-
      dren over the year and provided 155 books to classrooms and 1,181 books were sent home with children.

    ♦ Staff served on the even Start advisory Board. distributed even Start’s request for Proposal to Head
      Start Programs.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   131




Services to Children with Disabilities

Objective 1

to support and increase effective partnerships to meet the needs of families with children with special needs
by continuing and expanding Head Start/child care special needs partnerships.

♦ Serve on the Policy Council for the Child Care Plus Me Program which is funded with Child Care and
  development Funds and provides technical assistance to Head Start and child care providers who have
  children with special needs in their classrooms. Head Start programs are among the programs that receive
  technical assistance.

Services to Homeless Children and Families

Objective 1

Strengthen and link resources for Head Start programs serving preschool children experiencing homelessness
and migrant children as appropriate.

♦ Collaborate with the department of education State Coordinator for Homeless education to improve
  coordination between Head Start Programs and family shelters in Maine. Met with Shelley reed, the
  dOe State Coordinator, to begin discussion on how to connect Head Start local programs with the
  McKinney-Vento lead in each school district.

♦ developed protocol for conducting an onsite survey of homeless shelters to determine the number of
  homeless preschool children, to bring information on resources to the shelter, and to facilitate the connec-
  tion between Head Start and homeless families.

♦ Initiated coordination with the Governor’s Homeless Policy Committee through the Maine State Hous-
  ing authority with the goal of increasing preschool children’s access to services and developing new strate-
  gies to serve preschool children.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
♦ Head Start is represented on the early Childhood task Force, the State early Childhood Systems Initia-
  tive, the Pre-kindergarten advisory Group, the Child Care advisory Council, the aCCeSS Collaborative,
  the Infant and toddler Initiative, the technical assistance Network, and many other state-level committees.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
The merger of the department of Human Services and the department of Behavioral and developmental
Services created the opportunity for closer collaboration with the Children’s Behavioral Health division.
discussions have focused on common screening and assessment tools and review and coordination of chil-
dren’s services. This collaboration will also provide opportunities for shared training and more seamless
services for families.
132 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
    families in your State.
    ethnically, Maine is 99.3% non-Hispanic and 0.7% Hispanic. The Head Start information printed in Spanish
    was distributed in communities that have a Spanish-speaking population.


    How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
    coming year?
    ♦ More emphasis will be placed on connecting homeless populations to Head Start programs.

    ♦ More work will be done to connect families receiving taNF to the Head Start programs in their area.

    ♦ a focus on behavioral health consultation is needed to support early care and education staff as they work
      with children with behavioral issues.
                                                                          AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   133




                                   Maryland


Collaboration Director             Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                   areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
linda Zang, Director
                                   plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Head Start-State Collaboration
Project
                                   Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Maryland State Department          services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
of education
                                   are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
200 West Baltimore Street
                                   at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Baltimore, MD 21201
                                   in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
Phone: 410-767-0140
fax: 410-333-6226 fax              ♦ The overarching goal of the Head Start-State Collabora-
                                     tion Project (HSSCP) is to establish partnerships and
lzang@msde.state.md.us
                                     collaborative efforts to build an effective early care and
                                     education system and achieve positive outcomes and
Lead Agency Contact                  results for children. State and community early care and
                                     education needs are examined, gaps in services identified,
linda Zang, Director                 issues raised, and linkages created to provide resources and
Head Start-State Collaboration       services for early Head Start (eHS), Head Start (HS),
Project                              and other children from low-income families through the
Maryland State Department            efforts of the Maryland State department of education
of education                         (MSde), the Maryland Head Start association (MHSa),
                                     the Maryland Head Start Collaboration advisory Council,
200 West Baltimore Street
                                     the Maryland early Care and education Committee, and
Baltimore, MD 21201                  the administration for Children and Families region III
Phone: 410-767-0140                  technical assistance (ta) Network. This year, issues were
fax: 410-333-6226 fax                raised and addressed around achieving FY 2006 goals that
                                     include furthering Head Start/child care/pre-kindergarten
lzang@msde.state.md.us
                                     partnerships, improving program quality, increasing treat-
                                     ment access for children’s mental health and oral health,
ACF Regional Contact                 increasing public awareness, and promoting education
                                     and professional development opportunities. results are
nancy elmore                         included in this report.
150 South Independence Mall West
Suite 864                          ♦ two statewide agreements, one between the Maryland
                                     State department of education (MSde) and the Mary-
Philadelphia, PA 19106-3499
                                     land Head Start association (MHSa) and the other
Phone: 215-861-1000                  between the HSSCP, MHSa, the Infants and toddlers
fax: 215-861-4071                    Program and Preschool Special education Services in
nelmore@acf.hhs.gov
                                     MSde, Migrant and Seasonal Head Start, and the region
                                     III Office that were signed in 2004, continue to improve
                                     school readiness for all Head Start children, including
                                     those with disabilities. Statewide and local agreements
134 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




        address common areas that Head Start and public schools work on collaboratively, including strategies for
        joint planning, parent involvement, articulation (curriculum and transition), and professional development.
        regional and local facilitation helped initiate and continues to renew and further local partnerships.

    ♦ The consolidation of many child and family services in MSde brought together HSSCP, pre-kindergar-
      ten/kindergarten policy, program accreditation, Judith P. Hoyer Partnerships, credentialing, early child-
      hood professional development, child care licensing and subsidy, home visiting, special education, and the
      contracts for Maryland’s family support centers and resource and referral centers. as a result, opportunities
      are created and shared that improve access to services and for quality improvements levels.


    Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
    your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
    Health Care
    ♦ The Collaboration Project Coordinator serves on the Children’s Health Coalition that oversees the
      implementation of the early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Grant received through Maternal and
      Child Heath. The grant is administered by the Maryland department of Health and Mental Hygiene and
      adopted the health goals of the Achieving School Readiness: A Five-Year Action Agenda for Maryland.

    ♦ Following the annual review and renewal, an agreement between the University of Maryland School of
      Pediatric dentistry and HSSCP continues to improve the access of Head Start/early Head Start children
      to exams and treatment.

    ♦ With the participation of the HSSCP, a region III Oral Health Conference, sponsored by Maternal and
      Child Health, was held in Baltimore for Head Start Health Coordinators and dental health providers.

    ♦ two oral health brochures on good oral health practices were produced and disseminated by the HSSCP
      for Head Start/early Head Start, one for staff and one for parents.

    ♦ With the help of the Office of Oral Health in the department of Health and Mental Hygiene and dr.
      Harry Goodman from region III, attendees at the Leadership Symposium Oral Health Forum developed
      recommendations, resulting in the Maryland Head Start Oral Health action Plan. The plan was presented
      to the newly formed Children’s Health Coalition for assistance in achieving the goals.

    ♦ The Collaboration Coordinator is a member of the early Childhood Mental Health Steering Committee
      that provides advice to MSde on the developing early Childhood Mental Health Consultation Network.

    Welfare
    ♦ The Collaboration Coordinator participates in reviewing and advising Judy Center Partnerships that
      include the local department of social services representative along with Head Start and other community
      representatives to create and ensure productive relationships between all partners to the benefit of children
      in those programs.

    ♦ Finding Words is a national forensic interviewing course for law enforcement officers to learn how to talk
      with and relate to young children in preparation for applying appropriate interviewing techniques for
      children in crisis. The Collaboration Coordinator facilitated the participation of Head Start children.

    ♦ The HSSCP works with the Family Support Center Network to promote collaboration and coordination
                                                                               AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   135




   between Family Support Centers, Head Start/early Head Start, and adult education services in public
   schools to support family self-sufficiency.

Child Care
♦ as a result of the move of child care to MSde, the HSSCP is positioned to connect Head Start/early
  Head Start programs with child care licensing, grant development, and the subsidy program. Information
  in these areas is shared with grantees and facilitation provided upon request.

♦ The Collaboration Coordinator serves on the Office of Child Care advisory Council where collaboration
  issues are explored and opportunities developed with many public and private interest stakeholders.

♦ The HSSCP disseminates information on MSde funding opportunities that require partnerships
  between Head Start/early Head Start, pre-kindergarten, and child care, including the Head Start-State
  Supplemental Grants, the Judith P. Hoyer enhancement Grants, and through the Credentialing Program.

Education
♦ Grantees may obtain professional development on the Maryland Model for School readiness, the Ounce
  Scale, or another approved framework/assessment with funding from the Head Start-State Supplemental
  Grant that is administered by the Collaboration Coordinator.

♦ Information is shared on the MSde Credentialing Program whereby training costs are reimbursed, bo-
  nuses provided, and tuition is partially reimbursed.

♦ The Collaboration Coordinator encourages Head Start/early Head Start educators to enroll in the as-
  sociates degree in teaching (aat) in early Childhood education that is available in community colleges.
  The aat fully articulates credits from two year colleges to four year colleges.

♦ The Collaboration Coordinator worked with Head Start programs and community colleges to encourage
  Head Start/early Head Start educators with a Child development Credential (Cda) to enroll in early
  childhood college courses where a Cda may be accepted for six credits.

♦ The MSde division of early Childhood development and early childhood stakeholders developed a
  strategic plan for the division. The plan includes a benchmark for the expansion of on-line and on-site
  professional development and college courses.

Community Services
♦ The Collaboration Coordinator continues to work with Montgomery County Head Start to offer an an-
  nual summer training and mentoring course to child care providers to improve the quality of their services
  through adopting the Head Start Program Performance Standards. Following the training, Head Start
  children have been placed in child care programs.

♦ The Collaboration Coordinator continues to act as a liaison between PNC Financial Services and Head
  Start programs in Montgomery and Prince George’s Counties. The bank offers volunteer services from
  bank employees, school readiness materials, and funding to improve the quality of Head Start services in
  those counties. Montgomery County Head Start received two $50,000 grants to develop a science cur-
  riculum.
136 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    ♦ HSSCP produced and widely disseminated a brochure describing Head Start/early Head Start programs,
      services, benefits, and Head Start/early Head Start contact information.

    Family Literacy Services
    ♦ a series of parent tip sheets produced by the ready at Five Partnership provides information on child
      development and school readiness. The information is shared with Head Start/early Head Start programs
      monthly.

    ♦ The Collaboration Coordinator works with MSde adult education, even Start, local education agencies,
      and Judith P. Hoyer Partnerships to coordinate joint family literacy activities.

    Services to Children With Disabilities
    ♦ as noted above, a state agreement has influenced Maryland jurisdictions to improve the availability and
      quality of inclusion services for children with disabilities and their families. all local programs have revised
      or soon will be revising their current agreements, using the atate agreement as a model and integrating ef-
      forts with the second school readiness agreement that applies to the general population of young children.
      The Collaboration Coordinator provides state and local facilitation.

    ♦ The Collaboration Coordinator works with the Maryland Child Care resource Network that is develop-
      ing and coordinating the Children’s Mental Health Consultation initiative.

    Services to Homeless Children and Families
    The HSSCO director continues to serve on the Community Services Subcommittee to establish a system of
    collaborative efforts for reducing the cause and effects of homelessness as required in the Governor’s Strategic
    Plan on Homelessness.


    Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
    ♦ Through placement in MSde, the presence of the Collaboration Coordinator and Head Start/early Head
      Start representatives on relevant early childhood committees, such as the Three-year Strategic Plan for
      the division of early Childhood development, assures Head Start/early Head Start a place at the early
      childhood table for planning and developing early childhood systems in Maryland.

    ♦ The Collaboration Coordinator managed the 2006 Head Start-State Supplemental Grants for all Head
      Start/early Head Start programs in Maryland. The $3 million in Head Start-State Supplemental Funds,
      which enhance Federal funds, are distributed based on actual enrollment numbers. The funding is primar-
      ily used to conduct summer or extended day programs, improve quality, and provide professional devel-
      opment opportunities. an additional $1 million was added this year from the Child Care development
      Fund (CCdF) specifically to extend full-day, year-round early care and education services.

    ♦ The Collaboration Coordinator and several Head Start/early Head Start and Community action Pro-
      gram (CaP) administrators continue to serve on the early Care and education Committee to oversee the
      progress of achieving School readiness: a Five-Year action agenda for Maryland. The six goals address
      improving access to pre-kindergarten and health services, increasing parent involvement, increasing public
      awareness, improving professional development, and creating an infrastructure. Through the work of the
      committee members and their agencies/organizations, improvements in school readiness all over the State
      have occurred, as evidenced by MSde results that show a continuing increase in the number of children
      ready for school, including Head Start children.
                                                                                       AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               |   137




Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
The Collaboration Coordinator worked with the Maryland Child Care Resource Network and MSDE Early Learning staff on
adapting the Maryland Model for School Readiness (included in the Pre-K-12 standards) professional development modules
for public schools to use with Head Start and child care educators working with four-year-olds. The modules are complete
and train-the-trainer sessions will be conducted in 2007.
after six months of development and the active participation of the Collaboration Coordinator and Head
Start representatives, the division of early Childhood development produced a 3-year strategic plan:

♦ The plan coordinates services and activities offered through the State child care program, resource and
  referral centers, family support centers, Head Start collaboration, Judy Center Partnerships, subsidy, home
  visiting, program accreditation, staff credentialing, Infants and toddlers Programs, pre-school special edu-
  cation, public pre-kindergarten and kindergarten policy, and professional development.

♦ The purpose is to achieve a cohesive, effective early childhood system.

♦ The plan addresses quality improvements, changes in licensing requirements, professional development,
  public awareness, and partnerships between early childhood stakeholders to improve children’s access to
  and the quality of early childhood programs.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
♦ Working with the HSSCP, Ready At Five initiated a pilot project with a Head Start program in Baltimore
  City to assist Hispanic parents in preparing their children for success in school.

♦ available school readiness print and internet information on school readiness in Spanish are shared with
  Head Start/early Head Start programs.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
In 2007, the HSSCP will:

♦ Continue to support Head Start/early Head Start in improving the quality of their programs by coor-
  dinating available resources through state agencies and private resources, including the Head Start-State
  Supplemental Grants, Judith P. Hoyer enhancement Grants, Credentialing bonuses, tiered reimburse-
  ment, and other available, applicable funding opportunities.

♦ Facilitate revisions and renewals of state and local school readiness initiatives between public schools and
  Head Start, including outreach to child care programs, Infants and toddlers Programs, and preschool
  special education.

♦ Work with ta specialists to identify program needs and connect programs with appropriate opportunities.

♦ Focus on implementing Maryland’s Children’s Oral Health action Plan to promote decay prevention and
  improve access to treatment.
138 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    ♦ Work with State partners to coordinate the early Childhood Mental Health Initiative.

    ♦ Provide and coordinate professional development (including college) opportunities for Head Start/early
      Head Start staff.

    ♦ Work with the Md Head Start association to promote the value of Head Start/early Head Start to state
      and local agencies, legislators, and the public.

    ♦ Promote the participation of Md Head Start association in state policy and decision-making processes.

    ♦ disseminate school readiness tips, funding opportunities, professional development opportunities, pub-
      lic awareness suggestions and reports, and other relevant information to Head Start/early Head Start
      programs, parents, local education agencies, child care associations, resource and referral centers, family
      support centers, and other early childhood stakeholders.
                                                                            AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   139




                                     Massachusetts


Collaboration Director               Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                     areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Anita Moeller
                                     plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Department of early education
and Care
                                     Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
51 Sleeper Street                    services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Boston, MA 02210                     are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Phone: 617-988-7817                  at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
fax: 617-988-2451                    in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
anita.moeller@massmail.state.ma.us
                                     July 1, 2006, marked the first anniversary of the department of
                                     early education and Care (eeC) and its independent board;
Lead Agency Contact                  the first state department of its kind in the nation. The eeC’s
                                     mission is to continuously improve accessibility, quality, and
Amy Kershaw                          affordability of early education and care for children and their
Deputy Commissioner                  families by providing and coordinating a range of services
Phone: 617-988-6648                  and assistance. during its second year, eeC has continued
                                     the work of building a system of coordinated care that bal-
fax: 617-988-2451
                                     ances improvement of quality, affordability, and access in the
amy.kershaw@massmail.state.ma.us     process. Within this context, the Head Start-State Collabora-
                                     tion Office (HSSCO) is located in the Office of the deputy
ACF Regional Contact                 Commissioner of eeC. The HSSCO has worked to increase
                                     visibility of Head Start, its inclusion in policy-making and its
tom Killmurray                       integration of the Head Start model into the developing goals,
                                     priorities, and activities of eeC. Some successes (described in
Office of Head Start
                                     more detail throughout this report) include:
Region I
JfK federal Building                 ♦ The signing of a contract with the Ma Head Start as-
Room 2000                              sociation to support the work of the HSSCO and its state
                                       partners. This contract has enabled the executive director
Boston, MA 02203
                                       of the Ma Head Start association to increase Head Start
Phone: 617-565-1104                    collaboration with several state administrations in order to
fax: 617-565-2493                      address areas such as homelessness, oral health, and provi-
tom.killmurray@acf.hhs.gov             sion of comprehensive services to children involved with
                                       the Ma department of Social Services.

                                     ♦ Head Start directors and the executive director of the
                                       Ma Head Start association have continued to serve on
                                       both the eeC Commissioner’s advisory and Parent ad-
                                       visory. The HSSCO has supported the attendance of Head
                                       Start parents by reimbursing parents for the costs directly
                                       associated with their participation.
140 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    ♦ The eeC Commissioner has demonstrated commitment to working with Head Start in many ways
      including visiting programs, supporting increased funding, and attending the aCF region I joint admin-
      istrators meeting with the HSSCO held this year in Boston.

    ♦ Lessons learned from Head Start, among others, about developmental assessment were included in the
      development of the State’s first Universal Pre-Kindergarten (UPK) program.

    ♦ Head Start Program Performance Standards were included in the development of a new draft of State
      licensing regulations.

    ♦ HSSCO director provided input into the Ma State Plan submitted to aCF regarding child care dollars
      and areas where the State plan included Head Start collaborations.

    ♦ Collaboration increased with the Ma early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (MeCCS) project.


    Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
    your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
    The following highlights activities that resulted in the priority areas addressed in the past year:

    Early Education and Care
    ♦ assessment. The director of the HSSCO has continued to serve as an active participant of eeC’s child
      assessment team. The most significant outcome of this work in 2006 has been the incorporation of les-
      sons learned from a study on assessment that the HSSCO co-funded to capture the current assessment
      practices in the State and to identify best practice among them. This study incorporated lessons learned
      from programs with experience using assessment tools (including Head Start) and directly impacted the
      incorporation of assessment into the design of the state’s Pilot UPK project.

    ♦    Universal Pre-Kindergarten (UPK). The HSSCO director has served on the team charged with design-
        ing eeC’s first UPK program. In the fall of 2006, this team designed and distributed a UPK request for
        Information (rFI). The purpose of the rFI was to gather information to help eeC estimate the number
        and extent of providers likely to be eligible to apply for UPK funding, based on a set of proposed criteria.
        Of the 830 responses to the rFI, 218 providers (serving approximately 9,800 children, with approximately
        2,700 of those receiving eeC financial assistance) reported information that would indicate they meet
        all of the UPK Pilot proposed eligibility criteria. The rFI responses were shared with the eeC Board
        to inform their decisions about possible basis for awarding UPK pilot grants to programs. The Board
        and Commissioner reale recommended that funding levels be based on a formula that combines some
        measure of the overall community’s demographics and total program enrollment (i.e., the percent of low-
        income children living in a given community) with the specific number of eeC subsidized children served
        in a qualifying program. The funding would be distributed as a quality grant, in addition to the current
        eeC rate. recipients would be able to use the funds for a variety of program improvement initiatives, in-
        cluding: increasing staff salaries; purchasing equipment needed to collect and submit child assessment data
        electronically; and supporting professional development for staff. actual per program award amounts will
        depend on the final criteria, as well as the total number of eligible providers and the number of children
        that they serve. UPK grant applications were then planned for development early in 2007.
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS         |   141




♦ Licensing regulations. While Massachusetts is recognized for having excellent licensing regulations, eeC
  has begun a regulation reform effort designed to update the regulations to reflect current research on child
  development and to add more flexibility for providers and families. The potential changes create a set of
  “core” requirements across group, family, and school age regulations that outline features that are good for
  all children, regardless of age or setting, and also include requirements that are specific to different age
  groups and settings. The HSSCO director has been a member of the team of eeC staff charged with de-
  veloping the new State licensing regulations. Throughout the process, it has been the role of the HSSCO
  director to provide comparisons to and gathering guidance from the Head Start Program Performance
  Standards. In 2007, the role of the HSCCO will be to gather and incorporate feedback on the draft regula-
  tions from the Head Start community.

Health

Mental Health

♦ Young Minds Matter: A Summit to Address the Social and Emotional Wellbeing of our Youngest Children was
  held at the Omni Parker House on November 1, 2006, and was sponsored by the following organizations:
  United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley; Schott Fellowship in early Care and educa-
  tion; together for Kids Coalition; Massachusetts Head Start-State Collaboration Office, Massachusetts
  department of early education and Care; and the Massachusetts early Childhood Comprehensive
  Systems, Massachusetts department of Public Health. The purpose of the day-long Summit was to bring
  together leaders from elected office, private foundations, not-for-profits, public agencies, families, pediatric
  and clinical settings, and universities to share information and develop recommendations about the chal-
  lenge of creating a comprehensive, coordinated, high-quality system of early childhood mental health in
  Massachusetts. The proceedings of the day were documented (available at www.uwmb.org) and are being
  included in policy discussions across agencies.


Nutrition

♦ In 2006, the HSSCO director was appointed as eeC’s representative to the Ma Nutrition Board and has
  attended quarterly meetings.

♦ Increased collaboration between Head Start and WIC. The department of Public Health and the Ma
  Head Start association have created a MOU designed to increase WIC participation among Head Start
  families and to outline future collaboration opportunities for sharing of information, training, and stream-
  lining of services.


Oral Health

♦ The HSSCO director participated in the regional forum on Oral Health. The HSSCO also supported
  collaboration between the department of Public Health and the Ma Head Start association by providing
  $4,500 in matching funds to support the continuation of their oral health awareness project. as a result
  of this collaboration, a well respected puppeteer was hired to develop a puppet show designed to teach
  children and families about oral health. Materials in english and Spanish were purchased, and two events
  were held in the State where children and families enjoyed the show, met with a hygienist, and took home
  materials to reinforce what they had learned.
142 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Child Welfare
    ♦ The final FY2007 Budget included additional funding to provide early education and care to families
      involved with the department of Social Services (dSS). to spread the word about the availability of part-
      nerships with eeC for the provision of supportive child care, eeC and dSS jointly held regional meet-
      ings throughout the State to announce plans for implementing this important new “supportive expansion”
      initiative. With the new funding, eeC and dSS plan to serve an additional 800 families on waitlists for
      care – requiring a significant expansion of the current supportive child care system. to accomplish this
      goal, eeC made plans to: expand services through the existing contracted supportive system; collaborate
      with Head Start programs across the State; and recruit new providers in six areas throughout the State
      with high need and limited capacity. expansion via Head Start programs was prioritized due to the recog-
      nized match between the needs of the children involved with dSS and the comprehensive nature of Head
      Start programming. Through the supportive expansion project six Head Start programs identified that
      they would be willing to serve children that did not previously have a contract with eeC to do so, and
      several other contracted Head Start programs agreed to participate. The role of the HSSCO has been to
      support collaboration with dSS and Head Start in project design and implementation. The HSSCO also
      was responsible for the distribution and analysis of a survey to gather information on the Head Start pro-
      grams interested in participating in the supportive expansion project and for outreach to those programs.

    Services to Children with Disabilities
    ♦ The HSSCO director continues to serve as an active member of the department of Public Health’s early
      Intervention Interagency Coordinating Council and uses this opportunity to share information about
      Head Start systems as well as to gather information to share with members of the State Head Start asso-
      ciation. at their annual planning retreat, the HSSCO helped to facilitate the participation of the Com-
      missioner of eeC to participate on a panel to discuss interagency collaboration related to the services of
      infants and toddlers.

    ♦ The HSSCO director continues to work with the Head Start Quality Initiative’s disability Content
      Specialist to co-chair an interagency committee determined to develop a Memorandum of agreement
      on the integration and transition of children with disabilities into and between early education and care
      programs. Members include representatives of the department of education, early education and Care,
      department of Public Health’s early Intervention Program, Head Start (aCF and the State association)
      and a parent of a child in care. This group has continued to meet and now has a document ready for signa-
      ture by agency heads and roll-out in 2007/08.

    ♦ The Collaboration director continued participation on the eeC’s internal Special education team. The
      work of this team is focused on ensuring that Ma meets the requirements of chapter 619 and the State
      Performance Plan pertaining to early education and care services to children with disabilities. In 2006, the
      HSSCO helped to facilitate training for public school staff on required reporting on indicators for the Of-
      fice of Special education (OSeP). at this training, 86 public school systems were trained on the use of the
      tool required for use in the reporting of progress of children with disabilities.

    Services to Homeless Children and Families
    ♦ In the fall of 2006, over 300 individuals arrived in Massachusetts as they fled their communities devastated
      by Hurricane Katrina. eeC was part of the team assembled by Governor romney to support the families
      as they arrived. The HSSCO helped coordinate with the local Head Start program to provide child care,
      transportation, and comprehensive services to the young children and their families. The HSSCO direc-
      tor also volunteered in the “playspace” developed for the children by the non-profit Horizons for Home-
      less Children. In response to the support, Commissioner ann reale accepted the Outstanding advocate
                                                                               AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   143




   award at Horizons for Homeless Children’s 10th annual recognition and awards dinner on behalf of
   eeC. eeC was honored for its commitment to the needs of homeless children in providing services for
   young children who were evacuated from Hurricane Katrina to Camp edwards on Cape Cod.

♦ Through the contract with the Ma Head Start association, the HSSCO supported the participation of
  the executive director of the Ma Head Start association in two committees related to homelessness:

             ♦ The Steering Committee for the development of the 2nd National Young Children Without
               Homes conference. The first national conference on child homelessness in the country was
               held and was extremely well received with over 500 in attendance. The second conference is
               scheduled for May of 2007.

             ♦ The McKinney–Vento Preschool Subcommittee. This group has continued to work on a
               common definition of homelessness, an annual survey of shelter programs and the tracking
               of homeless children jointly served by eeC and the department of transitional assistance
               (dta). The greatest success of late from collaboration between dta and eeC has been the
               development of policies that provide immediate access for homeless families in the receipt of
               child care subsidies.

Community Service
♦ PNC Corporation’s Grow Up Great program is a school readiness initiative that allows PNC employees to
  take up to 40 hours per year of paid leave to volunteer at a Head Start program. The HSSCO director has
  continued to participate in regular national conference calls with PNC and met with PNC staff in Wash-
  ington, d.C. to discuss the program and plans for their demonstration Grant (one HS program in Ma is
  a PNC demonstration Grantee). regrettably, and seemingly due to staffing issues at PNC, the volunteer
  component of the Grow Up Great initiative seems to have faded in the past year. PNC reports that they
  remain committed to the program so hopes remain that it will be rejuvenated in 2007.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes and decisions.
In addition to the policy-related work described above, the HSSCO has also facilitated several meetings be-
tween members of the State Head Start association and the Commissioner of eeC. during her first year in
office, the Commissioner has visited two Head Start sites, attended a meeting with the full membership of the
State association, spoke at the New england Head Start association’s annual conference, and held a meeting
at her office to hear from members of the Head Start association Board. each of these meetings has served
as an opportunity for the Head Start programs in Massachusetts to inform the Commissioner of their hopes
and concerns about the integration of Head Start into the new department, as well as an opportunity for the
Commissioner to hear and learn from those in the field. Parents of children in Head Start have been present
at each of these meetings and have provided the Commissioner important perspectives to guide her work.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
New this year was an increase in collaboration with the Ma early Childhood Comprehensive Systems
(MeCCS) project. The HSSCO director was assigned by the Commissioner of eeC as the agencies liaison
to MeCCS. results of this relationship have included:

♦ Joint participation in the eCCS Partnership Meeting in Virginia in September 2006.

♦ Collaboration on a study of early childhood child care consultants. The MeCCS project was the lead
144 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




        agency and funded of the study, the HSSCO director supported the effort by providing input into the
        design of the survey tool, supporting outreach to the early education community via development and
        distribution of a letter to the field from eeC Commissioner, and posting a bulletin about the study on the
        eeC Web site.

    ♦ Supporting the eCCS director and eeC Commissioner in the planning and coordination of the joint-
      Commissioner meeting on MeCCS. at this meeting, Commissioners across human service agencies
      came together and agreed to define and work toward common goals related to early childhood systems
      development. The Commissioners then appointed key staff to take on the planning and management of
      the project. Both the MeCCS and HSSCO directors were included on this team. The “MeCCS execs,”
      as the group was named, has continued to meet monthly since. The group has decided to focus on early
      childhood mental health as a starting point for collaboration and systems development.

    Collaboration has also continued with the Head Start Quality Initiative (HSQI). early in the year, the HSQI
    and HSSCO directors and the director of the Ma Head Start association decided to meet regularly to
    ensure ongoing communication among offices. The HSSCO has attended meetings of the region I HSQI
    staff in order to provide them with an update on the development of the department of early education and
    Care, its priorities, and new policies that could have an impact on Head Start programs. Opportunities for
    collaboration around cluster technical assistance sessions were also discussed. In 2006, the HSSCO co-spon-
    sored the following cluster technical assistance sessions with the HSQI:

    ♦ Self-assessment

    ♦ Vision and Hearing (2 sessions)

    ♦ Infant/toddler socialization.

    In each case, child care partners were invited to participate. Partnering agencies that have attended these
    cluster sessions have included the staff of eeC, child care programs, public schools, home visiting programs,
    and early intervention. attendance has been excellent as each session was filled to capacity and some sessions
    developed a waiting list for entry. evaluation scores on each showed a high level of participant satisfaction for
    each of the sessions.

    Management of the Head Start Supplemental Grant: Massachusetts is one of 17 states that provide supple-
    mental Head Start funding and has done so as a state line-item since 1987. In FY2007, the HSSCO was suc-
    cessful in working with eeC to combine “Head Start supplemental salary” and “expansion” state grants into
    one $7.5 million Head Start Supplemental Grant. While the new grant did not allow programs to eliminate
    care for children enrolled with state dollars it did allow programs more flexibility in the use of these funds. In
    the fall of 2006, the eeC Board approved the allocation of a $1 million increase in state Head Start funding
    to this grant and for the first time allowed these funds to extend to early Head Start programming. The eeC
    Board agreed that programs receiving funding will be subject to new requirements, including: the establish-
    ment of direct access to eeC’s Centralized Waitlist; incorporation of Head Start into eeC’s statewide data
    collection systems; and acting as a point of entry for families into the eeC subsidy system, regardless of their
    eligibility for Head Start or early Head Start. In this way, Head Start and early Head Start programs have
    been able to more easily access this now $8.5 million dollar fund, yet have been required to develop some
    systematic methods for aligning their programming with that of the eeC.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS         |   145




Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
No efforts have been undertaken in 2006 that specifically target Head Start services for Hispanic children.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
along with all of the work of the HSSCO, particular areas likely for prioritization in 2007-08 include:

♦ Further development of UPK including issues raised by its grantees concerning assessment.

♦ Gathering feedback on and procurement of new licensing regulations.

♦ Continued collaboration with dSS regarding the supportive expansion project.

♦ Incorporation of the results of the HSSCO-funded study of mental health consultation into state-funding
  and policy considerations.

♦ Support of eeC’s procurement team with an analysis of best practice regarding the purchase of services
  from Head Start programs.

♦ Continued collaboration with the Ma Head Start association via a renewed contract for services.

This work will take place as Massachusetts’ new Governor begins his administration. eeC is thrilled that Gov.
Patrick continues to highlight early education as a top priority for his administration and looks forward to
working with his office to support the needs of Massachusetts children and families.
146 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                        AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   147




                                 Michigan


Collaboration Director           Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                 areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
nancy Willyard
                                 plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Department of Human Services
c/o early Childhood Investment   Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Corporation                      services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
221 north Pine Street            are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
lansing, MI 48933                at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 517-371-9000 ext. 202     in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 517-371-9080
                                 ♦ In February 2005, Gov. Granholm approved the formation
willyardn@michigan.gov             of the early Childhood Investment Corporation (eCIC)
www.mhsa.ws                        based on key recommendations from the eCCS grant. The
                                   major functions of the eCIC are to: select, fund, support,
Lead Agency Contact                and monitor local Great Start Collaboratives (GSCs) to
                                   provide universal access to early childhood services and
lisa Brewer-Walraven               supports; serve as a convener and coordination point for all
                                   early childhood system development; promote early child-
federal liaison
                                   hood education as an economic imperative/investment;
Department of Human Services       provide technical assistance regarding early childhood
235 South Grand Avenue             system building; leverage public and private sector funds
                                   to expand the availability and quality of early childhood
lansing, MI 48909
                                   services; and establish an accountability system to measure
Phone: 517-373-4116                achievement toward the results, outcomes, and performance
fax: 517-241-8125                  standards of the Great Start system. The HSSCO direc-
brewer-walravenl@michigan.gov      tor has been detailed to operate and function within her
                                   priority areas as part of the eCIC. This strategic placement
                                   is meant to facilitate continued Head Start participation
ACF Regional Contact               and connection to the major early childhood comprehen-
                                   sive system building initiative in Michigan. The HSSCO
frank Marfia                       director serves on the Child Care and education external
Chicago Regional Office            advisory committee of the executive Board of the eCIC.
Office of family and Child         This committee is working to develop a system that will ad-
Development                        dress pre-kindergarten collaborative efforts in Michigan.
233 north Michigan Avenue
                                 ♦ detailed to the eCIC, the HSSCO will continue to work
Suite 400
                                   closely with Michigan departments of education (Mde),
Chicago, Illinois 60601-5519       Human Services (dHS), Labor and economic Growth
Phone: 312-886-4925                (dLeG) and Community Health (dCH), as well as Mich-
fax: 312-353-2629                  igan Community action agency association (MCaaa)
                                   and Michigan Head Start association (MHSa). The
fmarfia@acf.hhs.gov
                                   HSSCO director consults often with and involves the MI
148 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




        Head Start association executive leadership team in the many initiatives, future planning and direction of
        the HSSCO. The HSSCO director also participates in the MI Head Start association quarterly meet-
        ings (two of which are held jointly with the MCaaa per their MOU) in order to update the larger Head
        Start (and Community action) community and gain feedback on the impact of HSSCO initiatives.

    ♦ The HSSCO has also been working closely with the Mde to undertake efforts at the state level designed
      to increase collaboration between Head Start and State pre-kindergarten programs. Meetings have been
      held with eCIC to coordinate enrollment and recruitment efforts; plan a research symposium on col-
      laboration between Head Start, State pre-kindergarten, special education, and GSCs for young children,
      present the early On redesign in Michigan and the latest research on special education and outcomes for
      young children; and give an awareness of the latest research that supports the effectiveness of Head Start
      and State pre-kindergarten programs for low-income populations.


    Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
    your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
    Health Care

    Goal

    to improve access to health care services for low-income families.

    ♦ In 2006, Michigan received the american association of State dental director’s grant to deliver a Plan
      of Action for Improving the Oral Health Status of Michigan Residents. The HSSCO director collaborated
      with members of the Michigan Oral Health Coalition to apply for this grant. We completed the Plan of
      Action for Improving the Oral Health Status of Michigan Residents (Summer 2005). The HSSCO supported
      regional focus groups throughout Michigan and supported Head Start participation in these focus groups.
      The HSSCO also facilitated meetings with staff from dCH to assist Head Start programs with the oral
      health needs of their children and families.

    ♦ as a member of the Michigan Oral Health Coalition, the HSSCO director has helped support the efforts
      of the Coalition and provide access to Head Start to the work of the Coalition. The HSSCO director is
      a member of the education workgroup of the Coalition and also working closely with the Michigan State
      dental director to address the specific needs of Head Start grantees.

    ♦ The HSSCO director is also working with dCH on vision and hearing screenings for all early Head
      Start children. a Michigan team that included Head Start staff has been trained in the use of eCHO
      and will be helping with the statewide screening in 2006.

    Welfare

    Goal

    to improve collaboration with the welfare system.

    ♦ Several Head Start agency staff have participated in wrap-around program training sessions occurring
      around the state. These training programs are designed as a collaborative model involving agencies and
      schools that seek to provide a safe and nurturing environment for children.
                                                                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   149




Child Care And Education

Goal

to improve the availability, accessibility, and quality of early education and child care services.

♦ In January 2003, Michigan continued on a journey to develop a comprehensive early childhood system,
  with the vision of Gov. Granholm’s “a Great Start for every child in Michigan: safe, healthy, and eager
  to succeed in school and in life.” In response to this, Mde convened an interagency group to lead the
  development of the Early Childhood Standards of Quality for Pre-kindergarten (ECSQ-PK). The State Board
  of education approved the document at its March 2005 meeting. Immediately after the approval of the
  pre-kindergarten document, Mde convened another interagency group to lead the development of a
  similar document to apply to programs for children birth to three years of age. HSSCO facilitated Head
  Start participation at the parent, staff, and director levels on both of these groups.

♦ The document for children birth to three years of age was more difficult to develop since Michigan did not
  have any previous documents to use. Starting from the eCSQ-PK framework, an ad-hoc committee and
  a Steering Committee were convened and work began in spring of 2005. The Steering Committee wanted
  an alternate framework that would include goals for children’s development and learning. The steering
  committee was inspired by the work in New Zealand, with their framework Te Whàriki, but the principles
  needed to apply to Michigan’s children. We began the process of putting together the Michigan Early
  Childhood Standards of Quality for Infants and Toddler Programs (ECSQ-IT), which was a collaborative
  effort of 65 individuals, including the HSSCO director and Head Start and early Head Start staff and
  directors. This document went out for public comment and was approved by the State Board of education
  in december 2006.

♦ There are articulation agreements between some of Michigan’s two-year and four-year institutions, but
  the effort is very fragmented. This past spring, Mde and the HSSCO director formed a focus group
  of two- and four-year higher education institutions early childhood coordinators to begin the discussion
  of a statewide professional development system for professionals leading to a degree in early childhood
  education or child development, including articulation issues and solutions. The HSSCO director served
  as a member of the professional development workgroup and co-facilitated with Mde an organizational
  meeting to address articulation issues.

♦ The HSSCO director also served as a member of a statewide professional development workgroup. It has
  designed a brochure to promote the Core Knowledge and Core Competencies for early Childhood Care
  and education Professionals framework.

♦ a workgroup was formed to address recruitment and enrollment issues for Head Start and the State pre-k
  program Michigan School readiness Program (MSrP). The HSSCO, dHS, Mde, and members of
  several Head Start programs continue to discuss, identify, and create action steps toward resolving recruit-
  ment and enrollment issues between local Head Start programs and MSrP. These meetings have resulted
  in joint recruitment and eligibility efforts at the local level to build capacity for all low-income children in
  Michigan.

♦ The HSSCO director continues to be directly involved in the work of dr. Susan B. Neuman from the
  University of Michigan and other Michigan early childhood partners on a U.S. department of education
  Professional development Grant. Michigan was awarded this grant for two years. as a result of this grant,
  a collaborative team was put together from the University of Michigan, dHS, Mi4Cs, community col-
  leges, and the MI Head Start association to address the issues of mentor coaching in the area of literacy
  and numeracy.
150 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    ♦ The HSSCO director has formed the Michigan Statewide Social/emotional Workgroup to address
      professional development concerns of Head Start mental health consultants and other mental health con-
      sultants in Michigan. These concerns were related to the accessibility of services, collaboration with Head
      Start mental health staff and other state mental health consultants, professional development and knowl-
      edge of the Head Start social/emotional PrOtOCOL. a listserv was developed to connect all of the
      consultants, networking sessions were held jointly with dCH’s Child Care expulsion Prevention Program
      consultants who have assisted Head Start programs with professional development.

    Community Service

    Goal

    to promote interaction with community service agencies

    ♦ The HSSCO has worked to link Head Start programs with Service Learning programs from community
      colleges and four-year institutions in Michigan.

    ♦ The HSSCO connected Spanish-speaking college students to assist Head Start programs that have a need
      with their Spanish-speaking children.

    Family Literacy

    Goal

    to improve access to family literacy services

    ♦ The HSSCO is a part of the even Start statewide advisory committee name taG (technical assistance
      Group) which meets every other month. The HSSCO director has helped to complete a Family Centered
      Practices model that is being field tested throughout Michigan.

    ♦ The HSSCO has supported informational meetings to promote the National Center for Family Literacy
      Project with Head Start agencies across the State, and family literacy symposiums are planned in May of
      2007.

    Children With Disabilities

    Goal

    to improve opportunities for children with disabilities

    ♦ Michigan has had a long history of leading the nation on issues and best practices around infant mental
      health. Unfortunately, the lack of dollars allocated towards infant mental health has steadily decreased. We
      are lucky in Michigan to have Betty tableman from Michigan State University who is known nationally
      for her work on infant mental health issues to partner in our efforts. The HSSCO director has partnered
      with Ms. tableman to connect mental health consultants in Michigan. We have brought together mental
      health consultants from Head Start and early Head Start, dCH, dHS, Mde, early On and Leas to
      help identify issues relative to the mental health needs of infants and toddlers.
                                                                               AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS        |   151




♦ The HSSCO director convened a meeting of stakeholders to begin the revision of the MOU on disabili-
  ties between the Mde and Head Start. a final MOU will be endorsed in early 2006.

Opportunities For Homeless Children

Goal

to improve opportunities for homeless children

♦ The HSSCO has been promoting linkage between the Michigan State Housing development authority
  (MSHda) and Head Start agencies. Moreover, the HSSCO director has continued to participate on the
  Michigan Homeless assistance advisory Board (MHaaB). MHaaB, the Statewide Continuum of Care
  (COC) planning body, is comprised of representatives from state human service departments, coalitions of
  statewide homeless service providers, non-profit state housing developers, foundations, and representatives
  from the local business community.

♦ a MHaaB ad-hoc work group was responsible for developing a 2006 action Plan for addressing home-
  lessness and ending chronic homelessness in Michigan.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
Michigan HSSCO Advisory Committee
Meetings are held to bring together advisory members that represent various government departments, agen-
cies, Head Start directors, staff, and parents. The advisory Committee helps give direction to the HSSCO
director. a new Michigan early Learning Council was formed in 2006 to replace the current advisory
committee. This new early Learning Council will be a part of the Michigan early Childhood Investment
Corporation.

Michigan’s Fatherhood Initiative
The HSSCO serves on the dHS Fatherhood Workgroup and connects members of this workgroup and the
Michigan Fatherhood Coalition to region V and national initiatives. The HSSCO also was a sponsor of the
Michigan Fatherhood Coalition Statewide Conference.

Migrant Services
Michigan has a large number of migrant farm workers that spend six to eleven months working for growers in
Michigan. While we have telamon Migrant Head Start to serve a large number of migrant children, some of
their programs are not located near the growers. a lot of the migrant children have “in-camp” aides that care
for them within each camp while their parents are working. The use of “in-camp” aides to care for children
is unique to Michigan. HSSCO has helped to facilitate collaboration between all of the programs that serve
migrant children and their families. This collaborative effort became the Michigan Migrant Child task Force
which is a work group of the Michigan Interagency Migrant Services Council. The HSSCO director has also
coordinated these activities with the National Migrant Head Start technical assistance Collaboration Office.
This team approach was useful as we worked on a strategic plan for Michigan to address the needs of migrant
children and their families. The strategic planning continued through 2006 with two specific projects.

♦ Michigan State University extension in collaboration with the HSSCO conducted focus groups with
  parents and providers in two of our migrant camps.
152 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    ♦ The Michigan 4Cs (resource and referral) did red Cross and First aid basic training courses with migrant
      child care providers. The collaboration between all of the members of the task Force resulted in Michigan
      being asked to present at the National Hispanic Institute in denver, Colorado and additional conferences
      and speaking engagements in Michigan. It was noted by many of the conference participants that it was
      the first time they had seen a Child Care administrator, HSSCO director, Mde representative, Migrant
      Head Start director, resource and referral executive director, and a State Migrant Services director on
      the same stage.

    Domestic Violence Pilot
    The HSSCO was awarded a grant from Glenwood research and the Office of Head Start to facilitate and
    collaborate on a domestic Violence Pilot project with the City of detroit Head Start program and the
    Michigan dHS in 2005. Because of the success of this pilot in Michigan, the dHS along with Head Start
    has continued this professional development for all Head Start programs in Michigan.

    HSSCO director actively serves on numerous State committees such as:
          ♦ early Childhood Investment Corporation
          ♦ Michigan department of education early Childhood Collaborative Conference
          ♦ t.e.a.C.H. Michigan advisory Committee
          ♦ early On
          ♦ Michigan Housing development authority advisory Committee
          ♦ Michigan Oral Health Coalition
          ♦ Michigan Migrant Services advisory Committee
          ♦ Michigan day Care Licensing advisory Committee



    Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
    ♦ One of the major highlights of 2006 was the work of the Michigan tribal Child task Force. This task
      Force was formed in November 2005 from the efforts of the dHS Office of Native affairs, HSSCO di-
      rector, MI Head Start association executive director, and Michigan Child Care administrator, to address
      the child care needs for Native american children and their families in Michigan. The tribal Child task
      Force convened a Steering Committee facilitated by Susan rohrbough from NCCIC and Grace Hardy
      from tri-tech to focus on the child related needs of the 12 Federally-recognized tribes in Michigan.
      Listening sessions were held with the 12 tribes and a tribal Future Search Conference was planned and
      conducted in august 2006. The focus of the Future Search Conference was to develop a coordinated vision
      and service delivery system that focused on protecting reservations and strengthening of Native american
      children and their families both on and off tribal lands. This was the first time that all 12 tribes came
      together to discuss issues related to early childhood care and education.

    ♦ another exciting activity of the HSSCO was moving into the new offices of the early Childhood Invest-
      ment Corporation (eCIC). The HSSCO was detailed to eCIC by the Michigan dHS to assist in the col-
      laborative work of all of the early childhood partners in Michigan, including Head Start, in the develop-
      ment and implementation of the Great Start System for Michigan.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   153




Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
♦ The HSSCO has extensively worked with the Migrant and Seasonal Head Start Programs in Michigan.
  The HSSCO has played a pivotal part in collaborating with Gov. Granholm’s Office of Migrant af-
  fairs that is administratively located in the Michigan dHS. The HSSCO director is a participant of the
  ad-hoc early Childhood Committee for Migrant affairs Interagency Services Council of Michigan. This
  ad-hoc early Childhood Committee is also working with Brenda Coakley, Migrant and Seasonal Head
  Start-State Collaboration director. The forming of the Michigan Migrant Child task Force was a direct
  result of the collaboration of early learning partners that affect the lives of migrant children. We began the
  implementation of our strategic plan in 2006 and will be revising this plan in 2007.

♦ The HSSCO director is a member of Projecto escalon through Michigan State University. Projecto
  escalon is working to address linguistic and cultural needs of Hispanics as well as making sure that His-
  panics are represented in all workgroups at the state level.

♦ The HSSCO continues to respond to the needs of the Hispanic Head Start families in Michigan, whether
  they are in regular Head Start classrooms or in our telamon Migrant and Seasonal Head Start programs.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
The HSSCO director meets with the dHS Federal Liaison and the Chief Operating Officer of eCIC to
develop the HSSCO work plan. This work plan is focused on the HSSCO priorities and how these priorities
can be meshed with the priorities of the eCIC and the state early childhood system building efforts.
154 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS             |   155




                              Migrant & Seasonal
                              Head Start

Collaboration Director        Migrant and Seasonal Head Start
                              Al, AR, AZ, CA, CO, De, fl, GA, IA, ID, Il, In, KY, lA, MD, MA,
Brenda B. Coakley             MI, Mn, MO, ne, nJ, nM, nY, nC, nD, nV, OH, OK, OR, PA, SC,
Academy for educational       tn, tX, ut, VA, WA, WI, WY
Development
1875 Connecticut Avenue, nW
                              Introduction
Suite 800
                              Migrant and Seasonal Head Start (MSHS) programs, origi-
Washington, DC 20009
                              nally funded in 1969, are currently providing services for
Phone: 202-884-8005           35,657 children, six-weeks of age to compulsory school age, at
fax: 202-884-8732             over 450 center sites, 100 family child care homes, in 38 states.
bcoakley@aed.org              MSHS programs are seasonal in nature, providing services in
                              some areas for two months and other areas for ten months.
                              Hours of service reflect the needs of the migrant farm worker
Lead Agency Contact           parents—12 hours a day and often 6 days a week. MSHS pro-
                              grams are administered from the national level—HHS Office
Helen Visarraga               of Head Start (OHS)/Migrant and Seasonal Program Branch
Phone: 202-884-8792           (MSPB).
fax: 202-884-8732
hvisarraga@aed.org            The MSHS Collaboration Office, a division of the MSHS
                              technical assistance Center (taC-12), has been operating
                              without the benefit of a Federal/state collaboration grant since
ACF Regional Contact          2004. However, its co-location with, and support from taC-
                              12, increases the direct availability of training and technical
Sandra Carton                 assistance to the grantee and delegate programs, access to the
Office of Head Start          technical assistance specialist (content experts and field), as
Portals Building              well as improves MSHS HSSCO visibility. The Collabora-
                              tion Office also benefits from the direct relationship with
8th floor
                              MSPB, grantee and delegate agencies of the Federal region.
1250 Maryland Avenue, SW      These advantages, coupled with the academy for educational
Washington, DC 20024          development, a nationally/internationally recognized incorpo-
Phone: 202-205-8397           rated non-profit, make for an effective and productive working
                              relationship.
fax: 202-260-9336
scarton@hhs.acf.gov           The role of the MSHS Collaboration Office:

                              ♦ Has a national focus.

                              ♦ Stimulates Federal, state, and community partnerships to
                                strengthen efforts to address critical migrant child and
                                family issues.
156 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    ♦ Fosters collaboration among states to enable migrant farm workers and programs to readily and fully
      access services.

    ♦ expands Federal-to-state partnerships to strengthen services for migrant and seasonal farm workers.

    ♦ Supports state and Federal governments to coordinate services and initiatives.

    ♦ Provides materials, support, and expertise to Migrant and Seasonal Head Start programs in forging part-
      nerships and accessing resources and services.

    The MSHS Collaboration Office continues be engaged with select states to simulate needed comprehensive
    systems changes by:

    ♦ Bringing leaders and organizations together in regional, state, and national meetings to collectively solve
      shared challenges.

    ♦ assisting in identifying strategies to address needs and priorities through consultation with diverse stake-
      holders.

    ♦ Contributing to the development of information and communication systems for those working with
      migrant and seasonal farm worker populations.

    ♦ Promoting greater visibility and awareness across systems of early childhood education/migrant and sea-
      sonal farm workers’ concerns.

    ♦ assisting in identifying public and private resources and services.

    ♦ Helping states plan (through their State Head Start Collaboration Offices), develop, and implement col-
      laborations and partnerships to support migrant farm worker families and communities.

    The co-location of MSHS Collaboration Office with the MSHS technical assistance Center continues to
    offer numerous and ongoing opportunities for:

    ♦ development and sharing of migrant-specific resources (such as the 2006 publications: “Migrant and Sea-
      sonal Head Start Center Locator Directory, Bilingual Infant/Toddler Environments: Supporting Language and
      Learning In Our Youngest Children, Introduction to Data Analysis Handbook, and Professional Development
      Handbook.”)

    ♦ regular exchange with program content and migrant experts.

    ♦ timely delivery of responsive technical assistance.

    ♦ Obtaining the most current and accurate Federal policy directives affecting MSHS via relationship with
      the Head Start Office/Migrant and Seasonal Program Branch (MSPB).

    ♦ dissemination of, and direct access to, the most up-to-date migrant-specific information and contacts—
      national, state, and local—and MSHS grantees.
                                                                                            AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                |   157




Work Plan Goals and Outcomes
The administrative location of the MSHS Collaboration Office has resulted in the development of a multi-
year work plan which reflects aspects of partnership development, as well as technical assistance.

The work plan, while being primarily nationally focused, also identifies state and local issues critical to
strengthening migrant initiatives, partnerships, and opportunities for resource development and/or coordina-
tion which will support MSHS. The Collaboration Office continues to identify states which are recognized as,
or have the potential for, demonstrating promising best collaboration practices (and research) in health and
early care/education based upon the State’s infrastructure, national recognition and/or resource commitment.
The state-to-state work with State Head Start Collaboration Offices is addressing and raising the awareness
for a coordinated approach to the inclusion of MSHS services, maximizing/leveraging funding, and creating
living case studies for consideration and possible replication.

The following work plan goals have been designed to be conceptually compatible with the Office of Head
Start’s expectations of all State Head Start Collaboration Offices. Much of the work being conducted and the
resulting accomplishments are occurring as a result of the interest and engagement of the State Head Start
Collaboration Offices.


Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from
your work plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive services for all low-income children. Include a description
of how you are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations at the local level, as well as your efforts to
involve Head Start programs in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.

Goal

Serve as facilitator to improve and expand services for low-income children in Head Start, child care, and
State preschool programs


Outcomes

♦ Continuous and ongoing inter- and intra-agency dialogue with management staff of the Office of Head
  Start, Child Care Bureau and the Office of Migrant education (U.S. department of education) in raising
  awareness about, identifying policies, reducing barriers to, and improving coordination of the use of child
  care financial assistance by migrant farm worker families and enrollment in Migrant education pre-
  kindergarten. With assistance from the Migrant and Seasonal Head Start technical assistance Center
  (taC-12), who surveyed Migrant and Seasonal Head Start (MSHS) grantees to assess their level of
  involvement and/or partnerships with Migrant education pre-kindergarten programs. This information
  has become the framework for early childhood/pre-kindergarten systems discussions with the Office of
  Migrant education and U.S. department of education and used as the base-line data for the 2006 MSHS
  HSSCO Supplemental grant proposal.

♦ Presentations and/or facilitation of presentations at state and national conferences: National association
  of Child Care resource and referral agencies, Child Care Bureau’s 2006 State administrator’s Meeting,
  University of California/davis Campus Immigration reform Conference, Michigan Interagency Migrant
  Services Committee, and Head Start National Hispanic Institute.
158 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    ♦ Media utilization to heighten awareness and communicate the issues related to migrant farm worker
      children—authored articles for professional newsletters: Early Childhood Report: Children With Special
      Needs & Their Families and Michigan Pediatric Update Michigan Chapter, american academy of Pediatrics;
      in person and video conferencing.

    ♦ resource, research, and researcher (current and prospective) identification of those whose work contributes
      to the core/base knowledge about this special population and which can be used to inform policy; such
      individuals as those affiliated with the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, University
      of North Carolina department of Maternal and Child Health, Case Western reserve University, Western
      Michigan University, and the University of California: davis Campus department of agriculture and re-
      source economics, Berkley School of Public Health, San Francisco department of Growth and develop-
      ment.

    Goal

    Build best possible linkages between local, community-based Head Start programs and state early childhood
    programs and state early childhood initiatives and policies.

    Outcomes

    ♦ Creation of statewide migrant-specific task forces or sub-committees and the inclusion of MSHS mem-
      bership on state advisory councils, state and national conference presentations, and policy forum invita-
      tions, site-visits, etc., with State Head Start Collaboration Office counterparts in delaware, Maryland,
      Michigan, North Carolina, South Carolina, tennessee, and others.

    ♦ Membership in the MSHS Oral Health team: developing goals and strategies to create more effective
      oral health service delivery and coordination with state oral health systems and services.

    ♦ MSHS Collaboration Office as a catalyst for change in early care/education system reforms through
      its state-to-state work by identifying or recognizing opportunities for intervention and organizational
      change—fiscal, administrative, or structural; being a partner with other technical assistance entities such
      as NCCIC, Project tHrIVe, and the National Center for Farm worker Health; being a participant in
      the planning of North Carolina Head Start Latino Institute and as invited speaker at the State Head Start
      association Board of director’s leadership institute; having membership on State early childhood advi-
      sory councils; and being a participant in the planning of delaware’s new professional development system.
      These activities have resulted in the inclusion of the migrant farm worker child perspective as state policies
      are reviewed and systems are reformed.


    Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
    Outcomes

    ♦ Continue to distribute and promote the first national Migrant and Seasonal Head Start Center Locator
      directory. a product of the MSHS Collaboration Office, it provides the names, addresses, and contact
      information, unique opening and closing schedules of all MSHS grantees/delegates, the 450 center sites in
      each state, as well as a state map which identifies the geographical location of each center. This year it has
      been marketed by the National Migrant Head Start association and provided to all NMSHSa legislative
      day participants including elected officials, MSH grantees and MSHS partners. The publication is avail-
      able in searchable electronic and PdF editions at: www.ece.aed.org/publications/locator.htm and as a link
      to the National Maternal and Child Oral Health resource Center at Georgetown University—
      http://www.mchoralhealth.org. address and telephone site information can be obtained on the early
      Childhood Learning and knowledge Center (eCLKC): http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc.
                                                                              AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS         |   159




♦ documented examples of coordinated migrant and seasonal early care service delivery “best practice col-
  laboration models.”

♦ early stage collaboration with the National Center for Children in Poverty Project tHrIVe to seek
  opportunities to inform the work of the State early Childhood Comprehensive Systems grantees.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
♦ Hosted the Federal Migrant Interagency Committee quarterly meeting in december. Membership
  includes representatives from all major Federal departments which administer migrant farm worker-
  related programs, policy or research, such as the department of Labor, Housing, and Urban development,
  education, environmental Protection agency, etc. The host develops the meeting agenda and conducts
  the meeting. traditionally, and in keeping with our mission, the MSHS hosted meetings are migrant child
  and/or family focused. The 2006 guest speaker dr. andrea Weathers—pediatrician, researcher, and profes-
  sor of the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill—spoke on her research: “Health access to Care
  among Children of agricultural Labor Migrants in the United States.”

♦ Presented testimony at the public hearings conducted by the National advisory Council on Migrant
  Health and addressed the U.S. environmental Protection agency Child Health Protection advisory
  Committee.

♦ Continue to build relationships with key organizations/representatives that may have impact upon or
  influence national migrant farm worker child and family conditions:

             ♦ National advisory Council on Migrant Health, U.S. department of Health and Human
               Services, Health resources and Services administration (HrSa).

             ♦ american academy of Pediatrics, early education and Child Care Initiatives, and the
               Michigan Chapter of the american academy of Pediatrics.

             ♦ U.S. department of Health and Human Services, Health resources and Services adminis-
               tration, Bureau of Maternal and Child Health, and Bureau of Minority Health.

             ♦ U.S. environmental Protection agency, Office of Children’s Health Protection, and Office
               of Pesticide Programs.

             ♦ Columbia University, National Center on Children in Poverty, Project tHrIVe.

             ♦ Old North State dental Society (North Carolina).

             ♦ University of California, davis Campus, department of agriculture and resource economics.

             ♦ Pre- and Post-doctoral students with research interest in migrant children and families.

             ♦ State Offices of Medicaid assistance.

             ♦ University cooperative extension programs.
160 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
    families in your State.
    MSHS programs operate in 38 states. Since 98% of the Migrant and Seasonal Head Start children and fami-
    lies are Hispanic, all efforts and activities of this Collaboration Office directly affect this population. MSHS
    programs recognize the need for coordination and provision of services that respond to the social, cultural,
    and linguistic needs of the migrant farm worker family-their work and lifestyle. The challenge is to ensure that
    coordination of MSHS services occurs in all 38 states where programs operate. The HSSCOs play a pivotal
    role in making this occur.


    How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
    coming year?
    The MSHS Collaboration Office work plan is multi-year. The Collaboration Office continues to build upon
    the previous years’ work and experiences with a focus on the key elements of successful partnerships: people,
    systems, and resources.
                                                                          AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   161




                                   Minnesota


Collaboration Director             Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                   areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Mary Vanderwert
                                   plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Minnesota Department of
education
                                   Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
1500 Highway 36 West               services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Roseville, Mn 55113                are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Phone: 651-582-8463                at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
fax: 651-582-8494                  in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
mary.vanderwert@state.mn.us
http://education.state.mn.us/mde   Goal

                                   Increase the availability, quality, and affordability of child care
Lead Agency Contact                and preschool services.

Barbara O’Sullivan
                                   ♦ Served as member of the Family, Friend and Neighbor
Phone: 651-582-8422                  Care task Force to develop materials and strategies for
fax: 651-582-8494                    supporting the care provided in these settings. a brochure
Barbara.osullivan@state.mn.us        was designed and printed to alert providers about the ser-
                                     vices available to them, and networking meetings between
                                     child care resource and referral staff, Head Start programs,
ACF Regional Contact                 and others were held to network and share successful
                                     strategies.
leonard norberg
ACf Region V                       ♦ The HSSCO assisted in planning and holding an all-day
233 north Michigan Avenue            meeting for refugee and immigrant leaders to provide
fourth floor                         information about early care and education opportunities
                                     for their clients.
Chicago, Il 60601
Phone: 312-353-5205                ♦ Series of meetings with staff from dHS to discuss the
fax: 312-353-2629                    advantages and barriers to Head Start and child care col-
lnorberg@acf.hhs.gov                 laborations. Gathered sample contracts and Performance
                                     Standards that pertain to child care and discussed child
                                     care assistance regulations and policies that set up barriers
                                     to collaboration. Visited 8 programs (some with CCaP
                                     staff ) that have established and successful collaborations
                                     with School readiness/eCFe or child care to explore
                                     what makes them successful, what benefits there were for
                                     children, and to be familiar with how the programs served
                                     families. This work continues.
162 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    ♦ attended meetings of MntreCC early Childhood Committee to share information and learn how
      tribal programs are providing care and resources to child in their communities. also participated in the
      Mahnomen early Childhood Conference on Brain development to build relationships and gain new
      skills and knowledge.

    ♦ assisted in the facilitation of two meetings for the National Governor’s association Summit on School
      readiness. These meetings brought together leaders in the early Childhood community, policy makers,
      and researchers to provide recommendations to the Governor for policy. These recommendations have
      been the basis for legislative consideration in the current session.

    ♦ Wrote supplemental grant and participated in the planning for the partnership meeting held in January
      2007.

    ♦ Participated on both the MeCCSS Leadership team and Outreach Workgroup to carry out the goals
      of the grant. This group has supported the development of a Web site and a series of videos in several
      languages that promote early childhood screening.

    ♦ arranged for and facilitated two focus groups of parents to provide input to the Quality rating System
      for child care being developed at the department of Human Services.


    Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
    your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
    Health Care
    ♦ Increase access to comprehensive health care services.

    ♦ The Collaboration Office has supported the work on oral health in Minnesota that has resulted in the
      establishment of collaborative practice between dental hygienists and dentists throughout the State to
      provide greater access to dental care. In addition, preventive care in the form of fluoride varnish can now
      be provided by Head Start programs that desire to do so with reimbursement through medical assistance.

    ♦ The HSSCO facilitated a day of networking for Head Start Health Coordinators with training on early
      childhood screening, inclusion of children with disabilities, and other related topics at Mde.

    ♦ Participated in the aBCd II stakeholders meetings to support the use of social emotional screening tools
      in pediatrician/family practice clinics and to provide training for mental health professionals in the dC
      0-3 to increase their skills in working with young children.

    ♦ Supported the Summer Institute on Mental Health at the College of St. Benedict where Head Start staff,
      health care plan providers, and mental health professionals met to share promising practices and recent
      efforts to improve access to mental health care.

    ♦ Helped to facilitate a day of training on mental health and behavior management provided by Medica and
      MHSa held at Mde.
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   163




Welfare
♦ assist families in moving successfully from welfare to work.

              ♦ Participated in the planning and facilitated part of the training for Head Start staff on the
                Four Cornerstones of Financial Literacy and an orientation to other opportunities for fami-
                lies to build assets in Minnesota.

              ♦ established strong relationship with staff of the Office of economic Opportunity where the
                CSBG funds are administered to find ways to collaborate in support of Head Start activities
                in the State.

Child Care
♦ Increase the availability, quality and affordability of services.

              ♦ See earlier.

Education
♦ Promote the coordination of early childhood programs.

              ♦ Planned and assisted in the facilitation of a data conference for early childhood adminis-
                trators. Participants learned about developing professional learning communities, specific
                information about assessment tools, and the use of technology to support using data to guide
                classroom and program decision making. One hundred fifty staff attended.

              ♦ Member of the “Change Process Leadership team,” which met to create a vision for a new
                and improved professional development system for child care in Minnesota. The result of
                several meetings was a request for Proposals issued in april 2007. This new contractor will
                have responsibility for recruiting and certifying trainers for the system, building a registry to
                track professional development for individuals, and work with MnSCU (Minnesota State
                Colleges and Universities) to facilitate articulation throughout the system.

              ♦ Served as Mde liaison to the planning committee for the early Childhood administrators
                Conference, “essential Pieces for effective Leadership.” This involved coordinating the plans,
                serving as liaison with the conference consultants and attending to many details.

              ♦ Participated in overall planning and specific hospitality details for second annual Birth to
                Three Conference. Secured the main keynote and breakout speakers and coordinated well-
                ness and other activities to make the conference a rich and pleasant experience. Nearly 450
                professionals attended the conference in January 2007.

              ♦ Served on the early Childhood advisory Committee for the MacPhail Center for Music.
164 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Community Services
    ♦ Increase range of community service partnerships.

                   ♦ Worked with several groups considering proposals for the Minnesota Parent Information
                     and resource Center. PaCer, a local parent advocacy group received the grant, and it was
                     established in September. The HSSCO sits on the advisory Committee.

                   ♦ Participated in quarterly Minnesota Head Start association meetings, gave updates to Board
                     and general assembly, and facilitated networking sessions.

                   ♦ Served on the early Childhood advisory Committee for the United Way Success By Six
                     initiative.

                   ♦ Chaired the Children’s Mental Health Subcommittee of the ramsey County Citizen’s
                     advisory Committee.

    Family Literacy Services
    ♦ Increase family literacy.

                   ♦ Participated in the planning and implementation of the 2006 Family Literacy conference
                     for about 200 participants. assisted in securing presenters and in facilitation of the event.

    Services to Children with Disabilities
    ♦ Increase number of low-income children with disabilities who receive appropriate early intervention
      services.

                   ♦ Planned and facilitated a day-long meeting for Head Start programs with a focus on dis-
                     abilities. topics included changes to Part C eligibility, eCSe rules, and MnSIC agreements
                     and how they relate to Head Start. Nearly all of the State’s programs had representation.

                   ♦ Served on the Interagency Screening taskforce and Screening Workgroup. The taskforce
                     has reviewed, set standards for acceptability, and approved tools for the early Childhood
                     Screening program. Only school districts utilizing approved screening instruments can be
                     reimbursed for this activity. The workgroup developed an award winning tool for establishing
                     and evaluating community screening programs. The workgroup is working on a Web-based
                     training module to assist communities in using the tool and improving their programs.

                   ♦ Presented a draft of a State Interagency agreement to both tribal and region V grantees
                     for their input. With that, the agreement was sent to the region V office for approval. That
                     approval is still pending.

                   ♦ Member of the Center for Inclusive Child Care advisory Committee—provided input to
                     strategic plan.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS             |   165




Services to Homeless Children and Families
♦ Coordinated a forum with MN Head Start association to share successful strategies for serving children
  and families who are homeless. From the meeting drafted a written piece for consideration by MN Head
  Start association to use in educating others about the role of Head Start in serving children who are
  homeless.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
♦ HSSCO participated in the National Governors association-funded Summit on School readiness held in
  the form of two meetings in the summer of 2006. These meetings brought together the leaders in the field
  of early Childhood Care and education, policymakers, advocates, and researchers to be oriented to the
  services currently being offered in the State, to identify gaps in the programs and the system, and to make
  recommendations for improvement. These recommendations became the basis for the legislative proposals
  in the current session.

♦ Participated in the development of the Head Start portion of the Mde proposal to the legislature. This
  includes policies for enrollment, partnerships, and literacy curriculum.

♦ Participated in the retreat held at St. John’s University to provide input to the legislative agenda and vision
  creation for the BUILd initiative.

♦ Member of the early Learning Services division of Mde and Head Start team. Provide input and
  reports on community activities pertinent to the creation of Mde initiatives in regard to early childhood
  care and education.

♦ Met quarterly with Booz allen Hamilton staff to develop and maintain a positive and productive relation-
  ship with state providers and the Minnesota Head Start association.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
Hosted a state meeting where Head Start directors were oriented to the qualification and procedure for
applying for the e-rate reimbursement. Several programs are in the process of applying as a result of this
information.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
dental care is a great need in the Hispanic community. The efforts to increase access have positively impacted
the children of this community in Head Start. all support to Head Start is provided with attention to its
cultural competence including relevance to Hispanic families.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
♦ Work will continue on promoting an effective system of professional development for early childhood
  educators in the State to support the implementation.
166 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    ♦ as the Quality rating System is implemented, support will be provided to Head Start programs providing
      child care to ensure their participation.

    ♦ Work will continue to promote child care/Head Start partnerships that utilize the two funding streams in
      a way that enable children to receive their services in only one setting.

    ♦ Partnerships with school-based early childhood programs will continue to be supported by educating
      state and other staff about Head Start Program Performance Standards and how they could relate to other
      programs in a supportive and effective way. as much as possible, support for consistency of practice will be
      provided.

    ♦ Much more needs to be done to ensure that young children in homelessness do not lose out on develop-
      ment during that time of stress and that parents are supported in their role even as they work to find stable
      housing. Head Start must play a role in this work.

    ♦ Connections to the arts community, libraries, museums, and other opportunities for family and program
      enrichment will be promoted throughout the State.

    ♦ Work with MeCCSS, the screening work groups, MdH in obesity prevention, dHS in increasing mental
      health screening and services, Minnesota’s PIrC and others will continue. There is much to be done in
      Minnesota toward a comprehensive system of care and education for young children.
                                                                        AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   167




                                 Mississippi


Collaboration Director           Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                 areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
laura Beth Hebbler
                                 plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Office of the Governor
PO Box 139                       Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Jackson, MS 39205                services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Phone: 601-576-2021              are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
fax: 601-359-3741                at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
lhebbler@governor.state.ms.us
                                 in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.

                                 Goal
Lead Agency Contact
                                 to develop a common understanding of what comprises qual-
Kristy luebbert
                                 ity early care and education and create a coherent and widely
Phone: 601-576-2019              shared vision for improving quality, accessibility, and compre-
fax: 601-359-3741                hensiveness of early care and education.
kluebbert@governor.state.ms.us
                                 Actual Outcome
ACF Regional Contact
                                 Mississippi implemented a voluntary pilot Mississippi Child
Paula Oliver                     Care Quality Step System (MCCQSS) in October 2006, led
                                 by the Mississippi department of Human Services, Office for
Administration for Children
and families                     Children and Youth. The Collaboration director works closely
                                 with the director of the Office for Children and Youth and
61 forsyth Street
                                 reports pilot progress to the Governor.
Suite 4M60
Atlanta, GA 30303-8909
                                 Goal
Phone: 404-562-2838
fax: 404-562-2982                ♦ to develop thoughtful well-articulated plans in order
poliver@acf.hhs.gov                to deliver services to all members of the early childhood
                                   community responsible for serving Mississippi’s youngest
                                   children and to support efforts to blend services among
                                   child care, Head Start, and public preschool programs.


                                 Actual Outcome

                                 ♦ The Mississippi Head Start Collaboration director was
                                   instrumental in crafting the Governor’s early Learning
                                   Collaborative act 2007. The 2007 act builds on 2006
                                   legislation that established the MCCQSS and the Child
168 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




        Care resource and referral (CCr&r). The Governor’s 2007 act is comprised of three initiatives which
        support quality early care and education for Mississippi’s youngest citizens and their families. The first and
        second initiatives support funding for the implementation of the MCCQSS and the MCCr&r, which
        will offer resources and training to all licensed child care programs, as well as educational resources for
        parents. The third initiative called the early Care and education Gant Program will support all existing
        programs in their effort to enhance or extend services to four-year-old children. Programs must demon-
        strate a collaborative effort in writing a grant application, must provide a local match and must designate
        one entity to serve as fiscal agent for the collaboration grant. (Implementation will be contingent upon
        funding.)


    Goals

    ♦ to encourage all early childhood programs to develop partnerships that will support parents and families
      of young children.

    ♦ to create a resource and referral system that will provide local, state, and national information regarding
      professional development resources for early childhood teachers and caregivers in order to improve the
      quality of early childhood programs.


    Actual Outcome

    ♦ 2006 legislation establishing the MS Child Care resource and referral System will enable local commu-
      nities to build partnerships that provide resources and educational materials to parents of young children.
      The MS Head Start Collaboration supports efforts of the statewide system and will join in state efforts to
      promote and implement the system.


    Goals

    ♦ to provide a comprehensive early childhood educational system with an emphasis on cognitive develop-
      ment and developmentally appropriate practices that enable children to meet Head Start Child Outcomes
      and Mississippi Early Learning Guidelines.

    ♦ to develop new partnerships and strengthen existing ones that promote shared agendas including Federal
      and state compliance issues.


    Actual Outcome

    ♦ The Mississippi Head Start Collaboration Office received a National Governors association Grant award
      of $10,000 to host the Governor’s Mississippi early Childhood Summit 2006. Mississippi was one of
      seven states to receive an award to host an early Childhood Summit with a focus on school readiness. The
      MS Head Start Collaboration director organized, facilitated, and met follow-up requirements of grant.
      Head Start, public school preschool programs, and public and private child care providers attended the
      Summit and helped facilitate specific workgroups.


    Goal

    ♦ to promote a smooth transition and continuity of services for young children between preschool and
      kindergarten programs.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   169




Actual Outcome

♦ The Mississippi Head Start Collaboration director was among a select group of individuals invited to
  attend the National Governors association Leadership Forum in Maryland during december 2006. The
  Forum provided an opportunity for early childhood professionals to share information and strategies
  regarding early childhood system building and transition of children and families.


Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
Health Care
The Mississippi Head Start Collaboration Office director served on the Planning Committee for the 2006
Super Health Conference. The conference addressed the eight components of a coordinated school health
program and the link to academic performance including Healthy School environment, Health education,
Nutrition, Physical activity, Health Services, Mental Health and Counseling, Health Promotion for Staff, and
Parent/Community Involvement. The Office of Healthy Schools is investigating various methods of collabo-
ration and support in the areas of nutrition and obesity for all early childhood programs.

Child Care and Welfare
The Mississippi Head Start Collaboration Office works closely with the Mississippi department of Human
Services, Office for Children and Youth, in crafting legislation that directly effects low-income children and
their families. The MS Head Start Collaboration director and the director of the Office for Children and
Youth recently attended and presented at a regional Saturday Child Care Conference regarding “Quality
Child Care.” More joint activities are scheduled for the coming months.

♦ The Mississippi Head Start Collaboration Office provided funds to the Mississippi early Childhood
  association to support the speaker at the annual state conference.

Education
The Mississippi Collaboration Office partnered with the Mississippi Head Start association in providing
Profession development to 150 child care teachers who work in programs that partner with Head Start. The
Scholarship award covered the registration fee for teachers to attend the Child Care Super Saturday, Mis-
sissippi Head Start association/Pre-Conference Session. each scholarship recipient was required to attend a
Head Start 101 training session designed to give information regarding the Head Start Program Performance
Standards and Child Outcomes.

♦ The Mississippi Head Start Collaboration Office and the Mississippi Head Start association have a good
  collaborative partnership that is often referred to as “a model partnership” by State and Federal Government
  staff. The two entities work closely in designing and implementing educational as well as comprehensive
  activities on local and state-level that ensure participation of Public School district Superintendents
  and Head Start directors and legislators. The Mississippi Head Start Collaboration Office supported the
  Mississippi Head Start association in holding regional meetings with legislators across the State. The
  meetings were for the purpose of discussing Head Start’s position on pre-kindergarten and state initiatives
  regarding early care and education.

♦ The Mississippi Head Start Collaboration Office in partnership with the Mississippi department of
  education and the Mississippi department of Human Services facilitated the revision process for the
170 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




        2001 Mississippi Pre-Kindergarten Curriculum Guidelines for Four-Year-Old Children. Mississippi is
        implementing a 2007 voluntary pilot Mississippi Child Care Quality Step System and the Guidelines are
        included in the rating criteria.

    Community Services
    The Collaboration Office supports the eXCeLL by FIVe pilot sites and the SParK sites. The focus of
    these early childhood initiatives is on school readiness of children as well as making schools ready for young
    children. The Mississippi Head Start Collaboration Office is responsible for alignment of the Mississippi de-
    partment of Human Services State Child Care emergency Plan and the Mississippi Head Start emergency
    Plan with the State’s emergency plan. The Collaboration director is investigating possibilities of contracting
    with the rural early Childhood Institute to help with alignment of plans. The Institute has been recognized
    nationally for their outstanding response to child care during Hurricane Katrina.

    Family Literacy Services
    The Mississippi Head Start Collaboration Office provided funding for the continuation of the Shared Begin-
    nings Program/reading is Fundamental. This program distributes books to teen mothers and their children
    three times a year. The distribution program provides a book on the mother’s reading level and a book that can
    be read to the child.

    Services to Children with Disabilities
    The Mississippi Head Start Collaboration Office contracted with the Mississippi early Childhood Institute
    to develop a Side-by-Side of Key Program regulations required by the Mississippi department of Health,
    First Steps Intervention, Mississippi department of education, Office of Special education, and the Head
    Start Program Performance Standards. This document was designed to facilitate easy transitions for children
    and families.

    ♦ The Mississippi Head Start Collaboration Office collaborates and partners with the Institute for disabili-
      ties, University Southern Mississippi in planning events and providing information to Mississippi Head
      Start and child care programs.

    Services to Homeless Children and Families
    The Head Start Collaboration Office director communicates with the Grant Project director of the Homeless
    Program, MS department of education, and a plan is being investigated as to how the State can locate and
    provide services for homeless preschool children. Homelessness is just beginning to be an issue in Mississippi.

    The Mississippi Head Start Collaboration Office communicates and collaborates with the following entities
    in promoting partnerships that address the priority areas:

          ♦ The Mississippi Head Start association
          ♦ Mississippi Head Start Grantees
          ♦ Office of the Governor
          ♦ Community action agencies
          ♦ The aCF region IV Office
                                                                              AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   171




     ♦ The aCF Office of Head Start
     ♦ The National Child Care association
     ♦ The National Head Start association
     ♦ region IV technical assistance Providers
     ♦ The Mississippi department of education
     ♦ The Mississippi department of Human Services
     ♦ The Mississippi department of Health
     ♦ The Mississippi department of Mental Health
     ♦ The Children’s defense Fund
     ♦ Save the Children, International emergency Organization
     ♦ Chevron’s excel by Five Initiative
     ♦ Mississippi’s SParK Initiative
     ♦ Mississippi State University’s early Childhood Institute
     ♦ Mississippi State University’s rural early Childhood Institute
     ♦ Mississippi Public Broadcasting



Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
♦ The Mississippi Head Start Collaboration Office is now housed in the Governor’s Office and is directly
  involved with state decisions regarding early childhood plans, policies, and legislative decisions.

♦ The Collaboration director is charged with the responsibility of working with and providing informa-
  tion to Head Start Grantees and the Mississippi Head Start association regarding statewide initiatives or
  meetings that need Head Start representation.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
♦ The Mississippi Head Start Collaboration Office in partnership with the Mississippi Head Start associa-
  tion published a Mississippi Head Start Program Partnership Directory for the purpose of showcasing agency
  partnerships and services provided.

♦ The MS Head Start Collaboration Office in partnership with the MS Head Start association awarded
  over 150 Professional development Scholarships to child care teachers in partnership with Head Start
  programs. The award provided child care teachers the opportunity to attend training sessions associated
  with the annual Spring Head Start Conference. The scholarship covered the teacher’s cost of registration,
  lunch, and travel. teachers who attended sessions received contact hours through the Mississippi depart-
  ment of Health.

♦ The Collaboration director was invited to be a member of the State Oral Health task Force and the Mis-
  sissippi early Intervention Interagency Coordinating Council.
172 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
    families in your State.
    Mississippi has a very low number of Hispanic children, and this has not been an issue in years past. However,
    strategies are being formed regarding the growing number of children entering programs.


    How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
    coming year?
    ♦ The Mississippi Head Start Collaboration Office work plan for the past five years was primarily developed
      around:

                  ♦ Supporting existing early care and education partnerships.

                  ♦ Creating new partnerships in an effort to provide quality services to families and children
                    most in need. as a result of intentional planning and facilitation of focused activities, Mis-
                    sissippi programs serving four- and five-year-old children are overcoming obstacles and are
                    working together to provide quality services for this group of children.

    ♦ The Mississippi Head Start Collaboration Office work plan for the next five years will continue to support
      Mississippi pre-kindergarten partnerships and will include a focus on programs serving pregnant women
      and children from birth to age three. Intentional and focused activities will be implemented in an effort to
      reduce system fragmentation, identify gaps in service areas, identify funding streams for early intervention
      programs, and identify duplication of services to pregnant women and children from birth to age three.
      Collaboration activities will be research-based and include best practices for children with and without
      disabilities. The ultimate collaboration goal is to create an early care and education system in Mississippi
      that provides comprehensive and quality services to pregnant women and all children prior to school entry.
                                                                               AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   173




                                        Missouri


Collaboration Director                  Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                        areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Stacey Owsley, Director
                                        plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Carolyn Stemmons, Assistant Director
university of Missouri                  Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Center for family Policy and Research   services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
1400 Rock Quarry Road                   are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Columbia, MO 65211-3280                 at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 573-884-0650
                                        in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 573-884-0598
                                        Health Care
owsleys@missouri.edu
stemmonsc@missouri.edu                  enhance community awareness regarding the health care
                                        needs of children, community challenges affecting the health
                                        of children, and the resources needed to address health care
Lead Agency Contact                     needs.
Johnetta Morrison
university of Missouri                  Outcomes
Phone: 573-882-6829
                                        ♦ Missouri Coalition for Oral Health. The HSSCO served as
morrisonj@missouri.edu                    co-lead agency with the Missouri Head Start association.
                                          Coalition applied for and received aStdd grant ($5,000)
ACF Regional Contact                      to develop a statewide oral health action plan for children
                                          with special health care needs.
lynda Bitner
ACf Regional Contact                    ♦ Supported the development of an Oral Health White
                                          paper, led by the Mid-MO area Health education
Office of Head Start
                                          Center, with funding provided by the National Library of
Region VII                                Medicine. The White Paper was formally adopted by the
Kansas City Regional Office               Missouri Coalition for Oral Health and serves as a tool for
601 east 12th Street
                                          the Coalition to work with policy makers and professionals
                                          in the health care and public service arenas to implement
Room 276                                  strategies and policy recommendations to improve oral
Kansas City, MO 64106-2808                health for all Missourians.
Phone: 816-426-2275
fax: 816-426-2888                       ♦ emergency Guidelines for early Childhood Programs.
                                          The HSSCO, in partnership with the Missouri depart-
lynda.bitner@acf.hhs.gov
                                          ment of Health and Senior Services, Injury and Violence
                                          Prevention Program, has adapted an emergency guidelines
                                          health resource for early childhood child care providers.
                                          The Emergency Guidelines for Early Childhood Programs are
174 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




        meant to serve as basic “what to do in an emergency” information for providers without medical/nursing
        education when a health consultant is not available. The guidelines are recommended procedures and are
        not intended to supersede any laws or rules established by the child care facilities, the State of Missouri,
        or Head Start Program Performance Standards. Guidelines have been distributed to providers, as well as an
        electronic version posted on the Missouri Head Start Web site.

    ♦ Maternal and Child Health Oral Health Institute. Served on the Missouri team with the lead agency,
      department of Health and Senior Services. team strategized ways to better integrate oral health into
      the maternal child health and children with special health care needs programs, which were specifically
      focused on enhancing capacity by building public/private partnerships to address unmet oral health needs
      of the maternal child health population.

    Welfare
    Integrate pro-active strategies that will leverage positive change in the service delivery system for low-income
    families.


    Outcome

    ♦ Strengthening Families. The Collaboration Office has worked with the department of Social Services by
      serving on the Strengthening Families Leadership team. The Strengthening Families approach seeks to
      create a child abuse and neglect prevention framework that can help program developers, policymakers,
      and advocates embed effective prevention strategies into existing systems. Missouri was one of only seven
      states selected by the Center for the Study of Social Policy to participate in an initiative geared toward
      preventing child abuse and neglect by utilizing early childhood and child care programs as a vehicle for
      systemic prevention efforts.

    ♦ The HSSCO worked with the department of Social Services by serving on a statewide Prevention Part-
      ners team. The group was made up of state agencies and other key stakeholders with a statewide focus on
      child abuse and neglect prevention. The ultimate goal of the team was to create and foster an active and
      collaborative public and private interagency child abuse and neglect prevention coalition to ensure the
      safety and well-being of children and families in Missouri.

    Child Care
    Streamline and coordinate long-range planning for child care needs and resources throughout the state.


    Outcome

    ♦ early Childhood Comprehensive System. The Missouri Head Start-State Collaboration Office played a sig-
      nificant role in the eCCS project, serving on the Steering Committee to finalize the eCCS state plan. The
      Governor, Missouri’s child-serving state departments, and the Collaboration Office officially endorsed the
      plan. The Collaboration Office expects to extend this commitment throughout the implementation phase.

    Education
    Improve and support systems designed to ease or minimize transitions between early care and education ser-
    vices and age divisions. Increase teacher qualifications for all early care and education professionals by strength-
    ening the state professional development initiative. Support and expand quality early education experiences
    for young children regardless of the setting.
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS             |   175




Outcome
♦ Interagency agreement MO QrS Model. Missouri departments of elementary and Secondary educa-
  tion, Health and Senior Services, Mental Health, Social Services and Collaboration Office developed
  and signed an interagency agreement formally adopting the Missouri Child Care Quality rating System
  model as Missouri’s official QrS System for early childhood programs in the state.

♦ Peer to Peer: The HSSCO and the Missouri Head Start association coordinated a roundtable discussion/
  networking session between the department of elementary and Secondary education and MO Head
  Start programs on the topic of Universal access and HS-Lea’s partnership strategies. Seventeen HS
  directors/representatives from MO HS programs attended the session and provided input on the Vision,
  Principles, and Quality Standards of a Missouri Universal access System.

Community Service Activities
Facilitate collaboration between Head Start agencies and local early care and education activities so that they
become an integral part of any efforts to strengthen communities.


Outcome

♦ Co-led a collaborative effort with Federal, state, and association stakeholders to develop a statewide Mem-
  orandum of Understanding between Head Start, Community action, Social Services and the education
  System. The MOU is targeted at: a) strengthening coordination and maximizing resources among stake-
  holders at the Federal, state, and association levels by modeling behaviors, adopting strategies, and setting
  an agenda that will forge new and strengthened partnerships among local, state, and regional organiza-
  tions concerned with the needs of low-income children and their families and b) promoting collaborative
  efforts among education and social service providers in order to strengthen communities and c) enhance
  the delivery of high quality, coordinated services to low-income children and families in communities
  throughout Missouri.

Family Literacy Services
Improve access and availability of family literacy services to low-income participants. Increase awareness of
the importance of literacy activities in the home and early care and education environments for supporting
emergent literacy in young children.


Outcome

♦ The HSSCO contracted with the Missouri Head Start association to plan, coordinate, and execute the
  fourth annual parent leadership workshop. The workshop brought together approximately 50 Head Start
  parents and staff from around the State. Participants toured the Capitol, practiced “mock testimony,” and
  gained an understanding of the legislative process as well as local, state, and national issues that are affect-
  ing children and families.

♦ Steps to Success. The HSSCO participated in the Steps to Success workshop facilitated by region VII
  t/ta. The workshop focused on building relationships to promote child literacy outcomes and identified
  the roles and responsibilities of mentor-coaches and protégés.
176 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Children with Disabilities
    Continue to foster the inclusion of children with disabilities in all activities related to child development, early
    care and education, and family life.


    Outcome

    ♦ The Collaboration Office has worked to strengthen relationships with the State Interagency Coordinat-
      ing Council, the departments of education, Health, and Mental Health, the Head Start association and
      Head Start programs to include children with disabilities in all priority areas.

    ♦ The Collaboration Office is the Head Start representative on the State Interagency Coordinating Council
      and participated in quarterly meetings of the council.

    Homelessness
    Work with programs that serve transient populations to ensure that information on quality early childhood
    programs are available to homeless families. explore strategies to make sure these families can access Head
    Start or other affordable, quality early care and education services and develop an interagency plan to put
    these strategies in place.


    Outcome

    ♦ Participated in regular Governor’s Committee to end Homelessness meetings, active member on Home-
      less awareness Week subcommittee


    Include a description of how you are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
    at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs in State Pre-kindergarten initia-
    tives.
    ♦ roundtable discussion with Head Start directors. In March 2006, the HSSCO and the Missouri Head
      Start association coordinated a roundtable discussion/networking session between the department of
      elementary and Secondary education and MO Head Start programs on the topic of Universal access
      and HS-Lea’s partnership strategies. Seventeen Head Start directors and representatives attended the
      session and provided input on the Vision, Principles and Quality Standards of a Missouri Universal access
      System.

    ♦ education/Social Service/Head Start/Community action MOU. The statewide MOU brought Federal,
      state, and association organizations from Missouri together in an attempt to strengthen and coordinate
      efforts to address the effects of poverty by supporting children and families so all children can grow to
      be healthy, productive and thriving members of local communities. The ultimate goal of this joint effort
      should result in improved services to children and families in schools and in their communities across the
      state. (See above).

    ♦ received a $10,000 supplemental grant from aCF for promoting Head Start/pre-kindergarten activities.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   177




Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
Health Care
Missouri Preventive Services Program. The HSSCO partnered with the department of Health and Senior
Services, Missouri Head Start association and Missouri Coalition for Oral Health to educate and connect
the Missouri Preventive Services Program to Missouri Head Start/early Head Start programs. Partners
conducted a pilot project at a local Head Start program and used these lessons learned to inform the state-
wide roll out. The Preventive Services Program is a community-based, systemic approach to population-based
prevention of oral disease. The intent of the program should result in an evaluation of the state of oral health
disease in the community’s children, provide referrals for immediate/emergency dental care, and provide edu-
cational and preventive dental services to the target population.

Welfare
Strengthening Families (See above).

Child Care
The HSSCO supports state funded early Head Start programs, administered by the Children’s division at
the department of Social Services. The HSSCO provided written and/or verbal reports at quarterly early
Head Start/Child Care Partnership meetings and engaged in dialogue connecting early Head Start grantees
to statewide initiatives that could potentially impact their programming.

Education
♦ Missouri Preschool exit assessment. Partnered with the department of elementary and Secondary edu-
  cation and Project Construct to coordinate a plan for Head Start participation (pilot project) on the pre-
  school exit assessment. It will be the sixth year of the assessment for Missouri Preschool Project programs,
  seventh year for title I Preschool programs, second year for early Childhood Special education programs,
  and the first year for the selected Head Start programs. The deSe staff, along with staff from other state
  agencies, use the results to inform efforts in creating and implementing policies that support children’s
  readiness to succeed in school.

♦ read and ranked Missouri Preschool Project Proposals for the department of elementary and Secondary
  education. MPP programs increase the amount of high quality early care and education programs

Community Services
Head Start Innovation and Improvement Project (Fathers For Life). Grant is based on statewide collabora-
tion designed to enact statewide systemic level changes as well as upon local level collaboration and project
implementation. The Collaboration Office, an influential partner, aided in coordination, dissemination, and
consultation on grant activities, served on grant management team and the State Steering team, and partici-
pated in bi-monthly conference calls with Missouri department of Social Services Grant administrator and
the Office of Head Start to provide regular updates of project. The role of the Collaboration Office promises
to be pivotal to the replication of the model in other states as the 3-year project comes to a close in 2008.
178 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Family Literacy
    With funds provided through the Head Start Innovation and Improvement Project, “Fathers For Life,” the
    HSSCO worked in concert with the Fathers For Life Grant Management team in connecting participating
    Head Start programs to a variety of books and educational materials. Through these grant funds, three sets of
    books have been purchased and are currently being disseminated to participating Head Start programs with
    an additional set given to correctional facilities. One set of books was aimed at supporting Head Start staff in
    their work with fathers and children. a second set of books included children’s books which are to be used in
    Head Start classrooms, and a third set of books were targeted at providing fathers with knowledge and skills
    needed to continue developing their parenting skills. all of the book selections were identified and reviewed
    by a workgroup led by the University of Missouri Outreach and extension (with participation of the HSS-
    CO) and then approved by the Office of Head Start.

    Services related to Children with Disabilities
    ♦ developed and disseminated a “Partnering to Support Children with disabilities” Survey and Mental
      Health Services Survey to all Missouri Head Start/early Head Start directors and Coordinating staff
      overseeing these service areas throughout the State. responses helped in HSSCO program planning and
      guided the design of networking events

    ♦ Convened and led the effort in the development of a partnership letter between department of elementa-
      ry and Secondary education-Special education, the HSSCO, and region VII t/ta targeted at strength-
      ening partnerships between Head Start and early Childhood Special education throughout the State.
      Letter was signed by eCSe leadership (asst. Commissioner, region VII ta and HSSCO). The letter was
      posted on MO HS and deSe early Childhood Special education Web sites and distributed on eCSe
      and Head Start listservs reaching 324 eCSe districts, 22 HS grantees, and 6 delegates

    ♦ Participated in quarterly State Interagency Coordinating Council Meetings and made recommendations
      to the department of elementary and Secondary education on First Steps (Part C) operations in the
      State.

    Services to Homeless Children and Families
    Participated in the Governor’s Committee to end Homelessness meetings and served as a member of the
    Homeless awareness Week subcommittee. The committee sponsored a poster contest focused on Homeless
    awareness and conducted outreach to all Missouri schools and Head Start programs in an effort to bring at-
    tention to homelessness in Missouri. all winning entries were displayed at the State Capitol rotunda during
    Homeless awareness Week.


    Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
    ♦ The work of the Coordinating Board is intended to start formally integrating the early childhood systems
      in the State to maximize resources and the quality of all programs. The Coordinating Board for early
      Childhood was established in state statute in 2004 and formally launched in december 2006. The Board
      includes representatives from the Governor’s Office, the child- serving state departments, the judiciary,
      Head Start, business, civic groups, faith-based organizations and early childhood service providers. The
      HSSCO director represents Head Start and is a governor-appointed member to the Coordinating Board.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS         |   179




♦    The division of Community Health, department of Health and Senior Services received funding from
    the Federal MCH Bureau to utilize an interagency planning process that supports the development of
    an early childhood comprehensive system plan for Missouri (State eCCS Plan). The HSSCO played an
    integral role on the Steering Committee. The eCCS plan included a signed cover letter to the Governor
    endorsed by dSS, deSe, dMH, and dHSS department directors, and the Missouri Head Start-State
    Collaboration Office as the initial lead agencies on the Steering Committee and as the lead agencies who
    jointly convened the original coalition to work on the plan. The HSSCO continues its commitment during
    the implementation phase which involves bridging the plan to the local level.

♦ The early Childhood Interagency team was created to facilitate the sharing of program information that
  guides change within the stakeholder agencies. Members include representatives from the departments
  of elementary and Secondary education, Health, Higher education, Mental Health, and Social Services,
  and the Head Start Collaboration Office. eCIt team meets every six to eight weeks.

♦ Led by the department of Social Services, the HSSCO participated on the Prevention Partners team. The
  group is comprised of state agencies and other key stakeholders with a statewide focus on child abuse and
  neglect prevention. This team is focused at creating and fostering an active and collaborative public-private
  interagency child abuse and neglect prevention coalition to ensure the safety and well-being of children
  and families in Missouri.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
♦ State matching funds. Since 1997, the Office of Head Start has funded HSSCO to support the develop-
  ment of multi-agency and public/private partnerships at the state level. Since the establishment of the
  Missouri Collaboration Office, select state departments have agreed to contribute state matching funds
  to support the work of the office. during the reporting year period, the State departments of education,
  Social Services, and Health contributed funds to match the Federal grant.

♦ Worked with local communities to overcome local community challenges, such as HS-Lea partnerships
  and understanding statewide polices/procedures for obtaining services for children and families with
  mental health issues.

♦ Ongoing monitoring of Strategic Plan (2006-2011).


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
due to multiple priorities, limited efforts by the HSSCO were targeted at supporting the coordination of
Head Start services for Hispanic children and families in Missouri. due to the increase in number of Hispan-
ic children and families in Missouri and the needs of Head Start/early childhood programs within the State,
it is our objective to increase these efforts in the 2007-2008 year.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
The needs of Missouri indicate the HSSCO should place more of an emphasis on supporting the coordina-
tion and improvement of the quality of services to the Hispanic population provided by programs.
180 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                         AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   181




                                  Montana


Collaboration Director            Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                  areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Jamie Palagi, Bureau Chief
                                  plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
early Childhood Services Bureau
Dept. of Public Health and        Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Human Services                    services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
PO Box 202925                     are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Helena, Mt 59620                  at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 406-444-0589               in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 406-444-2547
                                  The focus of the Montana Head Start-State Collaboration
jpalagi@mt.gov                    Office (HSSCO) throughout 2006 was school readiness for
                                  all young children in Montana, especially low-income chil-
Lead Agency Contact               dren. In September 2005, the Collaboration director took on
                                  coordination of the early Childhood Comprehensive Systems
Mary Jane Standaert               grant (eCCS) when the second coordinator resigned, as the
early Childhood Services Bureau   work was very similar to the Collaboration’s work. Through an
                                  MOU among the Family and Community Health Bureau, the
Dept. of Public Health and
                                  early Childhood Services Bureau, and the private nonprofit
Human Services
                                  employer of the Collaboration director, the work of both
PO Box 202925                     grants was blended and is moving forward. This integration of
Helena, Mt 59620                  these two grants is proving to be an effective way to “build” or
Phone: 406-444-1828               integrate the separate parts of the early childhood system so
                                  as to increase access to comprehensive services for all children.
fax: 406-444-2547
                                  Head Start and early Head Start have a more prominent
mjstandaert@mt.gov                profile at the State government level now that the grants are
www.childcare.mt.gov              integrated. The parts of the early childhood system are already
                                  “built;” the task of the Collaboration Office and eCCS work is
                                  to get them synchronized and integrated.
ACF Regional Contact

Deb Hedin                         The first six months of 2006 were spent planning two Gover-
                                  nor’s Summits on School readiness. One was held in June and
ACf Region VIII federal Office
                                  included 13 community teams and one state government team,
federal Office Building           and one was held in October and included representatives
9th floor                         from those teams, but was targeted at business owners and
                                  philanthropists. Through this process the partnership with the
1961 Stout Street
                                  Governor’s Office and the Washington Foundation has opened
Denver, CO 80294-3538             doors during the past year, including additional donations from
Phone: 303-844-1154               a private source.
fax: 303-844-3642
dhedin@acf.hhs.gov                In Spring 2006, the HSSCO applied for and was awarded
                                  the Implementation funding for eCCS. With the Governor’s
182 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Office, the HSSCO applied for and was awarded two grants from the National Governors association—
    one to host a Governor’s Summit on School readiness, a second one for early Childhood Systems building.
    This has provided a great opportunity for extra funding, technical assistance, and many helpful informational
    resources. In late June 2006, Montana was host to a national meeting sponsored by the Council of Chief State
    School Officers (CCSSO) focused on the states that do not financially support pre-kindergarten education.

    The Head Start Collaboration Office has and continues to support Head Start/child care partnerships in
    many ways, in spite of the numerous barriers. The two entities communicate regularly on policy and legislative
    issues through an advocacy organization called Montana advocates for Children (MaC). No state-funded
    pre-kindergarten program exists in Montana, and will not likely be available in the near future. a full-time
    kindergarten initiative limped through the 2007 legislative session and proved to be a contentious issue;
    however it did pass recently. Some school districts already provide full-time kindergarten, and some even have
    creatively learned how to provide pre-kindergarten services through partnering with the local Head Start
    program. The HSSCO has encouraged communication about these collaborative efforts and has provided
    requested information to legislators.

    The focus on the integration of the various parts of the early childhood system is presently the most effective
    method to encourage early childhood partnerships that best serves children at the community and State gov-
    ernment level. The background and infrastructure work must be in place before any statewide partnerships or
    investment can successfully be made. during the present legislative session, the words “early childhood” and
    the concepts of quality early childhood were used by legislators to support various proposals. as awareness
    grows and the infrastructure is strengthened, Montana moves forward toward securing major state investment
    in young children.


    Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
    your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
    The four goals of the Collaboration work have always remained constant in order to preserve the integrity of
    the initial intent of the office. The objectives under each goal have been refined and updated periodically to
    reflect current realities. activities change and are added or subtracted annually. Since the five-year grant was
    submitted in 2005, some objectives have been completed, but most are intended to be ongoing during the
    five-year cycle. Goal 2 addresses education, Child Care, Health/Mental Health, and disabilities. Goal 3 ad-
    dresses Welfare, Family Literacy, Community Service, and Homelessness.

    Health Care
    ♦ Work continues with Healthy Mothers/Healthy Babies, Kids Count, Mental Health association, the
      Health Policy advisor for Governor, the Mt Oral Health Coalition, and Maternal and Child Health to
      coordinate promotional and outreach activities.

    ♦ Work with Medicaid/ePSdt and the Children’s Mental Health Systems of Care Committee on more
      effective and coordinated efforts focused on early childhood.

    ♦ attended and presented at the Head Start/early Head Start Health Managers’ quarterly meetings, the
      region VIII Oral Health meeting, and State Public Health Conference.

    ♦ developed model of early Childhood Consultation that includes both Health and Mental Health.
                                                                               AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   183




Outcomes

♦ Maintaining the connection to the various components of the Health system is vital work. adding eCCS
  coordination to the Collaboration work has increased Head Start/early Head Start visibility and presence,
  focused the work, and helped the stakeholders in the Health system to begin to see their work through
  a school readiness “lens.” Head Start is included in much of the work and decisions, especially in oral
  health and mental health. People are more informed, Head Start population issues and data are shared and
  included in consideration, and Head Start is seen as an important partner. eCCS coordination maintains
  much needed regular contact in order to facilitate change. Oral Health work has been successful, and with
  the addition of a new oral health officer, the work will continue. Work with the Mental Health system has
  been slow, but the importance of prevention in early childhood has been continually reinforced, and Head
  Start presence and input is valued and seems to have an influence.

♦ regular communication with the Governor’s Health Policy advisor, who is a past Head Start parent, has
  been beneficial. The HSSCO has multiple, regular, and consistent working relationships in the Governor’s
  Office, which has increased accessibility to key people, decisions and information.

Welfare
♦ applied for and received a technical assistance grant on the Bill of rights for Children with Incarcerated
  Parents. The HSSCO is working with the department of Corrections, Justice, Child Protective Services,
  and others to address policy issues with direction and guidance from the 2006 Senior Justice Fellow from
  the Soros Foundation whose host organization is the Family and Corrections Network of New York.


Outcomes

♦ Workgroup created and numerous resources received, creating a tool kit for families who have an incarcer-
  ated family member. This project has widened the HSSCO’s scope of communication and influence.

Child Care
♦ active involvement in the Mt early Childhood advisory Council (MeCaC), which advises the depart-
  ment of Health and Human Services on Child Care Policy and the spending of the Child Care develop-
  ment Fund (CCdF). Much of the work of the Collaboration Office emerges from this group. Collabora-
  tion/eCCS reports are presented quarterly.

♦ regular contact with CCr&r network on school readiness, data, and legislative issues.

♦ Meeting regularly with eCSB Chief and staff


Outcomes

♦ Pertinent data and information were shared as requested, individuals were trained or received information,
  and connections were maintained, which facilitated increased awareness, more comprehensive planning,
  and action.
184 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Education
    The Collaboration Office has consistently been involved in all councils, planning groups, professional groups,
    and activities that have occurred to strengthen the education of professionals working in all capacities with
    young children. active involvement has been maintained with: Montana association for the education of
    Young Children (MtaeYC), Mt early Childhood advisory Council (MeCaC), early Care and education
    Career development advisory Council, early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (eCCS) Core team, the
    early Childhood Partnership for Professional development, and the Head Start/early Head Start technical
    assistance team.

    ♦ to facilitate Head Start use of the Early Learning Guidelines, the Collaboration Office created a document
      that compares the Early Learning Guidelines (eLG) to the Head Start Program Performance Standards, the
      Head Start Child Outcomes, the Head Start PrISM, the Montana early Childhood Knowledge Base
      and the K-12 Standards. It is entitled Montana early Childhood Connections.

    ♦ Working on a matrix of all pertinent requirements/certifications etc. in the field of early childhood, fam-
      ily service, and early intervention with the early Childhood Partnership for Professional development
      (eCPPd), sponsored by Office of Public Instruction.

    ♦ Coordinated an effort to procure books for young children that were presented to the Governor’s wife in
      order to ensure that she would have appropriate books to read on her travels to communities and early
      childhood programs.


    Outcomes

    By taking an active role in the many early Childhood groups and organizations in Montana, the Collabora-
    tion director becomes a conduit of information. MtaeYC is more informed about happenings in State gov-
    ernment and can thus be more involved and have a say. The Connections document has been well received in
    all the groups as useful, not only for Head Start staff, but for others such as college instructors and CCr&r
    trainers who do much of the training regarding the eLG. The Collaboration being connected to all of these
    groups keeps information flowing among state partners. taking an active part, keeps the Collaboration
    director rooted in reality and credibility as an early childhood professional, which is critical to maintaining
    relationships and influence in the field.

    ♦ Planning and implementation of both Governors’ Summits on School readiness.

    ♦ Conducted nine community forums in preparation for the June School readiness Summit.

    ♦ attended a meeting on Universal Pre-kindergarten that was sponsored by Pre-K Now and the Council of
      Chief State School Officers for the nine states without state-funded Pre-kindergarten. It was held in Big
      Sky, Mt in late June 2006. Pre-kindergarten pilots may develop in Montana in the future, but for now,
      the partners choose to support the priority of full-time kindergarten, which is an initiative of the State
      Superintendent and the Governor.

    ♦ applied for and awarded two grants from National Governors association.

    ♦ Presentations on early Childhood Care and education in Montana to two Interim Legislative Commit-
      tees—education and Local Funding and Child and Family Services.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   185




♦ Blending of eCCS Core team, State School readiness team and Universal Pre-kindergarten group as
  one School readiness task Force to better coordinate state-level planning focused on school readiness as
  well as the work with the National Governors association.

♦ awarded 14 Community grants to teams that attended June Summit to address community school readi-
  ness goals and added 5 additional teams.


Outcomes

By adding the eCCS work to the Collaboration work, a framework and terminology of School readiness
began to be used regularly. This simple step has drastically changed and increased the workload. The Collabo-
ration Office, eCSB, and the Governor’s Office, working together with the NGa, have propelled forward as
leaders in school readiness in Mt. The HSSCO has become the informal early childhood policy office which
is very important in future work. The HSSCO takes responsibility for community teams and for the State
School readiness task Force and communication with the NGa. Partners are excited, staying focused, taking
responsibility, and following through with the work that needs to be done to tackle the difficult subjects of
early childhood system governance and data consistency. as stated in the grant application for 2006-2010, the
seams between services might actually become less visible.

Community Service
For many years this priority area focused on National Service and work with ameriCorps and the VISta
program. There were four VISta volunteers at the HSSCO over three years. Many Head Start/early Head
Start programs began recruiting VISta volunteers also. a year was spent working closely with the Commu-
nity action agencies in Montana; and the HSSCO hopes to continue some work with these agencies in the
future. However, this priority area has evolved into more of a local focus by facilitating the State government
to be more connected and to communicate more effectively with communities.

♦ Planning for Head Start day at the Capitol for January 2007.

♦ Presented at Volunteer appreciation Luncheon for rMdC Head Start.

♦ Conducted Community School readiness Forums in nine communities.


Outcomes

♦ By creating the 19 community teams focused on school readiness, contact is maintained with people at the
  local level. The education system is strongly controlled by local communities. Community forums, small
  incentive grants, and regular communication are vital if any change is to occur.

Family Literacy Services
The HSSCO focus is offering opportunities to develop parents and other family members to be responsible,
informed citizens.

♦ Head Start day at the Capitol.

♦ awarded Bill of rights for Children of Incarcerated Parents ta grant.
186 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    ♦ Incorporated eCCS Family Support and Parent education components into this and other pertinent
      components of collaboration work.

    ♦ Involved in the strategic planning for Fatherhood in Montana.


    Outcomes

    Head Start day at the Capitol is popular and results in parents learning about the legislative process and
    becoming comfortable in the Capitol. There is now a Montana Fatherhood Strategic Plan. The Bill of rights
    has increased connections and possible partners. These activities keep the state-level HSSCO work grounded
    in reality—parents and their young children are the reason that we do what we do.


    Services to Children with Disabilities
    This target area is integrated into all of the other areas. a large part of the focus in the recent past and future
    is on children’s mental health (see Health).

    ♦ Member of State Inclusion team and Family Support Services (Part C) advisory Council.

    ♦ rewrite of Statewide Head Start/early Head Start MOU on services to children with disabilities.


    Outcomes

    The MOU is completed—waiting for signatures and dissemination. Various partners in the disabilities field
    always include Head Start as partners.


    Services to Homeless Children and Families
    The Collaboration Office is a member of the Montana Council on Homelessness which systematically
    addresses the many issues identified during the November 2005 Policy academy.

    ♦ Provided information to Prevention resource Center on Head Start and poverty; wrote an article for
      the newsletter.

    ♦ Invited Coordinator of Mt Council on Homelessness to present at the Mt Head Start association
      meeting.

    ♦ Gathered information from Head Start/early Head Start programs on how homeless families are served
      and the incidence of homelessness in the Head Start programs’ catchment areas of the State.


    Outcomes

    These activities have increased awareness and communication.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS             |   187




Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
a unique aspect of the Montana Collaboration Office is the partnership with the Montana Head Start as-
sociation. The director of the association also works part time as a co-Collaboration director. She takes
primary responsibility for Mental Health and Homelessness priority areas, but work is shared across all prior-
ity areas. together, the HSSCO staff enlist many Head Start/early Head Start program representatives for
various councils and task forces and help to support them in attending meetings and sharing information with
others. Many State government representatives are invited to speak at association meetings. The HSSCO
and the association share an office in the early Childhood Services Bureau as guests/contractors, and both
have close partnerships with many government representatives, Head Start/early Head Start programs, and
other early childhood representatives and entities. HSSCO work is reviewed by the Head Start association
quarterly, and the HSSCO takes guidance and direction from the association. The work that is specifically for
the association is allocated and accounted for separately for approximately five hours per week. Goal 1 of the
work plan specifically addresses partnership and work with the Head Start association. Goal 4 addresses the
structure and operation of the Collaboration Office.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
The private partnerships and new relationships that emerged during the planning of the School readiness
Summits are tremendously supportive.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
In Montana there is concern about serving Hmong children from Vietnam and russian immigrants that
populate a few communities in western Montana. There are also Hutterite colonies in the State that many
Head Start programs serve (a tribal Head Start serves a Hutterite colony in Montana). Great efforts are made
at collaborating, working with and engaging the Native american population. The population is 6.2 % Native
american with seven tribal reservations, ten tribes in total, all with different languages. The Hispanic portion
of the population is less than 1.5%, and the majority speaks english. asian and african-american are 1% of
the population. a value of cultural competence and resiliency are infused in all work with partners. Constant
efforts are made to change language appropriately, and to accommodate and problem-solve around issues
and focus on strengths. Inquiry has been made into programs serving the Hispanic population, but few issues
emerged.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
The approved work plan for 2007 is underway and focused on school readiness and integrating the work
of the HSSCO with the NGa and eCCS. all goals and objectives have remained the same.
188 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                        AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   189




                                 Nebraska


Collaboration Director           Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                 areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
eleanor Shirley-Kirkland
                                 plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
nebraska Department of
education
                                 Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
301 Centennial Mall South        services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
PO Box 94987                     are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
lincoln, ne 68509-4987           at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 402-471-3501              in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 402-471-0117
                                 ♦ The Nebraska Head Start-State Collaboration Office
eleanor.kirkland@nde.ne.gov        (HSSCO) continued to focus on the “Health” priority
www.nde.state.ne.us/eCH/HSSCO.     area as the hub of all other priority areas. This allowed for
html                               intense support to the state Maternal Child Health early
                                   Childhood Comprehensive Systems integration grant, to-
Lead Agency Contact                gether for Kids & Families, which is housed in Health and
                                   Human Services, Office of Family Health. The HSSCO
Same as above                      adopted the together for Kids & Families implementa-
                                   tion plan as its work plan for 2006 and aligned priorities
                                   with the strategies and focus areas of the eCCS project.
ACF Regional Contact               The HSSCO ensured that Head Start programs and/or the
                                   Head Start association were represented in the planning
Clarence Small
                                   phase and also in the current implementation phase.
Administration for Children
and families
                                 ♦ results Matter, the Nebraska department of education
Office of Head Start               child and family outcomes initiative was prompted by the
federal Office Building            OSeP to identify child and family outcomes. The HSSCO
Room 276                           was involved in the planning for this effort with other
                                   Head Start program participation. results Matter includes
601 east 12th Street               all children, not just those who are children with disabilities
Kansas City, MO 64106              or developmental delays. Three assessment systems were
Phone: 816-426-2290                selected to gather data on children and a family survey was
                                   developed to gather information on families. Head Start
fax: 816-426-2888
                                   grantees, as partners with Leas, are included in the State
csmall@acf.hhs.gov                 online assessment system. It has been planned to offer all
                                   Head Start grantees the opportunity to contract with the
                                   department of education to be a part of the State online
                                   assessment license/system.

                                 ♦   Positive Behavioral Supports—Head Start grantees in a
                                     pilot phase and/or affiliated with school districts have had
190 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




        access to training in the “teaching Pyramid” model for Positive Behavioral Supports (PBS). The HSSCO
        is the lead entity that coordinates the statewide PBS initiative.

    ♦ The HSSCO annual Networking Session—a “State of the State” annual event that brings together state
      agency representatives, representatives of other statewide early childhood initiatives, regional Office, state
      and regional Head Start associations, and Head Start directors was convened for a day of dialogue and
      updates about areas of early childhood that are relevant to Head Start programs.

    ♦ Nebraska Head Start association (NeHSa) Meetings and Strategic Planning—The HSSCO participates
      and supports the association in many ways throughout the year and helps to inform the strategic planning
      process. The HSSCO has aligned the NeHSa goals with the HSSCO work plan.


    Include a description of how you are supporting Head Start/child care/pre-kindergarten collaborations
    and Head Start/pre-kindergarten collaborations at the state and local levels.
    ♦ The HSSCO worked with a “key issues group” comprised of the Child Care administrator, the Commu-
      nity Services Block Grant administrator, the Head Start association and the Nebraska department of
      education to address some primary concerns related to Head Start–pre-kindergarten partnership develop-
      ment. The HSSCO sponsored and assisted in developing a specialized facilitator training for the Nebraska
      Center Mediation association. Facilitators deployed from mediation centers across the State participated
      in the training. Their role was to learn about key issues and to use interest-based facilitation and mediation
      skills to help in the development of Head Start-pre-kindergarten local partnerships. The HSSCO contin-
      ues to offer this form of support as funds and resources allow.

    ♦ In december, the HSSCO, in cooperation with the Nebraska department of education Office of early
      Childhood and Panhandle Community Services early Childhood Programs, hosted a pilot administra-
      tors’ Workshop. The purpose was to explore and discuss alignment of Head Start standards and state early
      childhood standards as a preparatory event for submitting applications for state early childhood grant
      funds.


    Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
    your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
    Health Care
    ♦ Head Start Oral Health Forum proposal and event in cooperation with Nebraska Health and Human
      Services Office of dental Health and Nebraska Head Start association and together for Kids & Families.

    ♦ Newborn Hearing Screening—seated on the state advisory team.

    ♦ Maternal Child Health Strategic Planning involvement and participation with the Healthy Weight Work
      Group.

    ♦ early Childhood Mental Health—Positive Behavioral Supports implementation with some Head Start
      grantees as pilots and/or as part of school district implementation in the primary grades. Funds to sup-
      port this activity currently come primarily from Federal funds from Part C. early Intervention and U.S.
      department of education focused on professional development and program improvement needs.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   191




Welfare
together for Kids & Families access Work Group—focus on identifying safety nets for services and support
in areas of:

♦ uninsured and underinsured children

♦ transportation

♦ cultural and linguistic barriers.

a partnership is in development with the Nebraska Children & Families Foundation to expand “Community
Learning Collaboratives” to support local communities in addressing these barriers, assessing community
readiness to do so, learning from experience and identifying best practices.

Child Care
♦ The early Head Start Infant/toddler Initiative continues to be funded by Nebraska Health and Human
  Services Child Care and development Fund quality dollars. The HSSCO attends meetings, provides up-
  dates, and offers resources and support. Currently seven early Head Start grantees are participating in the
  child care outreach and quality improvement initiative.

♦ Core Competencies—the HSSCO participates in leadership team to identify early childhood professional
  core competencies. a draft document is completed and focus groups are planned for 2007 to obtain feed-
  back. The target completion date is Fall 2007.

♦ Early Learning Guidelines—completed the Infant/toddler guidelines and both the preschool and infant/
  toddler guidelines are now available in Spanish as well as english. Broad dissemination of guidelines and
  ongoing training available to Head Start, school districts, child care providers, and other community-based
  programs.

Education
♦ Come As You Are— Nebraska department of education early Childhood transition resource that was
  made available at no cost to all Head Start grantees.

♦ Head Start grantees were invited to participate in discussions to assist in the revision of Nebraska depart-
  ment of education rule 11, regulations guiding early childhood programs administered by school districts.

♦ Professional development—Head Start is represented in area regional training coalitions and professional
  development partnerships that make up the resource and referral system in Nebraska. This is a joint state
  agency effort among HHS, Child Care and the department of education.

Community Services
♦ Nebraska’s Head Start Fatherhood Initiative—the HSSCO provided funds and technical assistance for
  state Fatherhood Initiative administered by the Children & Families Foundation. Phase II of a Head Start
  Fatherhood Factor Survey included analyzing survey data by grantee and providing technical assistance to
  improve attitudes and strategies regarding father involvement.
192 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    ♦ Prevent Child abuse Nebraska Conference—Children Need everyday Heroes. The HSSCO provided
      funds to help support this statewide event.

    ♦ Nebraska domestic Violence and Sexual assault Coalition—the HSSCO provided funds for special
      initiative to develop a manual and resource notebook specifically geared to Head Start programs to address
      domestic violence issues among the populations that they serve. a training was held, and the curriculum
      reproduced on Cds for distribution and ongoing training needs.

    Family Literacy Services
    ♦ The HSSCO also serves in the capacity of the state even Start Coordinator. Several even Start programs
      are locally implemented by Head Start grantees. a special focus was put on sustainability, and an even
      Start Family Literacy Sustainability toolkit was drafted. Plans are in development to launch a virtual
      “Sustainability University” for Nebraska in cooperation with Nebraska Children & Families Foundation
      Community Learning Center Network.

    Services to Children with Disabilities
    Memorandum of agreement; Positive Behavioral Supports

    Services to Homeless Children and Families
    Together for Kids & Families includes needs of homeless children and families in implementation strategies.
    Stakeholders include a Health/Human Services Homeless Shelters representative as well as a title I Home-
    less education Services representative.


    Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
    Newsletters/Articles—State:

    ♦ “What’s Up” early childhood online newsletter published by the early Childhood training Center.
      HSSCO routinely submitted articles for publication, especially in the area of health for 2006.

    ♦ articles submitted related to asthma Prevention and Oral Health in the online Office of Head Start
      HSSCO Health Newsletter.

    ♦ HSSCO electronic resource/newsletter called EChOes (Early Childhood Outcomes) was disseminated to all
      Head Start grantees providing information related to program resources and supports, research articles/
      summaries.


    Planning, Conferences, Initiatives, Special Events and Participation:

    ♦ NeHSa training Coordinator worked closely with HSSCO in professional development and networking
      session plans and coordination.

    ♦ Nebraska Head Start-State Collaboration Professional development Committee was comprised of repre-
      sentatives from Head Start technical assistance system (ICF International); Nebraska’s early Childhood
      training Center (resource and referral entity); Nebraska Head Start association training Coordinator.
                                                                               AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   193




♦ Nebraska Head Start association annual training Conference – participate and support with special
  projects funds.

♦ region VII Head Start association annual training Conference – participated as a presenter.


Statewide Task Forces or Committees:

♦ early Childhood Comprehensive Systems grant, Together for Kids & Families.

♦   Head Start Oral Health Forum and dental days in cooperation with University of Nebraska Medical
    Center dental College.

♦ Nebraska department of education rule 11 revisions governing early childhood programs operated by
  school districts.

♦ Pre-kindergarten Partnerships Issues Group


Activities:

♦ Head Start-Pre-kindergarten administrators’ Workshop pilot focused on what is working now, alignment
  of Head Start Program Performance Standards, and rule 11, not compromising Federal funds coming in to
  the State via Head Start—not competing for children “slots.”

♦ Facilitation support to Leas and Head Start grantees in partnership development.

♦ early Childhood Interagency Coordinating Council—seated on the Gaps & Barriers Standing Commit-
  tee taking lead in transportation barriers and providing status report to the Council which serves as the
  advisory group for the Head Start-State Collaboration Office.

♦ together for Kids & Families Implementation team—statewide comprehensive systems planning.
  HSSCO adopted and aligned Implementation Plan;

              ♦ The HSSCO co-chairs data Work Group—completed data mapping of state early child-
                hood data systems.

              ♦ The HSSCO co-chairs access Work Group—emphasis on transportation; underinsured and
                uninsured children; and cultural/linguistic diversity needs in collaboration with Nebraska
                Children & Families Foundation “Community Learning Collaboratives.”


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
The HSSCO coordinates with the region VII Head Start technical assistance representatives [ICF Inter-
national] to include Head Start ta representatives in professional development statewide planning efforts.
Beginning in 2006, quarterly communication and planning meetings were instituted which include: HSSCO;
Nebraska’s early Childhood training Center (resource & referral mechanism); and Nebraska Head Start
association. This provides opportunity to focus on special initiatives, such as Positive Behavioral Supports,
statewide emphases, and to discuss training needs and coordinate professional development events. Coordina-
tion also ensures that up-to-date information is available related to Core Competencies development.
194 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
    families in your State.
    efforts at this point are mostly around building awareness to make sure that state early childhood work is
    representative and inclusive of all diverse/ethnic populations in as much as resources and support allow. The
    HSSCO has supported grants that propose to influence change in the system around the growing Spanish-
    speaking population in our State, and has purchased oral health materials and printed transition documents
    in Spanish.

    The partnership HSSCO has with Together for Kids & Families, the early Childhood Comprehensive Systems
    integration project allows for opportunities to address cultural and linguistic diversity and the barriers to ac-
    cess for immigrant populations. The partnership is also working to promote health services to all children who
    are economically disadvantaged, do not have access to health insurance, are underinsured, and to help coor-
    dinate and promote “safety nets” that will accommodate the multiple needs of young children from diverse
    backgrounds.


    How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
    coming year?
    Our work plan continues to be aligned with the Together for Kids & Families implementation plan for early
    Childhood Comprehensive Systems integration across the State. Many of the five workgroups are focused on
    aspects of the HSSCO priority areas. It is a fairly static plan, but the action steps to reach goals are fluid and
    have been adapted in order to achieve outcomes where needed.
                                                                          AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   195




                                   Nevada


Collaboration Director             Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                   areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Margot Chappel
                                   plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Director
Department of Health and Human     Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Services, Director’s Office        services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
680 South Rock Blvd.               are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Reno, nV 89502                     at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 775-448-5254                in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 775-448-5251
mchappel@dhhs.nv.gov               Statewide
http://dhhs.nv.gov/HeadStart.htm   a draft child care MOU was developed early in 2006. Nevada
                                   Head Start association members decided to research how other
Lead Agency Contact                states include contract child care with Head Start grantees in
                                   their state plans. The Child Care workgroup will determine
Mary liveratti                     how to proceed during 2007. If wraparound funds are assured
Deputy Director DHHS               within the State Child development plan due at the end of
                                   2007, individual contracts between CCr&r agencies and HS
Phone: 775-684-4000
                                   grantees may be sufficient.
fax: 775-684-4010
mliveratti@dhhs.nv.gov             at the end of November, the HSSCO provided assistance to
                                   the Nevada Health division by fleshing out the eCCS plan
ACF Regional Contact
                                   for submittal to the Maternal Child Health division to con-
                                   tinue funding for the project. The HSSCO director served on
Suki Graves, MA                    the interview committee to hire a new eCCS Coordinator in
                                   November. The new Coordinator will begin working January 2,
ed Program Specialist              2007, and plans to attend the national eCe Partners’ meeting
Region IX ACf                      in January.
90 7th Street
ninth floor                        The HSSCO director wrote a grant, and funding was ap-
                                   proved to support the development and travel of a statewide
San francisco, CA 94103-6710
                                   eCe systems planning team that will attend the Office of
Phone: 415-437-7648                Head Start/MCH/Pre-K Now meeting in January 2007. The
fax: 415-437-8438                  statewide Nevada eCe systems planning team includes the
suki.graves@acf.hhs.gov            HSSCO director, State Pre-Kindergarten administrator, State
                                   Part B section 619 Coordinator, State Child Care administra-
                                   tor, Nevada Head Start association President, eCCS Coordi-
                                   nator, and additional staff. The region IX technical assistance
                                   specialist for Nevada has participated in the team as well.
196 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
    your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
    Health Care
    The HSSCO director recruited two Head Start directors to represent Head Start in a committee convened
    by the Nevada Health division to develop strategies for increasing the number of families accessing the
    Medicaid ePSdt benefit. Jane Hogue, UNr eHS director, and Jean Childs, CSa Head Start director, are
    serving on that committee in addition to the HSSCO director.

    The region IX technical assistance Specialist, the region IX Nevada Lead, regional Head Start Oral
    Health Consultant, the HSSCO director, and the Nevada Oral Health Program Manager began meeting to
    develop strategies to assist HS grantees in serving more children with oral health exams, thereby increasing
    their ability to meet performance standards.

    The HSSCO director and assistant provided help with completion of the eCCS grant in the absence of a
    program coordinator. This work included research, editing of the evolving eCCS strategic plan and executive
    summary.

    Welfare
    No work was conducted in this area during 2006.

    Child Care
    Only one child care meeting was conducted in 2006 because stakeholders did not feel there was reason
    to meet. a meeting was scheduled directly after the december Partnership Committee meeting, but was
    cancelled due to lack of perceived need. Contractors were sending child care expenditures to the HSSCO for
    inclusion in a quarterly report early in the year. This practice was discontinued, however, when the economic
    Opportunity Board lost the child care contract for the south. In the final quarter of 2006, it was determined
    that wrap around reports are to be generated by the State Child Care administrator’s Office and therefore
    it would be a duplication of effort if the HSSCO reported as well. Nevada’s Child Care administrator, Jerry
    allen, will forward the reports to the HSSCO, and this activity will be removed from the 2007 work plan.

    a draft Child Care MOU between the Office of early Childhood education (OeCe) and the new Head
    Start association was developed early in 2006. However, Nevada HSa members decided to research how
    other states include contract child care with Head Start grantees in their state child development plans. The
    Child Care workgroup will determine how to proceed during 2007. If wrap around funds are assured within
    the state child development plan due at the end of 2007, individual contracts between CCr&r agencies and
    Head Start grantees may be determined as sufficient.

    Education
    The HSSCO Lead team includes the early Childhood Consultant with the Nevada department of educa-
    tion (Nde) who is in charge of distributing state pre-kindergarten grants. rapport building with Nde has
    been a focus of the new HSSCO director since august 2006. Opportunities for collaboration continue to be
    sought. In the coming year, the Nde Part B Coordinator and the HSSCO director will work together to get
    Part B MOU in place for all Nevada grantees.
                                                                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   197




education for teachers was a focus area during the final quarter of 2006 during which OHS approved the
Nevada apprenticeship program’s Child development Specialist certificate as a state issued Cda alternative.

Program managers from both the Nevada Child Care apprenticeship Program and the t.e.a.C.H. program
made presentations at the december Head Start association meeting at the request of the HSSCO director.
Lastly, a higher education panel convened during the december Partnership committee meeting. eCe degree
program representatives from all higher education institutions in Nevada were present or represented.

early Childhood degree program representatives from all six Nevada State Higher education (NSHe) Insti-
tutions participated in a panel during the december 2006 Partnership Committee. Questions asked included:

♦ What strategies are you using to recruit and support students seeking eCe degrees, especially those
  working full time?

♦ How are you currently working with local Head Start programs to meet their higher education perfor-
  mance standards?

♦ What trends in enrollment do you see in students seeking eCe degrees? do you have fewer or more
  students?

The discussion brought to light collaborations of which only participating organizations had previously been
aware. The Community College of Southern Nevada and UNLV were both able to present their long-stand-
ing collaborations with Las Vegas grantees (both eOB and CdI) linking Head Start teachers to degrees.
UNr presented its OHS grant funded program providing support to Spanish speaking Head Start teach-
ers. a list of strategies was generated for use in stimulating discussion between individual grantees and their
respective NSHe eCe degree program.

Community Services
No work was conducted in this area during 2006.

Family Literacy Services
The State Literacy Coordinator presented during the december Partnership Committee meeting invit-
ing grantees and their partners to participate in a strategic planning process to increase literacy rates across
Nevada.

Services to Children with Disabilities
Localized agreements (MOUs between Leas and grantees) were finalized for Northeastern Head Start, CSa
Head Start, and the various school districts it works with early in 2006.

as of September 2006, an MOU had been signed between CdI Head Start and the Clark County School
district (CCSd) Child Find, but one is still needed with the CCSd Special education Pre-kindergarten
division. In September, Little People’s Head Start in White Pine County also reported that the school district
was in the process of drafting an MOU that would be signed before year’s end. as of the december Partner-
ship Committee meeting, this was incomplete. This activity will continue to be a priority in 2007. a meeting
is scheduled for January 9, 2007, with CdI Head Start in Las Vegas, CCSd, Nde, and the HSSCO in Las
Vegas to draft the agreement.
198 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Services to Homeless Children and Families
    No specific work was conducted in this area during 2006.


    Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
    The HSSCO director asked Head Start association members to consider serving on a committee to expand
    knowledge and utilization of ePSdt benefits. two Head Start directors now serve on that committee. The
    committee is currently exploring how ePSdt benefits are marketed and will develop ideas to increase par-
    ents’ knowledge of the benefits. Secondly, the committee will make recommendations to improve the acces-
    sibility of applications for ePSdt benefits.

    during development of the early Childhood Statewide systems team, the HSSCO director and lead team
    assured that the Head Start association President was on the team along with Nde Pre-kindergarten and
    Special education representatives, eCCS, and Child Care administrator Office representatives.

    The HSSCO director led the effort and secured funding to compose and support a team of eight statewide
    partners to attend the January meeting in d.C. to develop eC Comprehensive system emphasizing Head
    Start/pre-kindergarten partnerships. This group will continue to meet in the coming year. The January meet-
    ing will serve as the kick off to future planning efforts.


    Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
    Funding was provided by the HSSCO to the NevaeYC to facilitate a round table discussion during the an-
    nual statewide early childhood conference. The discussion focused on applying for a Federal early Childhood
    Professional development grant and simplifying access to Cda for college students working in campus early
    childhood programs.


    Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
    families in your State.
    The previous HSSCO director attended the 2nd National Hispanic Institute in denver during the 1st quar-
    ter of 2006. Shortly after, the previous director left and minimal information regarding the conference remains
    with the office.

    during the higher education panel in december 2006, dr. eva essa discussed the Federal grant the Human
    development and Family Studies department at UNr is using to support Spanish speaking teachers.


    How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
    coming year?
    The HSSCO director and the Lead team and Partnership committee members reviewed and revised the
    2007 work plan based on much of the above reported information. For example, in the final quarter of 2006,
    it was determined that wraparound reports are generated by the State Child Care administrator’s Office and
    is therefore a duplication of efforts if the HSSCO does it as well. Nevada’s Child Care administrator will
    forward these reports to the HSSCO, and this activity was removed from our 2007 work plan.
                                                                         AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   199




                                  New Hampshire


Collaboration Director
                                  Please note that the New Hampshire Head Start-State Collabora-
Debra nelson                      tion Office position was vacant September through December 2006.
Department of Health and          Ellen C. Wheatley, Ph.D., was the Collaboration Administrator
Human Services                    from January through August. This report is based on the collabora-
129 Pleasant Street               tion activities during this time period.
Concord, nH 03301
Phone: 603-271-7190
fax: 603-271-4729
                                  Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
Debra.J.nelson@dhhs.state.nh.us   areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
                                  plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Lead Agency Contact
                                  Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Maggie Bishop                     services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Phone: 603-271-4440               are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
fax: 603-271-4729
                                  at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
                                  in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
mbishop@dhhs.state.nh.us

                                  Strengthening Families through Early Care and Education
ACF Regional Contact              Initiative
Janine Gerry
                                  Description
ACf
JfK federal Building              during 2006, the Collaboration administrator was the New
Room 2000                         Hampshire project coordinator for a statewide initiative to re-
                                  duce the incidence of child abuse and neglect for children birth
Boston, MA 02203
                                  through five years. New Hampshire was one of the seven pilot
email: 617-565-2461               states for the Strengthening Families through early Care and
fax: 617-565-2493                 education Initiative (SFI), funded by the doris duke Foun-
Janine.Gerry@acf.hhs.gov          dation and administered through the Center for the Study
                                  of Social Policy. SFI uses early childhood programs to build
                                  evidence-based protective factors for children and their fami-
                                  lies. It focuses on building protection for children within their
                                  homes and communities by seeking to overcome or mitigate
                                  manageable individual causes of child neglect and abuse, such
                                  as parental isolation, lack of knowledge about child develop-
                                  ment, and mental, physical, or financial crisis in the family.
                                  This two-year initiative has been a collaborative effort among
                                  22 public and private partners. during 2006, the ten exemplar
                                  Child Care Programs worked on self-improvement plans. The
200 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Collaboration administrator worked with eCCS, early Supports and Services (Part C Services), Preschool
    Special education (Part B Services), institutions of higher education, Child Protective Services, Head Start
    programs, and child care programs to infuse SFI protective factors in training, education, and strategic plan-
    ning. The State Parent advisory Council has been an important advisory body for the initiative.


    Desired result

    Families will have increased access to high quality child care services for their children and social services for
    themselves.


    Actual result

    The ten exemplar Programs are implementing plans to improve their family support capacity. Families
    enrolled in these programs completed retrospective surveys to provide data regarding the efficacy of the
    improvements made. Families indicated they had improved abilities to find and utilize supports, improved
    knowledge and skills in parenting, and that they had adequate support from their child care program to assist
    them with family stress.


    Head Start PowerPoint Presentation

    Description

    The Collaboration administrator continued to utilize the presentation developed in 2003 to expand existing
    and establish new relationships between Head Start grantees and early childhood system partners throughout
    the State.


    Desired result

    enhanced community partnerships at state and local levels, increased referrals from community partners,
    increased coordination of services and supports to children and families, and increased the likelihood that
    qualified early childhood professionals will apply to become Head Start employees.


    Actual result

    The Head Start PowerPoint has been a catalyst for professionals with enhanced knowledge of Head Start’s
    role in the community to engage with the Head Start Collaboration Office and local Head Start grantees. The
    number of programs referring children and families to Head Start programs has increased. Head Start staff
    has had increased access to community services for children and families. Students in nine early childhood
    education college courses indicated that they had greater knowledge regarding Head Start and would be more
    likely to seek employment in a Head Start program after viewing the PowerPoint presentation.


    Maternal and Child Health Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems planning grant:

    Description

    The Collaboration administrator’s participation in the efforts of the Maternal and Child Health Office in
    the development of the eCCS planning grant continued through the first half of the year. The Collaboration
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   201




administrator chaired the committee on coordinating services for families with multiple service needs. The
Maternal and Child Health Office submitted the planning grant in 2006.


Desired result

Increase the number of children, families, and Head Start programs that benefit from coordinated health,
child care, and family support initiatives.


Actual result

The Maternal and Child Health Office developed a position to coordinate eCCS activities. The position
providing coordination support was briefly filled but became vacant and recruitment for the position was
indefinitely delayed due to budget issues.


Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.

Health Care

Watch Me Grow

Description

The Collaboration administrator assumed a leadership role in the development of a proposal for a universal
health and developmental screening system for children birth through five years.


Desired result

Health and developmental screening universally available to children in their natural environments includ-
ing child care. The Watch Me Grow initiative will be statewide, involve several state supported systems of care
for young children, have guidelines regarding screening tools and referral procedures, and will have a system
evaluation component.


Results

Watch Me Grow development was delayed when the position providing coordination support became vacant
and recruitment for the position was indefinitely delayed due to budget issues.

Welfare

Child Care Solutions

Description

The Collaboration administrator participated in the development of a welfare-to-work program called Child
Care Solutions.
202 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Desired results

    Child care and Head Start programs willing to provide intensive training to parents receiving taNF benefits
    would be matched with parents wanting to explore early childhood education as a career path.


    Results

    Child care and Head Start programs were identified and matched with parents receiving taNF benefits. data
    are being collected to evaluate the success of the program.

    Child Care

    Development of a Quality Rating System—Licensed Plus

    Description

    The Collaboration administrator participated in the development of a child care quality rating system.


    Desired results

    The quality rating system will provide assessment for child care programs to increase the quality of their
    services.


    Results

    Over 40 child care program attained the Licensed Plus designation by the end of 2006. Four of these pro-
    grams have since become nationally accredited.

    Education

    Early Childhood Educator Certification

    Description

    The department of education invited the Collaboration administrator to participate in the restructuring of
    the early Childhood educator Certification.


    Desired results

    The department sought to update the certification requirements by changing outdated terminology and
    choosing a valid and reliable certification test. The Collaboration administrator sought to change several pre-
    service educational requirements and the actual certification.


    Results

    By the end of 2006, the department of education had agreed to change the certification from K-3 to Nursery
    to 3. This allows for the development of pre-kindergarten in NH without further changes in certification. In
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   203




addition, the department has agreed to require that students in teacher preparation programs for the new
N-3 certification be competent in assisting families to connect with community resources to address a variety
of family issues.

Community Services

Respite System Development Project

Description

In 2005 the NH Bureau of Special Medical Services surveyed families and providers regarding what children
with chronic health conditions and their families needed most. The top priority was respite care. The Collabo-
ration administrator provided facilitation for the process of developing a plan for a respite service training
system.


Desired results

The development of a proposal to address training, recruitment, placement, and funding that would provide
for the availability of respite providers for families who have children with chronic health conditions


Actual Results

The proposal was developed and the Bureau of Special Medical Services is seeking funding to implement it.

Family Literacy Services
The NH department of education cut the even Start position. as this position was the primary partner for
family literacy activities, plans for family literacy activities were suspended while other local and statewide
partners were sought.

Services to Children with Disabilities

Mentorship Program through Early Education and Intervention Network (EEIN)

Description

The Collaboration administrator continued to participate in the Steering Committee for a program admin-
istered by the professional development and technical support organization for professionals working with
young children with disabilities. The Mentorship Program Steering Committee provides oversight to the
Mentorship Program funded by early Supports and Services under Idea Part C and Preschool Special
education under Idea Part B.


Desired results

The program matches experienced, highly qualified professionals with novice professionals and professionals
who seek to expand their knowledge and skills.
204 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Actual results

    Over 40 early childhood professionals were matched with mentors to enhance their skills in working with
    young children with disabilities.

    Services to Homeless Children and Families

    New Hampshire 10-Year Plan to End Homelessness

    Description

    New Hampshire’s Governor agreed to provide his response to “a Home for everyone: The New Hampshire
    10-Year Plan to end Homelessness” during 2006. as the Co-Chair of the Governor’s Interagency Council
    on Homelessness (ICH), the Collaboration administrator co-wrote the plan. at the end of the summer, the
    Collaboration administrator facilitated a smooth transition to new co-chairs of the ICH.


    Desired result

    reduce the incidence of homelessness in New Hampshire.


    Actual result

    Gov. Lynch did accept the plan and issued an executive Order to continue the work of the ICH.


    Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies
    as described above, the following initiatives facilitated Head Start’s involvement in the development of state
    policies:

    ♦ Watch Me Grow

    ♦ Child Care Quality rating System

    ♦ early Childhood education Certification

    ♦ New Hampshire 10-Year Plan to end Homelessness


    Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
    Strengthening Families Guidebook to Preventing, Recognizing and Reporting Child Abuse and Neglect

    Description

    The Collaboration administrator chaired a stakeholder task force to revise a 20-year-old manual for child care
    providers regarding recognizing and reporting child abuse and neglect
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   205




Desired result

The new guidebook is designed to focus on preventing child abuse and neglect through providing families
with supports that enhance and improve protective factors. The section on recognizing and reporting child
abuse and neglect was to be updated to reflect current philosophy and knowledge in the field, as well as cur-
rent New Hampshire Law.


Results

The task force completed the draft of the guidebook. Funding is being sought to publish it.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
In comparison to 2004, when only one of the six New Hampshire Head Start Grantees had Hispanic children
enrolled, three Head Start programs had one or more Hispanic children in their centers in 2006. Of the 1,632
children served through Head Start in New Hampshire, approximately 85 were Hispanic. In the two popula-
tion areas with a number of Hispanic families, the Head Start grantee has employed bilingual teachers. The
Head Start programs serving Hispanic children engage with local family services agencies to meet their needs.
The directors of these Head Start programs, as with the other Head Start program directors, work closely with
the Head Start-State Collaboration administrator regarding state-level barriers to eligibility determination
and service delivery for families enrolled in Head Start. There have been no collaboration issues specific to the
needs of Hispanic children and their families.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
The Collaboration administrator used the results of the 2004 statewide Head Start Collaboration Survey, in
combination with the information in the 2004 and 2005 State Profile report, to develop the five-year plan for
the reapplication for the Head Start-State Collaboration Office.

as indicated throughout the preceding pages, several large multi-year projects are in process. The information
reported in this document will be used to further refine those projects, to inform the work of ongoing com-
mittees and councils, and to increase attention to aCF priorities.


*Special Note: New Hampshire has neither local school district-supported pre-kindergarten nor state-supported
pre-kindergarten.
206 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                          AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   207




                                   New Jersey


Collaboration Director             Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                   areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Suzanne Burnette
                                   plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Department of Human Services
222 South Warren Street            Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
PO Box 700                         services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
trenton, nJ 08625                  are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Phone: 609-984-5231                at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
fax: 609-292-1903
                                   in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
Suzanne.Burnette@dhs.state.nj.us   Early Childhood Comprehensive System Project: The Head Start-
                                   State Collaboration Office work plan includes encouraging and
Lead Agency Contact                maintaining Head Start involvement in the implementation of
                                   the early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (eCCS) plan-
terri Buccarelli                   ning. The work plan strategy is to promote linkages for county-
                                   based services to improve coordination, avoid duplication,
Department of Human Services
                                   and increase service access to Head Start eligible families. In
Phone: 609-984-5231                order to avoid duplication and to increase access to Head Start
fax: 609-292-1903                  programs, the eCCS committee developed a Maternal Child
terri.Buccarelli@dhs.state.nj.us   Health Community assessment. In New Jersey, Public Health
                                   Nurses are located in Federal Qualified Health Centers. Public
                                   Health Nurses will assess their community to determine
ACF Regional Contact               resource availability and the needs of the community. Public
                                   Health Nurses will gain a better understanding of Head Start
Alisa Cupid                        programs in their communities. Included in the assessment are
Region ll                          the following questions regarding Head Start:
26 federal Plaza
Room 4114                          ♦ How many child care centers collaborate with Head Start/
                                     early Head Start programs? If they do, what services are
new York, nY 10278
                                     being provided and by whom? Number of Head Start and/
Phone: 212-264-2890 ext. 302         or early Head Start programs in your jurisdiction. When
Alisa.Cupid@ach.hhs.gov              does the Head Start/early Head Start Health Services
                                     advisory Council Committee meet? and, what comprises
                                     their membership? Is there a representative from the health
                                     department on their Health advisory Committee Council?

                                   ♦ The New Jersey Health department will gain insight into
                                     services that are being provided in the community and how
                                     Head Start services are being augmented by the Public
                                     Health Nurses. The eCCS project and the Head Start-State
                                     Collaboration Project will issue a statewide report in 2008.
208 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




             National Governors Association Grant: an application for an early childhood systems building was
             submitted in 2006. In order to gain input into the development of a proposal, an invitation went out
             to the leadership from the BUILd Initiative, the eCCS Project, Head Start-State Collaboration
             Project, and leaders from various state departments. This was an opportunity for New Jersey’s part-
             ners not only to be involved in systems building for children, but also to develop one plan to truly
             maximize cross-system collaboration for planning, funding, data collection, and sharing to benefit
             New Jersey’s children and families. New Jersey was awarded the grant and the New Jersey NGa
             Kick-off took place in November 2006. Invitations were sent to various state department leaders,
             state legislators, business leaders, Head Start directors, and to the New Jersey Head Start associa-
             tion. as a result, a NJ Strategic Plan for early Childhood System Building was developed. Three
             workgroups were formed: finance, governance, and data. The workgroups are required to review and
             analyze existing plans, review and analyze funding levels and gaps, and to review and analyze agency
             data capabilities. The long-term outcomes include governance integration with monitoring system
             building, improved services delivery to children/families, services coordination, and service access.
             New Jersey and NGa’s ultimate goal is to improved child and family outcomes.


    Include a description of how you are supporting Head Start/child care/pre-kindergarten collaborations
    and Head Start/pre-kindergarten collaborations at the state and local levels.
    New Jersey has a distinctive approach to its provision of early childhood education programs. The program
    year of 2005-2006 marked the first budget year for which Head Start agencies were given the option to use
    newly organized budget forms designed specifically for Head Start agencies that received both Federal and
    state funds. With assistance from the administration for Children and Families (aCF), region II, and the
    NJ Head Start-State Collaboration Office (NJHSSCO) located in the NJ department of Human Services
    (NJdHS), the new forms were devised to produce a more accurate reflection of how state funding supple-
    ments Federal funding to allow Head Start agencies to incorporate abbott standards into their existing
    programs. Overall, 14 Head Start agencies chose to use the new budget forms right away, while the remaining
    seven opted to use the original forms for an additional year.

    The NJHSSCO continues to support collaboration between the department of education, regional Office,
    and the department of Human Services to address issues surrounding Head Start, state-preschool, and child
    care that impede collaboration. The NJHSSO work plan strategy was to convene an abbott Summit:

    ♦ The New Jersey Head Start association sponsored an abbott/Head Start Summit which brought together
      representatives from the departments of education, Human Service, and State Child Care administrator,
      the administration for Children and Families, and association for Children of New Jersey. The goal was
      to dialogue about current regulations, issues, and barriers.

    ♦ twenty Head Start grantees successfully entered into abbott contracts and contracts with their local
      school districts.

    ♦ In august 2006, the department of education hired an assistant Commissioner to oversee the Office of
      early Childhood education. The HSSCO director has met several times with the assistant Commission-
      er to establish a positive working relationship. In October 2006, HSSCO sponsored a summit to introduce
      the new assistant Commissioner to Head Start grantees and to develop a process for a successful abbott/
      Head Start collaboration.

    another approach to the preschool program is dHS (division of Family development where the State Child
    Care administrator is located), which coordinates wraparound child care services to support extended days
    of service before and after school from September to June and full days in July and august. The availability of
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   209




wraparound services for working parents so that their children can attend pre-kindergarten was an executive
decision made by the Governor’s Office. Head Start programs that participate in the preschool (abbott) pro-
grams provide full day and calendar year services, a strategy in the HSSCO work plan. The HSSCO director
communicates with the State Child Care administrator periodically to discuss issues surrounding Head Start
and Child Care services. Through this partnership, there is an increase of accessibility to child care services
that Head Start families need during the non-Head Start portion of the day. The outcome is that priority is
given to families with income at or below 150 percent of the Federal poverty level needing child care services.
The Head Start-State Collaboration Project continues to ensure Head Start program staff members have an
integral role in New Jersey efforts to improve services for children and families.


Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
Health Care
Oral Health—The major accomplishment on the HSSCO work plan is the completion of the atSdd rFP
for New Jersey Oral Health Forum; the grant was awarded to the NJHSSC. In addition, the New Jersey Head
Start/early Head Start Oral Health Planning Committee was established. The Planning Committee consist-
ed of representatives from the Medicaid Office, Maternal Child Health, New Jersey Head Start association,
Head Start grantees, HMOs, PNC Bank, New Jersey dental School (University of Medicine and dentistry
of New Jersey), South Jersey Family Medical Centers-Oral Health Programs, Oral Health Coalition, New
Jersey dental association, and aCF region II.

Child Care
The HSSCO work plan addressed the need for Head Start programs to provide full day and calendar year
services. The HSSCO director provided input to the state plan for CCdF services regarding how Head Start
can partner with the CCr&rs. The state plan included a policy that families with income at or below the
poverty level will not be required to pay a fee. The proposed policy effective date is July 7, 2007.

Welfare
The HSSCO director has been working with the New Jersey task Force on Child abuse and Neglect
Prevention Subcommittee. The task Force committee recommended Prevention Standards. The Prevention
Standards shall include the following recommendations:

♦ develop and implement curriculum for training and dissemination of prevention standards that integrate
  family empowerment and cultural competence for key leaders, policy makers, funding sources, decision-
  makers, county leaders, dHS-funded programs, and family and community members which include Head
  Start programs.

♦ effectively engage families in prevention planning, implementation, and evaluation through clarifying
  family leadership and family empowerment concepts, preparing professionals to engage and work with
  families, and preparing and supporting families in leadership roles.

The Prevention Child abuse agency Home Visiting Program sponsored the Home Visiting training
academy. The training was held in three locations: Northern Jersey, Central Jersey, and Southern Jersey. The
collaboration project is working on a Memorandum of Understanding with the Home Visiting Program and
early Head Start programs.
210 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
    There is Head Start representation involvement on the following:

    ♦ The Head Start-State Collaboration Project Advisory Committee has two co-chairs, the NJ Head Start-State
      Collaboration Project director and the NJ Head Start-State association President, who ensure Head
      Start’s involvement in the decision-making process. The plan for the committee membership is to have at
      least 41 percent of Head Start program staff to serve on the advisory committee.

    ♦ The Ready, Set, Grow initiative, funded by a grant from the National Governors association Center for
      Best Practices, is designed to support gubernatorial leadership for building early childhood systems.
      “ready, Set, Grow” will not duplicate existing system building efforts but rather synthesize them into a
      coordinated effort across the early care and education arena. The first order of business for the initiative
      was to develop an early childhood strategic plan. There is enormous Head Start representation on the early
      childhood strategic plan committee.

    ♦ The New Jersey Professional Development Center for Early Care and Education’s (NJPdC) Policy advisory
      Board: The NJPdC was founded as a result of statewide planning efforts led by the New Jersey Child
      Care advisory Council and the New Jersey association of Child Care resource and referral agencies.
      The Policy advisory Board is composed of representatives from early care and education, NJ Head Start
      association, out-of-school care, higher education, government, business, and social services.

    ♦ BUILD New Jersey: Partners for Early Learning: In 2006, BUILd focused on a new vision and policy
      agenda to improve the care of infants and toddlers. The BUILd Committee is expanding the incorpo-
      ration of infants and toddlers in the BUILd Blueprint. The BUILd committee reviewed New Jersey’s
      quality of care for infants and toddlers and how to improve upon the quality. The committee selected four
      priority areas:
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   211




          Health                      Family                   Early Learning              Planning and
                                                                                           Collaboration



  Health and develop-        Support for early             Workforce development      Addressing the needs
  mental screenings          parenting in ways that        and support through        of infants and toddlers
  and early intervention     support family interac-       training, incentives,      when investing in pre-
                             tions and help parents        mentoring, based on        kindergarten initiatives
                             promote their children        core competencies
                             healthy development




  Health insurance           Increased support for         Increased                  transition between
  coverage                   in-home and out-of-           compensation               and among programs
                             home infant/toddler                                      to ensure continuity
                             care (includes increased                                 of services
                             supply of infant/toddler
                             care, increased infant
                             care subsidies, paid
                             family leave, at home
                             infant care subsidies,
                             paid sick leave)




  Prenatal health care       Additional targeted           Public support             Community Hub
                             support for highly            campaign tied to
                             vulnerable babies and         policy agenda              * Partnership with fami-
                             families with a combina-                                 lies and all partners as
                             tion of risk factors (child                              integral to this priority
                             welfare, foster care,
                             immigration, poverty,
                             child with special needs,
                             and incarceration)




  Infant/toddler mental
  health




Next Steps

Support for Parenting: Collect and analyze additional information, including information from families of
children birth-3 through focus groups in diverse locations and family surveys and at the same time compile a
directory of resources, then convene a meeting with a larger stakeholder group.

Infant/Parent Mental Health: to urge the division of Child Behavioral Services to develop an early childhood
mental health initiative.
212 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Early Learning: develop credential standards for infant/toddler care to align with the existing early learning
    standards and to work with the Office of Licensing to incorporate the infant/toddler credentialing.

    Head Start programs’ visibility has increased and has played an integral role in developing statewide plans.


    Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
    In the past year and a half, the New Jersey Head Start association and the Collaboration Project direc-
    tor have formed a wonderful working relationship and have made great strides in developing collaborative
    partnerships with dOe and Head Start programs. The association, the Collaboration Project, and abbott
    administrators sponsored a joint forum to facilitate action-planning to resolve issues surrounding abbott and
    Head Start collaboration.


    Issues

    ♦ Budget—cost allocations over 70 percent of Head Start funds pay for State pre-kindergarten

    ♦ Professional development—the need for joint training with Head Start staff and abbott staff

    ♦ enrollment/recruitment—improve communication with Leas regarding recruitment (competing
      for children)

    ♦ Facilities—needed classroom space (requirement of square footage of 950 feet is too burdensome for
      Head Start programs)

    ♦    Monitoring—the need for joint monitoring


    How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
    coming year?
    In the coming year the collaboration project will continue its focus on completing the Head Start/State pre-
    kindergarten (abbott) action plan and completing the Statewide Pediatric Oral Health Plan.
                                                                        AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   213




                                 New Mexico


Collaboration Director           Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                 areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Carolyn Brownrigg
                                 plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Children, Youth and families
Department of new Mexico
                                 Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
PO Drawer 5160                   services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
1120 Paseo de Peralta            are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Santa fe, nM 87502-5160          at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 505-827-8409              in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 505-476-0490
                                 The Collaboration Office was present at the New Mexico
carolyn.brownrigg@state.nm.us    pre-kindergarten Collaborative meetings held in the capitol
                                 building. The Collaboration Coordinator, in partnership with
Lead Agency Contact              the CYFd pre-kindergarten administrator, visited some pre-
                                 kindergarten programs, which involved Head Start grantees.
Dan Haggard
Phone: 505-827-6614              The Collaboration Coordinator attended the NM Pre-kinder-
                                 garten Institute on literacy.
fax: 505-476-0490
email: dan.haggard@state.nm.us
                                 The Collaboration Coordinator attended SParK NM meet-
                                 ings which further improve aspects of transition at all levels,
ACF Regional Contact             but especially transitioning to kindergarten.

Shannon Hills                    The Collaboration Office was present at early Childhood
Region VI                        alliance meetings, and various early Childhood action
1301 Young Street                Network teleconferences.
Room 925 B
                                 The Collaboration Office attended early Childhood Inter-
Dallas, tX 75202
                                 agency team meetings.
Phone: 214-767-2976
fax: 214-767-2038
Shannon.hills@acf.hhs.gov
                                 Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start
                                 and other appropriate programs. Describe your accom-
                                 plishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
                                 Health Care
                                 The Collaboration Office supported the Health Care Institute
                                 preliminary information sessions for Head Start associations
                                 and follow-up contacts with the New Mexico/Southern Colo-
                                 rado Indian Head Start directors’ association.
214 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    The Collaboration Coordinator attended meetings with the Oral Health Office team to discuss the needs of
    the early childhood community.

    Welfare
    No activity noted.

    Child Care
    The Collaboration Office included Child Care agency staff and providers in the early Childhood Higher
    education Institute, which was held in September 2006.

    Education
    The Collaboration Office supported an early Childhood Professional development Institute, which worked
    to revise the career lattice, professional development competencies, and courses.

    Community Services
    The Collaboration Office supported and attended FLaN (Family Leadership action Network) conference.

    The Collaboration Office supported and attended the Family Leadership/advocacy Institute for Head Start
    families.

    Family Literacy Services
    The Collaboration Office supported the Health Care Institute from UCLa Johnson & Johnson, with funding
    from Pfizer. Inc., which provides training for health care literacy for families.

    Services to Children with Disabilities
    The Collaboration Office Coordinator served on the transition Steering Committee.

    The Collaboration Office Coordinator served on the Infant Mental Health Committee.

    The Collaboration Coordinator presented to Part C, the early Intervention System, and Part C, in turn,
    transferred information at a transition Conference.

    Services to Homeless Children and Families
    No activity noted.
                                                                             AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   215




Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
♦ The Collaboration Office is a member of the early Childhood alliance, which supports all early child-
  hood-related activities within the State ranging from funding to professional development.

♦ represent Head Start at the NM Pre-kindergarten Collaboration meetings for government agencies.

♦ Presented information about the Health Care Institute at the Child development Board.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
♦ Supported the development of a Web site to serve Head Start grantees, early childhood stakeholders,
  including families, and the community.

♦ Supported information on Web maintenance for Head Start grantees, so that their links can be updated as
  needed.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
No activity noted in this area.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
Plan to:

♦ extend focus to more areas of support for the Homeless.

♦ refine and further develop the Head Start Collaboration Office Web site.

♦ develop more support for services to Hispanic children.

♦ Continue a focus of providing support for families through community action.
216 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                              AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   217




                                       New York


Collaboration Director                 Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                       areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Robert G. frawley, Director
                                       plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
new York State Head Start
Collaboration Office
                                       Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
nYS Council on Children and families   services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
52 Washington Street                   are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Room 256 West Building                 at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Rensselaer, nY 12144                   in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
Phone: 518-473-8081
                                       early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Plan: The Col-
fax: 518-473-2570                      laboration Project director serves as a key member of several
bob.frawley@ccf.state.ny.us            initiatives designed to create a system of high quality early
                                       childhood services. This includes serving as co-chair of the
Lead Agency Contact                    early Childhood Comprehensive Services Initiative. a signifi-
                                       cant part of the planning process included developing better
Same as above                          linkages between Head Start, child care, and pre-kindergarten
                                       programs and between these programs and health care, foster
                                       care, mental health, substance abuse, and other services de-
ACF Regional Contact                   signed to meet the needs of young children and their families.

Alisa Cupid
                                       The completed plan contains 31 strategies in four focus areas
Head Start t/tA liaison                (Healthy Children, Strong Families, early Learning, and
Office of Head Start                   Coordinated System/Supportive Communities) which lay a
Region II                              foundation for building a comprehensive early childhood sys-
                                       tem, a system comprised of coordinated and responsive services
26 federal Plaza                       and resources that support the physical, social, emotional, and
Room 4114                              cognitive health and development of all young children and
new York, nY 10278                     their families. Implementation efforts have begun and include:
Phone: 212-264-2890 ext. 302
                                       ♦ developing a Children’s Cabinet to oversee the planning
fax: 212-264-4826
                                         and coordination of services for young children and their
Alisa.Cupid@acf.hhs.gov                  families.

                                       ♦ Implementing a comprehensive four-year strategy to enroll
                                         every child in the State in health insurance.

                                       ♦ establishing a statewide parenting education initiative.

                                       ♦ developing and implementing an early care and education
                                         trainers’ credential and trainers’ registry.
218 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    ♦ developing a comprehensive data report on the health and well-being of young children and families.

    The development of a Children’s Cabinet is a major step toward building an early childhood comprehensive
    services system. The Council on Children and Families, including the Head Start Collaboration director, will
    serve to staff the Cabinet, which will begin its work by focusing on access to health insurance, implementation
    of universal pre-kindergarten and a quality system of early care and education.

    Early Childhood Health and Development Data Report—as part of the early Childhood Comprehensive
    System Planning Initiative, Collaboration Project staff is developing a special data report on early childhood
    health and development. The report will provide statewide, New York City, and the rest of the State’s data in
    four goal areas: Healthy Children, early Learning, Strong Families, and Coordinated Systems/Supportive
    Communities. The report will be completed and ready for dissemination in the summer.

    Comprehensive Infant and Toddler Services—With increasing numbers of infants and toddlers receiving care
    outside the home, there is considerable interest in New York State in ensuring that the care provided is of
    the highest quality possible. during the past few years, the New York State association for the education of
    Young Children, with Collaboration Project support, developed and launched the Infant/toddler Care and
    education credential. In addition, the Office of Children and Family Services funded a network of infant/tod-
    dler specialists across the State to support the development of high quality care and education. as part of this
    effort, the New York State Child Care Coordinating Council organized two statewide infant/toddler confer-
    ences.

    to support community efforts to build systems of comprehensive infant and toddler services, the Collabo-
    ration Project has provided up to $2,000 to reimburse meeting costs and other expenses of seven regional
    infant/toddler groups for the last three years. These regional groups are comprised of representatives of child
    care programs, colleges and universities, child care resource and referral programs, early Head Start programs,
    and others interested in quality care for infants and toddlers. regional group activities have included the de-
    velopment of a series of video-conference training sessions in the central region, establishing an infant/toddler
    mental health coalition in the capital district, supporting the Zero to Three network in New York City, and
    developing a infant/toddler resource directory in western New York.


    Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
    your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
    Health Care
    Early Childhood Comprehensive Services Plan—One of four focus areas of the eCCS plan is Healthy Children,
    which includes strategies to address prenatal care, breast-feeding support, access to health insurance, acces-
    sibility of a medical home for all children, children’s social and emotional development and mental health, and
    child care health and safety. The Head Start Collaboration works closely with the eCCS co-chair who is the
    director of the Bureau of Child and adolescent Health to implement these strategies.

    Oral Health—In addition to addressing health issues through the early Childhood Comprehensive Plan-
    ning Initiative, the Collaboration Project has partnered with the Bureau of dental Health in addressing the
    oral health needs of low-income children and families. This year the focus of efforts was the development of
    a statewide oral health coalition and conducting a surveillance study of the dental health of children in Head
    Start programs. The NYS Oral Health Coalition is comprised of over 150 individuals and organizations,
    including several Head Start programs that are working together to ensure that all children, particularly, low-
    income children, have access to dental care services. The dental health surveillance study includes providing
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   219




dental screening for a stratified sample of children in Head Start programs across the State to demonstrate
the dental health needs of low-income children. an unintended side benefit of this study has been the devel-
opment of relationships between Head Start programs and the dental practitioners supporting the study in
areas where dental services are scarce.

Welfare
Safe Futures Institutes—The NYS Head Start Collaboration Project facilitated the provision of a series of Safe
Futures domestic Violence Prevention Institutes across the State. Safe Futures is a program designed to assist
Head Start programs in their efforts to support families that are risk of or have experienced domestic violence.
Institutes were held in albany, Batavia, and New York City. approximately 30 representatives of Head Start
programs participated in each institute.

Child Care
Literacy Development for Early Care and Education Providers—While New York State has some of the highest
regulatory standards for people providing early care and education in licensed or registered programs and
settings in the nation, many people working as classroom assistants and family child care providers lack the
literacy skills needed to provide quality services. Numerous training programs exist to help providers meet li-
censing standards. However, providers with low literacy skills cannot fully benefit from these trainings if they
are unable to read and communicate effectively.

to address the needs of these providers, the Head Start Collaboration Project, the State Child Care admin-
istrator, SUNY research Foundation’s Strategic training Group, and Literacy New York (formerly Literacy
Volunteers of New York State) developed a train-the-trainer program that uses existing early care and educa-
tion training curricula as the context to provide adult literacy instruction. two training sessions were held to
target two groups that are responsible for the bulk of non-college-based early care and education training in
the State: child care resource and referral program trainers and family child care network trainers.

Supporting families in child care—New York State was one of six states whose application for participation in
“State Partnerships for Prevention: reducing the risk of Maltreatment of Very Young Children” was accepted
by the National Center for Infants, toddlers, and Families (Zero to Three). Participation in the project will al-
low for a cadre of 40 trainers to receive training in the Zero to Three developed curriculum “Preventing Child
abuse and Maltreatment: Parent-Provider Partnerships in Child Care (PCaN).”

Through a partnership of the Head Start Collaboration Project, the Child Care administrator, NYC admin-
istration for Children Services, State education, and Prevent Child abuse New York, the training team was
selected to ensure statewide availability of the training in various programs serving infants/toddlers and their
families. Once trained, the cadre of trainers will be available to train staff and administrators of child care,
home visiting, early intervention, early Head Start and Head Start programs, Universal Pre-kindergarten,
public television educational coordinators, and New York City’s Community Partnership Initiative and re-
thinking Child Care Initiative.

Education
Universal Pre-kindergarten Implementation—Since 1998, New York State has been implementing the Uni-
versal Pre-kindergarten Program. In the 2006 budget, this program received a significant increase in funding
($50 million) with additional money being added to the program in New York City through local tax levy
funding. Initial implementation of the program has gone well with over 60 percent of the classrooms being
operated through contracts with community-based providers (10 percent of all classrooms are operated by
220 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Head Start programs). However, the new infusion of funding and gubernatorial campaign promising to add
    significantly more funding in the coming year has caused concern about competition for four-year-olds. In
    response, the Head Start Collaboration Project has working closely with the State education department and
    advocacy organizations to develop and implement strategies to ensure that the expansion of Universal Pre-
    kindergarten is done in a way that maximizes existing early care and education programs.

    Parenting Education—as part of an effort to implement four strategies having to do with parenting educa-
    tion that were included in the early Childhood Comprehensive Services plan, a interagency group (including
    the Head Start Collaboration Project director) applied and was accepted for participation in the University
    of North Carolina’s PreVeNt Institute. Through their participation in the PreVeNt Institute, the group
    further developed their strategies for strengthening and expanding parenting education services. The effort
    will include establishing a statewide task force of individuals and organizations involved in parenting educa-
    tion including early Head Start and Head Start programs, assessing the availability of parenting education
    services including the level of evidenced-based practice, building and disseminating a body of evidenced-
    based research on parenting education, compiling and disseminating program evaluation information, and
    developing and disseminating culturally appropriate and family friendly mass media messages and vehicles.

    Community Services
    Governance Training Initiative—Using supplemental funding from the Office of Head Start, the NYS Head
    Start Collaboration Project developed a contract with Caliber associates to provide governance training to
    support effective Head Start policy councils and governing boards of Head Start sponsoring organizations.
    Implementation of this project initially concentrated on addressing the governance training needs of ad-
    ministration for Children Services (aCS) delegate agencies in New York City prior to their citywide review.
    training efforts then shifted to grantee and delegate agencies in the rest of the State. In all, 45 training ses-
    sions were held for more than 100 grantee and delegate agencies and 600 members of policy councils, board
    of directors, and administrative staff. While the training was customized to meet the individual needs of the
    program, the focus of most of the training sessions has been on the roles and responsibilities of Head Start
    boards of directors, with emphasis on their legal and fiduciary responsibilities as defined by the Head Start
    Program Performance Standards and on shared decision making with the delegate agency Policy Committees
    (daPCs) and grantee Policy Councils.

    Family Resource Database—In 1986, the Council on Children and Families published the Family resource
    Book as a tool to help parents gain the education and training they need to deal effectively with the many
    issues they face in raising children. Over the years, this has been the most highly requested of the wide range
    of publications produced by the Council. Because of the success of this document, the Collaboration Project
    is working to update the manual and develop a family resource Web site where parents can easily access this
    information, including how to order or download related books and other publications. The Web site will also
    serve as a source of links to other Web sites helpful to parents and serve as a one-stop location for state agency
    publications for parents and other caregivers. In addition to making the resource available on the web, hard
    copies will be produced so that families without access to the Internet will still have the opportunity to benefit
    from the materials included in this resource. Hard copies will be provided to all early Head Start and Head
    Start programs as well as libraries and family resource centers.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   221




Services to Children with Disabilities
Special Education—The Collaboration Project has been working with staff of the region II technical assis-
tance Network and the Migrant Head Start program to revise the Memorandum of Understanding with the
NYS education department on the Preschool Special education Program and to develop a similar agree-
ment with the NYS Health department regarding the early Intervention program. draft agreements have
been developed and efforts will continue during 2007 to complete the agreements.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
The State Collaboration Project director serves on the State education department’s Committee on Home-
less education. One of the goals of the Committee is to facilitate improved linkages between schools and
early care and education programs serving homeless children.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes and decisions.
The Head Start Collaboration Project actively seeks out opportunities to involve representatives of the Head
Start community in a wide variety of state and local initiatives designed to improve services to children and
families. to accomplish this, the Collaboration Project director serves as a key member of several initiatives
designed to create a system of high quality early childhood services. This involvement allows him to connect
Head Start representatives to these initiatives where appropriate. Current projects include serving as co-chair
of the NYS early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Planning Initiative. to ensure that Head Start was
adequately represented in this planning process, two directors of early Head Start and Head Start programs,
as well as two Head Start parents, were included as member of the planning work group. The Collaboration
Project director is also a member of the Steering Committee of several other initiatives including: NYS Child
Care Coordinating Council’s Quality rating System Initiative, where he has facilitated the involvement sev-
eral Head Start program representatives; department of transportation’s United We ride Work Group; NYS
Parenting education Initiative (involving representation of a Head Start program director and a Head Start
parent); NYS Home Visiting Program Council (an early Head Start Program director); Statewide Home
Visiting Program Initiative (an early Head Start Program director ; NYS Child and Family trust Fund ad-
visory Committee; NYS department of education’s reading and Literacy Partnership, Homeless education
Committee (two Head Start program directors, region II Office of Head Start, and the ta Network), and
Universal Pre-kindergarten external advisory Committee (Head Start director); and the temporary task
Force on Preschool Special education.

The ability of the Collaboration Project to successfully implement its project activities is accelerated or ham-
pered by different factors that relate to the many aspects of program development. Certainly, a strong rela-
tionship with ongoing project partners is the single most important factor in the successful implementation
of projects. The New York State Head Start Collaboration Project continues to work closely with the New
York State Head Start association, Head Start technical assistance Network, region II Head Start, and
others to develop and implement project activities. Maintaining relationships with partners in the Head Start
community is crucial for the Collaboration Project to stay up-to-date on issues of importance to Head Start
programs.

reaching out to new partners to develop larger and broad-based alliances provides new opportunities to ad-
dress complex issues. Through collaboration, the strengths of each partner are combined, resulting in the abil-
ity to address larger projects and have a greater effect on issues impacting young children and their families.
Throughout the next five-year period, the Collaboration Project will continue to work closely with its Head
Start partners and seek alliances with agencies and organizations from outside the Head Start community to
increase opportunities for successful project development and implementation.
222 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
    families in your State.
    There are more than 144 different languages and dialects spoken in New York State. Therefore, attention to
    non-english speaking populations is a significant consideration in planning all collaboration project activities.
    to the extent possible, all large initiatives carried out by the Collaboration Project include representatives of
    language minorities. In other instances, like the Governance training project and the dental health surveil-
    lance study, where direct contact with non-english speaking program representatives, children, and families is
    involved, efforts are made to have native language speakers present and have documents and forms translated
    into the appropriate language.

    One project being carried out by the Collaboration Project that is directly related to non-english speaking
    minority populations, the Immigrant data project, is described below.

    Immigrant Families data Project—The Head Start Collaboration Project recently received a small grant from
    the anne e. Casey Foundation to study the extent to which immigrant families with young children make
    use of early care and education programs, including early Head Start and Head Start. The study will look at
    enrollment patterns, cultural preferences, and socio-economic factors that influence enrollment, community
    capacity to meet the needs of children of immigrant families, and how immigrant parents make decisions
    regarding children’s participation in early care and education programs. This report should prove useful in
    developing strategies for better meeting the early care and education needs of children in immigrant families.


    How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
    coming year?
    The early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Plan provides a framework for several cross-system initia-
    tives designed to provide the services and supports that families need to raise healthy children. While Federal
    funding of health, education, and human services remains categorical, New York and other states and commu-
    nities are working to integrate services to improve the ability to meet the multiple needs of families. Systems
    being developed seek to serve the family as a whole and build on strengths rather than address weaknesses.
    The Head Start Collaboration Project has and will continue to play an important role in the development of
    these systems.
                                                                          AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   223




                                   North Carolina


Collaboration Director             Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                   areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Khari M. Garvin
                                   plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Office of School Readiness
2075 Mail Service Center           Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Raleigh, nC 27699-2075             services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Phone: 919-431-2005                are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
fax: 919-855-6841                  at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
khari.garvin@ncmail.net
                                   in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
www.governor.state.nc.us/Office/   The Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO) conducted
education/Home.asp                 ongoing meetings with representatives from North Carolina’s
                                   state pre-kindergarten program, More at Four (MaF), through-
Lead Agency Contact                out 2005. One of the primary points of focus was to increase
                                   the collaboration between Head Start and MaF programs in
John Pruette                       the eastern part of the State. In the Fall of 2006, this goal was
Phone: 919-981-5303                more fully realized when the HSSCO was transitioned from
                                   the division of Child development to the Office of School
fax: 919-855-6841
                                   readiness (OSr). as a result, the HSSCO is now housed with
john.pruette@ncmail.net            the following state-level pre-kindergarten programs:

ACF Regional Contact                     ♦ Title I
                                         ♦ Even Start
Bobby Griffin
ACf/DHHS Atlanta federal Center          ♦ More At Four
Region IV                                ♦ Exceptional Children
61 forsyth Street, SW
                                   The strategic relocation of the HSSCO has helped to build
Suite 4M60                         an important comprehensive early care system for the State of
Atlanta, GA 30303                  North Carolina, which has sparked greater collaboration on
Phone: 404-562-2874                the local level.
fax: 404-562-2983
bobby.griffin@acf.hhs.gov          Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start
                                   and other appropriate programs. Describe your accom-
                                   plishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
                                   Health Care
                                   In 2005, the HSSCO sponsored a Health Network Com-
                                   mittee Meeting in collaboration with the region IV Head
224 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Start technical assistance Network. The purpose of the committee meeting was to organize a state/local area
    health network for Health Managers/Coordinators and associated staff persons. The transition process of the
    HSSCO to the Office of School readiness has temporarily halted further development of this committee in
    2006.

    The HSSCO continues its partnering commitment with the North Carolina Pediatric Society; North Caro-
    lina academy of Family Physicians; and the North Carolina State dental director to implement the “Into
    the Mouths of Babes” program. This initiative is an extension of the statewide program in medical offices
    that trains physicians to provide simple preventive dental care to young children birth to three. In addition,
    UNC School of dentistry is expanding the preventive dental health care initiative to serve early Head Start
    programs.

    Previously, an Oral Health Forum was planned and held during the NCHSa Conference.

    e. Joseph alderman, region IV dental Health Consultant, attended the Forum. The HSSCO collaborated
    with the NC State dental Office/dental association President; the UNC School of dentistry; NCHSa; and
    the Head Start t/ta Network.

    Welfare
    The HSSCO has continued its ongoing commitment to help Head Start programs in the State to increase
    opportunities for children and families in NC that are taNF participants. This includes partnering with
    the division of Social Services to the extent that the division actively promotes Head Start as an option to
    families with young children who currently receive welfare benefits. This also includes creating cross-training
    opportunities for Head Start family support staff and dSS staff in understanding the potential that exists
    for the two entities to provide seamless services to consumers. For example, families participating in NC’s
    taNF program must develop Self-Sufficiency Pacts (SSP), which outline goals and strategies for improving
    the economic condition of the family. Head Start staff can extend these SSPs to become the basis of a Family
    Partnership agreement with the same families.

    Child Care
    The HSSCO continues to participate with the NC early Governance Group. This body has continued its
    focus on monitoring existing child care funding streams and regulatory agencies in the State. This group criti-
    cally examines the future of early care and education in North Carolina, recognizing Head Start as a valuable
    provider of child development services in the State.

    The HSSCO also works to help Head Start grantees to identify ways to provide full day services to those
    families who are in need. This has become a growing challenge at a time when waiting lists for state subsidy
    assistance for eligible families are growing.

    Community Services
    The HSSCO continued its partnership with the NC division of Social Services (Family Support and Child
    Welfare Services Section), the NC division of Child development, and the North Carolina Head Start
    association, to plan and coordinate programs with faith-based and community organizations that promote
    programs consistent with “Healthy relationships/Marriage” and “responsible Fatherhood” initiatives.

    The HSSCO also used the work done previously with Latino families served through Migrant and Seasonal
    Head Start programs in NC to inform the development of a Latino Institute track at the State association
    conference. More details about this track are provided in the Family Literacy Services section that follows.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   225




The work with Latino families included a community assessment developed by the HSSCO that was shared
with the General accounting Office (GaO). Subsequently, representatives from GaO spent a week in North
Carolina assessing the outcomes of the agencies that were working with Latino families.

The HSSCO has continued its commitment to collaborate with the Internal revenue Service’s Stake-Holder,
Partnerships, Education, and Communication (SPeC) Office. This community partnership was designed to help
serve low-income families in the following areas:

♦ Outreach and education of the earned Income tax Credit (eItC) and other tax benefits;

♦ Free income tax preparation

♦ Financial literacy/asset building

eItC brochures, including Spanish versions, were shared with parents starting in January, 2006.

The HSSCO has continued tracking, collection, and dissemination of survey statistics on Head Start pro-
grams in North Carolina. The data tables (which include funding and allocation data, program licensing infor-
mation, etc.) are shared with Head Start programs across NC, as well as many state agencies that use the data
for planning purposes (such as the division of Child development and Smart Start).

Family Literacy Services
The HSSCO has continued its literacy collaboration with the Pines of Carolina Girl Scouts Council, Inc.
The collaboration centers on the Girl Scouts working with the Head Start Programs in the central and
eastern parts of the State to build literacy skills and social competence. “daisy Girl Scouts—a Head Start on
Literacy: Playing in the World of Words” initiative involves the Girl Scouts participating in activities at Head
Start sites that include story-telling, dramatic play, dancing, and drawing. The MOa for this partnership was
fully executed in april 2006.

as mentioned in the previous section, the HSSCO has worked collaboratively with state and national entities
to assess the literacy needs of non-english speaking families served in North Carolina. The result of this work
led to the development of a pre-conference track at the State Head Start association conference to address
these issues. The design of the Latino track was developed with input from the Governor’s Office, Smart Start,
NC State University, the North Carolina Head Start association, the Head Start t/ta Network, the Na-
tional Collaboration Office director of Migrant and Seasonal Farm Workers, and the N.C. division of Child
development. The Latino track provided training for Head Start program staff (e.g. teachers, family advo-
cates, and case workers) to better assist in serving families with children who are english language learners.

Services to Children with Disabilities
The HSSCO has continued its commitment to promote quality services to children with disabilities. This
commitment includes working with the National Collaboration Coordinator of the Migrant and Seasonal
Head Start technical assistance Center and developing a relationship with North Carolina’s disabilities
Content Specialist. This relationship includes ensuring that the State’s MOUs are current and that children
served in Migrant Head Start programs receive needed services, in spite of the irregularity of their enrollment.

The HSSCO has partnered with the Office of School readiness/dPI exceptional Children’s Services to
track the number of Head Start children served within Local education agencies (Lea) who have a written
Individual education Plan (IeP). Gaps identified in this data help to improve the planning to ensure that all
Head Start children receive quality, timely services.
226 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Services to Homeless Children and Families

    The HSSCO remains committed to assisting Head Start programs with serving children and families that are
    homeless. Head Start programs in NC became a refuge of sorts to families that were displaced due to Hur-
    ricane Katrina. Some programs offered direct services to children and families. This included over-enrolling
    classrooms at Head Start sites when possible to accommodate these families. For example, some programs fol-
    lowed the Head Start Program Instructions advising programs to relax early Head Start child/teacher ratios
    to accommodate Katrina victims if State licensing laws allowed a less restrictive practice.

    The HSSCO also addresses this priority by helping Head Start programs to find ways to implement recruit-
    ment strategies that will increase the availability of Head Start services to homeless families such as:

    ♦ Conducting recruitment sessions at homeless shelters.

    ♦ Inviting shelter directors to serve on the Policy Council.

    ♦ Intentionally planning bus routes prior to the start of the school year to include streets where homeless
      shelters are located.

    Education
    The HSSCO has continued its affiliation with the North Carolina Institute for early Childhood Professional
    development, which promotes educating the North Carolina early childhood workforce.

    The Institute has two standing committees and five task groups. The advisory Committee is composed of 39
    state-level stakeholders involved in educating the early childhood workforce in North Carolina. Members’
    participation in the Institute informs the work they do in their agencies and organizations. The executive
    Committee represents the co-chairs of the five task groups, the Head Start Collaboration director, and repre-
    sentatives from the division of Child development. each member of the advisory Committee must serve on
    a task group. The five task groups are: Compensation and education; Leadership and Mentoring; Professional
    development Infrastructure Coordination; Public awareness; and regulations and Standards.

    The vision of the Institute is realized through state-level planning, policy development, and implementation of
    a comprehensive early childhood professional development system.

    The following section addresses many of the Institute’s 2006 activities and achievements that also address
    Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, and processes.


    Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
    The HSSCO, through its collaboration with the North Carolina Institute for early Childhood Professional
    development, facilitated Head Start’s involvement in the development of State planning in the following
    capacities:

    ♦ Provided a state-level forum for members to share the work of their institutions, agencies, and organiza-
      tions with one another. This included sharing expertise in the development of curriculum for regulatory
      pre-licensing training for new and existing child care licensed programs, as well as developing a curriculum
      targeted for programs that have issues with child abuse and neglect.

    ♦ disseminated information to increase the early childhood workforce’s access to college coursework by
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   227




   facilitating workshops and presentations on professional development at multiple state conferences and
   state-level staff meetings. The training materials used are developed by the Institute.

♦ advised the pilot project of the National association for the education of Young Children to accredit
  early childhood associate degree programs at 18 of the 58 community colleges in NC.

♦ assisted the development coursework at UNC Greensboro that constitutes a graduate level certificate in
  early Childhood Leadership.

♦ assisted the development of a statewide articulation agreement between the NC University System and
  the NC Community College System to facilitate Head Start and other early childhood teachers to meet
  their education goals.

♦ Included the Head Start t/ta Network in this process as another outlet of information dissemination.

♦ Provided scholarships for 24 community college instructors to attend the Summer Faculty Institute, which
  included a focus on culturally and linguistically diverse children and infusing the early learning standards
  into college curricula.

♦ received funds to begin work on developing a model for a state recognized preschool teacher certification.

♦ Created “tips sheets” targeted to the early childhood workforce and approved by the State and the Federal
  departments of Labor. The tip sheets, entitled “Complying with Wage and Hour Law—What is Work”?,
  “Complying with Wage and Hour Law—Payroll ,” and “Complying with Wage and Hour Law—Exempt vs.
  Non-Exempt” are being disseminated to the early childhood workforce via the Institute’s membership of
  collaborative stakeholders.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
reference previous sections.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
reference the Community Services and Family Literacy Services sections.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
The responses given to the questions above inform the current and anticipated work plan for upcoming years.
areas from year 2006 that were not completed (or still in development) will become priorities for the follow-
ing year. For example, increased focus will need to be given in the Services to Homeless Children & Families
and Services to Children with disabilities areas as the need in NC continues to grow, and HSSCO interven-
tions are just beginning to take root. The same is true of addressing the Childcare Services priority as the
number of families requiring full day/full year services increases, and funding for such services becomes scarce.

In other areas where great strides have been made (e.g. education), it will be critical to maintain the strength
of existing alliances and collaborations. Certain adjustments may need to be made in other priority areas, but
only as the early care and education climate shifts in the State.
228 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                            AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   229




                                     North dakota


Collaboration Director               Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                     areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
linda Rorman
                                     plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Department of Human Services
600 east Boulevard Avenue, #325      Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
State Capitol                        services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Bismarck, nD 58505-0250              are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Phone: 701-328-1711                  at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
fax: 701-328-3538
                                     in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
sororl@nd.gov                        adopted and developed the appropriate goals from the
http://www.nd.gov/dhs/               Healthy Nd early Childhood alliance (HNdeCa) State
                                     Plan into a centralized statewide system that coordinates ser-
                                     vices and information concerning mental health, child care and
Lead Agency Contact
                                     education, health insurance, medical home, parent education,
                                     and family support.
Carol K. Olson
executive Director
                                     Action Steps
Department of Human Services
600 Boulevard Avenue                 ♦ The HSSCO will continue to support the work of the
Bismarck, nD 58505-0250                Healthy Nd early Childhood alliance in the implementa-
Phone: 701-328-2538
                                       tion phase of the State early Childhood Comprehensive
                                       Systems Plan (SeCCS) through systems development.
fax: 701-328-1545                      The HSSCO administrator provides leadership and serves
soolsc@nd.gov                          on the SeCCS Steering Committee, the SeCCS State
                                       Leadership team, as well as the following SeCCS Sub-
ACF Regional Contact                   committees: early Care and education, Family Support,
                                       and Medical Home and Insurance.
Debra Hedin
Office of early Childhood Programs
                                     ♦ Contracted with a grant writer to develop a medical home
                                       grant template to explore Federal and private non-profit
federal Office Building                medical foundation funding sources to build the regional
1961 Stout Street                      medical home infrastructure across the State.
Denver, Colorado 80294-3538
Phone: 303-844-1154                  ♦ Contacted dr. Sharon Lynn Kagan from Columbia Uni-
                                       versity to explore the Policy Matters process for early child-
fax: 303-844-3642
                                       hood policy planning and development over 15-18 months.
dhedin@acf.hhs.gov                     The three phases of the Policy Matters process are: a policy
                                       audit, a political survey, and a policy tool kit. The cost of the
                                       Policy Matters process would be approximately $70,000 to
                                       $75,000. The HSSCO director is also exploring an option
230 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




        on self-study of public policy through Frameworks and The Consensus Council, Inc.

    ♦ The HSSCO administrator facilitated the integration of the Head Start-State advisory Council into the
      HNdeCa in an effort to enhance and strengthen coordination and collaboration within the state-level
      systems building process.

    ♦ The HSSCO administrator also initiated the development of the early Care and education Unit within
      the department of Human Services/Children and Families Services division. The early Care and educa-
      tion Unit consists of the Head Start-State Collaboration Office (Linda rorman) and the early Childhood
      Services Office (dr. Linda Jagielo).

    The HSSCO will continue to provide leadership and support for the Implementation Phase of the “Grow-
    ing Futures,” early Childhood Professional development Plan addressing components needed to activate a
    cross sector systems approach. The HSSCO administrator and the early Childhood Services administra-
    tor reconvened the reconstituted early Childhood Professional development Committee and the following
    subcommittees: Career development, Professional recognition, and Quality rating System. The 2006 version
    of the North dakota early Childhood Professional development Plan is now on the department of Human
    Services’ Web site. The HSSCO administrator is the NddHS lead for both the Professional development
    Initiative and the Early Learning Guidelines and convenes and funds the work of the early childhood partners
    meetings.


    Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
    your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
    Health Care
    The HSSCO administrator is an active participant of the North dakota Oral Health Coalition and a mem-
    ber of the Preventative Care exists through access and Utilization Sub-committee. The HSSCO is working
    to coordinate the efforts of the Oral Health administrator, the North dakota Head Start association, and
    the Booz allen Hamilton consultant for oral health to submit a grant application for $2,500 to provide tech-
    nical assistance on a fluoride varnish application to the Head Start Health Coordinators/Managers working
    with the identified populations (children with disabilities, Native american, and low-income). The NdHSa
    has consented to be the Fiscal Lead agency for the aStdd (association of State and territorial dental
    directors) follow-up activities to Head Start/early Head Start/territorial Oral Health Forums. The HSSCO
    administrator also is represented on a committee with the Oral Health administrator, the North dakota
    dental association and an oral health consultant to select an appropriate fluoride varnish curriculum and ap-
    plication process.

    Welfare
    The HSSCO administrator is a member of the State Children’s Screening Coordination Committee, which
    provides leadership in the development of a statewide, multi-system, family inclusive training initiative re-
    garding direct screening administration and/or referral, targeted to key audiences (HNdeCa) for children’s
    mental health.

    Child Care
    The HSSCO provided input and leadership in the development and renewal of the 2007-2009 Work Plan
    for the Child Care resource and referral contractual process addressing the CdBG quality set aside services
    outcomes and deliverables.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   231




Education
The HSSCO administrator is the dHS lead for the development of the Early Learning Guidelines. The third
draft of the Early Learning Guidelines has been edited and revision to the format will be completed by Fall
2007 for the 3-year-old through 4-year-old section.

Community Services
No activity noted.

Family Literacy Services
No activity noted.

Services to Children with Disabilities
No activity noted.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
The North dakota department of Public Instruction Homeless Coordinator is represented on the HNde-
Ca due to the integration of the former Head Start-State advisory Council into HNdeCa.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
tracked legislation during the 2007 Legislative Session through the department of Human Services/Chil-
dren and Families Services/Head Start-State Collaboration Office impacting the development of state poli-
cies, plans, processes, and funding decisions affecting the Head Start/early Head Start targeted population.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
No additional activity noted.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
all minority populations, including Hispanic children and families, are included in the HSSCO work plans
and processes. The largest minority population of North dakota is Native american and specific attention and
support has been given to address the unique and urgent issues facing tribal Sovereign Nations’ populations.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
Many of the responses and questions are represented in the HSSCO work plan and are currently being
addressed based on the priority areas and goals mandated by the Office of Head Start (see the above action
steps). The input from the region VIII and region XI Head Start and early Head Start programs, as well
as the North dakota Head Start association, helps direct the work plan.
232 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                      AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   233




                               Ohio


Collaboration Director         Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                               areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
James A. Scott, Jr.
                               plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Ohio Department of education
25 South front Street          Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Mail Stop 305                  services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Columbus, Ohio 43215           are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Phone: 614-466-0224            at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
fax: 614-728-2338
                               in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
james.scott@ode.state.oh.us    The Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSSCO) is
www.ode.state.oh.us            housed in the Ohio department of education (Ode), Office
                               of early Learning and School readiness. Ode partners with
                               the Ohio department of Job and Family Services (OdJFS),
Lead Agency Contact
                               Bureau of Child Care and development, to fund and adminis-
                               ter the early Learning Initiative (eLI). eLI is a school readi-
Same as above
                               ness initiative that provides child care and education services
                               for children ages 3-5 in a center setting. eligibility is up to
ACF Regional Contact           185% of the Federal Poverty Level. Providers are paid weekly
                               based on a set reimbursement rate. The eLI program is funded
Michael Butler                 with taNF dollars and has taNF eligibility and cost alloca-
Administration for Children    tion requirements.
and families
233 north Michigan Avenue      The eLI program includes providers from Head Start, Child
Suite 400                      Care, and public school preschool. all providers must follow
                               the Ohio early Learning Content Standards and the Ohio
Chicago, Il                    early Learning Program Guidelines. The HSSCO continued
Phone: 312-353-5165            to be involved in the grant application and approval process
fax: 312-353-5544              and in the development of other system and support roles
                               provided by Ode (professional development services, ongoing
Michael.butler@acf.hhs.gov
                               monitoring, and technical assistance).

                               The HSSCO continued to attend regular meetings of state-
                               wide and national committees that conduct the planning and
                               implementation of initiatives that support the building of early
                               childhood systems. Listed below are some of the committees
                               on which the HSSCO is represented:

                               ♦ Build Ohio, administrative Board member

                               ♦ Ohio Professional development Network (OPdN), Co-chair
234 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




          ♦ State early Childhood Comprehensive Services System (SeCCSS)
          ♦ Child Care advisory Council
          ♦ Ohio department of Health (OdH), Oral Health Committee
          ♦ Ohio department of Mental Health, early Childhood Mental Health advisory Council
          ♦ Ohio Head Start association Futures Group

    Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
    your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
    Health Care
    The HSSCO continued to meet and plan with OdH, Bureau of Oral Health, Oral Health Work Group.
    HSSCO collaborated with OdH to plan regional oral health dental curriculum training for teachers and
    health staff. The Oral Health Curriculum Guide was completed in spring 2006. The Bureau of Oral Health
    conducted five regional Oral Health Curriculum Guide training sessions across the state in august 2006.

    The HSSCO continued to attend quarterly meetings facilitated by the Ohio department of Mental Health
    (OdMH), early Childhood Mental Health advisory Council. The council continues to promote statewide
    early childhood mental health policies, practices, and professional development. The council is in the process
    of collaborating with Build Ohio to develop a professional development plan to create early childhood mental
    health training modules for early childhood professionals.

    Utilizing information, expertise, and guidance from the OdMH early Childhood Mental Health advisory
    Council, HSSCO contracted with Ohio Head Start association (OHSaI) and the OHSaI Health advisory
    Committee to conduct a Spring 2006 Mental Health Institute for early and Head Start staff. The institute
    focused on the new mental health question in the PrISM document, statewide updates from OdMH, and
    county early childhood mental health services that are available for children and adults. Over 100 early Head
    Start and Head Start staff attended the sessions at the april 2006 OHSaI conference.

    Welfare
    The HSSCO continued to serve as an administrative board member of the Build Ohio initiative. Ohio is
    one of five states funded by the early Childhood Funders Collaborative, a consortium of national and local
    foundations that fund substantial grants in early care and education for the Build Ohio initiative. Build’s goal
    is to design a comprehensive, well-integrated early care and education system by creating system change and
    sharing information about system progress and innovation and fostering collaboration among key sharehold-
    ers. The Build Ohio group meets monthly and is guided by four work groups: early Learning Standards and
    accountability, Professional development, Community development, and Public Communications and
    Building Public Will. The Public Communication and Building Public Will workgroup continued to promote
    community advocacy by convening stakeholders to build awareness and support for increasing investment in
    early childhood education.

    The HSSCO co-chairs the Build Ohio Professional development Network (OPdN). The network met bi-
    monthly and is comprised of three subcommittees (trainer and training approval, articulation and Core
    Knowledge, and Compensation and retention). The articulation and Core Knowledge subcommittee utilized
    writing teams to construct the Ohio early Childhood Core Knowledge and Competencies document. The
    document includes core knowledge statements (what early educators who work with young children should
    know) and competencies (the observable skills that early educators display while working with young chil-
    dren) for educators working with young children birth-five and school-age children in kindergarten. The
                                                                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   235




committee also contracted to complete the development of an Ohio Professional development Plan that will
provide a historical documentation of the OPdN and early childhood professional development; past, pres-
ent, and future.

Child Care
The HSSCO collaborated with OdJFS and the Ohio Child Care and resource and referral associa-
tion (OCCrra). The three organizations co-chair the Ohio Professional development Network. HSSCO
partnered with OCCrra to coordinate and facilitate the Core Knowledge Writing team project. during
bi-monthly professional development committee meetings, the HSSCO meets with OdJFS and OCCrra
directors to plan, evaluate, and discuss the progress of the many child care initiatives that are currently occur-
ring throughout the state. Some include:

      ♦ t.e.a.C.H. early Childhood Ohio
      ♦ Step Up to Quality (Quality rating System)
      ♦ First Steps
      ♦ The Professional development registry
      ♦ Workforce Study
      ♦ Infant toddler Guidelines
      ♦ College Profiles (early childhood education course offerings)
      ♦ education
The HSSCO contracted with OHSaI to conduct fiscal planning and monitoring training sessions at the June
2006 OHSaI Leadership and development conference. The sessions were attended by Head Start and eLI
program administrators and fiscal staff.

The HSSCO participated in the School readiness Solutions Group (SrSG) as a state resource representa-
tive. SrSG is an initiative directed by the Ode State Board of education. SrSG is a statewide committee
of educators and representatives from the business sector that have been charged to construct a coordinated
statewide system for school readiness. In the summer of 2006, the SrSG provided a set of recommendations
to the State Board of education. The Board approved the recommendations, and the HSSCO supported
Ode in distributing the final SrSG report throughout the State.

Community Services
The HSSCO continued to participate in the PNC Grow Up Great demonstration Project. The project con-
ducts monthly conference calls with HSSCO directors (Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, New Jersey,
Virginia, Maryland, the district of Columbia, delaware, and Massachusetts) to plan and discuss the progress
of activities associated with the initiative. The HSSCO continued to work with the demonstration project in
Cincinnati and others in the three surrounding counties to assist in promoting the PNC volunteerism pro-
gram. Local PNC employees continued to provide volunteer hours to local programs and engage programs in
early literacy activities and collection and distribution of children’s books.

The HSSCO continued to partner with The Ohio State University, College of education, Quality Network
(Q-net) to provide a Parent Information Web site. The Parent Information Network (www.oh-pin.org)
provides essential parent information, resources, and statewide events that are collected by eight state agencies
and early childhood associations. The information is geared to parents of children birth through age six. The
Web site continues to increase in the number of daily “hits” by users.
236 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Family Literacy Services
    eLI providers are required to enroll leadership staff in monthly professional development sessions on the
    Preschool COre Curriculum for Preschool educators. The goals of the preschool core curriculum are to
    build language and literacy knowledge and teaching skills, and to build capacity and sustain growth of early
    educators. The core curriculum has a common set of understandings; provides foundational knowledge and
    skills; and provides standards of practice where all children achieve. The leadership team of the 28 new eLI
    providers attended monthly COre meetings.

    Services to Children with Disabilities
    The HSSCO contracted with OHSaI to facilitate a disabilities writing team to construct a guide for access-
    ing services for children with disabilities, ages birth to five. The writing team included HSSCO, Ode Special
    education staff and representatives from Head Start, a local education agency, the region V ta Network,
    and the Special education regional resource Center (SerrC). The writing team met in the fall of 2006 and
    plans to complete the document in June 2007. The document will be distributed throughout the State to early
    care and education agencies in September 2007.

    Services to Homeless Children and Families
    The HSSCO worked with the Ode even Start Coordinator to discuss the Ode programs and initiatives
    that support services to homeless children and families. HSSCO worked with the HSSCO to provide Head
    Start information to the Ode even Start Coordinator to prepare for the spring Ode Homeless Conference.


    Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
    The HSSCO worked collectively with Ode administrative staff to plan and implement a three-day profes-
    sional development conference for eLI, Public School Preschool and Preschool Special education staff in
    October 2006. Over 200 staff attended the sessions and received Ode approved credit towards the 20 hours
    per year requirement.


    Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
    families in your State.
    The HSSCO includes the texas Migrant Council (tMC) on the statewide listserv. The HSSCO facilitated
    tMC in becoming a representative of the Child Care advisory Council. The HSSCO included tMC in
    Health, Child Care, and education professional development activities. The HSSCO continued to work with
    tMC to explore how support services can be provided to tMC and local education agencies to ensure that
    all Hispanic children with disabilities receive appropriate services during the summer months. The HSSCO
    is working with Ode Special education staff to identify potential funding to support additional support
    services for the summer months.


    How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
    coming year?
    The HSSCO will continue to support the coordination and collaboration between Ode and OdJFS to fund
    and administer the eLI program and include all early childhood providers in statewide professional develop-
    ment activities. The HSSCO will continue to provide input and participate in the development of the next
    phase of the School readiness Solution Group initiative, the development of an Implementation Plan. The
    HSSCO will continue to explore strategies to obtain additional funding to partner with tMC to provide ad-
    ditional support services for children with disabilities during the summer months.
                                                                         AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   237




                                  Oklahoma


Collaboration Director            Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                  areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Kay C. floyd
                                  plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Oklahoma Association of
Community Action Agencies
                                  Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
2800 nW 36th Street               services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Suite 221                         are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Oklahoma City, OK 73112           at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 405-949-1495               in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 405-949-9-0955
                                  The Project Goal in this area: Serve as facilitator to improve and
kfloyd@okacaa.org                 expand services for low-income children in Head Start, child
www.okacaa.org                    care, and state preschool programs.

Lead Agency Contact               State Level

Vaughn Clark
                                  Desired Outcome #1 and #2:
Office of Community Development
Director
                                  Collaborative partnerships among Head Start, child care, and
Oklahoma Department of Commerce   state preschool will be documented; types of Head Start part-
Phone: 405-815-5370               nerships with public schools and child care will be identified
                                  for each collaboration.
fax: 405-815-5344
Vaughn_clark@odoc.state.ok.us
                                  Actual Outcomes
ACF Regional Contact
                                  ♦ The Oklahoma Head Start association was responsible for
                                    planning and hosting the region VI Head Start associa-
Susan Johnston
                                    tion annual Professional development Institute in Okla-
Acting Regional Program Manager     homa. The HSSCO worked with the association to involve
Office of Head Start                other state partners to plan collaboratively around the
Region VI                           theme “United for Families.” Partners were: The Oklahoma
                                    association of Community action agencies, University of
1301 Young Street
                                    Oklahoma Center for early Childhood Professional de-
Room 937                            velopment, State department of education, department
Dallas, tX 75202                    of Human Services – division of Child Care, Smart Start
                                    Oklahoma, and child care providers.
Phone: 214-767-8844
fax: 214-767-2038
                                  The HSSCO director presented two sessions at the above
sjohnston@acf.hhs.gov             institute. One session was on collaborating with state pre-
                                  kindergarten, presented jointly with the State department of
238 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    education early Childhood Coordinator. The other session was on the development of the Oklahoma Early
    Learning Guidelines and the status of the development of the Oklahoma Core Competencies for early Child-
    hood Professionals presented jointly with the Oklahoma department of Human Services division of Child
    Care and State department of education early Childhood Coordinators.


    Local Level

    Follow-up activities were planned at the state level in the supplemental funding application for the Partners
    meeting in Washington, d. C., in January 2007 that will be extended into the next budget year for comple-
    tion. These plans included creating categories for types of local Head Start/pre-kindergarten/child care col-
    laborations and a survey of all Head Start programs to determine who they are collaborating with, how they
    are collaborating, and identification of model collaborations and/or best practices for collaboration.


    Desired Outcome #3

    Local Head Start programs will have improved access to health care services; two model programs will be
    identified to serve as mentors for others.


    Actual Outcomes

    ♦ The Oklahoma Children’s Oral Health Coalition worked with the Oklahoma dental association, Okla-
      homa dental Foundation, and the Oklahoma City Housing authority to carry out activities of a grant to
      pilot “block parties” in low-income neighborhoods. These events were held in five Oklahoma City Hous-
      ing Projects where community organizations set up information booths and provided health information.
      Head Start centers were located in most of these projects. Hot dogs, drinks, treats, games, and the services
      of a live radio disc jockey were donated to attract families to the event.

    although these were actually health fairs, they were publicized as “block parties” to draw a larger number
    of participants. The specific purpose was to initiate the Mobile dental treatment program operated by the
    Oklahoma dental Foundation with volunteer dentists. Patients were pre-screened, then treated during the
    block parties which were from 4:30-7:30 p.m. on Friday nights. Children, including Head Start children, were
    targeted for treatment, but adults in need of treatment were also treated. Most were covered by Medicaid, but
    patients with no insurance could also be treated. a total of 180 patients were screened, and 68 were treated
    free with a value of the treatment being estimated at $14,219, an average per patient cost of $209. This model
    was then used in meetings with other communities who were interested in reaching the low-income popula-
    tion in this way.

    ♦ The HSSCO worked with the Oklahoma State department of Health (OSdH) Childhood Lead Poison-
      ing Prevention Program Coordinator who presented blood lead level testing information to the Head
      Start directors at a statewide meeting. The HSSCO director worked with the coordinator to develop a
      process for Head Start programs to obtain blood lead level test results from the OSdH for Head Start
      records and to determine if any Head Start children had not been tested so that they could complete their
      records. a form and model process was developed so that all Head Start programs needing this infor-
      mation could access it. The need for this process was discovered three years ago after a local Head Start
      program’s Federal monitoring visit revealed that there was no way for Head Start programs to access this
      information. The process is still new and is working for those who have tried to access the records.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   239




Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
Health Care
The focus of this year was on oral health and the prevention of lead poisoning. two important accomplish-
ments and outcomes are described above.

Welfare
The HSSCO worked with the Oklahoma department of Human Services with regard to development of the
Family Start Program, a family advocacy initiative targeting “fragile families” at the time of a couple’s family
formation. This initiative is a part of the Oklahoma Marriage Initiative, funded by taNF dollars.

Child Care and Pre-kindergarten
The HSSCO works with Smart Start Oklahoma and the Oklahoma Partnership for School readiness
(OPSr) in building a comprehensive early childhood care and education system in Oklahoma.

Education
The HSSCO director met monthly with a workgroup, including the Head Start-State ta specialist, develop-
ing the Oklahoma Core Competencies for early Childhood Professionals in eight areas. Five areas were com-
pleted with all eight projected to be completed by december 2007. The HSSCO director also worked with
the State department of education regarding Head Start teachers who are required to meet No Child Left
Behind “Highly Qualified” standards in order to teach in collaborations with public school pre-kindergarten.

Community Services
HSSCO staff person was assigned to participate in the Oklahoma alliance for Public transportation and was
appointed by the Governor to serve on Governor’s Oklahoma United We ride Council. an HSSCO staff
person was also assigned to participate on the Oklahoma 2-1-1 advisory Collaborative, developing a state-
wide system of information and referral for community services.

Family Literacy Services
HSSCO staff published a feature article about a model Head Start/public school collaboration in an early
reading First Program in the statewide Community action newsletter The HSSCO also expanded the scope
of “family literacy” to include financial literacy. The HSSCO leveraged state Head Start funds to continue fi-
nancial literacy “training-of-trainers” for Head Start staff that was initiated by previous supplemental HSSCO
funds.

Services to Children with Disabilities
The HSSCO sponsored and hosted the Oral Health Forum on Children with Special Health Care Needs.
Plans were made to host a meeting of partners to complete the MOU on disabilities that was held in the first
week of the new budget period.
240 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Services to Homeless Children and Families
    The HSSCO director co-chairs the access to Mainstream resources Committee of the Governor’s In-
    teragency Council on Homelessness. The Oklahoma association of Community action agencies hosted
    a Homeless Conference sponsored by the Governor’s Interagency Council on Homelessness. The HSSCO
    director and the State department of education title I/Homeless Specialist jointly presented a session on
    Head Start/pre-kindergarten collaboration in providing services to homeless children and families.


    Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
    Desired Outcome #1:

    Head Start data will be compiled and analyzed, and the Project report distributed.


    Actual Outcomes

    ♦ The HSSCO prepared and distributed the “Oklahoma Head Start Fact Sheet,” a two-sided page of state
      and national data on Head Start enrollment and funding. The state-level information also compiled all
      Head Start grantees’ significant demographic data and services reported in the Head Start Program Infor-
      mation report for Program Year 2005-2006.

    ♦ The annual State Profiles report was distributed to all Head Start directors and partners.


    Desired Outcome #2

    The best possible linkages will be made between local and community-based Head Start programs and state
    early childhood initiatives and policies.


    Actual Outcomes

    ♦ Working with the Oklahoma Head Start association, the Oklahoma association of Community action
      agencies supported legislation to ensure that a Head Start director will be a statutory member of the
      Oklahoma Partnership for School readiness.

    ♦ The HSSCO worked with the Oklahoma Head Start association and the Indian Head Start directors
      association to develop talking points on the merits of Oklahoma Head Start programs and the impor-
      tance of Head Start in providing leadership as the Governor considers providing state pre-kindergarten
      for all three-year-old children. The HSSCO contacted the Governor’s Chief of Staff and requested a
      meeting with the Governor that is pending.


    Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
    ♦ The HSSCO director served on the advisory board of the Oklahoma Pregnancy risk assessment Moni-
      toring System (PraMS) and The Oklahoma toddler Survey (tOtS), helping ensure that early Head
      Start programs were aware of these surveys. The PraMS survey is designed to help learn why some babies
      are born healthy and others are not. The tOtS survey is designed to provide a better understanding of
      what affects the health of the very young children in the state. The HSSCO distributed the PraMS-
      GraM newsletter published three times during the year to all Head Start programs.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS         |   241




♦ The HSSCO director participated in the workgroup developing the Infant Mental Health Profession-
  als endorsement System in Oklahoma to ensure compatibility with the mental health components of the
  PrISM Protocol.

♦ The HSSCO director facilitated arrangements for the State department of education to bring a group
  of educators from Singapore to visit and learn about a local Head Start/public school pre-kindergarten
  program that operates during the summer months.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
♦ The HSSCO director participated in the Second annual Head Start Hispanic Institute and met with the
  Office of Head Start Collaboration Lead and HSSCO directors to discuss Hispanic demographic data
  with an expert in the field.

♦ The HSSCO director worked with the region XI Head Start Collaboration expert in Washington, d.C.,
  to arrange for a conference call and follow-up communication concerning a texas Migrant Head Start
  grantee planning to open Migrant Head Start centers in Oklahoma.

♦    The HSSCO director was interviewed by researchers from the Center for Law and Social Policy
    (CLaSP) to discuss access to Oklahoma Head Start programs by children of immigrant parents, includ-
    ing mostly Hispanic children. The HSSCO director participated in the Smart Start Oklahoma Forum
    hosted by CLaSP to study the results of their research.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
♦ The HSSCO appreciated the supplemental funding and opportunity to attend and take partners to the
  Partners’ meeting in Washington, d.C. Follow-up activities will be a focus this year. an action team on
  Collaboration has been formed by Smart Start Oklahoma. The HSSCO director is a member of the team,
  and the Oklahoma association of Community action agencies will contract with Smart Start Oklahoma
  to carry out plans for local collaboration analysis, identification of models, and development of a “toolkit”
  for collaboration among Head Start, state pre-kindergarten, and child care.

♦ The HSSCO director will incorporate follow-up on the development of Migrant Seasonal Head Start
  (MSHS) programs in Oklahoma into the work plan to ensure that existing Head Start/state pre-kinder-
  garten programs work with MSHS programs to find and serve migrant children, and to avoid duplication
  of effort or competition for children.

♦ an increased focus on family literacy has already begun and will be continued through the work plan.

♦ The HSSCO director will pursue the planned Head Start visit with the Governor due to his interest in
  developing a state-funded three-year-old program.

♦ The HSSCO director will continue to work with the developing Infant Mental Health Professionals
  endorsement System in Oklahoma and will ensure that Head Start staff members become aware of the
  new system.
242 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                         AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   243




                                  Oregon


Collaboration Director            Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                  areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Dell ford
                                  plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Oregon Department of education
Public Service Building           Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
255 Capitol Street ne             services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Salem, OR 97310-0203              are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Phone: 503-947-5810               at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
fax: 503-378-5156
                                  in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
dell.ford@state.or.us
                                  Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start
Co-Lead Agency Contacts           and other appropriate programs. Describe your accom-
                                  plishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
Office of the Governor
Danny Santos, liaison             Single Collaborative System: State Pre-kindergarten and
Head Start Collaboration          Federal Head Start
Phone: 503-986-6544
fax: 503-378-3225                 Objective
Danny.santos@state.or.us
                                  to support and maintain a Federal Head Start and state Pre-
                                  kindergarten collaborative system.
Oregon Department of education
Jennifer Olson, Director, eCe
                                  Priority Areas
Phone: 503-947-5662
fax: 503-378-5156                 education, Family Literacy, Health Care, Welfare reform,
jennifer.olson@state.or.us        Child Care, disabilities, and Homeless.

                                  during the early years of the Oregon Head Start Collabora-
ACF Regional Contact
                                  tion Project (1991 and 1992), the Collaboration director
                                  developed, wrote, and facilitated the first Intergovernmental
nancy Hutchins
                                  agreement between the Oregon department of education
DHHS/ACf, Region X                and the region X aCF Office of Head Start to establish a col-
Blanchard Plaza                   laborative system for state pre-kindergarten and Federal Head
2201 Sixth Avenue, Mail Stop 70   Start programs. The agreement is renewed each biennium and
                                  is signed by the Ode Superintendent of Public Instruction
Seattle, WA 98121-1827
                                  and the region X Program Manager, Office of Head Start. The
Phone: 206-615-2547               State adopted the Head Start Program Performance Standards
fax: 206-615-2575                 and eligibility into state law for the state pre-kindergarten
nhutchins@acf.hhs.gov             program and has funded the program with state general funds
244 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    to serve additional children, in coordination with Head Start. The state pre-kindergarten program is a replica
    of the Head Start program, therefore ensuring full alignment of standards, eligibility, and degree requirements,
    classroom size, and other requirements.

    The Intergovernmental agreement includes identification of Federal and State membership in the State/Fed-
    eral collaboration team, articulation of a complimentary monitoring process, joint guidance and regulation in-
    terpretation, coordination of calendar and events, coordination of funding and service areas, coordination and
    sharing of training, joint planning for special initiatives and priorities, and joint problem solving. additionally,
    a State/Federal Service area Coordination policy and process is included to assist local state pre-kindergarten
    and Head Start programs with coordination and collaboration during expansion and/or reductions in funding.

    Currently the Collaboration director is involved with the State/Federal Collaboration team to revise and
    update the Intergovernmental agreement. The Collaboration director provides ongoing support for imple-
    mentation of mutually agreed upon responsibilities outlined in the agreement by participation in regularly
    scheduled meetings, conference calls, and ongoing communication.


    Head Start/Child Care Collaboration

    Objective

    to support and maintain collaboration between child care and Head Start for provision of full day/year ser-
    vice delivery models, shared training, and other partnerships as identified.


    Priority Areas

    Child Care, Welfare reform, education, disabilities, Homeless, Family Literacy, and Health Care.

    The Collaboration director established and continues to lead and facilitate the Head Start/Child Care Col-
    laboration Workgroup. The purpose of the Workgroup is to support local efforts to integrate and implement
    best practices for comprehensive child development services that address the needs of working parents. The
    Workgroup provides ongoing support and problem solving for local Head Start programs regarding child care
    contract issues, collaborative program models, funding, and policy issues. The Workgroup is made up of state
    agency representatives from the Child Care resource and referral (CCrr) Network, department of Human
    Services (dHS) Child Care team, department of education early Childhood education, and local represen-
    tatives from dHS district Offices, Head Start pre-kindergarten programs and CCrr agencies. The region
    X aCF Head Start ta Specialist and Head Start/Child Care team representative are also members of the
    Workgroup. Some of the accomplishments of the Workgroup are:

    ♦ Sponsorship and planning and implementing of three child care/Head Start Summits (“together We’re
      Better”) to address emerging collaboration issues

    ♦ development and dissemination of a document that addresses Head Start and child care contract issues
      titled, Frequently asked Contract Questions

    ♦ development of written descriptions of local child care/Head Start partnership approaches/models titled,
      Supporting Low Wage Workers and their Children.

    dHS contracts support comprehensive full day/year Head Start/child care services. The child care/Head Start
    partnership model descriptions have been disseminated to local Head Start and child care programs. training
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   245




has been provided at the annual Oregon Head Start Coordinators’ meeting and training to encourage more
partnership models across the State. an additional area that will be addressed is services and concerns about
foster children: lack of funding for child care, coordination of placements in Head Start, and provision of
services to foster parents.


Sustainable System for Children’s Social and Emotional Health

Objective

to access mental/behavioral health consultation for Head Start and other early childhood staff to improve
and promote children’s social and emotional health in early childhood settings.


Priority Area

Health Care, Children with disabilities

The Head Start Collaboration director led the planning and development of an invitational summit that took
place in 2002: Oregon Summit: Children’s Emotional Health at Risk. The Summit was supported with Head
Start Collaboration supplemental funds. results from the Summit, A Blue Print for Action, was developed
and published in the Oregon Head Start Collaboration newsletter in October 2003 and was disseminated to
legislators, policy-makers, and the early childhood community.

In 2004, the Head Start Collaboration director used additional supplemental grant funds to provide support
to implement the action steps outlined in the Blue Print for Action. as a result, a customized Oregon Model for
Supporting Young Children’s Social and Emotional Development was developed and a final report submitted. The
Oregon Model was developed to guide current and future efforts for establishing an effective and sustainable
statewide prevention model that supports children’s social and emotional health in early childhood settings
and focuses on children, from birth through five years of age. The model builds on current efforts and extends
existing services wherever possible. Strategies focus on on-site consultation with priority in the following
three areas:

♦ a sustainable financial strategy including private and public partnerships

♦ Policy development and modifications

♦ training strategies and implementation

a community tool that will assist local communities in implementing the recommendations outlined in the
Oregon Model was also developed. two local pilot communities used the tool to develop an action plan for
moving toward specific outcomes adapted to their needs. The October 2006 SPeCIaL edItION of the
Head Start Collaboration newsletter introduced the Oregon Model: Introducing the Oregon Model for Sup-
porting Young Children’s Social and Emotional Development. The newsletter includes a diagram of the model
which describes three levels of consultation: universal, individual, and intensive. Specific recommendations in
the areas of policy, training, and funding are also included. In response to the Oregon Model, the department
of education has provided Positive Behavior Supports training for consultants who were able to support ap-
proximately 45 Head Start pre-kindergarten and eI/eCSe pilot classrooms. a plan to expand these efforts
through Federal grant funding is in process. Currently, discussions regarding multi-agency and multi-funding
strategies to support the Oregon Model and other early childhood initiatives are underway.
246 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Early Childhood Systems Development

    Objective

    to develop a statewide responsive, effective, collaborative and well articulated early childhood system of
    services and supports for young children, ages 0-8, and their families.


    Priority Areas

    all.

    Ode is formally linked to other state agencies through a bill passed by the legislature requiring the depart-
    ment of education, department of Human Services, Commission on Children and Families, and department
    of employment, Child Care division, to jointly lead the development of policies necessary for a voluntary
    statewide early childhood system. The State early Childhood team is a part of this structure.

    The Head Start Collaboration director has participated as an active member of the State early Childhood
    team since its inception. The Collaboration director took the lead for development of the Quality Assurance
    Systems Standards, a description of systems-level components and indicators for quality early childhood and
    development of the Oregon Model for Supporting Young Children’s Social and Emotional Development in Early
    Childhood Settings. The State early Childhood team has been designated as the advisory body for the State
    early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Planning Grant funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau.
    Oregon’s early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Plan has been developed and focuses on four essential
    service and support elements:

           ♦ Health
           ♦ Social and emotional development and Mental Health
           ♦ early Care and education
           ♦ Family Support/Parent education
           ♦ It also includes essential infrastructure elements:
           ♦ Collaborative Leadership
           ♦ Family Partnerships
           ♦ Public awareness/Will and action
           ♦ Policy and resource alignment
           ♦ Workforce Capacity
           ♦ Shared accountability for Quality and Outcomes
           ♦ Sustainable Investments
           ♦ Cultural Proficiency


    This plan will be used as the foundation for further work in developing a responsive and effective early child-
    hood system.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS         |   247




The early childhood systems work is supported by Gov. Kulongoski’s Charter for Children, giving added
emphasis to the early years by highlighting the necessity for Oregon’s children to be safe and healthy with
adequate food and shelter and ready to enter school. The Superintendent of Public Instruction supports early
childhood systems work by proclaiming Ready for School–Early Childhood Education as the number one prior-
ity outlining the following steps:

♦ First Step: establish full-day kindergarten for title I Schools.

♦ Next Step: Increase the number of eligible students served through Oregon Pre-kindergarten Program and
  implement early Childhood Content Standards and assessments.


Collaborative Statewide Professional Development System

Objective

to lead partnership efforts in developing a collaborative training and professional develop system and increase
child care quality.


Priority Areas

education, Child Care, Children with disabilities, Children from Homeless Families, Health Care, and
Family Literacy.

The Head Start Collaboration director is a member of the Child Care and education Coordinating Coun-
cil (CCeCC), which is advisory to the employment department, Child Care division for the Child Care
development Fund, Child Care State Plan, and development of child care policy. The Collaboration direc-
tor serves as Co-Chair of the CCeCC training Quality Committee that is working on the formation of a
statewide complimentary training and professional development system. Components of the professional
development and training system have been identified, and a work plan has been developed. accomplish-
ments include the development of a training resources mapping project, modeled after the Financial Resources
for Training model developed by Wheelock College’s Center for Professional development. The report was
published in 2001, titled Oregon’s Training Neighborhood Map. additionally, the following training materials
have been developed: Social and Emotional Handbook, Health and Safety Handbook, and Infant/Toddler Training.
The following workgroups are actively working to address the various components of the statewide profes-
sional development and training system identified in the work plan:

     ♦ Oregon registry/trainer Standards/Mentor Standards
     ♦ Professional development data System
     ♦ articulation
     ♦      evaluation/diversity
     ♦ training Gaps
     ♦ Family, Friends and Neighbors
     ♦ training review Coordination
248 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    a Quality assurance Workgroup is in the process of being developed and proposed. This Work Group will
    address the involvement of child care in quality issues such as program standards/curriculum (essential ele-
    ments of Programs/Head Start Program Performance Standards), child outcome guidelines (early Childhood
    Foundations), Ode’s child assessment, Quality Indicators Project, licensing, and accreditation.


    Voluntary State Guidelines for Children Ages Birth to Five

    Objective

    to develop research-based state child outcome guidelines for children ages birth to five that align with the
    Head Start Child Outcomes Framework and Oregon’s K-12 standards.


    Priority Areas

    education, Child Care, Family Literacy, Children with disabilities, and Children from Homeless Families.

    This initiative supports President Bush’s Good Start, Grow Smart (GSGS) early childhood initiative and the
    Individuals with disabilities education act (Idea). GSGS requires states to develop research-based “State
    Voluntary Guidelines” on literacy, pre-reading, language, and numeracy for children ages 3-5 that align with
    State K-12 standards. Idea specifies certain requirements for aligning Individual education Plans (IePs)
    to state standards for children with disabilities. In Oregon, the Idea requirement is relevant for Individual
    Family Service Plans for children with disabilities ages 0-5.

    The Head Start Collaboration director participated on the Oregon team that attended the early Child-
    hood educator academy in Los angeles—a Good Start, Grow Smart (GSGS) training conference. an initial
    meeting of child care representatives with Ode staff took place in March 2003 to review the materials and
    to move forward with partners. In September 2003, the Head Start Collaboration director was asked to
    organize and lead a statewide effort to develop State Voluntary Guidelines, developing and aligning pre-kin-
    dergarten child outcomes with the Ode K-12 Common Curriculum Goals and Content Standards, defining
    pre-kindergarten foundations for children to reach the 3rd grade benchmark. a Stakeholders advisory Group
    of approximately 80 participants statewide was organized to serve in an advisory capacity to the Child Care
    division and department of education. an overall work plan and timeline were developed. Panels represent-
    ing eight domain areas were identified:

          ♦ approaches to Learning
          ♦ Language and Literacy
          ♦ Mathematics
          ♦ Science
          ♦ Physical education and Health
          ♦ Social Science
          ♦ The arts
          ♦ Social and emotional development


    In Oregon, the Voluntary State Guidelines are referred to as early Childhood Foundations and address chil-
    dren from birth to five years of age. draft materials were sent out to the general early childhood community
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   249




for review through focus groups with the opportunity to review and provide input through the Child Care
division’s Web site. The draft document was sent out to a national early childhood expert to be reviewed and
analyzed for gaps. Input from the national expert was integrated into a final document. Oregon’s early Child-
hood Foundations are posted on Ode’s Web site in the form of two documents: Birth to Three Foundations
and Three to Five Foundations with summaries of both documents.

The implementation plan includes developing a training Module, a two hour PowerPoint presentation that
will be used across the State to send a consistent message about the early Childhood Foundations: what they
are, how they can be used, and how they link with other standards. additionally, a training Manual is in the
process of being developed. It will be modeled after Through the Eyes of the Child, a manual produced by Idaho
and North Carolina. The manual will be adapted to address Oregon’s early Childhood Foundations and will
be completed by fall 2007.

Welfare Reform

Objective

to support and maintain collaboration with welfare reform efforts including proposed changes in the tempo-
rary assistance for Needy Families (taNF) program.


Priority Areas

Welfare reform and Child Care.

The Collaboration director continues to support and maintain collaboration with welfare reform efforts in-
cluding proposed changes in the temporary assistance for Needy Families (taNF) program. The Collabora-
tion director works with dHS on emerging welfare reform/taNF issues and serves as a resource person for
the Oregon Head Start association for taNF issues and any proposed changes. The Collaboration director
supported programs in efforts regarding families who are categorically eligible for Head Start due to their eli-
gibility and participation in programs administered under the authority of taNF. a joint dHS/Ode memo
was developed and disseminated. The memo lists all the programs administered under the authority of taNF
in which families could participate, and therefore be categorically eligible for Head Start pre-kindergarten.

Children with Disabilities

Objective

to support and maintain a collaborative system for services to children with disabilities.


Priority Area

disabilities, education, Child Care, Health Care, Homeless, and Family Literacy.

The Head Start Collaboration director participates on the Ode early Childhood team to address issues
related to disability services. The team is made up of Oregon Head Start pre-kindergarten and early Inter-
vention/early Childhood Special education (eI/eCSe) Specialists, along with representatives from other
early childhood programs. The collaboration is supported by regularly scheduled monthly meetings to address
emerging disability issues, provide joint problem solving and support for local programs, and developing and
issuing joint guidance papers for policy clarification.
250 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    The Collaboration director in partnership with an eI/eCeS Specialist facilitates the updating of the
    Intergovernmental agreement for Services to Children with Disabilities, Ages Birth to Five. The agreement
    is updated every four years and is signed by representatives from the aCF Office of Head Start including
    region X, region XI (american Indian and alaskan Native), region XII (Migrant/Seasonal Head Start),
    and the department of education for eI/eCSe. The agreement is endorsed by tribal governments that have
    Head Start programs, Oregon Head Start association for region X Head Start and state pre-kindergarten
    programs, and the executive director of the Migrant/Seasonal Head Start grantee. The Collaboration direc-
    tor participates in meetings that are convened annually, as required in the Intergovernmental agreement, to
    ensure collaborative and effective statewide disability services.

    The State agreement provides guidance for a statewide systemic approach to provision of services to children
    with disabilities and access to comprehensive services. It serves as a template for local Head Start and state
    pre-kindergarten programs to negotiate cooperative agreements with local eI/eCSe contractors. The local
    agreements define the roles and responsibilities for each program to jointly support the special education
    needs of children with disabilities.

    Currently, the Collaboration director is working with the Ode early Childhood team, Head Start associa-
    tion and child care to address two critical areas identified in the eI/eCSe State Performance Plan:

    ♦ Increase the percent of infants and toddlers referred for early Intervention services.

    ♦ Increase the percentage of preschool age children with IFSPs served in natural environments. The Head
      Start association has identified over-representation of children with disabilities in Head Start classrooms
      as another concern that will be addressed.

    Homeless Children

    Objective

    to support access to services for children from homeless families.


    Priority Areas

    Children from Homeless Families, education, Child Care, and Health Care.

    In November 2001, as a member of the Oregon team, the Head Start Collaboration director attended
    the HHS/HUd sponsored Policy Academy for State and Local Policymakers—Improving Access to Mainstream
    Services for Persons Who Are Homeless: Focus on Homeless Families with Children. an Oregon vision statement
    and work plan were developed as a result of the academy. Budget constraints limited the ability of Oregon to
    achieve the activities outlined in the work plan. Currently, there is an effort to revitalize this important activ-
    ity through President Bush’s Chronic Homelessness Initiative. a second academy, sponsored and funded by
    dHHS, Housing and Urban development (HUd), and Veterans affairs (Va), took place in September 2003.
    The Head Start Collaboration director was scheduled to attend as a member of the Oregon state team but
    did not attend due to funding constraints of the academy. The goal of the academy is to support state and
    local administrative and legislative policymakers in developing a collaborative state-level action Plan that in-
    cludes coordination with housing. The action Plan must include activities that can be realistically implement-
    ed to improve access to services by persons who are homeless. Currently, the Collaboration director is the
    Head Start contact person for the Oregon team and is working with local Head Start programs to encourage
    more collaboration with homeless shelters to serve Head Start eligible children and their families.
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS             |   251




Facilitate the involvement of Head Start in the development of State policies, plans, processes, and
decisions affecting the Head Start target population and other low-income families.
Oregon Head Start Association

Objective

to ensure the involvement of Head Start in state policies, plans, processes, and decisions affecting the Head
Start population and other low-income children and families and to provide resources and information as
requested.


Priority Areas

all, as needed.

The Collaboration director serves as a partner and resource person for the Oregon Head Start association.
The Collaboration director attends all of the Or Head Start association meetings and Head Start direc-
tors’ meetings to report on the activities of the Collaboration Project and to obtain input and direction. On an
ongoing basis, the Collaboration director ensures that Head Start representatives are assigned and appointed
to state-level advisory boards and committees, commissions, councils, and workgroups that have an impact on
state policy and services for Head Start eligible and other low-income children and families. Currently Head
Start association representatives are active on approximately 20 state-level boards and commissions.

The Collaboration director also serves as a resource person for the legislative committee of the Oregon Head
Start association. The Oregon Legislature meets every odd numbered year during the months of January
through June. Preparation activities related to the legislature take place during the off-legislative years and
during the legislative session. Oregon’s statutory legislative goal is to expand the Oregon Head Start pre-
kindergarten program to serve 50% of the eligible children by 1999 and 100% by the year 2004. although
this goal has not been reached, the legislative language lends credibility for continued efforts to fully fund the
Oregon Head Start pre-kindergarten program. as a support for this effort, the National Head Start Program
Performance Measures and FaCeS Study were published in the Head Start Collaboration newsletter as an
educational tool for legislators.

Most recently, the Head Start Collaboration director assisted the Head Start association in developing a
universal Head Start pre-kindergarten concept and funding plan. This is a Federal/State partnership approach.
as part of this effort, the Collaboration director provides resources and expertise for a new private partner.
The Children’s Institute is a growing coalition of business, philanthropic, civic leaders, and organizations that
describe themselves as a research to action organization. They are currently taking the lead in advocacy efforts
to fully fund the Oregon Head Start pre-kindergarten program.


Office of the Governor/Department of Education

Objective

to ensure the involvement of Head Start in state policies, plans, processes, and decisions affecting the Head
start population and other low-income children and families and to provide resources and information as
requested.
252 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Priority Areas

    all, as needed.

    Gov. ted Kulongoski has designated the Oregon department of education as a “co-lead partner” with the
    Office of the Governor for the Oregon Head Start Collaboration Project and has appointed a Governor’s li-
    aison to the Project. The Head Start Collaboration Office is housed and administered by the Oregon depart-
    ment of education. Both Gov. Kulongoski and the Superintendent of Public Instruction have ready for School
    among their top priorities.

    The Collaboration director serves as a resource person to the Governor’s Office on state pre-kindergarten,
    Federal Head Start, and early childhood collaboration issues and concerns. during the 2001 legislative session
    and during the following emergency legislative sessions, two documents were developed in response to ques-
    tions from the Governor’s Office regarding cost per child. The Collaboration director worked with the Ode
    early Childhood director and the Northwest educational Lab to produce a document titled: Oregon Head
    Start: A Program and Policy Analysis and Executive Summary, March 2002. additionally, a companion docu-
    ment was written titled: Oregon Head Start PreK Q & A. Both of these documents are available upon request.
    during the 2003 legislative session, two documents were developed as a response to questions about the cost
    and services of the Head Start pre-kindergarten health component and numerous budget scenarios were
    submitted as requested. during the 2005 legislative session, the Head Start Collaboration Office took the lead
    in developing the ODE Oregon Head Start Pre-kindergarten Legislative Report and developed and maintained a
    legislative notebook that includes relevant reports and responses to legislative requests.

    Currently, the Universal Head Start Pre-Kindergarten Initiative, a Federal/State partnership approach, is
    under discussion for the 2007-2009 legislative session. The Collaboration director provides information and
    resources as needed for this initiative.


    Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
    The Children’s Institute is a new private partner that is a research to action organization. The Children’s
    Institute is a coalition of business, philanthropic, civic leaders, and organizations. Partners include Innovative
    Partners, Stand for Children, and the ready for School Leaders Panel. They started their work by asking the
    following two questions:

    ♦ What is the best investment to make sure disadvantaged children arrive at school ready to learn?

    ♦ How do we unite heart and brain and do the right thing in a smart, efficient and effective way?

    after two years of intensive early childhood research, the Children’s Institute decided that expanding access
    to high-quality preschool is the best strategy for giving kids a solid chance to succeed in school and life. Their
    research led them to taking steps toward supporting and expanding a program that’s already proven successful:
    Oregon Head Start Pre-Kindergarten. They state that fully funding Oregon Head Start Pre-Kindergarten is
    the best first step.

    The Head Start Collaboration director is working closely with the Children’s Institute by providing informa-
    tion and expertise about Oregon’s Federal Head Start and state pre-kindergarten programs, the state/Federal
    collaborative system, service statistics, costs, infrastructure issues, and the Universal Head Start Pre-kinder-
    garten Initiative and funding plan. This relationship led to a joint presentation of the Children’s Institute and
    Head Start Collaboration Office at the Johnson and Johnson advanced Management training at UCLa and
    most recently a joint presentation at the Oregon Child Care Commission meeting. The Children’s Institute
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   253




was invited to present with the Head Start Collaboration Office at the recent NHSa Conference but were
unable to attend.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
The Head Start Collaboration director disseminated relevant information and statistics specific to Oregon.
Local Head Start programs that attended the Hispanic Institute shared information with the Oregon Head
Start association and discussed their plans for improving services to Hispanic children and their families.
More training and discussion are planned for this important issue. Local programs were very impressed with
the content of the Hispanic Institute.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
Ongoing work will need to continue in the areas of early childhood systems development, professional devel-
opment, child care/Head Start partnerships, support for children’s social and emotional health, Federal Head
Start and state pre-kindergarten collaboration, and support for children with disabilities. New work will need
to be nurtured and expanded in the area of public/private partnerships with the Children’s Institute and other
private organizations. This new private/public partnership is greatly needed and highly valued as a way of
establishing an effective and quality birth-5 early childhood system by educating the public about early child-
hood issues and advocating for funding of quality and effective programs. Continued work will need to take
place to provide requested resources and expertise for the Universal Head Start Pre-kindergarten Initiative.
254 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                          AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   255




                                   Pennsylvania


Collaboration Director             Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                   areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Sue Mitchell
                                   plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Department of education
333 Market Street                  Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
10th floor                         services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Harrisburg, PA 17126-0333          are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Phone: 717-787-7489                at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
fax: 717-783-8230 fax
                                   in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
susmitchel@state.pa.us             The HSSCO supports grantees’ provision of services for work-
                                   ing parents who need extended hours or services of care for
Lead Agency Contact                their children to participate in Head Start through:

tracey Campanini                   ♦ Supporting the creation of partnerships with early care
Phone: 717-213-2066                  providers including child care centers, family and group
                                     child care homes, and school districts.
fax: 717-213-0585
tracam@berksiu.org                 ♦ Working within communities to increase the quality and
                                     comprehensiveness of services offered to children in all
ACF Regional Contact                 early childhood settings through Keystone StarS.

Charles Jennings                   ♦ Coordinating with early Intervention in order to ensure
Region III                           access to appropriate services for children with special
150 South Independence Mall West
                                     needs.
Suite 864
                                   ♦ Coordinating work with the Certification and Subsidy
Philadelphia, PA 19106-3499          Bureaus of the Office of Child development to facilitate
Phone: 215-861-4036                  Head Start grantee partnerships with child care.
fax: 215-861-4070
charles.jennings@acf.hhs.gov       ♦ Coordinating with and promoting PreK Counts, a Public
                                     Private Partnership; an initiative that combines resources
                                     from school district, child care, early intervention, and
                                     Head Start programs to support high quality, collaborative
                                     early learning programs within communities and works to
                                     engage public leaders in the promotion of early learning in
                                     Pennsylvania.

                                   ♦ Utilizing state funds through the Head Start Supplemental
                                     assistance Program to continue funding extended day slots
256 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




        previously created by the HSSaP as well as dPW funded full-day full-year support to early Head Start.

    ♦ developing a new funding opportunity PreK Counts accountability Block Grant. By design, this oppor-
      tunity supports the expansion of services to the neediest communities, and a requirement of the grant is
      a community planning meeting and Head Start sign-off. If successful, this grant will support 11,000 new
      children in Pennsylvania.


    Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
    your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
    Health Care
    ♦ The Pennsylvania HSSCO will continue to support the expanded implementation of “Color Me Healthy”
      in Pennsylvania.

             Keystone “Color Me Healthy” (KCMH) is a joint effort between the HSSCO and the Pa depart-
             ments of education, Health, and Public Welfare. KCMH provides teachers and caregivers with tools
             to teach young children about healthy eating and physical activity. The HSSCO has sought oppor-
             tunities to promote the connection between KCMH and other emerging initiatives in the areas of
             obesity prevention and oral health. KCMH trainings have been offered across Pa and “Color Me
             Healthy” Kits were distributed to programs.

    ♦ The HSSCO will renew efforts to support the activities of the State Health Improvement Partnerships
      (SHIP).

             results from previous oral health forums were utilized to update plans for additional strategies in
             this area. The State dentist, dr. Howard tolchinsky, has presented to the HSSCO advisory Board.
             an application for an association of State and territorial dental directors grant to further evaluate
             and plan for oral health supports in Pa was drafted.

    ♦ The HSSCO will work with the departments of Health and education, along with the Office of Child
      development, to include Head Start in the planning and organization of initiatives on obesity in young
      children.

             In the spring of 2006, region III Head Start Bureau piloted I Am Moving, I Am Learning with
             several Head Start grantees in the State. The HSSCO has continued to work to integrate/coordinate
             the work of I Am Moving, I Am Learning with other health initiatives in the State. One initiative,
             Keystone “Color Me Healthy” (KCMH) incorporates some of the IMIL material into its training,
             and the workgroup supporting KCMH has also attended the IMIL training. additionally, dr. Linda
             Carson has provided input into the KCMH curriculum.

    ♦ The HSSCO will work with the departments of Health and education, along with the Office of Child
      development, to continue the implementation of “Mind in the Making” by bringing the training resources
      and implementation strategies to the Head Start community.

             Mind in the Making, created by the Family Work Institute, provides teachers with strategies for
             effective classroom management through the combination of social and emotional development with
             cognitive learning. developed as a “train the trainers” model, Head Start participants will train pro-
                                                                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   257




          gram management staff in this design. twenty Head Start staff from ten Head Start programs were
          trained in the Mind in the Making by december 2006. Plans were also made to offer an additional
          training in the eastern part of Pennsylvania. There will be an additional 20 slots available to the Head
          Start community.

♦ Coordinate with Key’s Infant toddler Mental Health Project—a collaborative project of the Pa Key and
  selected regional Keys, Berks County Intermediate Unit, and the Office of Child development with
  funding from the Heinz endowments.

          The project is designed as a consultative model aimed at bringing practitioners and specialists togeth-
          er to develop goals and strategies to enhance the practitioner’s capacity to encourage development
          of positive relationships and create a learning environment which promotes positive behaviors. This
          initiative had a limited rollout to two regions within Pennsylvania. Children enrolled in child care
          sites received direct services. Plans are in process to expand the number of regions participating.

Welfare
♦    The HSSCO will continue to promote the development of local collaborative relationships to develop
    high quality full-day full-year early childhood education services for families moving from taNF to self-
    sufficiency.

          State HSSaP funds and state dPW full-day full-year early Head Start funding were utilized to
          support partnerships and to extend services in communities to meet family needs. additionally each
          county in Pennsylvania has a Community engagement Group, CeG. Head Start is a recommended
          participant on this team along with private preschools and certified child care providers. In addition
          to strengthening partnerships, CeGs are charged with educating the local community to the benefits
          of high quality early care and education.

♦ The HSSCO will continue to utilize participation on the Office of Child development Leadership team
  to promote coordination of programs and services to families.

          Formal monthly meetings occur to coordinate services to children and families. There is a strong ele-
          ment of collaboration across several state offices. any time there are topics to be discussed, informal
          communications are used to connect with the necessary people. additionally, the members of the
          HSSCO are involved in a number of other committees where there are linkages between agencies
          and Head Start.

Child Care
♦ The HSSCO will continue its role in assisting with the design and implementation of pre-kindergarten
  initiatives in local communities via partnerships between Head Start, public education, and child care.

          eC regional Coordinator communication with Head Start grantees has targeted local child care
          partnerships as opportunities to utilize state funding and partnerships to expand program options
          and to further assist Head Start grantees in supporting families’ full day full year service needs. ad-
          ditionally, the Head Start Community was included in the Pennsylvania Keystone StarS Quality
          Initiative. a core group of Head Start representatives met over several months to ensure the system
          reflected Head Start’s uniqueness.
258 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Education
    ♦ The HSSCO will continue to support Head Start and child care as they seek active partnerships with
      public education preschool initiatives, such as PreK Counts and accountability Block Grant Pre-Kinder-
      garten.

              Both initiatives have collaborative partnership components. The HSSCO has encouraged collabo-
              ration in local community early care and education system-building. The HSSCO supports and
              encourages grantees to utilize state-developed early learning standards and align with recommended
              early childhood curricula and assessments. additionally, through the Community engagement
              Groups, Head Start can support collaborative practices regarding transition to Kindergarten with
              other community partners.

    Community Services
    In October 2005, a Memorandum of Understanding between the Pennsylvania Community action Partner-
    ship association and the Pennsylvania Head Start association was signed. The HSSCO has continued to
    work with leadership from both associations to promote the development of effective communication and
    coordination strategies that support meaningful collaborative relationships between Community action
    agencies and Head Start agencies in the State.

    Family Literacy Services
    ♦ The HSSCO will continue to be an active member of the Pennsylvania Family Literacy Consortium.

              The Consortium is comprised of a variety of agencies throughout Pennsylvania that have an inter-
              est in promoting interagency collaboration at the state level with expectations that policy to support
              family literacy will extend to local agencies or partners. The Consortium meets quarterly to discuss
              issues pertinent to the improvement of family literacy through collaboration and development of
              quality indicators and performance standards.

    ♦ The Pa HSSCO will also continue to work with the commonwealth libraries to support the continuation
      of the “One Book every Young Child” campaign that originated in the spring of 2006.

              This statewide initiative emphasizes the importance of literacy through a series of family-based ac-
              tivities and experiences, including the widespread distribution of a children’s book by a Pennsylvania-
              based author. In the spring of 2006, Head Start and child care centers received the featured book.
              The author traveled across Pennsylvania reading in various communities. In an effort to have a “read-
              ing event” in each county to support this initiative, local celebrities read to the children and families.
              It was a success and the committee made headway in selecting a book and author for spring 2007.

    Services to Children with Disabilities
    ♦ The HSSCO will further Pennsylvania’s focus on inclusion by taking an active role in ensuring that Head
      Start grantees are utilizing classroom models that promote inclusion.

              The HSSCO eC Project Manager will continue to participate in the quarterly meetings of the State
              Interagency Coordinating Council in order to remain informed of the ongoing status of programs
              for children with special needs in the State, as well as to seek new opportunities to promote collab-
              orative inclusive programs involving Head Start. Information is disseminated annually to all Head
                                                                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   259




         Start directors regarding the department of Health Barrier elimination Grants. Programs can apply
         for up to $3,000 to increase accessibility in their sites to promote inclusion.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
♦ The Head Start Supplemental assistance Program (HSSaP) continues to fund a grantee offering services
  to homeless children in Western Pa. additionally the eC regional Coordinators refer programs for sup-
  port if they are seeking resources for support of homeless children.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
The HSSCO director and eC Project participate on the Governor’s early Learning team, which has repre-
sentation from the Pa department of education, the Pa department of Public Welfare through the Office
of Child development (OCd), the Pa department of Health, and the Governor’s Office. The Governor’s
early Learning team works to frame a system of early care and education services in Pennsylvania. This
system continues its efforts to increase accessible, quality child care, early intervention services, voluntary pre-
kindergarten, and full-day kindergarten and to better coordinate and integrate these and other related early
childhood programs throughout the Commonwealth. The Governor’s early Learning team continues to work
on child care subsidy, quality initiatives for child care, and a coordinated approach to professional develop-
ment for all early care and education programs.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
“Mind in the Making,” I am Moving, I am Learning, and the Pa tSP were all described above.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
The HSSCO participates in the Family Literacy Consortium, which support programs for english Language
Learners. Our One Book initiative provided books in Spanish to all children identified by the local programs
as needing books written in Spanish.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
Completing the profile helped with orientation to the goals of the office. It has also revealed some areas where
more effort is needed in the coming year. The State’s work plan is under construction at this time.
260 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                          AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   261




                                   Puerto rico


Collaboration Director             Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                   areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Alejandra Alvarez Ibáñez
                                   plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Office of the Governor
PO Box 9020082                     Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
San Juan, PR 00902-0082            services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
787-725-4576                       are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
fax: 787-725-3424                  at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
aalvarez@fortaleza.gobierno.pr
                                   in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
                                   The HSSCO has been a key player in the establishment of col-
ACF Regional Contact               laborative agreements between Head Start programs and state
                                   agencies in the last several years. The following are agreements
Alisa Cupid                        recently signed, updated, or that will be signed in the following
ACf Region II                      months:
26 federal Plaza
                                   ♦ Division of Special Education of the Education Department:
Room 4114
                                     This agreement was updated and signed in November
new York, nY 10278                   2005 by Secretary aragunde torres and has to be revised
212-264-2890                         each year. The department of education is the Common-
alisa.cupid@acf.hhs.gov
                                     wealth’s Leading education agency (Lea). Head Start is
                                     the agency through which the local Lea can meet its obli-
                                     gation to make a free appropriate public education available
Lead Agency Contact                  through a contract, State or local collaborative agreement
                                     or other arrangement, or the agency in which the family
Mabel Crescioni Benítez, esq.        chooses to have the child served rather than using Lea
Advisor on Social Welfare            services.1
Office of the Governor
PO Box 9020082
                                             The HSSCO has held several meetings with the new
                                             Secretary of Special education and the Special Needs
San Juan, PR 00902-0082                      Cluster of the Head Start association of directors to
787-725-4576                                 review the agreement and to make sure early Head
fax: 787-725-3424                            Start and Head Start grantees are taken into account
                                             in the new pilot projects.
mcrescioni@fortaleza.gobierno.pr

                                   ♦ WIC Program: This Collaborative agreement has not been
                                     revised since 1998, when there were only 17 grantees in
                                     Puerto rico (there are 28 grantees at the present time).
                                     We are currently working with the Nutrition Cluster of the
                                     Head Start directors’ association, ta/t BaH and WIC’s
                                     Nutrition, Breastfeeding and dissemination divisions to
262 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




        revise and update the agreement. We would like to include in the agreement collaboration with WIC’s
        Farmer Market Program and Breastfeeding division.

             The Farmer Market Program distributes $20 checks to participant families, and then they can buy
             locally grown fruit and vegetables. Since many early Head Start and Head Start participants are also
             eligible for WIC, we hope to establish a collaboration that will promote the importance of eating
             fruits and vegetables and of buying produce from Puerto rican farmers.

             Our goal is to improve the nutritional habits of our children and their families and to help them
             establish healthy and active lifestyles that prevent obesity and the associated health threats. Chil-
             dren’s health starts at the womb by the mother’s diet. after birth, breastfeeding serves not only to
             feed the baby but also to establish a close bond between mother and child. Breast milk is the most
             complete form of nutrition for infants. “epidemiologic research shows that human milk and breast-
             feeding of infants provide advantages with regard to general health, growth, and development, while
             significantly decreasing risk for a large number of acute and chronic diseases”.2 Through the revision
             of this agreement, we hope to disseminate this message to all families in Puerto rico.

             We have already started the revision of the agreement, and it should be signed by the department
             of Health and the grantees by december 2007.

    ♦ Department of Health’s Early Intervention—“Program Avanzando Juntos”: “avanzando Juntos” is admin-
      istered by the Commonwealth’s department of Health, and its main goal is to help children (ages birth
      through 3) identified as having a developmental disability get all the services he or she needs to achieve
      his/her developmental milestones.

             In October 2006, we held four dissemination activities for the existing agreement that reached all
             Health regions and all grantees around the Island. Separate meetings for early Head Start and
             early Head Start and early Intervention staff were held to gather their feedback on the contents of
             the agreement. The consensus between both agencies was that the contents were appropriate, but
             the challenge is in the implementation of the agreement. The representative from the department
             of Health has stated that next year they expect changes in the early Intervention regulations that
             will require modifying the agreement as it is today. This is why we are currently drafting procedures
             along with the Special Needs Cluster and the department of Health that will facilitate the imple-
             mentation of the agreement. Once the procedures are finished, they will be submitted with the
             Spanish version of the agreement for the approval of the Secretary of Health and the grantees.

    ♦ Department of Education—Central Level: One of the HSSCO’s main goals is to work towards the align-
      ment of the department of education’s Early Learning Guidelines for all early childhood programs. With
      this goal in mind the Head Start-Child Care alliance Commission has worked hard to draft an effective
      agreement with the department of education. The agreement will also serve to facilitate communication
      between Head Start grantees and the department of education in order to achieve a smooth transition
      for the child. It was submitted to the department of education’s Legal division and will soon be signed
      by Secretary aragunde.

    ♦ Administration of Correctional Institutions: Family life is one of the key factors in preventing recidivism.3
      Head Start Program Information report (PIr) 2004-2005 for Puerto rico indicates that of 35,710 par-
      ticipant families, 581 received assistance related to one of their members being incarcerated. Because
      of the importance of helping families with an incarcerated member maintain a healthy and strong bond,
      we are currently in negotiations with the department of Correction and rehabilitation (dCr) to estab-
      lish a collaborative agreement that will benefit primarily pregnant women in correctional institutions, their
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   263




   children, and imprisoned fathers of young kids. Pregnant women would receive eHS services, and males
   would benefit from responsible fatherhood workshops.

         Of the many programs and institutions that this agency operates, there are four with which Head
         Start will establish direct collaboration:

             ♦ Pre-exit program: which helps prisoners 18 months or less prior to their release get ready
               to get back to their communities.

             ♦ Home for pregnant women and their babies under three years of age.

             ♦ Social adaptation Houses that serve as halfway homes for minimum security prisoners
               (most of them are serving time for not paying alimony).

             ♦ Therapeutic community which houses prisoners (minimum and medium security) that
               have drug addictions and tries to rehabilitate them and give them the skills they need
               to get back on track.

         We have invited early Head Start and Head Start programs that have centers near these correctional
         institutions to be a part of the negotiations because they will provide the aforementioned services.
         There are a total of five grantees that are taking part in the negotiations. Since early Head Start
         and Head Start programs are part of and serve the community, this agreement will allow for them
         to serve their neighbors and will result in stronger families and individuals. The agreement involves
         among other things:

             ♦ establishing communication between grantees and the social technicians of the dCr to
               facilitate enrollment and services to the children under 5 of members of the correctional
               population.

             ♦ allowing selected members of the correctional population to do the in-classroom hours
               required by the Children development associate (Cda) in early Head Start and Head
               Start classrooms.

             ♦ establishing communication between department of Corrections and early Head Start and
               Head Start grantees that will allow both parties to beneficiate from each other’s initiative
               (adult education programs, Healthy Marriages, Fatherhood, etc.).

         The final draft of the agreement was submitted with region II’s recommendation to the grantees’
         Policy Boards and Governance Committees for their approval. This step has taken longer than ex-
         pected, but we are hopeful that it will soon be signed and implemented.

♦ Patient’s Advocate Office: This Government agency has as its main goal to serve as an intermediary between
  citizens and public and private health providers. Their main goal is to empower citizens, making them
  aware of their rights as patients. They have elaborated a collaborative agreement to foster coalitions among
  different community partners to improve communication among them and populations’ access to health
  services and information. PrHSSCO presented along with Patient’s advocate Office’s staff the “Salud en
  tus Manos” agreement (“Health at your Hands”) to all early Head Start and Head Start grantees. Most of
  the grantees have signed the agreement. The agreement facilitates early Head Start and Head Start staff
  access to their regional Patient advocate offices and to the services they provide.
264 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




               The HSSCO also encourages widespread collaboration and communication among Head Start,
               early Head Start, child care and other early childhood programs, state agencies, and private initia-
               tives that advocate for young children that result in more and better served families.


    Outcomes

    ♦ The Child Care Program and Head Start have a common goal: to help low-income families and their
      children. The HSSCO recognizes the importance of collaborating with the Child Care Block Grant,
      which in Puerto rico is administered by the administration for Holistic Care and development of Chil-
      dren (aCUdeN) of the department of Family. We always try to include them in all of our activities and
      agreements and have established excellent communication with the program’s administrator. The HSSCO
      fosters collaboration between early Head Start and Head Start grantees and child care with the following
      activities:

                   ♦ Head Start-Child Care Alliance Commission: This Commission was created about five years
                     ago to assure good communication and collaboration among both programs. Last year we ex-
                     panded its membership in order to include representatives from the departments of Health,
                     Family, and education. as a result, we have solidified the Commission allowing Head Start
                     and child care programs to have direct access to state agencies and assuring that the work
                     done by each member’s organization is shared with others. We will expand the Commission’s
                     membership in order to include representatives from higher learning and early childhood
                     organizations and will change its name to broaden its scope. The Commissions’ goal for the
                     next five years will be to make sure all agencies are aligned with the department of educa-
                     tion’s Early Learning Guidelines and to obtain a unified system of services, that share a com-
                     mon philosophy regarding early childhood development. We will develop a plan of action
                     on an annual basis that will serve as measuring tool for the effectiveness of our work as an
                     alliance.

    The main outcomes of last years’ work are:

                   ♦ Early Childhood Roundtable: This convocation was hosted by the First Lady of Puerto rico
                     and it included participation from all of the Commission’s member organizations and also
                     representatives from higher education, NaeYC’s local affiliate aPeNet and aCF re-
                     gion II’s administrator Ms Mary ann Higgins. dr. Félix V. Matos rodríguez, Governor’s
                     advisor on Social Welfare, was the facilitator for the event. The roundtable served as a way
                     to emphasize the importance for agencies in Puerto rico to come together and work with a
                     common philosophy towards early childhood development.

                   ♦ Collaborative Agreement with the Department of Education’s central level (previously described).

                   ♦ Autism Roundtable: With this convocation, we had the opportunity to have Head Start
                     grantees, the Child Care Program, and the department of Health at the table to discuss
                     this important and sometimes ignored topic. There aren’t any statistics regarding the autism
                     population in Puerto rico. Without data, achieving changes in policy is almost impossible.
                     as a result, this population does not get the attention and services it needs, and society
                     remains ignorant of this disease. during the discussion, the department of Health had a
                     chance to present to the grantees the projects they are working on regarding autism. One
                     of these projects is an autism questionnaire. Most of the grantees that attended the event
                     are now collaborating in the distribution and collection of the questionnaires. The HSSCO
                     informed the Head Start director’s association of the project, and a total of 15 grantees
                     agreed to participate. Collaboration from Head Start programs has allowed the depart-
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS             |   265




                 ment of Health to reach all 78 municipalities. The department of Health has delivered the
                 questionnaires to the HSSCO, and we will distribute them among the participating grantees.
                 The process will end in October when the department of Health will begin organizing and
                 analyzing the collected data.

In the next few months we will develop an action plan with the members of the Commission that will guar-
antee collaboration and better communication among both programs and their active participation in all early
childhood initiatives island-wide.

♦ The HSSCO facilitated a collaboration effort that resulted in five Head Start grantees submitting a joint
  grant proposal for the Healthy Marriages Initiative. This marked the first time grantees in Puerto rico
  have come together to collaborate in a joint grant proposal. They named the group alianza de Matrimo-
  nios Saludables-Puerto rico, aMaS-Pr.

         Puerto rico wasn’t awarded the grant, but we have already had several meetings to review and im-
         prove the submitted proposal to make sure it’s ready in case new Healthy Marriages funds are made
         available for competition.

♦ The HSSCO is in the process of establishing collaboration with adFaN, the child welfare agency within
  the department of the Family in order to undertake a violence prevention effort in unison (child abuse/
  neglect, prevention, domestic violence prevention). The HSSCO will work in collaboration with the fol-
  lowing programs administered by adFaN’s assistant administration for Prevention and Community
  Services: Community Services Block Grant Program, Family Violence Prevention and Services Program,
  Community-Based Child abuse Prevention Program, the Promoting Safe and Stable Families Program,
  and the School for Healthy Living and Parenting.

♦ For the past four years, the HSSCO has been a member of the department of Health’s early Childhood
  Comprehensive System Grant Committee. The department of Health submitted their eCCS action
  Plan in June 2006 to the Maternal and Child Bureau for their approval. after several modifications, it
  was finally approved in January 2007. The HSSCO will collaborate with the department of Health in the
  implementation of their plan, which will help us in the establishment of a seamless system of services for
  early childhood.

         although the Commonwealth has not established the pre-kindergarten program, the HSSCO
         always includes the preschool special needs population in its initiatives. For example we are currently
         developing a Model Playground Pilot Project, along with the Governor’s Office, one of the Munici-
         palities, the Special Communities Office, and one of the Head Start grantees. This Project will create
         a model playground that fosters the development of social and cognitive skills of children and that
         will be accessible on a regular basis for Head Start, child care, special education participant children,
         and special communities’ children


Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
Health Care
See Collaboration agreements with early Intervention and Patient’s advocate Office above. also we have
been working with the department of Health, Patient advocate Office, Commonwealth’s Health Insurance
administration, Booz allen Hamilton technical assistance Local team (BaH), and the Oral Health Fellow
from the University of Puerto rico’s Medical Sciences’ Campus in order to revise the existing Periodicity
266 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    table. Using the recommendations of the american academy of Obstetrics and the american academy
    of Pediatric dentistry, we adjusted the table to include oral health screenings for pregnant women and for
    children before they reach their first birthday or after the appearance of their first tooth. also we drafted a
    proposed Oral Health Public Policy for the department of Health that supports these modifications. Both
    documents were submitted for the approval of the Secretary of Health.

    Welfare
    See collaboration with adFaN (foster care) above. The HSSCO collaborates with the Interagency Commis-
    sion for Integration of Violence Prevention Services of the department of Family. This Commission has as its
    main goal to align the protocols of every agency that serves children in order to assure that communication is
    effective and that the mechanism established to work with cases related to child abuse are handled in an
    effective manner. The HSSCO also made sure that a representative from the Family and Community Partner-
    ships Cluster of the Head Start association of directors participates in the dialogue. The Commission will
    submit their recommendations to the Secretary of Family before the end of 2007.

    Child Care
    Our Office has been working with the department of Family’s Licensing division, Puerto rico’s architecture
    association, Head Start directors association, arPe (buildings regulating agency), the american academy
    of Pediatrics (aaP), and the BaH team with the objective of drafting a position statement on the ideal quali-
    ties of playgrounds. Our ultimate goal is to have a document that contains all the applicable local and Federal
    regulations (including Head Start’s), the architecture association recommendations for Puerto rico’s climate,
    and aaP recommendations regarding the importance of play in children’s development. This document will
    support grantees in their planning process for playground areas.

    Education
    See Collaboration agreement drafted by the Head Start-Child Care alliance Commission above. The
    HSSCO held in april 2007 the “Play Symposium: Playing We all Win!” with the goal of disseminating the
    importance of allowing children time to play with out pre-imposed rules or instructions. The inspiration for
    the Symposium was the august 2006 report from aaP (http://www.aap.org/pressroom/play-public.htm),
    where they established how spontaneous, child-driven play is an excellent tool for early childhood develop-
    ment. also, we are presently planning with the education Cluster of the Head Start director’s association
    the “ecological encounter: In Harmony with Nature” which will serve to disseminate the importance of
    developing in children a sense of “oneness” with nature through existing early childhood curriculums. The
    encounter is schedule for September 2007.

    Community Services
    The United Way and the Medical Sciences Campus of the University of Puerto rico collaborate to offer
    breastfeeding workshops free of cost. The HSSCO has served as a liaison between the United Way and early
    Head Start grantees to assure that early Head Start pregnant women benefit from this initiative. We plan
    to keep and strengthen collaboration with United Ways early childhood programs. We will invite the early
    Head Start Cluster to meet with United Way representatives to have a brainstorming of ideas that will expand
    services for pregnant and newborn babies that are participants of early Head Start. United Way was one of
    our collaborators in the Play Symposium through their “ready at Six” Program.
                                                                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS             |   267




Family Literacy Services
In 2004, the HSSCO was awarded Literacy Supplemental funds to work on two projects, a Web site and two
educational videos that would focus on literacy in early childhood. The purpose of both projects is to edu-
cate families and professionals about early childhood development. The educational videos consist of one for
caregivers and one for parents. The main idea that the videos want to transmit is the importance of love as the
main ingredient in the development of healthy children. The videos were distributed to the 28 grantees and
the 22 delegate agencies. It was also distributed to governmental agencies that work with the early childhood
population (departments of Health, Family and education) so that they can use them in their workshops
and in waiting rooms in their local and regional offices. also, a Web site was created with the main purpose
of using it as a unifying tool for parents, caregivers, and early childhood professionals around the Island. It in-
cludes information regarding recommended practices, Puerto rico’s Early Learning Guidelines, Programa Lee
y Sueña (read and dream—First Lady Initiative), department of Health’s early Childhood Comprehensive
System (eCCS grant), information about Head Start and early Head Start services, Puerto rico’s early
Head Start and Head Start grantee directory and map, and list of certified centers and Professional develop-
ment Plan, higher learning programs, and a calendar of events.

Services to Children with Disabilities
See Collaboration agreement with Special education. The HSSCO promotes inclusion in all of its initiatives
and will keep collaborating with the Special education division to make sure that 100% of children over the
age of 3 with special needs receive the services they are entitled to.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
The department of Family has established an interagency committee in charge of implementing the Home-
lessness Public Policy. The Office for the Implementation of the Public Policy for Homeless People was
created on august 18, 1998 by Law Number 250. The Office chairs a commission composed of representatives
from the departments of Housing, Corrections, Work and Human Services, education, Health, and Police
that meets on a monthly basis. an important part of their work has been the gathering of statistics for the
homeless population in Puerto rico. The information gathered by them shows that there are approximately
30,000 homeless persons in Puerto rico of which 23% are under 18 years of age. The HSSCO has contacted
this Office and will soon begin participating in the Commission’s meetings. Our short-term goals will be to
include statistics regarding homeless children under the age of 5 and to make sure early Head Start and Head
Start grantees identify and provide services to all homeless families in their respective communities.

another one of the HSSCO’s goals is to help facilitate the dissemination of Head Start and early Head Start
approaches to providers of early childhood education.


Outcomes

Best Practices Conversatory (round table): Various grantees have expressed their interest in having a tool in
Spanish that will support early Head Start and Head Start centers’ teachers achieve excellence in the provi-
sion of services. The HSSCO will host a Best Practices Convocation to which we will invite representatives
from the department of education and Head Start and early Head Start grantees, NaeYC’s affiliate aP-
eNet, and representatives from higher learning institutions. The main goal will be to draft a best practices
document, using existing documents (e.g. eLLCO) to provide guidance, particularly in the area of children’s
literacy development.
268 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
    another one of our objectives is to facilitate the involvement of Head Start and early Head Start Programs in
    state policy development, planning efforts, processes, and decision making efforts that impact young children.

    ♦ Oral Health : See above the efforts made toward modifying the oral health Periodicity table for pregnant
      women and children.

    ♦ Asthma: The PIr for 2004-2005 indicates that 11% of children served received asthma-related medical
      treatment.4 PrHS-SCO will collaborate with the Patient’s advocate Office in their asthma campaign,
      which is intended to reach all families in Puerto rico, empowering them with information on how to
      prevent and treat this illness. For this purpose, we will work along with ta/t regionally based health
      content specialist to make sure that we have access to all the different tools available in Spanish regarding
      this important topic.

    ♦ Hearing Screening: The HSSCO will soon organize a meeting with the people responsible at the University
      of Puerto rico’s Medical Sciences Campus for implementing the neonatal hearing screen law. Our goal is
      to empower early Head Start staff and assure the early detection of hearing conditions in our children.

    ♦ Lee y Sueña Program: research on language acquisition and brain development shows that the ground-
      work for reading begins the day a child is born.5 Governor aníbal acevedo Vilá and his administration
      are committed to improving early childhood services in Puerto rico. The Lee y Sueña Program (read and
      dream) is an Initiative of our First Lady, Luisa Gándara, which consists of sending age-appropriate books
      to children. The families receive their first book on the first month of their baby’s life and keep receiving
      them until she or he is five-years-old. The non-governmental agency chosen to run the program is aS-
      PIra, which is also an early Head Start and Head Start grantee. The HSSCO facilitated a meeting that
      resulted in trainings for “Lee y Sueña” staff on easy methods for adapting books for families with special
      needs.

    ♦ Early Childhood Public Policy Committee: The HSSCO is a member of a Senate committee that’s developing
      a public policy draft on early childhood. This committee has been working for a year and is composed of
      representatives from public and private agencies. The final draft was submitted as a Senate Project of Law,
      and it will be submitted for the approval of the Senate, the House of representatives, and the Governor.

    ♦ TANF: The HSSCO will continue conversations with the temporary assistance for Needy Families
      (taNF) program in order to increase the number of taNF participants that enroll their children in early
      Head Start and Head Start programs. One of the alternatives of collaboration is providing for early Head
      Start and Head Start representatives to meet with taNF staff to inform them of the many services these
      programs provide. This way taNF staff will be able to present to their participants early Head Start and
      Head Start as proven quality options for child care and development. an indicator of the success of this
      collaboration will be the number of referrals from taNF to Head Start/early Head Start grantees.

             Our goal is to make sure that all taNF participating families (who are automatically eligible for
             Head Start) have access to quality child care, like early Head Start and Head Start, which helps
             them achieve their full potential. For example, we propose that early Head Start and Head Start
             programs explore the possibility of developing an option that includes serving children whose fami-
             lies are taNF participants in their place of care (kith and kin care).
                                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   269




Describe one new partnership or unique activity with an existing partnership developed during the
year and the results of that activity.
One of our newest collaborators has been the local chapter of aaP. They worked with us to develop the Play
Symposium, and we are already in the planning process for future collaborations. Their support not only facili-
tates our work, but it also helps to guarantee that primary health providers (family practitioners and pediatri-
cians) are in tune with early childhood development best practices and that they are providing the preventive
services children are entitled to.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
Our success has been expanding in our list of collaborators and strengthening old ones.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
N/a. Puerto rico’s population is 99% Hispanic.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
drafting the State Profile helps us put our goals in perspective, and it facilitates our planning for the upcom-
ing year.




1
    45 CFr 1308 (appendix)

2
    american academy of Pediatrics: Breastfeeding and the Use of Human Milk (Pediatrics Vol. 100, No.6 december 1997, pp. 1035-
     1039)

3
    Commonwealth of Puerto rico’ administration of Correctional Institutions Fact Sheet

4
    Head Start Program Information report for the 2004-2005 Program Year (Puerto rico).

5
    First Lady’s Laura Bush Healthy Start, Grow Smart Series 2002, Head Start Information and Publication Center.
270 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                         AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   271




                                  rhode Island


Collaboration Director            Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                  areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
lawrence G. Pucciarelli
                                  plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
lead Agency
RI Department of Human Services   Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
600 new london Avenue             services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Pasteur Bldg. #57                 are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Cranston, RI 02920                at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 401-462-3071
                                  in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 401-462-6878
lpucciar@dhs.ri.gov
                                  The Collaboration director is a member of the early Child-
                                  hood systems initiative known in rhode Island as Successful
Lead Agency Contact               Start. The Successful Start strategic plan calls for the expansion
                                  of comprehensive services to all preschool children, defined
Donalda Carlson                   as health care, family support, and quality early childhood
Phone: 401-462-6838               services, including professional development opportunities for
fax: 401-462-6878
                                  staff. Head Start and child care have been engaged in partner-
                                  ships since 1998, when the Legislature enacted the far reaching
dcarlson@dhs.ri.gov               Starting right legislation which created Comprehensive Child
                                  Care Services, a hybrid of child care, full day full year services,
ACF Regional Contact              and Head Start comprehensive services. With the advent of
                                  a new pre-kindergarten coordinator at the rI department
tom Killmurray                    of education, efforts are now in full progress to integrate the
Agency DHHS ACf                   State’s pre-kindergarten initiatives with current activities at
                                  dHS, dOH, and dCYF. rhode Island’s early Learning
JfK Bldg. Government Center
                                  Standards, promulgated in 2004, are a permanent partnership
Room 2000                         between dHS and rIde. as a member of the eLS Steering
Boston, MA 02203                  Committee, we oversee the professional development plan,
                                  which is in its third year of engaging preschool teachers and
Phone: 617-565-1104
                                  administrators. a committee has been formed to overhaul the
fax: 617-565-2403                 State’s pre-kindergarten licensing standards and align them
tom.killmurray@acg.hhs.gov        with our QrS system and eLS guidelines. a Leadership
                                  Forum is planned for February 2007 to engage public school
                                  and early education professionals in a dialogue and education
                                  process about the future of an integrated pre-kindergarten
                                  system in rhode Island.
272 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
    your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
    Health Care
    We have collaborated closely with the Medicaid division to promote the new rIte Smiles managed dental
    care program for children. Head Start grantees were first to enroll children and move out of the inadequate
    fee for service system. Through this program, we have increased services to children and the number of den-
    tists serving low-income children. rIte Care health insurance for children serves approximately 92% of the
    eligible children. although some cuts have been made due to fiscal restraints, it is still considered one of the
    most successful plans in the nation.

    Welfare
    Changes to the State’s Food Stamp program required extensive collaboration with community groups such as
    Head Start to bring services to families who need them. Collaboration with the department and the Poverty
    Institute at rI College increased access for families through the deployment of a cadre of knowledgeable
    professionals to assist them. The State’s cash assistance program (FIP) advisory work group meets monthly
    with dHS and is focused on increasing its MOe (Maintenance of effort) and work participation rates. The
    Collaboration director works with the FIP administrator and policy staff to comment on and make sugges-
    tions on how the Family Independence Program can meet its goals and link dHS and Head Start Family
    Service Staff.

    Child Care
    The advisory Committee on Child Care and development is the department’s community advisory mecha-
    nism. two significant events are as follows: dHS implemented a bi-monthly child care subsidy payment
    system for providers and made other special provisions for family child care. dHS partnered with rI Kids
    Count and others to develop a Quality rating System. The QrS quality matrix is all but in final form, and in
    2007, we will select an organization to operate a pilot and file legislation establishing the permanent existence
    of the QrS system.

    Education
    The Collaboration Project and the Head Start community have been invited to participate in an exciting new
    initiative: SWPBIS—School-Wide Positive Behavioral Supports and PeP—Positive educational Partner-
    ships Project. These are research-based approaches to working effectively with children and families with chal-
    lenging behaviors. In 2007, we anticipate that Head Start and child care sites will be identified as PeP/PBIS
    sites involved in data collection and other research activities. The coordination between Head Start, child care,
    and school districts will substantially increase permanent partnership within the pre-kindergarten to elemen-
    tary orbit.

    Community Services
    Providence ready to Learn, rI’s 21st Century learning organization, makes extensive use of ameriCorps vol-
    unteers. We coordinate with them in the areas of family literacy, health, and dental health to carry out systems
    strategies, reach families, and distribute information.
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   273




Family Literacy Services
See above. also the early Learning Standards Project has provided information and materials to over 600
early childhood practitioners. a booklet designed for family activities, to be used by parents, has been distrib-
uted to over 3,500 families and can also be printed out from the rIde Web site.

Services to Children with Disabilities
In addition to the aforementioned PeP/PBIS initiatives, the Collaboration Project has coordinated the
growth of the dHS Kids Connect Project, which brings additional resources to centers serving children with
disabilities. The program has grown from two to over a dozen agencies participating.

Services to Homeless Children and Families
The project coordinated a dialogue between the Office on Homelessness, Head Start, and Comprehensive
Child Care Networks in order to more effectively serve this population. The Project serves on the monthly
Coalition for the Homeless Group.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
The Collaboration Project reports to the taNF administrator, who reports to the director of dHS. as a
result, the Project has access to decision making at the highest levels. Some accomplishments are: Head Start
recruitment information goes each year to all taNF recipients through dHS mailings. Through an MOU,
Head Start grantees have access to the list of FIP enrollees who may not know about Head Start. Head
Start Grantees have access to health data maintained by dOH’s Kids Net. State Investments in Head Start
increased from $1.8M to $3.4M to make up for a loss of Ma funds. These funds support 400 additional chil-
dren. The State priorities include increasing services to infants and toddlers and comprehensive family support
programs; both issues are important priorities for Head Start.


Describe one new partnership or unique activity with an existing partnership developed during the
year and the results of that activity.
The Local Initiative Investment Corp (LISC) advisory board on child care has funded mini-grants to family
child care providers and construction loans to centers, dramatically improving space for hundreds of children.
as a Committee, we develop the eligibility criteria and selection processes, promoting both best practice and
alignment with the Performance Standards.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
We are reaching Hispanic children who make up a substantial percentage of the 15,000 children in Head
Start and child care, with a special emphasis on family child care, through coordination with community
groups which especially serve this population and also by ensuring that all meetings have translators available.
274 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
    coming year?
    For 2007, we will continue to move from planning to implementation of strategies for systems improvements
    for early care and education and build ongoing pre-kindergarten partnerships. Other ways we will work to
    support the growth and development of children and families is the roll-out of the QrS Quality rating
    System; implementation of the PeP/PBIS mental health and case management approach and the continued
    expansion of the Professional development system.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   275




                                         South Carolina


Collaboration Director                   Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                         areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Mary lynne Diggs
SC Department of Social Services
                                         plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
1535 Confederate Ave., Suite 331         Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Columbia, SC 29202                       services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Phone: 803-898-2550                      are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
fax: 803-898-4458                        at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
mldiggs@dss.state.sc.us                  in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
Lead Agency Contact

Dr. Kathleen M. Hayes, Director          during the 2006 calendar year, the Head Start-State Col-
                                         laboration Office was very involved with the early Childhood
SC Deptartment of Social Services
                                         Comprehensive Systems grant (eCCS). The task force has
Post Office Box 1520
                                         vigorously continued to promote interagency planning. In
Columbia, SC 29202-1520                  concert with eCCS activities, work continued with Good Start,
Phone: 803-898-7360                      Grow Smart (GSGS). Much of the 2006 GSGS work focused
fax: 803- 898-7277                       on the production of videos as a companion to the South Caro-
KMHayes@dss.state.sc.us                  lina Early Learning Standards. Made possible by a grant to the
                                         South Carolina education television Network, these films are
                                         designed to help viewers understand the process of assessments
leigh Bolick, State Child Care
Administrator–Immediate Supervisor       and a teachers’ responsibility. The videos can strengthen obser-
                                         vation abilities as well as serve as reinforcement to understand-
ACF Regional Contact                     ing the standards.

Bobby Griffin                            In addition to task force work, the Collaboration Office has
Admin. for Children and families         maintained a set-aside through the Child Care development
61 forsyth Street SW, Suite 4M60         Fund (CCdF). all Head Start grantees are eligible to access
                                         extended day/summer vouchers. From October 1, 2005-Sep-
Atlanta, GA 30303-8909
                                         tember 30, 2006, South Carolina grantees expended $444,921
Phone: 404-562-2874                      of a $1 million set-aside.
fax: 404-562-2983
bobby.griffin@acf.hhs.gov                a majority of 2006 was spent working with all identifiable early
                                         care and education partners on South Carolina’s response to
lisa Goldman, State lead                 the december 29, 2005 district Court ruling by Judge Thomas
Administration for Children & families   Cooper. The 13-year-old case, abbeville vs. South Carolina,
61 forsyth Street SW
                                         focused on funding inequities to rural and poor school districts.
                                         The South Carolina General assembly responded in part by
Atlanta, GA 30303-8909
                                         approving a two-year 4K pilot proviso focusing on trial and
Phone: 404-562-3087                      plaintiff districts. Six Head Start grantees are located in the
fax: 404-562-2983                        trial districts.
276 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    South Carolina Head Start’s continued growth in accessing NaeYC accreditation has enabled Head Start
    to maintain footing in the child care full year/extended day efforts, consideration as 4K sites in affected areas
    and mentor teacher grant opportunities through the State department of education. The Collaboration Of-
    fice partners with the Head Start association in encouraging programs to achieve accreditation status. The
    partnership allows for up to ten awards to programs. In addition, the Collaboration Office participates in a
    SCaeYC accreditation technical assistance pool. There are 70 accredited South Carolina Head Start centers.
    Public and private centers can request onsite NaeYC overviews and updates, as well as limited telephone
    question assistance because of the ta pool.

    The Collaboration Office continues to co-sponsor the annual SCaeYC conference. The 2006 SCaeYC elie
    Gailbrith award for excellence and love of teaching went to Pee dee Head Start teacher Jennifer reed.


    Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
    your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
    Health Care
    The South Carolina dental association again was awarded the american dental association’s Samuel Har-
    ris award. The award letter noted continued work with Head Start. (The Collaboration Office received the
    2006 SC dental association Collaboration award.) The Collaboration Office cosponsored the 6th annual
    South Carolina Oral Health Summit along with Voices for South Carolina’s Children, the Head Start Health
    Network, the department of Health and environmental Control (dHeC), the State dental association,
    the association of State and territorial dental directors, aNd the Centers for disease Control and Oral
    Health america. Keynote speaker was dr. Paul Glusman of the University of the Pacific. The focus was care
    for people with special needs. Other summit workshops included hands-on activities for school and home,
    geriatric oral health, and risk assessments. attendees included the early care community, dentists, hygienists,
    school nurses, and early interventionists.

    responding to rising obesity, South Carolina programs have participated in South Carolina Coalition for
    Obesity Prevention effort (SCOPe). Funded by the Centers for disease Control, the first two years of work
    focused on training early care staff and families on good eating habits. The recently passed State Student
    Health access act, focusing on physical fitness in elementary schools, strengthens early care initiatives. The
    act requires 150 minutes of physical activity a week in elementary schools. The SCOPe curriculum, “Color
    Me Healthy” was introduced at Head Start grandparents’ meetings and to the Head Start Health Network.

    a revival of attention to asthma occurred during 2006. The first of a series of train the trainer sessions pro-
    vided by the South Carolina Lung association started in November. responding to knowledge that 9% of
    South Carolina’s children suffer from asthma, the Lung associations “asthma-101-The Basics,” focuses on
    incidences of asthma, symptoms, triggers, medications and therapy goals. Head Start Health Coordinators
    participated in a train the trainer series in November.

    Welfare
    In November of 2005, Governor Sanford moved the Head Start Collaboration Office from the South
    Carolina department of Health and Human Services (dHHS) to the South Carolina department of Social
    Services (dSS), the State taNF lead. The Collaboration Office is located in the Office of Family assistance,
    a corresponding division of welfare issues. during the summer of 2006, both divisions were invited to partici-
    pate in the doris duke Foundation’s Strengthening Families Initiative. Our new placement provides stronger
    collaborative opportunities with welfare issues.
                                                                                     AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   277




Child Care
as noted earlier, we have maintained a set-aside by way of CCdF. Work continues on an MOa between
Head Start grantees and dSS, specific to usage of the set-aside. all but one grantee participated in a July us-
age training. during 2006, nine grantees linked 250 children to this effort.

The updated South Carolina Childcare Licensing Standards were finalized. The Collaboration Office worked
with the Head Start association to insure opportunities for all Head Start staff to be trained. Programs were
alerted about state regional trainings, and four grantees sponsored information sessions, training was provided
at the spring Head Start conference and a special training for directors was sponsored by the Collaboration
Office and the directors affiliate.

earlier noted Good Start, Grow Smart Standards are being updated. Head Start technical assistance staff have
participated in the review and revision process. Script writing for standards videos began in 2006, along with
filming of overview and introductory segments videos to accompany training modules.

during the summer of 2006, Head Start became aware of changes in the South Carolina Child Care tiered
reimbursement levels. NaeYC accreditation will no longer be the top reimbursement level. a new level three
is being introduced. Note that the Collaboration Office worked with the State Child Care administrator to
ensure that centers achieving accreditation prior to the January 2007 new level implementation would con-
tinue to receive top reimbursement as long as accreditation is maintained. The early Childhood environmen-
tal rating Scale is the basis for the new top level.

The Collaboration Office worked in 2006 to access Head Start’s involvement in the South Carolina early
Childhood technical assistance System. Known as taP, early care professionals complete a certification pro-
cess through the South Carolina Center for Childcare Career development. an electronic registry of techni-
cal assistance professional is maintained. at present, four Head Start staffers have achieved the designation.
another result of this effort included our accessing a training scholarship for a center for homeless children, a
Native american services partner, a Head Start director, and four Head Start staffers. Participants participated
in the graduate course, technical assistance for developmentally appropriate Programming for Preschoolers.
taP designation was available to those completing fifteen field hours after the course.

In 2003, the South Carolina General assembly enacted the South Carolina administrative Provision of
Children’s Service agencies, Section 20-7-3080. State dSS is to make available domestic violence aware-
ness training to child care. The State received a large grant and has contracted with the University of South
Carolina School of Social Work. during 2006, Head Start programs accessed trainings offered at two college
sites—Francis Marion University and USC aiken. Over 20 Head Start staffers participated. Others will be
able to receive the training in the coming year.

Education
The South Carolina Head Start Collaboration Office continues to work closely with grantees and South Car-
olina teaCH to insure smooth access and use of the scholarship program. The State Collaboration director
serves on the South Carolina teaCH advisory Board. Other 2006 major accomplishments included:

♦ NaeYC accreditation designation to 13 of the 16 technical education schools. The Collaboration Office
  funds with partners to assist in this process. accreditation facilitates our articulation with senior institutions.

♦ expansion of the teaCH scholarship to the baccalaureate level. two senior state institutions are slated
  to participate. Please note that Head Start has received 245 of the 1100 teaCH scholarships awarded
  thus far.
278 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    ♦ a coalition of early care partners started regrouping after not being awarded a teacher mentor grant from
      the U.S. department of education. The group reviewed the document and worked to address issues cited.
      Should the opportunity present itself, the grant will be resubmitted in 2007.

    ♦ The Collaboration staff and Head Start association leadership participated in a series of 4K meetings
      chaired by Gov. Sanford’s staff, prior to the June passage of 4K Proviso 175. Head Start family designees
      attended and participated in a South Carolina legislative-mandated study by the South Carolina educa-
      tion Oversight Committee, reviewing services and gaps in services available to South Carolina four-year-
      olds. In addition, the South Carolina Senate convened a select committee focusing on four year services.
      The purpose was to formulate legislation to expand services, statewide, on a voluntary basis, not just the
      38 districts noted in the Cooper decision. Head Start directors presented on numerous occasions, and
      the Head Start Collaboration director was included on the committee along with the State Childcare
      administrator, higher education representatives, a First Steps representative, as well as the director of the
      State Office on early Childhood. Nine senators participated.

    Community Services
    as always shared, 98% of South Carolina Head Start grantees are sponsored by Community action agen-
    cies. all Head Start work extends to community services. The Collaboration Office and the South Carolina
    Community action Partnership Office (State Head Start and CaaP associations headquarters) along with
    the Governor’s Office of economic Opportunity have joined to plan and sponsor a yearly comprehensive fall
    managers’ training, as well as serve on the Steering Committee for an annual joint spring conference. Partners
    are included in training opportunity scholarships for issues affecting all groups. Please note that a CaaP di-
    rector chairs the South Carolina Head Start Collaboration advisory Committee. a major and ongoing effort
    is the integration of Head Start and Caa reporting through a joint technology system.

    Family Literacy
    The three-year agreement with the State department of education, focusing on rural family literacy, ended
    in October 2006. The partnership focused on Head Start and taNF families in five rural areas. The adult
    education office served as the fiscal agent for partner pooled funds. Their involvement ensured a certified
    adult education teacher. Head Start was the major source of the early childhood component assisted by South
    Carolina aCt 135 Family Literacy sites. designated areas could not also be receiving even Start funds. Head
    Start funds were coupled with South Carolina Proviso 1.27 funds. Final reports include the number of fami-
    lies served, home visit documentation, access to life skills, and/or work readiness training, as well as documen-
    tation for completion of job readiness exams such as the Ged, the Career readiness Certification Program,
    and the Certified Nursing assistant Program.

    Services to Children with Disabilities
    The region IV StG disabilities technical assistance Specialist assisted in South Carolina accessing and
    verifying the most recent state transition agreement. as noted in the health section, early care partners were
    successful in assuring a focus on special needs at the annual oral health summit. The Good Start, Grow Smart
    task Force included special needs in the South Carolina early Learning Standards.

    Homelessness
    The Collaboration Office director continues to serve on the McKinney-Vento advisory Committee. Head
    Start programs are made aware of local school district McKinney-Vento liaisons. The McKinney-Vento State
    Coordinator continues to provide updates and training at our fall and spring conferences. The Collabora-
    tion Office was able to share in-kind materials to area homeless transitional shelters and daycares, once Head
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS      |   279




Start’s received theirs. In addition, the Head Start association agreed to share oral health products with
homeless service partners


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
The South Carolina Head Start association continues to maintain a voting seat on the State Child Care
Coordinating Council. The State executive Order names the Collaboration Office; the seat is deferred to the
association. The Head Start association was included in the series of Governor’s 4K meetings, invited to
Senate Select Committees, included in technical assistance (taP) designation and meetings, participated in
the State Oral Health Coalition, and included in the invitation to participate in the NGa/Head Start-funded
meeting. Note that the Head Start association leadership is prominent on the Head Start Collaboration ad-
visory Committee. The committee meets on a regular basis, reviews the progress of the grant, and participates
in formulating the direction of a new grant.
280 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                          AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   281




                                   South dakota


Collaboration Director             Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                   areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Steph lebeda
                                   plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
SD Department of education
Office of educational Services     Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
and Support                        services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
700 Governors Drive                are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Pierre, SD 57501                   at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 605-773-4640                in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 605-773-3782
stephani.lebeda@state.sd.us        Purpose
http://www.sdheadstart.org/        to assist in building early childhood systems and continue ac-
http://doe.sd.gov/oess/eCS/head-   cess to comprehensive services and support for all low-income
start/index.asp                    children.

Lead Agency Contact                Goal 1
Janet Ricketts                     to promote the development of access to comprehensive ser-
Phone: 605-773-4689                vices through quality Head Start programs, by supporting Head
fax: 605-773-3782                  Start quality improvement efforts.
janet.ricketts@state.sd.us
                                   Strategy 1.1
ACF Regional Contact
                                   Promote practitioner professional development in how to use
                                   Early Learning Guidelines for 3- to 5-year-olds that link with
Ross Weaver
                                   kindergarten content standards, in collaboration with USd,
Office of Head Start               Office of educational Services and Support, and a broad range
Region VIII                        of stakeholders.
1961 Stout Street
9th floor                          Outcome
Denver, CO 80294
                                   ♦ The South Dakota Early Learning Guidelines for preschool
Phone: 303-844-1154
                                     age children (ages 3-5) were submitted to the South da-
fax: 303-844-3642                    kota Board of education for review and approval at the July
rweaver@acf.dhhs.gov                 meeting. They were subsequently approved.

                                   ♦ This Office collaborated with dr. Gera Jacobs, facilitator of
                                     the eLG panel, and the dSS Office of Child Care Services
282 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




        to develop “training of trainer” materials. The child care enrichment center trainers will utilize the materi-
        als and offer eLG training statewide.

    ♦ South Dakota Early Learning Guidelines were translated into Spanish to be available to Spanish speakers.

    ♦ Nutritional materials and activities as part of the team Nutrition Project were aligned with the South
      Dakota Early Learning Guidelines.


    Strategy 1.2

    Support the Governor’s 2010E (Starting Strong) initiative to develop quality early childhood education pre-
    school program standards that include program accreditation and teacher certification.


    Outcome

    ♦ The Collaboration director participated in two Starting Strong meetings. This is the name of the depart-
      ment of education‘s 2010e workgroup. The group developed pre-kindergarten accreditation of preschool
      programs and teacher certification standards. NaeYC Program accreditation Standards were reviewed to
      see if some or all of them could be adopted for South dakota.

    ♦ Legislation was proposed in 2007. This would enable the South dakota Board of education to promulgate
      rules concerning preschool programs. This legislation was defeated.

    ♦ The Collaboration director wrote a supplemental grant to support Head Start planning with state part-
      ners at a national meeting in Washington dC ( January) and back home (February or March). Partners are
      the department of Health, department of Social Services, and department of education.


    Strategy 1.3

    Continue to review, revise, update existing state interagency agreements, and develop new ones, including
    Medicaid.


    Outcome

    ♦ distributed and summarized a WIC Survey. Made minor revisions to the agreement, re-signed, and dis-
      tributed it.

    ♦ Met with the State’s Medical Services Claims director and eligibility Coordinator for Medicaid and the
      region VIII Head Start ta specialist to discuss strategies for implementing better services to Head Start
      and early Head Start families through the Medicaid program.

    ♦ Met with the State agencies and Head Start to discuss a collaborative agreement between Medicaid and
      Head Start programs for improved, coordinated ePSdt services. Final agreement is pending.

    ♦ Finalized and distributed the disabilities agreements between the State/Head Start and the State/early
      Head Start.
                                                                                      AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   283




Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
Purpose

to encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs, services, and
initiatives and to augment Head Start’s capacity to be a partner in state initiatives on behalf of children and
their families.


Goal 3

to create linkages with and a more coordinated approach to planning and service delivery in child care,
welfare, health care, education, community service activities, family literacy services, activities related to chil-
dren with disabilities, and services for homeless children in order to strengthen and support South dakota’s
families.


Strategy 3.1

reconvene the Head Start Collaboration advisory Council (South Dakota Early Childhood Council) estab-
lished in the first years of the Collaboration Project. Invite representatives from state agencies that work with
the eight priority areas and new stakeholders.


Outcome

This group did not meet in 2006.

Child Care

Strategy 3.2

Promote Head Start involvement in forming child care partnerships to provide full-year full-day quality child
care services for Head Start families.


Outcome

No new activity in this area.


Strategy 3.3

Promote Head Start involvement in child care dialogue and planning, in collaboration with the South dakota
department of Social Services, Office of Child Care Services, and the South dakota Head Start association.


Outcome

No new activity in this area.
284 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Collaborated with the Child Care Services Office and the Early Learning Guidelines Panel to develop training
    and technical assistance materials for implementing the Early Learning Guidelines. Will roll out the training
    with its Child Care enrichment Centers.

    Welfare

    Strategy 3.4

    Collaborate with welfare systems to increase economic self-sufficiency and employability of low-income
    families.

    Outcome

    The South dakota Head Start association developed a resource directory for all programs to use. It is
    located on the South dakota Head Start association Web site.


    Strategy 3.5

    Help men become responsible, committed, and involved fathers.

    Outcome

    South dakota Head Start programs developed a strategic plan for fatherhood activities at the annual joint
    early childhood conference last year. The Collaboration Office supported this. This year the joint conference
    occurred during a storm , so this meeting was cancelled and will need to be rescheduled. This group is a state-
    wide support network for Head Start staff and fathers.


    Strategy 3.6

    Collaborate with welfare systems to recruit most in need Head Start families.


    Outcome

    ♦ The agreement between the HSSCO and dSS to share current data regarding eligible participants was
      renewed. The information is provided to Head Start and early Head Starts for recruitment efforts.

    ♦ Head Start recruitment flyers were published and inserted in Food Stamps and taNF mailings

    Health: Improving Access to Health Care Services

    Strategy 3.7

    Improve access to dental and mental health services by continuing partnerships with the health community.

    Outcome

    ♦ The Head Start-State Collaboration Office director continues to attend quarterly oral health Steering
      Committee meetings and the annual oral health summit. The department of Health conducted a series
      of focus groups and working with adworks, rolled out an oral health information ad campaign.
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS             |   285




♦ reviewed, revised, and signed the Head Start/WIC agreement.

♦ Participated in the fifth annual Oral Health Coalition Summit, June 2005. Head Start programs continue
  to participate locally and through the Oral Health Coalition for access to services.

♦ Participated in the Coalition’s Partners in Prevention initiative.

♦ Some Head Starts participated in the ronald Mcdonald “Care Mobile,” a mobile dental services unit.


Strategy 3.8

Link to the Child and adult Nutrition Services, team Nutrition project in order to develop nutrition and
physical activity cards that are user friendly for practitioners and that are cross referenced to the Early Learn-
ing Guidelines for 3- to 5-year-olds.

Outcome

These materials were aligned to eLG Summer 06.


Strategy 3.9

Convene a Medicaid workgroup to discuss ePSdt services available to Head Start and early Head Start
families.

Outcome

♦ Met with the State’s Medical Services Claims director and eligibility Coordinator for Medicaid and the
  region VIII Head Start ta specialist to discuss strategies for implementing better services to Head Start
  and early Head Start families through the Medicaid program.

♦ Met with the State agencies and Head Start to discuss a collaborative agreement between Medicaid and
  Head Start programs for improved coordinated ePSdt services. Final agreement is pending.

Education: Expanding and improving education opportunities in early childhood programs

Strategy 3.10

Promote practitioner professional development in how to use Early Learning Guidelines for 3 to 5-year-olds
that link with kindergarten content standards, in collaboration with USd, Office of educational Services and
Support, and a broad range of stakeholders.


Outcome

♦ Collaborated with the Child Care Services Office and the Early Learning Guidelines Panel to develop
  training and technical assistance materials for implementing the Early Learning Guidelines. Will roll out
  the training with its regional enrichment Centers.

♦ The Collaboration Office, in partnership with the University of South dakota and facilitated by dr. Gera
  Jacobs, started developing the Early Learning Guidelines for preschool children ages 3-5 in March 2003.
286 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




        The Early Learning Guidelines panel includes representatives from Head Start, schools, child care, parents
        and higher education. The panel developed Guiding Principles, guidelines in Language and Literacy;
        Mathematics; Social and emotional development; approaches to Learning; Science, Health, & Physi-
        cal development; Social Studies; and Creative arts. The Guidelines are completed. additionally there are
        resources such as Math and Language/Literacy book lists and a side by side comparison of the eLG to
        the Head Start Outcomes and South dakota Kindergarten Standards. They were approved by the South
        dakota Board of education in July 2006. In partnership with the Office of Child Care Services, training
        materials were developed and conducted by the regional early Childhood enrichment Centers. Parent
        guides and posters were developed in February 2007.

    ♦ The Collaboration Office director continues to coordinate Parents as teachers (Pat) (ages birth to five)
      parenting education program activities, including recertification, quality assurance, and training assistance.

    Community Services

    Strategy 3.11

    Build on and sustain the relationships developed between Head Start and Community action agencies dur-
    ing the 2004-05 unified planning and professional development project.


    Outcome

    The Head Start association developed a resource directory of services as a result of partnership planning with
    Community action agencies using Supplemental Funds. It is online as of June 2006.

    Family Literacy

    Strategy 3.12

    Continue linkages between Head Start and other state initiatives that provide family literacy services, includ-
    ing even Start.


    Outcome

    ♦ The State Library has a new vision for its services. This is the final year of the Head Start partnership that
      distributed literacy materials to participating Head Start programs without easy access to libraries. Future
      partnership opportunities include enhanced local services through local libraries.

    ♦ Free books are distributed periodically to Head Start/early Head Start programs through the South
      dakota Public Broadcasting’s Ready to Learn project. Programs also provide parents with access to parent
      workshops through Ready to Learn.

    ♦ Head Start programs continue to partner with even Start Family Literacy programs in communities that
      have even Start programs. typically Head Start provides quality early childhood services for the preschool
      age child and jointly plans parenting education for parents.

    ♦ Met with the State Library staff to discuss new vision for state library services and restriction on purchas-
      ing books with Head Start funds. We met with Head Start Literacy Coordinators and directors to discuss
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   287




    future partnership. Local libraries will receive the preschool book collection, and links to Head Start
    programs are emphasized.

Services to Children with Disabilities

Strategy 3.13

review, revise, and develop statewide agreements to enable Head Start programs to plan seamless services and
transition into public school programs.


Outcome

Completed the Interagency agreement process. Services to children with disabilities agreement signed and in
effect for children in early Head Start and Head Start programs.

Homeless

Strategy 3.14

develop partnerships with the McKinney-Vento Homeless State Coordinator, local liaisons, homeless coali-
tion, and Community action agencies to provide greater access to services for Head Start homeless families.


Outcome

The Collaboration Office director attended the two-day 2006 Homeless Summit to gather information and
develop strategies.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
Purpose

to facilitate the involvement of Head Start in state policies, plans, processes, and decisions affecting the Head
Start target population and other low-income families.


Goal 2

to maintain the structure of collaborative policy making, resource planning, coalition building, and informa-
tion exchange among Head Start and state and Federal programs serving young children and their families
and across the broader early childhood system in order to improve and expand services of low-income chil-
dren served in Head Start, child care, and other state programs and initiatives.


Strategy 2.1

Improve the system of information exchange in collaboration with the Head Start association and other
organizations. Gather, analyze PIr data, and disseminate information regarding Federal, state, and local issues
and relevant, significant, programmatic changes.
288 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Outcome

    ♦ Maintained ongoing contact and communication with the Head Start association by attending its
      executive Board meetings.

    ♦ Continued to represent Head Start on various committee or workgroups as requested.

    ♦ The Head Start association updated and printed a program information brochure and distributed it
      to the South dakota Legislature and the public.

    ♦ The Head Start association developed a Web site on which there is information about Head Start
      programs and events.

    ♦ distributed Head Start PIr data for the annual report.


    Strategy 2.2

    revitalize the collaboration between region VIII and region XI Head Start and early Head Start programs
    through a series of round table discussions focusing on collaboration issues and strategic planning of joint
    activities.


    Outcome

    ♦ The Head Start-State Collaboration director continued to maintain a relationship with Head Starts.

    ♦ activities included visiting several region VIII and region XI Head Start and early Head Start
      programs.

    ♦ The Head Start association executive director visited nine aIaN/aI programs to provide outreach
      information and to invite participation in the HS/Caa planning and professional development project.

    ♦ Participated in the joint region VIII and region XI South dakota Head Start directors’ meeting and
      the Northern Plains tribal Head Start directors’ Meeting (Sd, Ne, Nd region XI directors) on august
      7 and 8, 2006 and again in October. discussion concerned the efforts to do joint activities and to speak
      with one Head Start voice on issues. The region XI Collaboration director, Washington d.C., visited and
      provided technical assistance to the group.

    ♦ a series of “round tables” were planned in the grant and are to be continued until issues are resolved. The
      planned January 2007 round table was to be hosted by the Lower Brule Head Start but did not occur.
                                                                               AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS         |   289




Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
♦ South Dakota Early Learning Guidelines were translated into Spanish to be available to Spanish speakers.

♦ developed a parent guide to the South Dakota Early Learning Guidelines that is more user friendly.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
♦ The follow-up meeting (to the January Partners and Pre-Kindergarten meeting January 07) was successful.
  We discussed a more focused approach for South dakota’s Children’s Cabinet to take, and a direction for
  the Starting Strong group are outcomes of this ongoing activity.

♦ Medicaid workgroup—the dSS, Medicaid director is “checking” to see if the agency “needs” to sign a
  Medicaid agreement. Meetings to discuss coordination of services as well as the agreement should con-
  tinue.

♦ The Collaboration advisory Group should definitely meet to guide the new players in the Collaboration
  Office.
290 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                           AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   291




                                    tennessee


Collaboration Director              Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                    areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Janet Coscarelli, Director
tennessee Head Start-State
                                    plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Collaboration Office
                                    Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Andrew Johnson tower, 9th floor
                                    services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
710 James Robertson Parkway
                                    are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
nashville, tn 37243
                                    at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 615-741-4849
                                    in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 615-532-4989
Janet.Coscarelli@state.tn.us        The HSSCO director is on the executive advisory Board
www.tnheadstart.org                 and Planning Committee of the tennessee early Childhood
                                    Comprehensive Services (eCCS) project and participates in all
Lead Agency Contact                 called meetings. The eCCS project is funded to the Maternal
                                    and Child Health section of the tN department of Health.
Bobbi lussier, executive Director   eCCS’s project goals and objectives are in keeping with the
Office of early learning            medical, dental, and mental health Head Start Program Perfor-
tn Department of education          mance Standards. The HSSCO director and Lesa Byrum, the
                                    eCCS director, will participate in the national Head Start/
Phone: 615-253-3167
                                    eCCS meeting scheduled for January 2007 and have submit-
fax: 615 -532-4989                  ted two papers for presentation at this meeting. Both papers
Bobbi.lussier@state.tn.us           have been accepted, Work with Children’s Cabinets and Gover-
                                    nor’s Task Forces and Assuring a Medical and Dental Home for
ACF Regional Contact                Every Young Child.
Marsha lawrence, Program Manager
ACf, Office of Head Start           Tennessee Pre-K
Atlanta federal Center
                                    ♦ Many Head Start programs are collaborating and partner-
61 forsyth Street, Suite 4M60         ing with Local education agencies (Leas) to increase en-
Atlanta GA 30303-8909                 rollment in quality early childhood pre-kindergarten pro-
Phone: 404-562-2841                   grams. total funding for state pre-kindergarten programs
fax: 404-562-2982                     is $55M; $30M from state dollars and $25M from excess
mlawrence@acf.hhs.gov
                                      lottery funds. Out of the 136 tennessee Leas, 124 have
                                      pre-kindergarten classrooms resulting in 677 classrooms
Gail Maynard, State Rep.–tn           statewide. tennessee Head Start programs lead the State
ACf, Office of Head Start
                                      in providing classroom opportunities for pre-kindergarten;
                                      62% of the pre-kindergarten classrooms not-in-Leas are
Atlanta federal Center
                                      in Head Start classrooms.
61 forsyth Street, Suite 4M60
Atlanta GA 30303-8909               ♦ The HSSCO director was appointed to the State PreK
Phone: 404-562-2895                   advisory Coalition (SPaC), an advisory group that advises
fax: 404-562-2982                     department of education, Office of early Learning on the
gmaynard@acf.hhs.gov                  statewide operation of the pre-kindergarten program.
292 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    ♦ The tN HSSCO cosponsored with the dOe Office of early Learning, Pre-K alliance, and Pre-K Now
      the Second annual early Childhood Collaboration conference.


    Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
    your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
    Health Care
    tennessee has a statewide health system called tennCare. 2005-06 Program Information report (PIr)
    revealed outstanding accomplishments in the health arena for tennessee’s Head Start programs with 99%
    of children having an ongoing medical home, 93% having appropriate immunizations for their age, and 86%
    having an ongoing source of continuous, accessible dental care.

    ♦ CoverTN and CoverKids are new state health insurance plans for adults and children that can help families
      not eligible for tennCare. CoverKids will utilize S-CHIP monies for health care for children birth to 18
      years of age. It does not cover dental services.

    ♦ tennessee was awarded a $5000 grant from the association of State and territorial dental directors
      (aStdd) to hold an Oral Health dental Forum in collaboration with the tN department of Health–
      Oral Health Services, tennCare Oral Health division, and the tN Head Start association. The Oral
      Health Forum will be conducted in concert with the annual tN dental association conference in the
      spring of 2007.

    Welfare
    taNF and child care funding will probably be cut based on current Federal allocations. to date, the taNF
    reauthorization bill has not been signed, so final state allocations are uncertain.

    Child Care
    The tN department of Human Services for the past five years has administered the Infant-toddler environ-
    mental rating Scale (IterS) and early Childhood environmental rating Scale (eCerS) for all licensed
    child care centers in the State. Scoring is on a Star rating system with a three star rating as being the
    highest rating. Head Start classrooms are licensed by the tN department of Human Services and consis-
    tently score in the 3-Star rating level with approximately 90% of the Head Start classrooms scoring at the
    3-Star level.

    ♦ The HSSCO and the Office of early Learning and the Office of Safe School from the tN department of
      education held a joint train-the-trainer session on child safety using the Talk About Touching curriculum.
      This session was necessary to customize the child safety curriculum utilized in the Head Start/pre-kinder-
      garten partnership classrooms.

    ♦ The Collaboration director serves on the advisory Board for the tN department of Human Services,
      Child Care referral and resource Centers that provides training and technical assistance to child care
      centers across the State.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   293




Education
advancement in the tennessee public education system has been a cornerstone in Gov. Phil Bredesen’s ad-
ministration with pre-kindergarten education as a highlight. Currently 677 pre-kindergarten classrooms are
operational across the State with Head Start programs being the primary partner. The tennessee pre-kinder-
garten budget is at $55M with a possible increase of $20M for the upcoming year.

♦ The Pre-K Now Satellite Conference was held on September 20 at Vanderbilt University in Nashville.
  Gov. Bredesen participated in a live satellite interview with George Stephanopoulos and Libby doggett,
  executive director, Pre-K Now. Gov. Bredesen highlighted the implementation of the newly developed
  pre-kindergarten program in tennessee.

♦ The tennessee Early Learning Developmental Standards (eLdS) are being implemented in the pre-kinder-
  garten classrooms; eLdS is in keeping with the Head Start Performance Standards so compliance for Head
  Start and pre-kindergartens who are in partnership is easy.

♦ The Collaboration director serves on the advisory Board of the tN association for the education of
  Young Children (taeYC), a statewide group of professionals serving young children. taeYC is the state
  arm for the National association for the education of Young Children (NaeYC).

Community Services
Head Start has always been a community-based organization that revolves around community needs. activi-
ties that involve families with their children have been an important activity for the Collaboration Office.
each year the Week of the Young Child (WOYC) has been a unified event in Nashville, spearheaded by the
Nashville area association for the education of the Young Child. The Collaboration Office has always been
an active co-sponsor of the WOYC event. additionally, Children’s advocacy days (Cad), a legislative event
for advocates to meet legislators and discuss state issues in the State legislature, is another annual community
service event. In addition, the Collaboration director has:

♦ Participated on the Children’s advocacy days held on March 14-15, 2006; Cad is a “day on the Hill”
  for advocates to meet legislators and discuss prevailing bills being considered for passage.

♦ Participated in the Week of the Young Child event and served on the overall Planning Committee and
  the Cultural diversity Sub-Committee. The event was held on april 2-8, 2006.

♦    attended the joint conference of the tN Head Start association and the tN association for Commu-
    nity action agencies on december 4-6, 2006. Gov. Bredesen attended the opening session and gave posi-
    tive remarks on Head Start’s partnerships with pre-kindergarten program expansion. Marsha Lawrence,
    region IV Program Manager also attended and gave a national and regional update.

Family Literacy
Increasing literacy skills for children is a high focus in tennessee through the Governor’s Books From Birth
Foundation that distributes the Imagination Library throughout the State, county by county. Gov. Bredesen,
through the dolly Parton Foundation has created a partnership that seeks to bring the joy of appropriate
books to every child, five years and younger in the State. Membership in the Imagination Library provides an
age appropriate book that arrives in the mail monthly to each registered child from birth to age five years. all
95 tennessee counties are operational in the Imagination Library event.
294 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    ♦ Head Start program staff uniformly registers Head Start children and siblings into the Imagination Li-
      brary upon initial contact and have been instrumental in getting the Imagination Library activity successful
      across the state.

    ♦ The Collaboration director serves on the even Start advisory Council. even Start, funded through the
      Federal department of education, promotes family literacy in children birth through age seven. Many
      Head Start programs collaborate with even Start centers.

    Services to Children with Disabilities
    tennessee’s Program Information report (PIr) data for 2005-06 indicated that of the funded enrollment
    of 16,397 children enrolled in Head Start, 13.2% (2,180) had diagnosed disabilities recognized by the Local
    education agencies (Leas) for services. Of the 2,180 children with disabilities, only 1,107 had the diag-
    nosed disability coming into Head Start. The remaining 1,073 children (51%) were identified in Head Start
    as having a disability due to the comprehensive and thorough screening and assessment procedures completed
    by Head Start programs. This collaboration assists Leas in meeting the Federal requirement of child find
    implementation that is part of the Special education act.

    ♦ Memorandum of agreement between Head Start and tN department of education/Special education is
      in final draft and being reviewed by the regional Office for signature.

    ♦ The tN department of education/Special education’s program, tN early Intervention Services (teIS)
      which is Part C of the Special education act will go under a thorough review by an outside consulting
      firm. a Core team was appointed to assist and spearhead the review and the Collaboration director will
      serve on the Core team. recommended results will make changes in services for young children with dis-
      abilities.

    Services to Homeless Children and Families
    In 2004, Gov. Bredesen established the Interagency Council on Homeless. The Collaboration director is an
    appointed member of the Council’s advisory Board which meets on a quarterly basis.


    Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
    The Collaboration director participates on numerous boards, task forces, councils, associations, and commit-
    tees, which render major decisions on policies, plans, processes and decisions. Please review text for specifics.


    Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
    ♦ The actual number of collaborative partnerships between Head Start and state pre-kindergarten increased
      significantly during 2006. Sixty-two percent of the total classrooms not located in Lea buildings are
      located in Head Start facilities.

    ♦ tennessee was awarded a $5,000 grant from the association of State and territorial dental directors to
      conduct an Oral Health Forum. The Collaboration director wrote the grant in cooperation with the tN
      Head Start association.
                                                                              AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   295




Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
♦ Worked cooperatively with the telamon Corporation agency, located in Knoxville that manages the
  Migrant Head Start program throughout tennessee. telamon staff are included in all Head Start activities
  gendered by the Collaboration Office.

♦ Cooperated with the telamon Corporation and the Migrant Head Start Collaboration Office in the site
  visit of Channell Wilkins, director of the Office of Head Start, to a local Migrant Head Start center in
  Bybee, tN.

♦ assisted the tN Head Start association in organizing “Latino Conference” that will occur in spring 2007.

♦ Participated on boards, task forces, and committees that encourage informational documents for families
  to be translated into Spanish for clarity.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
activities for 2007 will remain similar to 2006 with the implementation of early childhood pre-kindergarten
programs being paramount. drafts of the Head Start reauthorization Bill give the Collaboration Office more
responsibilities. Changes in the HSSCO work plan are pending passage of the reauthorization Bill.
296 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                             AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   297




                                      texas


                                      We continue to focus on providing seamless integrated services
Collaboration Director
                                      that address all of the Head Start/early Head Start priorities.
                                      We believe that integrated programs are more effective. We
Dorothy J. Calhoun, ed.D., Director
                                      also believe that what we provide for Head Start/early Head
university texas Health Science       Start children in texas will benefit all low-income children in
Center
                                      our great state. Consequently, our answer to providing the best
7000 fannin Street                    education possible to all children is demonstrated through our
Suite 2355                            texas early education Model (teeM).
Houston, texas 77030
                                      This report encapsulates some of the HSSCO activities
Phone: 713-500-3835
                                      during 2006. Our monthly Status reports at http://cli.uth.
fax: 713-500-0386                     tmc.edu/thssco/ provide considerably more detailed informa-
Dorothy.J.Calhoun@uth.tmc.edu         tion, including our current Five-Year approach and Plan of
www.cli.uth.tmc.edu/thssco            action.
www.uth.tmc.edu/tececds
                                      Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
Lead Agency Contact                   areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Susan H. landry, Ph.D. Director       plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
university texas Health Science       Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Center
                                      services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
State Center for early Childhood
Development (State Center)            are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Phone: 713-500-3710
                                      at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
                                      in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 713-500-3705
Susan.H.landry@uth.tmc.edu            ♦ texas early education Model (teeM)—Working with
                                        the State Center to implement teeM, we are now in our
ACF Regional Contact                    fourth year. We are in 32 communities and have worked
                                        with over 25,000 children around the State. This number of
Mr. Carlton Reid                        children includes child cares, Head Starts and ISd pre-
                                        kindergartens.
ACf/DHHS
1301 Young Street                     ♦ The texas School readiness Certification System—
Room 937                                developed by the State Center, it is a valid, research-based
Dallas, texas 75202                     Web-based system that links quality early childhood edu-
                                        cation program practices with school readiness. The system
Phone: 214-767-8850
                                        is in place in 32 communities serving 30,000 pre-kinder-
fax: 214-767-2038                       garten children. Our purpose is to connect best practices
creid@acf.hhss.gov                      with key kindergarten and school readiness skills.
                                        http://cli.uth.tmc.edu
298 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    ♦ texas early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Initiative, “Raising Texas”—The HSSCO director initi-
      ated the updating of the Head Start/early Childhood Intervention Memorandum of Understanding
      (MOU) which we hope to have signed and in the hands of Head Start/early Head Start directors and
      personnel by September 2007.

    ♦ Successful continued work with Senator Zaffirini’s staff—a committee of community college profes-
      sors, four-year institution professors, eCe advocates, and other stakeholders have continued to meet with
      Senator Zaffirini’s staff to develop Senate Bill 50, which addresses the issues of non-traditional teachers
      in their efforts to receive college degrees. a smaller group of professionals are working on a request for
      applications from community colleges and four-year institutions who are willing to enter into a piloted,
      research-based model for Head Start and child care teachers to take controlled courses for college credit.

    ♦ texas 2-1-1—an Information and referral Network of HHSC is now available, 24-7, to the public in
      eight languages. This project has resulted from continued work which was mandated by Senate Bill 2048.
      We are currently developing a corresponding Web site.

    ♦ Healthy Child Care texas— Healthy Child Care texas is now online with information related to the wel-
      fare of all children, low-income children specifically. We have developed an online CMe curriculum for
      physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and residents to become medical consultants to early
      care and education providers. We continue working on the development of medical and dental homes. See
      Web site www.healthychildcaretexas.org

    ♦ texas early Care and education Career development System (teCeCdS)—The texas training reg-
      istry continues to grow. We currently have more than 300 registered trainers, representing more than 500
      training possibilities related to early childhood. See Web site www.uth.tmc.edu/thssco.


    Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
    your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
    Health Care
    ♦ texas Head Start “Save Our Smiles” (SOS)—SOS is in partnership with the texas department of Oral
      Health, texas dental association, texas dental Hygienist association, and region VI t/ta Specialists.
      We are piloting a project in four communities, with emphasis on rural areas, to serve over 1,000 children
      with an oral health examination, application of fluoride varnish, education for children, parents, and staff,
      and connections to a dental home.

    ♦ Lead Prevention Pilot Project— Lead Prevention Pilot Project is in collaboration with texas Childhood
      Lead Poisoning Prevention Program (tX CLPPP), Head Start program staffs in high risk areas of the
      State will be provided instructions to educate parents about lead poisoning and empower them to discuss
      lead screening and/or testing with their child’s health care provider. We distributed “Lead Safe Work
      Practices” dVds and retailer training Mini diskettes, in english and Spanish, to Head Start/early Head
      Start directors. These were provided by the National Paint and Coating association.

    ♦ Nutrition, exercise and Children Food Choices—We continue to involve Head Start programs with The
      Children’s Nutrition research Center, Baylor College of Medicine to address issues related to obesity as
      well as “Life Stress, Maternal depression, and Children’s diets.” We are also concerned with the influence
      of parents and teachers on the food choices of children.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   299




♦ Shaken Baby Syndrome—Prevention Cds prepared by the texas attorney General’s Office were made
  available to this office for use in texas. However, in partnership with region VI, the Cds were made
  available to Louisiana, New Mexico, arkansas, and Oklahoma Head Starts as well.

♦ texas Immunization tracking registry (Immtrac)—In collaboration with texas region VI t/ta
  Specialists and “raising texas,” we are working with Head Start/early Head Start directors to identify
  children birth to five who are not enrolled in Immtrac, with the intent of getting 100% enrollment.

♦ Healthy Child Care texas—(previously mentioned).

Welfare
♦ texas association of Infant Mental Health (taIMH)—Through our continued partnership taIMH has
  become a great support for our Head Start/early Head Start professionals. The HSSCO’s professional and
  financial support ensures outstanding training in this area.

♦ Fatherhood Initiative—Continued collaboration with the Office of the attorney General has provided out-
  standing resources for Head Start/early Head Start directors and staffs. The Cd “responsible Fatherhood”
  was made available to all. Contact with resources and persons from aCF region VI and texas Health and
  Human Services Commission enriches our resources to Head Start/early Head Start directors for this initiative.

♦ african american Healthy Marriage Initiative held in Houston was enhanced by the participation of
  the HSSCO, local Head Start programs, and area t/ta Specialists. The focus was on the involvement of
  youth and their relationships with parents and healthy decision making.

♦ Four Grant Writing Workshops facilitated by region VI staff, were sponsored by the HSSCO to prepare
  Head Start/early Head Start directors for the Marriage Initiative Grant designated for Head Start.

♦ earned Income tax Credit (eItC) and Child tax Credit is an ongoing concern for this Office, since it is
  such a valuable tool for our families.

♦ Healthy Child Care texas—(previously mentioned).

Child Care
♦ The HSSCO director’s involvement with teeM allows the opportunity to visit child care facilities as
  well as pre-kindergartens and Head Starts. Visits to most of the sites verifies the success of the teeM
  project and its impact on teachers, and consequently, the children. The greatest reward is not being able to
  tell the difference from a child care, Head Start, and pre-kindergarten classroom.

♦ Senate Bill 50—Involvement with stakeholders and child advocates included a request for an increase for
  child care reimbursement rates and higher education demonstrating projects as part of the new budget.

Education
♦ texas early Care and education Career development System (teCeCdS) continues to work on the
  career development ladder for our non-traditional teachers. a group of stakeholders and advocates are de-
  veloping a research-based pilot project to explore options for Head Start/early Head Start and child care
  teachers to get college credit toward aa, Ba, and BS degree. Combined efforts to work with the Legisla-
  ture to improve the recruitment, retention, and quality of early childhood education.
300 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    ♦ raising texas early Care and education Committee are working together to develop a Cross Walk of
      eCe priorities. The Cross Walk will provide us with a statewide uniform set of quality standards that are
      proven to meet best practices in early care and education programs for children in our State.

    ♦ teeM (previously mentioned).

    Community Service
    ♦ Successful collaboration with aCrON and tX CLPPP to co-sponsor a training seminar on classroom
      environment, lead poisoning, and asthma. early Childhood professionals from child care and pre-kinder-
      garten sites in the el Paso area, to include Mexico, joined our Head Starts/early Head Starts in attendance.

    ♦ Continued collaboration with aCOrN to locate Head Starts/early Head Starts that might be in high
      risk areas of texas and New Mexico. ePa studies have shown that there is a possible lead and arsenic
      contamination in a 50 Km area around an old smelter.

    ♦ refurbished Cars texas Head Start/early Head Start has become an annual event in some of our commu-
      nities. We continue to work with and encourage others to get involved.

    ♦ Healthy Marriage Grant Writing training Workshops sponsored by this office and region VI were held
      in four communities around the State with outstanding results.

    Family Literacy Services
    ♦ Even Start—Meetings were and continue to be held with the even Start director and participating col-
      laborating Head Start and even Start programs to determine the strengths of the existing partnerships,
      with the intentions of getting more Head Starts involved.

    ♦   tX registry of Parent educator resources (rOPer) as an advisory Board member of rOPer, the
        HSSCO director continue to encourage the organization to be cognizant of our Head Start/early Head
        Start population when planning conferences, etc.

    ♦ tX association for Parent educators (taPe) and tX Council on Family relations (tCFr) continue to
      collaborate with this Office to meet the needs of Head Start/early Head Start families and children.

    ♦ earned Income tax Credit (eItC) and Child tax Credit (CtC) are topics of discussion with Head
      Start/early Head Start programs along with encouragement and instructions as to how they may get
      involved.

    Services to Children with Disabilities
    ♦ Texas 2-1-1— (previously mentioned).

    ♦ SeCCS “Raising Texas”—The HSCO director participates on two of the permanent committees,
      “Social emotional and Mental Health” and “early Care and education.” Plans are being implemented
      which are in compliance with national and state regulations.

    ♦ Oral Health Grant targeting Children with disabilities—Continuing action for an association of State
      and territorial dental directors (aStdd) grant which focuses on oral dental assistance for children with
      disabilities, in collaboration with region VI t/ta Specialists.
                                                                                     AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   301




Services to Homeless Children and Families
♦ as a member of texas Interagency Council for Homeless (tICH), we continue to develop a texas Home-
  less Plan as directed by our Governor and work with the Texas Homeless Network and HUd to encourage
  each major and minor city in the state to address their homeless issues.

♦ The HSSCO continued collaborative effort with the texas Homeless Network (tHN) to ensure that the
  McKinney-Vento act definition of homelessness is applicable in appropriate settings.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
The HSSCO director has facilitated Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans,
processes, and decisions by participation on numerous committee and councils, e.g. tICH, tX Oral Health
Coalition Steering Committee, teeM visitations rOPer, tX Child abuse Prevention association, texas
early Childhood Coalition (teCeC), State Center, and many other stakeholders. We were involved in
spearheading 34 Senate and House early childhood related bills. These bills addressed such topics as eCe,
child health and nutrition, school vouchers, child safety, certification for eC teachers, class size limits in pre-
kindergarten classrooms, child care grants, infant care, child care licensing, special education, and eligibility for
pre-kindergarten.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
One of our most rewarding activities this year was visiting teeM sites, composed of Head Start, child care
and pre-kindergarten classes and seeing no differences from one classroom to the other as far as classroom en-
vironments, best practices, appropriate curriculums, and teacher/children interaction are concerned. another is
the development of Senate Bill 50.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
Our efforts to support the coordination of HS services to Hispanic children and families are ongoing and
continuous, not only because 57,342 – 66.79% of our children are Hispanic—but also because they are all
americans and entitled to the best our State can give them.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
The current HSSCO work plan is on line at http://cli.uth.tmc.edu/thssco.
302 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                       AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   303




                                      Utah


Collaboration Director                Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                      areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Janna forsgren
                                      plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
utah Department of Health
                                      The Utah Head Start-State Collaboration Office promotes the
Division of Community and family
Health Services                       development of coordinated early childhood systems and ser-
                                      vices for children in Utah (from birth through age eight) and
Child, Adolescent and School Health
Program
                                      their families and collaboration among agencies, organizations,
                                      service providers, and parents.
PO Box 142001
Salt lake City, ut 84114-2001         ♦ Worked with Utah’s State early Childhood Comprehen-
Phone: 801-538-9312                     sive Systems Grant director to support and coordinate
fax: 801-538-9409                       early childhood systems development efforts with the
                                        Utah Kids Link Project. Provided technical support for
jannaforsgren@utah.gov
                                        the Community-Based Services for Children age Birth to
                                        eight Grants.
Lead Agency Contact
                                      ♦ Maintained and updated the Utah Early Childhood Connec-
George Delavan, MD                      tions Web site (http://earlychildhoodconnections.weber.edu)
Phone: 801-538-6901                     as a vehicle to form linkages and partnerships for all early
fax: 801-538-6591                       childhood providers.
gdelavan@utah.gov
                                      ♦ Provided funding to the early Intervention research
                                        Institute at Utah State University to facilitate “town meet-
ACF Regional Contact                    ings” throughout the State of Utah to learn more about
                                        the service delivery system in place for families with young
Debbie Hedin                            children in various communities and brainstorm strategies
ACf/DHHS                                for improvement.
federal Office Building
                                      ♦ Worked with the Utah Child Care Professional devel-
1961 Stout Street
                                        opment Institute to coordinate cross-sector professional
Denver, CO 80294                        development planning and implementation activities.
Phone: 303-844-1154
dhedin@acf.hhs.gov                    ♦ Served on the Utah Family Partnership Network advisory
                                        Board to include Head Start in local Utah Parent Informa-
                                        tion Center (Utah PIrC) activities to support and educate
                                        families.

                                      ♦ Continued to assist the early Intervention research Insti-
                                        tute at Utah State University with the inclusion of Head
                                        Start programs in Utah’s Universal application System,
                                        Utah Clicks. Utah Clicks is a Web-based application process
304 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




        designed for Utah families who have young children, especially those with special needs.

    ♦ Continued to facilitate Head Start representation on state-level committees through working with the
      Utah Head Start association. Head Start was represented on the following state-level committees by
      either a Head Start program staff person or the Utah Head Start-State Collaboration director:

          ♦ Governor’s Immunize by two task Force
          ♦ Utah Family Partnership Network advisory Board
          ♦ Utah Interagency Coordinating Council
          ♦ early Childhood Council
          ♦ Office of Child Care advisory Committee
          ♦ Utah Oral Health Coalition
          ♦ Child Care Conference Planning Committee
          ♦ Covering Kids Utah
          ♦ early Childhood Conference Planning Committee
          ♦ Special education Preschool Conference Planning Committee
          ♦ Utah Issues
          ♦ Child Care Professional development Institute Steering Committee
          ♦ Child Care Professional development Institute Core Competencies Work Group
          ♦ Child Care Professional development Institute Mentor Certification Work Group
          ♦ Child Care Professional development Institute trainer Certification Work Group
          ♦ Child abuse Prevention task Force
          ♦ Utah Fetal alcohol Prevention Committee
          ♦ early Childhood alternative teacher Preparation (eCatP) advisory Committee

    Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive services for all low-income children.
    Include a description of how you are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations at the local level, as
    well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
    Participated in the drafting of a proposal of the Utah Pre-K School readiness Initiative to fund Pre-kinder-
    garten educators within school districts to work with families and existing community programs to provide
    access to quality pre-kindergarten experiences for all four-year-old children. This initiative will necessitate that
    the Utah Legislature allocate ongoing funding at $7.5 million.

    ♦ Provided funding and technical assistance to six community-level early childhood interagency coordinat-
      ing councils to provide opportunities to implement locally determined collaborative projects. Provided
      monthly technical assistance to the Bridgerland Child Care resource and referral advisory Committee
      and the Family and Community Partnership Council in the areas of:
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   305




              ♦ Community-level planning and action

              ♦ Initiating community-level change and achieving outcomes

              ♦ Community-level evaluation

              ♦ Sustaining community-level work

♦ assisted regional early Childhood Councils with taking feedback from the local town meetings and
  addressing the needs of families at the local level.


Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
Health Care
♦ Worked with the department of Health’s Children’s Mental Health Promotion Specialist to address men-
  tal health issues impacting Head Start and child care centers with a focus on children being expelled from
  child care centers.

♦ assisted with the planning and implementation of the Oral Health Forum: assessing the Issues and
  developing action Steps for Prevention and Care Issues for Children with Special Health Care Needs in
  Utah and facilitated the inclusion of Head Start programs.

♦ Participated in site visits to all Head Start programs in Utah with the Utah department of Health Oral
  Health Specialist to provide follow-up evaluation and technical assistance to the 2003 Head Start Oral
  Health Summit to Health Specialists.

♦ Facilitated the inclusion of Head Start programs in the Utah early Childhood Mental Health Initiative to
  improve access to collaborative mental health services. This initiative is sponsored by the Children’s Center
  from a grant received by the Utah State division of Substance abuse and Mental Health.

♦ Continued to provide technical assistance and follow-up activities with Head Start programs on the im-
  pact of the lead screening/testing requirements of Medicaid.

♦ Served on the Governor’s Immunize by two task Force to represent Head Start and to facilitate the
  inclusion of local Head Start programs in state-level efforts.

Welfare
♦ Provided funding to send a state team to the Safe Futures Institute in denver to support capacity building
  for supporting children and families affected by domestic violence in Utah.

♦ developed and submitted a proposal to educational Services, Inc. to provide a Safe Futures Summit in
  Utah to build cross-sector, state-level early childhood partnerships and the capacity to support children
  and families affected by domestic violence in child care, Head Start, and other settings working with chil-
  dren and families in Utah.
306 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Child Care
    ♦ Provided funding to co-sponsor the Utah Child Care Conference.

    ♦ Worked with the Utah Child Care Professional development Institute (CCPdI) to continue to imple-
      ment strategies outlined in the Utah’s Blueprint for Cross-Sector Early Childhood Professional Development.

    ♦ Served on the Utah Child Care Professional development Institute Steering Committee and training
      approval Sub-committee to promote and implement early childhood cross-sector training opportunities.

    Education
    Worked with the State Office of education to refine a proposal and bill to provide extended-day kindergarten
    in Utah.

    Community Services
    ♦ Created a “Support for Families” section to the Utah Early Childhood Connections Web site to provide a Web
      site directory of resources and programs for children and their families.

    ♦ Financially supported early childhood coordinating councils in six communities throughout the State of
      Utah.

    Services to Homeless Children and Families
    Served on the Supportive Services Subcommittee of the Homeless Coordinating Committee to include Head
    Start programs in providing preventive services to families.


    Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
    ♦ Monitored state legislation to provide extended-day kindergarten and distributed information to Head
      Start programs.

    ♦ Worked with Voices for Utah Children and Head Start education Specialists to create a template for
      Head Start programs to report their child outcomes that will be aggregated into state-level data to educate
      legislators and policy makers on the impact that Head Start has on children and school readiness.

    ♦ Participated in the Child Care Professional development Institute Strategic Planning Summit to promote
      cross-sector early childhood professional development while creating a philosophical framework and a
      core body of knowledge to the Utah Career Ladder.

    ♦ Worked with Voices for Utah Children to include Utah Head Start PIr data in the 2007 Utah KIdS
      COUNt data Book.

    ♦ developed and distributed monthly Utah early Childhood Systems Coordination Bulletins to Head Start
      programs and other early childhood partners to keep them informed on state initiatives and how to get
      involved.

    ♦ Served on the Utah early Childhood Council and assisted with the implementation of Utah’s early child-
      hood systems development state plan, Utah’s Early Childhood Blueprint for Progress.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   307




Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
The partnership with Voices for Utah Children expanded to include developing an issue brief that will focus
on Head Start. It will include:

♦ research on the impact of Head Start.

♦ Information to counter the argument of “fade out” when a child enters public school.

♦ demographics of Head Start programs in Utah.

♦ National comparison of what other states are doing to support Head Start programs in their state
  (funding issues).

♦ Information on the Head Start Child Outcomes Framework.

♦ aggregate state data on 2006–2007 Child Outcomes data.

♦ Comparison of children coming into Head Start who have received early Head Start services to
  children not receiving those services.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children
and families in your State.
♦ Hispanic families were encouraged to attend the “town meetings” to share their experiences with knowing
  about services available for their children and accessing those services.

♦ The davis County early Childhood Council, Family and Community Partnerships Council, held a
  Hispanic Night to meet the needs of these families in their local area.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
♦ Continue to monitor the impact of extended-day kindergarten on Head Start programs, especially those
  programs that currently have centers in school districts.

♦ Continue to support and monitor the Utah Pre-K School readiness Initiative to fund pre-kindergarten
  educators within school districts if this effort receives funding from the Utah Legislature in the future.

♦ The Utah Head Start-State Collaboration Office will continue to assist with implementing two major
  objectives of Utah’s Early Childhood Blueprint for Progress: 1) promoting new and supporting existing local
  interagency early childhood councils through providing funding and technical assistance and 2) providing
  support to early childhood professionals and promoting shared training opportunities through maintain-
  ing and managing the Utah early Childhood Connections Web site along with a partnership with the
  Utah Child Care Professional development Institute.
308 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                     AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   309




                              Vermont


Collaboration Director        Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                              areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
K.C. Whiteley
                              plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Agency of Human Services
103 South Main Street         Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Waterbury, Vt 05671-0204      services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Phone: 802-241-2705           are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
fax: 802-241-1220             at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
kc.whiteley@ahs.state.vt.us
                              in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.

                              Building Bright Futures
ACF Regional Contact
                              The Vermont Head Start-State Collaboration Office (HSS-
louise eldridge               CO) plays a key leadership role in developing Building Bright
ACf/DHHS                      Futures (BBF), a state public/private partnership with the
JfK federal Building          authority to plan, coordinate, integrate, and implement early
                              care, health and education programs, policies, and resources at
Room 2000
                              the state and regional levels.
Boston, MA 02203
Phone: 615-565-1150           Significant work this year included helping to staff the act 186
fax: 615-565-2493             Pre-Kindergarten education Study Committee and serving
leldridge@acf.hhs.gov
                              as a member of the Building Bright Futures Leadership team
                              with the Council Co-Chairs and executive director.

                              Major accomplishments in 2006 include:

                              ♦ January ’06—revised early Childhood System Plan
                                is approved by transitional Board.

                              ♦ May ’06—approval of $100,000 for Building Bright
                                Futures in FY’07 budget.

                              ♦ June ’06—Second executive Order signed creating the
                                current BBF State Council.

                              ♦ June ’06—act 186 passed by Vermont Legislature estab-
                                lishing a pre-kindergarten education study committee. The
                                HSSCO provided information and presentations about
                                Vermont Head Start programs; their scope, services, role
                                in Vermont’s early childhood system, and priority needs.
310 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




        (recommendations from this committee became legislation in ’07 session.)

    ♦ august ’06—First meeting of full, 19 member Building Bright Futures State Council.

    ♦ September ’06—early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Committee released its Implementation Plan
      for Vermont’s early Childhood System.

    ♦ November ’06—Building Bright Futures State Council approved the issuance of an rFP for a single state-
      wide fiscal agent to employ the 12 regional directors and the executive director.

    ♦ November ’06—Building Bright Futures Parent Committee established to assure role of parents in shap-
      ing services for young children; first statewide meeting held.

    ♦ december ’06—Building Bright Futures State Council retreat clarified and reaffirmed purpose and goals
      of the Council, set action plans.

    ♦ december ’06—Final interviews to hire full time Building Bright Futures executive director.


    Child Development Division: Children’s Integrated Services (CIS)

    Following the agency of Human Services re-organization in July 1, 2004, the HSSCO became part of the
    newly configured Child development division (Cdd) and the Collaboration director was assigned new
    responsibilities as assistant director for Cdd overseeing the Systems development Unit.

    during the past year, the HSSCO worked with the Children’s Integrated Services Unit of the Child develop-
    ment division to assist the 12 agency of Human Services regions to understand the elements and framework
    for integrated prevention and early intervention services. The framework was developed with the assistance of
    the HSSCO. While this first phase of integration involves services directly under the authority of the Child
    development division (Part C Family Infant and toddler Program; children’s mental health services and
    Healthy Babies, Kids and Families), future integration efforts will include Head Start and early Head Start,
    child care programs, and early childhood special education services.

    Major accomplishments in 2006 include:

    ♦ State partners meeting held in September to roll out phase one of the Children’s Integrated Services
      expectations for all 12 regions.

    ♦ Identification of a team to develop an integrated plan for services including all the Federal requirements
      of Part C, as well as integrated outcomes and indicators for all three services.

    ♦ report template developed and distributed for each region to identify current practices in children’s
      integrated services, support needed from the State to assure an integrated services approach, and what
      regions are ready to integrate beginning July 2007.

    ♦ technical assistance teams formed to assist regions in developing their reports; ta provided from
      October through december 2006.

    ♦ Work specifications developed for pilot grants to three regions to deliver family support services in the
      Healthy Babies, Kids, and Families program through direct grants rather than fee-for-service billing.
                                                                                           AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS               |   311




Vermont’s Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (ECCS) Plan

Vermont’s early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (eCCS) grant is administered by the Child develop-
ment division in partnership with the Vermont department of Health. day-to-day operations are supervised
and supported by the HSSCO director to ensure close coordination and alignment of the eCCS grant goals
with the Federal HSSCO goals and with the Building Bright Futures statewide work. eCCS grant resources
are focused on the Building Bright Futures system development.

receipt and timing of this grant were optimal, as Vermont was able to integrate the eCCS planning resources
and health focus with the BBF systems work already in progress. The eCCS’ goals fit practically and concep-
tually with the vision, mission, and goals of the Building Bright Futures work.

♦ eCCS grant resources were used to add capacity to the ongoing systems development work with a specific
  focus on strengthening the health role and representation at both the state and regional levels. These ef-
  forts have been successful in building a stronger role for health and mental health within Building Bright
  Futures.

♦ The eCCS Coordinator helped develop the regional planning capacity, including a statewide planning
  template for all twelve regions to use.

♦ resources targeted to regional planning and evaluation including identification of a core set of indica-
  tors to be used in all regions as foundational data. These indicators are tied to the Building Bright Futures
  outcomes.

♦ Core principles of an evaluation plan have been identified.


Supporting Home Visitors and Home Visiting Services

The HSSCO brought together Head Start programs, our state technical assistance providers, local child and
family service programs, parents, and the Child development division to sponsor a conference on home visit-
ing which highlighted national research on early Head Start home visiting services. This one-day conference
was a great success in attracting a diverse group of home visitors working in Head Start and early Head Start,
parents, Parent-Child Centers, school districts, early intervention programs, family literacy programs, and
more. This event highlighted the need for more support, targeted training, and collaboration between pro-
grams offering home visiting services.


Include a description of how you are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations at the local level, as
well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
♦ HSSCO continues to be the resource for Head Start programs that are or wish to engage in reserved
  Spaces agreements for child care subsidy with the Child development division. These agreements enable
  programs to receive child care subsidies to support the implementation of full-day, full-year Head Start
  services and Head Start/child care partnerships.

♦ Vermont’s pre-kindergarten initiative encourages partnerships between school districts and community-
  based early childhood programs, including Head Start programs. a legislative study committee formed in
  the summer of 2006 to gather information about existing pre-kindergarten services in Vermont, study the
  research, and make recommendations about whether to spend public dollars on pre-k services. The com-
  mittee met six times during the summer and fall of 2006. The HSSCO supported this pre-kindergarten
  initiative and Head Start’s involvement in it in the following ways:
312 |     Head Start State Collaboration Offices




                      ♦ The director provided support to the legislative committee by collecting data on Head Start
                        partnerships, numbers of children in Head Start and funding, and by educating the commit-
                        tee about Head Start comprehensive services and Federal support for Head Start pre-kinder-
                        garten partnerships.

                      ♦ One activity of the study committee was to visit successful pre-kindergarten partnerships
                        with Head Start and child care programs. The HSSCO facilitated a visit to a Head Start
                        program that is currently engaged in one such partnership.

                      ♦ The HSSCO kept the Vermont Head Start association (VHSa) informed about the study
                        committee’s progress, facilitated Head Start testimony at a public hearing, educated the Vt
                        Head Start association on key elements of the pre-kindergarten initiative and how Head
                        Start could position itself to be a pre-kindergarten partner.

    ♦ The HSSCO supports two initiatives, the Vermont early Childhood educator Licensure Project and the
      Higher education Collaborative early Childhood Program, that reduce critical barriers to Head Start/
      child care/pre-kindergarten partnerships by enabling child care and Head Start teachers to attain Vermont
      department of education licensure. This makes their programs eligible to enter into contracts with local
      school districts that provide education funds to deliver preschool education services. two separate projects
      with related goals of increasing the number of licensed early childhood educators resulted in a combined
      effort to add 40 new licensed teachers to Vermont’s early education system, making their Head Start and
      child care programs eligible to participate in pre-kindergarten contracts with local schools.

    ♦ The HSSCO continues to support the implementation of the Vermont early Learning Standards in Head
      Start, child care, and public pre-kindergarten. In 2006, it published and distributed 10,000 copies of Guid-
      ing Your Child’s Early Learning: A Parent’s Guide to the Vermont Early Learning Standards.

    The Vermont Early Learning Standards can be found at: http://www.state.vt.us/educ/new/pdfdoc/pgm_earlyed/
    pubs/vels_03.pdf.

    Guiding Your Child’s Early Learning can be found at http://education.vermont.gov/new/pdfdoc/pgm_earlyed/
    pubs/parent_guide_06.pdf.

    Both publications are recognized as key tools supporting collaboration on the state and local levels because
    they create a common ground of language, content, and expectations for children’s development among the
    different sectors of the early childhood community, including parents.


    Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
    your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
        Health Care
    ♦ Oral Health for the prenatal to five-year-old population continued to be a major focus for the Collabora-
      tion Office in 2006. Our role, based upon follow-up activities from the Head Start Oral Health forum,
      continued to link the department of Health and Head Start programs.

    ♦ Participated in the region I developing Oral Health Partnerships Conference.

    ♦ Provided information to the Vermont Head Start directors for their grant application which expanded the
      Vermont tooth tutor Program.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   313




♦ Provided a mini-grant to help one Head Start program expand their tooth tutor program to levels consis-
  tent with other Head Start programs in the State.

♦ Continued to support the Oral Health division of the department of Health as they met with local
  groups to disseminate information on oral health prevention and programs for the prenatal to five-year-
  old population.

♦ at a regional early Childhood Council meeting, the State dental director was able to assist in partnering
  a local dentist with preschool teachers, creating a model for free delivery of service to a select preschool
  population.

♦ Met with Head Start directors, health managers, and other interested parties to assist in issues around
  finding dental homes for children and other related oral health issues.

♦ Continued to fund oral health initiatives through our mini-grant program.

♦ Oral Health for the prenatal to five-year-old population has been a major focus for the Collaboration
  Office this year. Our role to keep momentum moving forward on this issue is evidenced by the Head Start
  Oral Health Forum and follow-up activities.

♦ In collaboration with the department of Health, the HSSCO:

             ♦ Secured funding for a statewide forum and supplemental funding for expanded activities.

             ♦ raised statewide visibility around oral health issues.

             ♦ assisted in the expansion of services to our families through the tooth tutor Initiative.

             ♦ actively worked to secure dental homes for all our children through the various grant activi-
               ties mentioned above and with the Vermont dental Society’s “Give Kids a Smile” campaign.

In partnership with the department of Health, Head Start health managers, directors, and stakeholders from
around the State, we have built a collaborative foundation to advance the issue of access to dental care for our
young children. With the department of Health, our priority goal in continuing these efforts will be geared
towards training of dental professionals to work with the 0-5 population.

Healthy Child Care Vermont (HCCVT)

Since the inception of the HCCVt initiative in 1996, a strong partnership between the Vermont department
of Health (VdH) and the Child development division (Cdd) has supported this work.

as a result of the agency of Human Services reorganization, the HCCVt program was transferred from
VdH to the Child development division which has primary responsibility for HCCVt program oversight,
policy development, standard setting, and infrastructure development. Within the Child development divi-
sion, the HSSCO director supervises the work of Healthy Child Care Vermont. Strong connections with
public health have also been maintained through the title V director and grant coordinator at VdH.

♦ each of the 12 regions in the State is served by a child care health consultant located in local VdH
  district offices and supported through Cdd. The public health nurses have up to eight hours per week to
  carry out child care health consultation activities.
314 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    ♦ Vermont has been a participant in the Healthy Child Care New england (HCC-Ne) training Collab-
      orative since its inception in 2003. This collaborative has shared planning, implementation, evaluation, and
      technical assistance of a health and safety consultant training series, based on the North Carolina National
      training Institute (NtI) for Child Care Health Consultation certified trainers model. The HCC-Ne
      Collaborative will continue with support from grant funds and contributions from each of the six New
      england states.

    ♦ In collaboration with HCCVt and New Hampshire, the HSSCO delivered a training module on early
      childhood program quality for the 2006 child care health consultants training.

    Child Care
    ♦ The HSSCO continues to provide leadership and coordination to 14 state-funded infant and toddler child
      care programs. The purpose of this network is to increase capacity of the child care system to serve infants
      and toddlers, enhance the quality of care, and increase opportunities for infant toddler professional devel-
      opment throughout the State. In 2006, the HSSCO facilitated collaboration between this network and an
      early Head Start program to share research on primary caregiving and continuity of care for infants and
      toddlers. Leadership development was identified as a primary interest of the State grantee program direc-
      tors, and this has been supported by the HSSCO with guest speakers, collaboration with state advocacy
      groups, and in planning for statewide professional development activities.

    Education
    ♦ Provided individual support and guidance to Head Start and child care providers wanting to become
      licensed teachers with the Vermont department of education.

    ♦ Coordinated the Vermont early Childhood educator Licensure Project, described earlier.

    ♦ Served on the advisory Committee for the Higher education Collaborative, an initiative of the depart-
      ment of education, to increase the numbers of licensed teachers in early childhood education and early
      childhood special education.

    ♦ Produced and distributed a parent’s companion to the early learning standards called Guiding Your Child’s
      Early Learning: A Parent’s Guide to the Vermont Early Learning Standards.

    Services to Children with Disabilities
    ♦ The HSSCO participated in and encouraged Head Start participation in training sponsored by the Part
      C Family, Infant and toddler Program on a multi-domain assessment system called the Infant-toddler
      developmental assessment (Ida).

    ♦ The HSSCO continues to support implementation and distribution of the interagency agreement, Sup-
      porting Children with disabilities and their Families, produced by this office in 2005.

    ♦ Brought Head Start best practice and research approach to serving children with disabilities to the devel-
      opment of Vermont’s Children’s Integrated Services system.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   315




Welfare Systems
For the past several years, the Child Care advisory Board and statewide advocacy groups have worked with
the Child development division to bring needed attention to child care affordability issues, including the
need to raise state subsidy rates and to update the 1999 Federal Poverty Guidelines used to determine subsidy
eligibility.

The HSSCO helps bring the interests and voices of the Head Start community to these recommendations
which are critical to meeting the needs of low-income working Vermonters and improving Vermont’s eco-
nomic infrastructure:

♦ Bring Vermont child care subsidy eligibility criteria into compliance from 1999 to current Federal
  Poverty Guidelines.

♦ annually adjust the Vermont child care eligibility criteria to current Federal Poverty Guidelines.

♦ adjust the child care reimbursement rate to the 75th percentile of Vermont’s market rates.

♦ Modify the Vermont Health access Program and Catamount Health as needed so every regulated
  child care provider and their employees are eligible.


Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes and decisions.
♦ The HSSCO is a member of the oversight committee for Vermont’s Quality rating System, StarS. The
  HSSCO promotes StarS participation in Head Start programs throughout Vermont. In 2006, nine
  Head Start centers participated in StarS. Four had a four-Star rating, and five had achieved the high-
  est rating of five StarS.

♦ Chaired the State workgroup subcommittee on Professional Preparation and development, whose mission
  is to ensure a comprehensive, coordinated system of quality learning opportunities that gives current and
  prospective professionals the knowledge, skills, and dispositions they need to provide the best care and
  education to children and families in Vermont. In 2006, the HSSCO invited our two technical assistance
  specialists from the Head Start Quality Initiative, Steve russell and Shannon Shaw, to participate in this
  statewide committee, and now they attend our quarterly meetings.

♦ Continued to work closely with the Vermont Northern Lights Career development Center
  (http://northernlights.vsc.edu/) particularly in the ongoing work of the Instructor registry System.

♦ Co-chaired a workgroup to research and develop a state-awarded Infant-toddler certificate to recognize
  specialized training and experience in serving infants, toddlers, and their families. Projected completion
  of this certificate program is pushed ahead to december 2007. to date, two of the three early Head Start
  programs are represented on this workgroup.

♦ Co-coordinated the Vermont touchpoints Initiative, bringing interdisciplinary touchpoints trainings to
  health, early childhood, mental health, and human service professionals throughout the State. In 2006, we
  developed a new training geared to supervisors, mentors, and managers that supports reflective practice in
  supervision to strengthen the use of touchpoints in individual practice.

♦ actively sought Head Start participation in all planning and development aspects of Building Bright
  Futures and the Child development division’s Integrated Services work.
316 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Describe one new partnership or unique activity with an existing partnership developed during the
    year and the results of that activity.
    as stated above, the HSSCO took on responsibility in 2006 for the oversight and supervision of Vermont’s
    early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (eCCS) grant. as part of this role, Healthy Child Care Vermont
    is being integrated into the eCCS work. a strong partnership with the department of Health is key to the
    success of these projects.


    Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
    families in your State.
    We have no targeted outreach to this extremely small population.


    How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
    coming year?
    ♦ Continue to collaborate with the Head Start ta Network in support of shared priorities for Head Start
      and state partners.

    ♦ Collaborate with Healthy Child Care Vermont and the Vermont department of Health on a preschool
      obesity prevention curriculum called I am Moving, I am Learning.

    ♦ Promote Head Start/pre-kindergarten partnerships in light of newly passed legislation on H.543.

    ♦ Continue providing assistance and materials to support the full use of Vermont Early Learning Standards
      products.

    ♦ Further the work of the Children’s Integrated Services Initiative with planning and guidance on integrat-
      ing Head Start and early Head Start, early childhood special education, Family and economic Services,
      and Building Bright Futures regional Councils Welcome Babies services.

    ♦ Strengthen specialist support, technical assistance, and quality improvements in infant toddler child care.

    ♦ Provide leadership to develop infant-toddler early learning guidelines.

    ♦ Complete the development of the Vermont Northern Lights Infant-toddler Credential.

    ♦ Continue providing leadership to the Professional Preparation and development Committee and oversee
      the transition of this workgroup to become a standing committee under Building Bright Futures.

    ♦ Continue providing leadership and coordination to the Vermont early Childhood educator Licensure
      program, increasing the number of licensed teachers with the early childhood educator endorsement.

    ♦ develop presentations to roll out “Supporting Children with disabilities,” the Interagency agreement
      among early Care, Health, education and agencies in Vermont.

    ♦ Continue to foster collaboration between Head Start and state and community partners.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS         |   317




♦ Continue to engage the Vt Head Start association to articulate and implement a consistent statewide
  role with Building Bright Futures, i.e. what role Head Start will play in a statewide integrated services
  system, and in the regional integrated services teams.
318 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                           AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   319




                                    Virginia


Collaboration Director              Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                    areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
Mary Jo thomas, Acting Director
                                    plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Virginia Dept. of Social Services
7 north eighth Street               Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
6th floor                           services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Richmond, VA 23219                  are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Phone: 804-726-7640                 at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
fax: 804-726-7655
                                    in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
maryjo.thomas@dss.virginia.gov      The overall goal of the Virginia Head Start-State Collabo-
www.dss.virginia.gov                ration Office (HSSCO) is to represent and promote Head
                                    Start programs at the state level and to serve as a catalyst
                                    and facilitator in working with all programs that serve low-
Lead Agency Contact
                                    income preschool children in Virginia. Project goals of the
                                    HSSCO include honing the capacity to contribute to policy
Anthony Conyers, Jr.
                                    and programmatic initiatives at the state level to vigorously
Virginia Dept. of Social Services   support the educational needs of at-risk children; serving as a
7 north eighth Street               catalyst in facilitating collaboration and integration in order
6th floor                           to maximize Virginia’s capacity to serve at-risk children with
                                    high quality programs; and increasing opportunities among
Richmond, VA 23219
                                    preschool programs to enhance supplemental services and re-
Phone: 804-726-7011                 sources for at-risk children and their families. The goals of the
                                    Virginia HSSCO fit well within the context of the broad early
ACF Regional Contact                childhood system and provide strong support to the statewide
                                    agenda.
edward Vreeswyk
Department of Health and Human      The HSSCO uses several strategies to work toward its goals.
Services                            The HSSCO director convenes an advisory committee made
                                    up of a range of constituent groups, which meets every other
Administration for Children and
families—Region III                 month to address collaboration issues and opportunities. This
                                    committee includes representatives from the child care com-
150 South Independence Mall West
                                    munity, resource and referral, Head Start, CaPs, VPI/dOe,
Suite 864                           Mental Health, dept. of Health, VeCCS, the early Learning
Philadelphia, PA 19106              Council, and the Virginia elementary School Principals as-
                                    sociation.
Phone: 215 -861-4040
fax: 215-861-4070
edward.vreeswyk@acf.hhs.gov         Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start
                                    and other appropriate programs. Describe your accom-
                                    plishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
320 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Health Care
    The HSSCO continues to partner with the Virginia department of Health on goals and strategies that work
    toward improving the oral health of Head Start children relative to issues of access, prevention, and education.
    Following the successful Oral Health Forum held in richmond the previous year, the HSSCO applied for
    and received follow-up funds to continue oral health initiatives in Virginia. The funding was utilized to hold
    presentations at the statewide Head Start conference held in March 2006. Facilitators of the presentations
    included representatives of the dental community, staff from the division of dental Health, and members of
    the Head Start Health advisory Committee. The presentations addressed goals from the statewide strate-
    gic plan for oral health, including promoting the dental home concept to Head Start programs, addressing
    transportation needs of Head Start families to access dental services, and training Head Start representatives
    regarding the Bright Smiles program. attendees not only learned from lectures and educational sessions but
    also had the opportunity to participate in roundtable discussions on targeted issues. roundtable discussion
    topics were drawn from questionnaires completed at the Oral Health Forum. The discussion was directed to
    build on the state plan.

    along with working to coordinate the Oral Health presentations, a session on a behavioral health topic was
    also provided.

    The HSSCO has participated in the region III Oral Health Conference calls for the purpose of bringing
    together the State dental officers and the Head Start-State Collaboration directors to share information on
    current issues and efforts underway and to begin to develop a joint information base that will support every-
    one’s efforts to ensure that young children get the services they need. The calls are part of a series of regional
    calls conducted across the country.

    The HSSCO has been very supportive of the I Am Moving I am Learning Initiative hosted by administration
    for Children and Families (aCF) region III staff. The training is to offer strategies and resources to assist in
    preventing childhood obesity by more intentionally facilitating the quality and quantity of physical activity for
    Head Start children. This training has been piloted and enthusiastically embraced by most of the Head Start
    programs in Va and WV.

    The HSSCO continues to support the efforts of the Va Head Start Health advisory Committee by attending
    quarterly meetings and providing state-level updates in the area of health. This committee has proven to
    be a strong group of health professionals from around the State.

    Welfare
    Local departments of social services collaborate with local Head Start programs to facilitate application for
    child care subsidies for Head Start families.

    If a local agency has a waiting list for Fee System Child Care Services, Head Start Wrap-around funds may
    be used to pay for child care for eligible siblings of an enrolled Head Start/early Head Start child. a co-
    payment is assessed for the siblings. If there is no local agency waiting list, child care for the siblings of the
    enrolled Head Start child will be paid from Fee System. Head Start Wrap-around funds may be used for
    child care services for the summer prior to attendance in a part-year Head Start/early Head Start program
    for families with a child enrolled in a Head Start/early Head Start program.

    The HSSCO also provides a listing of potentially eligible recipients of Medicaid, taNF, and Food Stamps
    to allow Head Start Programs to recruit income eligible children. In addition, foster care children in custody
    have been included. a confidentially agreement has been signed by every program requesting the information.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS             |   321




Child Care
The Virginia department of Social Services’ (VdSS) division of Child Care and development (CC&d)
provides classes throughout the Commonwealth that are available to child care and Head Start professionals.
CC&d now offers a comprehensive child care provider training catalog to assist providers with professional
development. This semi-annual catalog replaces the previous child care provider training “fliers” and is de-
signed to be more helpful with sections on current course offerings—including a pull-out calendar of classes,
additional educational opportunities, and a comprehensive listing of all courses. The catalog and additional
resource information has been provided to all Head Start programs through the CC&d mailing list.

The VdSS has many distance learning courses available that are available to Head Start programs, such as the
read-a-Book program, video series, online playground safety courses, and the online recognizing and report-
ing child abuse and neglect. additional classroom trainings are listed on the tIPS calendar found at www.dss.
virginia.gov.

Education
Inspired by the opportunities of emphasis and examination of existing programs, the HSSCO recently led
a series of conversations between the department of education and the regional Office to discuss blended
classrooms. although the practice has been allowable and encouraged, it has not been a reality
for the majority of our classrooms in the State.

These discussions have resulted in a memo co-signed by the Superintendent of Public Instruction at the
department of education (which oversees VPI) and the Commissioner of the department of Social Services
(which houses the HSSCO), affirming and promoting the blended classroom model and encouraging a single
point of entry for recruitment, an important first step toward successful integration of the programs. This
success was heightened by an offering from the regional Office to fund, competitively, sixteen Head Start
programs willing to form the partnerships necessary to model the single point of entry recruitment.

Community Services
The early Childhood Partnership grants have been extended under the new administration. Grantees are
encouraged to continue to work toward initiatives that strengthen their communities’ ability to provide high-
quality early education and school readiness programs. early Childhood Partnership grants are targeted to
community-based organizations which can demonstrate an ability to bring together people and organizations
on a local or regional level to create a comprehensive system of early care and education for young children.

Family Literacy Services
This distance learning self-study program allows early childhood professionals to earn training credit hours
by reading children’s literature and books on early childhood education and child development. The Virginia
department of Social Services’ division of Child Care and development has collaborated with the Library
of Virginia to place sets of books in each of the 350 public libraries across Virginia. This initial phase of the
read-a-Book Program focuses on the importance of incorporating children’s literature across the curriculum,
reading to and with young children daily, understanding early brain development, fostering language and
literacy development, and communicating successfully with young children.

Services to Children with Disabilities
The HSSCO participates on the early Childhood Special education Priority Project team which consists of
representatives from department of education and the training and technical assistance staff from the area
322 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    colleges. The team works collaboratively on initiatives that benefit children with special needs, which includes
    the planning of and presenting at the Shining Stars Conference held in Va Beach each summer. Head Start
    programs are kept informed of these activities.

    Services to Homeless Children and Families
    The HSSCO has an established collaborated effort with Project HOPe-Virginia on resolving various issues
    relating to children that are homeless and attending Head Start programs. We will continue to support the
    efforts of Project HOPe-Virginia and assist them where possible.


    Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
    The election of Gov. timothy M. Kaine in January of 2006 has been a boon to the Commonwealth’s early
    childhood agenda. Gov. Kaine exercised an executive Order within his first week in office creating the Start
    Strong Council, a task force to study and recommend strategies for implementation of a universal pre-kinder-
    garten program.

    In his first few months in office, Gov. Kaine has also endorsed the Smart Beginnings initiative in partnership
    with the Virginia early Childhood Foundation and local systems-building efforts. Gov. Kaine’s leadership of
    the Smart Beginnings initiative forms an important context of a birth to kindergarten comprehensive agenda
    for his centerpiece focus on enhanced preschool opportunities.

    The Smart Beginnings public awareness effort has begun to emerge through print and radio ads directing
    interested listeners and readers to the Web site for more information and for opportunities to participate.
    This public education campaign coincides with the season of Gov. Kaine’s Smart Beginnings Summit, a series
    of events highlighting the importance and benefits of investment in early childhood education. One of the
    events in the Summit series was co-sponsored by the Head Start Collaboration advisory, underwriting a
    presentation by dr. Sharon Lynn Kagan, a former Head Start teacher, to share her wisdom about aligning
    standards, curricula, and educator competencies and emphasizing the multiple domains of a child’s develop-
    ment.

    an important foundation to bolstering infrastructure for the early childhood system, a team has formed to
    tackle the alignment Project, an intensive initiative spearheaded at the VdSS to create aligned sets of early
    learning program guidelines, core competencies, and professional development lattice for providers and teach-
    ers of very young children, and a framework for a statewide quality ratings system. The dedicated project team
    includes representation from Head Start, the department of education, the department of Mental Health,
    Mental retardation, and Substance abuse Services, the department of Social Services, two-year and four-
    year institutions of higher learning, the National Child Care Information Center, Success by 6, the National
    Women’s Law Center, and the Virginia early Childhood Foundation. The president of the Va Head Start
    association serves on this committee. The Start Strong Council began its work in June 2006 and will continue
    for the next year and a half. They have been tasked with bringing the Governor initial recommendations for
    budgetary action by October of 2006 and then to continue working through the next summer to bring full
    recommendations by fall of 2007 to assist with planning the next biennium budget. They begin by examin-
    ing the current system of delivery of educational services to 4-year-olds in the Commonwealth. Head Start is
    represented on this Council by the chair of Head Start’s directors Council.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS         |   323




Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
The HSSCO is working with PNC Grow up Great Program as they expand from Pennsylvania into Virginia.
PNC Bank has recently purchased the riggs banks which are currently located only in Northern Virginia.
PNC is committed to working with Head Start programs located near their banks. Currently, there are
six Head Start programs that will benefit from this initiative. The Collaboration Office has participated in
monthly phone conferences with PNC representatives and the other collaboration directors involved with the
initiative. The Head Start programs have been kept informed of the progress.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
Like most other states, Virginia is aware of the increasing need to improve services provided to Hispanic chil-
dren and families in the State. The HSSCO works to ensure that many of the educational materials provided
to families are in both english and Spanish. Programs across the State are also working to provide translators
when possible to help with this need. Virginia will continue to explore more opportunities in the future.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
Virginia is experiencing an exciting time right now and has built enormous momentum regarding early
childhood education. Continued collaboration with pre-kindergarten and child care partners is essential. The
HSSCO will continue to serve as a leader with an increased focus on collaborative efforts. We will also con-
tinue to focus on much needed health initiatives.
324 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS             |   325




                               Washington


                               Washington State HSSCO in 2006: A Year of Transformation
Collaboration Director
                               In 2006, the Head Start-State Collaboration Office in Wash-
Kelli Bohanon, M.ed
                               ington State endured a number of changes enacted by the
Department of early learning   Governor and the Legislature in the formation of an executive
PO Box 40970                   branch agency, the department of early Learning (deL).
Olympia, WA 98504-0970         deL’s purpose is to bring visibility, focus, and a streamlined
                               effort to early learning infrastructure, funding, and leadership
Phone: 360-725-4940            throughout the State. additionally, the department has been
fax: 360-413-3482              charged with enhancing its capacity to partner with the private
kelli.bohanon@del.wa.gov       sector in an effort to establish and implement improved early
                               learning opportunities for children and families. The deL
www.del.wa.gov
                               went into effect on July 1, 2006, under the temporary leader-
                               ship of an acting director, with the founding director, Jone
Lead Agency Contact            Bosworth, sworn in by the Governor on September 12, 2006.

Jone Bosworth, J.D.            as mandated in the deL legislation, the HSSCO was moved
Phone: 360-725-4877            to deL (from dSHS) in July 2006, creating a new environ-
fax: 360-413-3482              ment for it to function within. In addition to the transition into
                               a new department, the HSSCO director, Sangree Froelicher,
jone.bosworth@del.wa.gov
                               was promoted as the department’s new assistant director for
                               Systems, Partnerships, and Collaboration division, resulting in
ACF Regional Contact           an HSSCO director vacancy from September 2006 through
                               May 2007. The HSSCO Project assistant, rachel Blacke,
Julianne Crevatin              departed the agency in august 2006, and the position was not
ACf/HHS Region X               filled until February 2007 with the arrival of Stephanie Ben-
                               field. The new HSSCO Project Manager, Kelli Bohanon, was
2201 6th Avenue, MS-70
                               hired in May 2007 and officially assumed the role on June 18,
Seattle, WA 98121              2007. Kelli is currently located within the deL central office
Phone: 206-615-2615            in Lacey and has been placed to function within the newly es-
jcrevatin@acf.hhs.gov          tablished Systems, Partnerships, and Collaboration division—
                               placing the HSSCO in a pivotal position to participate with
                               key individuals and stakeholders in planning and executing
                               plans for building early childhood systems across the State.

                               despite ongoing transformation at the state level, the HSSCO
                               has continued to serve as a leader and catalyst in facilitating
                               the development of multi-agency and public/private partner-
                               ships across the State. The HSSCO accomplished some of
                               its goals and objectives over the last year, continuing to play a
                               significant role in developing and supporting initiatives that
                               improve opportunities and outcomes for children and families
                               in Washington State.
326 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from
    your work plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
    Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive services for all low-income children. Include a description
    of how you are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations at the local level, as well as your efforts to
    involve Head Start programs in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.

    Kids Matter

    In 2006, the HSSCO continued its partnership with the department of Health, early Childhood Com-
    prehensive Systems (eCCS) Grant and Washington BUILd to facilitate the ongoing development and
    implementation of the Kids Matter framework. Through collaborative partnerships, efforts have produced the
    following:

    ♦ Kids Matter Full report: a report outlining a collaborative and comprehensive strategic framework for
      building an early childhood system in Washington to improve outcomes for children.

    ♦ Kids Matter executive Summary: a brief summary (10 pages) of the Kids Matter Full report was created
      as a tool for policymakers who may not have the time to read the full report. The executive Summary has
      proven to be an extremely useful tool for many and varied audiences.

    ♦ Gates Grant: The goal is to ensure Kids Matter becomes a living, active framework at the community and
      local level. to this end, Kids Matter will be implemented from the “inside-out”—supporting communi-
      ties in using the framework to guide them in a decision making process that cultivates their unique values,
      needs, and goals in developing early learning systems that work.

    ♦ BUILd “Building Connections” Grant: The goal of this grant is to give focus and funding support toward
      a merged systemic venture that will support the Governor’s early Childhood Summit with the following
      objectives: 1) fostering reciprocal learning between systemic community and state early learning efforts;
      2) facilitating the development of a network—Communities in Practice—that provides opportunities for
      communities to learn from each other and jointly discuss challenges and strategies, so community leaders
      can significantly participate in future early systems planning and decision-making efforts.


    University of Washington – CHILD Profile Parent Survey

    The HSSCO provided funding to the University of Washington to include specific early learning questions on
    the biennial department of Health CHILd Profile parent survey. The early learning questions were designed
    to gather feedback from parents around early learning, quality child care and preschool options, child devel-
    opment, kindergarten readiness, and health of their young children (birth–five). data analysis and tabulation
    (aggregate and geographic) was also performed.


    Gary Consulting Group

    The HSSCO contracted with Gary Consulting Group for tribal relations consultation services. The Gary
    Consulting Group assisted the HSSCO in conducting a formal listening season with aI/aN Head Start pro-
    grams in Washington to better understand tribal concerns and needs within the context of both sovereignty
    and societal imperatives. The Gary Consulting Group also prepared a “briefing book” for the HSSCO that
    provides detailed knowledge of tribal Head Start programs in the context of culture, communication venues,
    and culturally relevant early childhood education approaches.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   327




City of Seattle

The HSSCO sponsored a planning session designed to develop strategies and parameters to implement a
collaborative partnership between the City of Seattle pre-kindergarten and Head Start programs. The City of
Seattle wanted to create a partnership arrangement between its pre-kindergarten and Head Start programs
that would allow for seamless services to children and families. The outcome of this planning session resulted
in Head Start programs partnering with the City of Seattle to provide Step ahead Pre-K programs.


Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
Education
Collaborative Leadership Institute: The HSSCO continued to support the Collaborative Leadership Insti-
tute (CLI), the ten month intensive training institute for growing leaders in the early learning and care field.
The goal of the CLI is a renewed and lasting network of leaders prepared to advance innovative approaches
that benefit children and families in Washington. The CLI has completed two sessions, and the results have
been very positive, though more recent follow-up with graduates is needed to assess outcomes. For the 2006
class for example, 57% expanded their role in community child and family initiatives, 38% indicated they had
experienced career advancement since beginning the Institute, and 38% planned to pursue their next degree
through higher education. all participants have a greater understanding of their own leadership style and po-
tential and developed a network of colleagues from other disciplines and types of organizations that will help
them as they work to improve early learning and help children in Washington.

Health Care
University of Washington—early Head Start-Promoting First relationships Collaboration: The HSSCO
provided the opportunity to four early Head Start programs to collaborate with Promoting First relation-
ships: reflective Support for relationship-Focused Programs (PFr), a reflective practice program based out
of the University of Washington. This project was specifically designed to address needs of early Head Start
staff and engage early Head Start programs in setting up reflective systems for supporting staff and families.

Welfare
Head Start/early Head Start data Share agreements: The HSSCO has 31 data share agreements to provide
dSHS client data to Head Start/early Head Start programs in Washington for recruitment and enroll-
ment purposes. Four data share agreements are with tribal Head Start programs. This past year, the HSSCO
amended several data share agreements to allow for eCeaP recruitment (one stop shop). The department of
early Learning currently holds responsibility for maintaining the data share agreements.

Services to Children with Disabilities
Infant/early Childhood Conference: Sponsored the Infant and toddler early Intervention Conference for
professionals and administrators serving young children with disabilities and their families.

Within the changing landscape of the new department of early Learning, the priority areas not addressed in
2006 through specific efforts (Services to Homeless Children and Families, Child Care, Community Services,
and Family Literacy Services) should be further defined in the context of the HSSCO’s role as the depart-
ment engages in an intensive process for developing strategic priorities in 2007.
328 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
    The HSSCO has continued to provide a single point of contact for Head Start within the State and worked
    closely with the state association with recruiting Head Start/early Head Start participation in state planning
    efforts. The HSSCO connected groups working on related issues and assured local Head Start representation
    on various state work groups and committees. Finally, the HSSCO continued to invest funds in a number of
    cross-agency and community organization collaborative initiatives. Key projects in 2006 included:

    ♦ Joint advisory Council

             Over the last year and a half, the HSSCO has gone through a merger process to blend advisory
             Council memberships with the Foundation for early Learning, Kids Matter, and BUILd, bringing
             together several key early learning leaders and stakeholders in their advisory capacity. Meetings were
             held in March, June, and October. There is representation from the region X Office, WSa, Head
             Start/early Head Start t&ta, and Head Start/early Head Start directors on the Joint advisory
             Council.

    ♦ Head Start/early Head Start School Site data request

             The HSSCO provided support to the early Learning Council—K-12/early Learning Work Group
             by gathering and tabulating school site data from all Head Start/early Head Start programs (includ-
             ing region XI & XII) in Washington. a formal report was shared with this group as well as with the
             region X Office, t/ta, and all Head Start programs in Washington State.

    ♦ Family Policy Council Simulation Project

             The HSSCO provided funding for the Family Policy Council’s Simulation Project which brought
             together participants from multiple perspectives (private, public, philanthropy, and communities) to
             improve understanding of how systems behave and the short-term/long-term effects of different pol-
             icy interventions intended to help families thrive. an agent-based computer simulation model will be
             created to chart the complex interrelationships of actions that affect at-risk children and families.


    Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
    In 2006, the HSSCO continued to sponsor a number of partnership conferences for the purpose of support-
    ing professional development opportunities in the field of early learning. two of those conferences held in the
    last year include:

    ♦ Healthy Child Care Washington & HS/eCeaP Health Symposium

             This sponsorship provides opportunities for statewide partners to attend various videoconferences
             and/or in-person region X trainings that present the latest information around best practices in the
             development and implementation of quality early learning systems.

    ♦ Infant and early Childhood Conference

             This annual conference provides professional development opportunities for early childhood practi-
             tioners and administrators, with a specific focus on serving children with disabilities in a variety of
             settings.
                                                                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS             |   329




Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
In 2006, the HSSCO did not participate in supporting the coordination of services to Hispanic families
in Washington State in any definite manner. at this time, there are not clearly identified Hispanic initia-
tives within the State with regard to Head Start or early Head Start programs. It is imperative to mention,
however, that the HSSCO continues to support action that creates opportunities for improving early learning
systems and processes that serve to be inclusive of all populations within the State (i.e., children with disabili-
ties, homeless children, children representing all racial and ethnic backgrounds, children in foster care, etc.).
Finally, as the five-year goals of the HSSCO are continually assessed within the changing context of the new
department and the early learning landscape across Washington State in 2007, it is possible that the specific
early learning needs of Hispanic children and families may be more closely addressed through collaborative
projects or initiatives behind the leadership of the HSSCO.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
as the HSSCO’s evolving role in the department of early Learning is more specifically defined and deL
strategic priorities are firmly established in 2007, it is anticipated that new directions will be identified in
addition to maintaining some efforts and initiatives currently in motion. The deL will be embarking on a
strategic planning process in early 2007, and the HSSCO will participate in and focus on aligning efforts with
the results from the process to inform its directions in the coming year and beyond. Further, the HSSCO will
examine its role in promoting action and providing leadership to projects related to all eight priority areas––
particularly those that may not have been addressed to the extent that others were in 2006. The HSSCO
will also continue to maintain its leadership role in Washington State’s early childhood systems building
plan, Kids Matter. In summary, the HSSCO’s work plan and grant funds for the coming year will be greatly
influenced by and aligned with deL strategic planning, ongoing development of the Kids Matter plan, and
existing projects and initiatives.
330 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                     AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   331




                              West Virginia


Collaboration Director        Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                              areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
lena Rapp
                              plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
WV Department of Health and
Human Resources
                              Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
350 Capitol Street            services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Room B18                      are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Charleston, WV 25301          at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
Phone: 304-558-4638           in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
fax: 304-558-8800
                              a lot of time and effort has been directed to building and sup-
lenarapp@wvdhhr.org           porting the WV pre-kindergarten system. Full implementation
wvhsa@comcast.net             of WV pre-kindergarten is scheduled to occur school year
                              2012/2013. School districts (counties) continue to submit an-
Lead Agency Contact           nual pre-k plans describing how they are partnering with Head
                              Start and child care agencies in their communities to provide
Charlie Young                 pre-kindergarten services. technical assistance from the State
                              Pre-kindergarten Steering team (WV department of educa-
Phone: 304-558-5204
                              tion, State Child Care administrator, Head Start-State Col-
cyoung@wvdhhr.org             laboration) is provided to counties building pre-kindergarten
                              collaborations for full universal access by 2012/2013. activities
ACF Regional Contact          related to this include: visits to counties to assist with team
                              members understanding of the policy (State Policy 2525) and
nancy elmore                  providing examples of successful collaboration in other areas of
                              the State.
DHHS
150 Independence Mall West
Suite 864                     Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start
Philadelphia, PA              and other appropriate programs. Describe your accom-
Phone: 215-861-4048           plishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
nancy.elmore@acf.hhs.gov
                              Health Care
                              Planning events related to the Oral health in WV. a grant was
                              awarded to the WV Head Start association to provide educa-
                              tion and mini-grants to Head Start programs across the State.
                              additionally, this partnership has benefited Head Start pro-
                              grams, particularly in the eastern panhandle of the State where
                              dentists are in short supply and rarely accept Medicaid. Mobile
                              dental units have been provided to assist in dental screenings
                              to take place in this region of the State. This was accomplished
                              by the Office of the dental director for the State, in collabo-
332 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    ration with the Office of Maternal and Child Health. an Oral Health Summit was held at the Governor’s
    Mansion by the First Lady of West Virginia, highlighting the oral health projects across the State to improve
    services to children and families across West Virginia.

    a brief screening tool has been developed for pediatricians to use during the examination of children. This
    tool has been inserted into language in the policy revisions for WV pre-kindergarten. The HSSCO has
    worked with the developers to ensure this would work well within Head Start programs. Pediatricians across
    the State are currently reviewing this tool and making revisions based on best practices.

    Welfare
    a state domestic violence training of trainers event was planned to provide training to local HS programs and
    their partners in Child Protective Services, Substance abuse Counselors, and domestic Violence victim ad-
    vocates. The training focuses on what Head Start staff should be aware of regarding signs of domestic violence
    and how they can work with their local partners to assist families with this issue. training events will be held
    across the State in 2007.

    Child Care
    Pre-kindergarten collaborative partnerships efforts with child care agencies. targeted ta to child care centers
    that are not active or are struggling with pre-kindergarten collaborative partnerships. This targeted technical
    assistance primarily revolves around contract development between child care agencies and local partners.

    Education: Universal Pre-kindergarten.
    an articulation agreement has been secured for Fairmont State University and West Virginia University
    ensuring that Head Start staff will be able to more easily obtain advanced education to provide high quality
    services.

    Community Services
    to be addressed in 2007.

    Family Literacy Services
    to be addressed in 2007.

    Services to Children with Disabilities
    revision of transition procedures from Part C to Part B services and Head Start. revision of the transition
    check list to be distributed to early care and education programs throughout the State.

    Services to Homeless Children and Families
    Partnership formation with the WV department of education’s Homeless Coordinator. This person provided
    information to Head Start programs at Head Start association meetings as well as providing a training mod-
    ule at the annual fall conference. It is intended that this will assist programs in properly identifying homeless
    families in their programs and referring them to the appropriate, available services.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   333




Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
The State Pre-Kindergarten Policy (Policy 2525) is due for revision. a committee made up of representation
from Head Start grantees, child care directors, Board of education administrators, as well as education union
representatives, have met over the course of four months to revise the current policy to be considered by the
State Board of education in May of 2007. These revisions began in early fall of 2006 with the State Pre-Kin-
dergarten Steering team (Head Start, State Child Care administration, department of education, Preschool
Special Needs, and WV Birth to Three).

Policy Matters project began during the year of 2006. This process occurred through the State’s early child-
hood advisory committee (PIeCeS – Partners Implementing early Care and education Systems). an audit
of state policies took place under the guidance of dr. Sharon Lynn Kagan of Columbia University. a survey
of state-level stake holders was administered. results were analyzed by the membership and three top priority
areas were established. It was determined that planning was the top priority area for WV. From this, a bill was
drafted and introduced to the State legislature in January 2007 that would provide for a structure to coordi-
nate early childhood planning for the State for children age birth through 8. This measure did not pass but it
did emphasize the importance of investing in early childhood. The First Lady of West Virginia has renewed
her commitment to early care and education through this process and has been very involved in the PIeCeS
advisory Council.


Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
The HSSCO has been able to successfully develop working relationships with partners that focus on pro-
tective/social services to families in WV. This has helped educate more providers about Head Start and the
potential to develop local working relationships which will provide more coordinated, higher quality services
to the children and families grantees serve. This will continue with a new relationship being explored with
“Prevent Child abuse” and the “WV Pediatric Medical advisory Board.” Work of the West Virginia Oral
Health Planning Committee has progressed and has caused a solid, long-term working partnership to benefit
low-income children across the State.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
There is not a large Hispanic population in the state of West Virginia. a small population is beginning to
move into the eastern panhandle of the state. The Collaboration Office will work with the programs in that
area of the State to provide assistance where appropriate.


How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
coming year?
reviewing the work that has been completed for the year, there is a need to have more focus on family literacy
initiatives as well as community services.
334 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                                                        AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   335




                                 Wisconsin


Collaboration Director           Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
                                 areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
linda leonhart
                                 plan and the desired and actual outcomes.
Dept. of Workforce Development
PO Box 7946                      Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
Madison, WI 53707                services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
Phone: 608-261-2137              are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
fax: 608-267-7952                at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
linda.leonhart@dwd.state.wi.us
                                 in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.

                                 Wisconsin Early Childhood Collaborating Partners
ACF Regional Contact
                                 The Wisconsin early Childhood Collaborating Partners
terry lechner                    (WeCCP) is a network of state, regional, and community,
ACf                              public and private organizations, state departments, agencies,
233 north Michigan               associations, and individuals working together to positively
                                 impact the lives of young children and their families. a priority
Suite 400
                                 for WeCCP this year has been reorganization to include the
Chicago, Il 60601                five early Childhood Comprehensive Systems components
Phone: 312-353-7796              and to improve ongoing communication across the state, re-
fax: 312-886-5373                gional, and community levels. WeCCP now encompasses the
                                 areas of early care and education, health, mental health, parent
terry.lechner@acf.hhs.gov
                                 education, and family support through a state action team,
                                 regional networks, and evolving communication systems.


                                 Wisconsin Model Early Learning Standards

                                 The first edition of the Wisconsin Model Early Learning Stan-
                                 dards was disseminated in the fall of 2003. Since then, support
                                 for implementation of the Wisconsin Standards has included
                                 development of training curriculum, sponsorship of a three-day
                                 training for trainers, community-based training and techni-
                                 cal assistance, revision/expansion of the standards to include
                                 ages birth to three, and efforts to develop statewide account-
                                 ability guidelines related to the Early Learning Standards. It is
                                 anticipated that the revised Standards will be completed and
                                 disseminated in 2007.


                                 Strongest Links Collaboration Conference

                                 The 2006 annual Strongest Links Collaboration Conference
336 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    was held on January 13 in Madison. Conference outcomes included increasing understanding of the impor-
    tance of economic development/early childhood connections; developing new partnerships involving early
    childhood and economic development professionals at the individual, community, regional and state levels;
    and promoting enhanced networking among individuals, programs, communities, institutions and systems to
    improve the lives of young children and families.

    a White Paper, sponsored by the HSSCO and developed by the Wisconsin economic development Institute
    on the economic impact of early childhood, was presented, as well as keynote presentations by Mildred War-
    ner and richard Florida. Mildred Warner is an associate professor at Cornell University and director of the
    Child Care and economic development Project. Her research on the economic impact of child care explores
    the potential of an economic development framework to increase public and private will to invest in human
    development. richard Florida is an economist best known for his 2002 best-seller, The rise of the Creative
    Class, and his more recent book, Flight of the Creative Class.


    Preserving Early Childhood Collaboration Conference

    This annual conference was held on March 7-8 in eau Claire for communities interested in exploring and
    implementing four-year-old kindergarten using community approaches. Highlights included tours of a
    number of selected 4K community sites in eau Claire and a keynote address by Peter Block. additional
    speakers included elizabeth Burmaster, State Superintendent of Public Instruction; dWd Secretary roberta
    Gassman; and Charity eleson, executive director, Wisconsin Council on Children and Families.


    Intersecting Interests Higher Education Articulation Forum

    This annual forum was held on November 17 in Madison. This event is part of an ongoing initiative focusing
    on the following goals:

    ♦ ensuring positive outcomes for all children through high quality early childhood education and care
      provided by well trained professionals.

    ♦ Creating articulated, connected, and competency-based systems of professional development guided by
      the implementation of PI 34, which support ongoing professional development and mentoring.

    ♦ Increasing the number of people in the state with bachelor degrees in order to meet the growing demand
      for highly qualified teachers in 4K, Head Start, and other quality early childhood education and care
      programs.

    ♦ Improving access to higher education to diversify the workforce and meet the needs of non-traditional
      learners.

    The keynote address, Storytelling Practices: a Key to Cross-Cultural Education and Professional Development,
    was provided by Susan Bernheimer, and updates were provided by higher education articulation mini-grant
    recipients.


    Strengthening Families through Early Care and Education

    a final report on the two-year pilot of Strengthening Families Wisconsin was completed this year. This initiative
    has brought together professionals from the early childhood, family support, and child welfare fields to share
    knowledge, pool resources, and work together to strengthen families. Thousands of early childhood providers
    were educated about the protective factors and program strategies, and nearly 2000 licensed group child care
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   337




centers completed the self-assessment. Strengthening Families-Wisconsin has also contributed to an increas-
ing recognition of the overlapping interests between these fields, leading to more conversation, cross-field
professional development planning, and joint initiatives at the state and local levels. The director of the State
Collaboration Office served on the State leadership team.


Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start and other appropriate programs. Describe
your accomplishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
Health Care
♦ Served on the leadership team for the early Childhood Comprehensive Systems initiative.

♦ Worked closely with leadership of the Wisconsin Infant Mental Health alliance.

♦ Participated in the Professional development Initiative’s Health Systems Workgroup.

Welfare
♦ Served on the State leadership team for the Strengthening Families through early Care and education.

♦ Supported a service integration approach to early childhood education and care, including planning a
  video-conference on this topic.

♦ Continued to work closely with Governor doyle’s Kids First Policy advisor in the Secretary’s Office at the
  department of Workforce development.

Child Care
♦ Continued to support a tribal child care liaison position contracted through the Wisconsin Child Care
  resource and referral Network to strengthen partnerships among tribal Head Start grantees and tribal
  child care.

♦ Continued to work closely with the Child Care administrator for the State of Wisconsin.

♦ Included child care representation on the HSSCO advisory Committee.

Education
♦ Continued to serve on the State Superintendent of Public Instruction’s department of Public Instruction’s
  Forces for Fours advisory Committee.

♦ Continued to serve on the leadership team for the Wisconsin early Childhood Collaborating Partners.

♦ Participated in planning for the annual Preserving early Childhood collaboration conference.
338 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Community Services
    ♦ Worked closely with the executive director of the Wisconsin Community action association.

    ♦ encouraged community action participation in the economic Summit for Southeast Wisconsin held in
      September.

    ♦ Included community action program representation on the HSSCO advisory Committee.

    Family Literacy Services
    ♦ Continued to serve on the Wisconsin Model early Learning Standards Steering Committee.

    ♦ Participated in efforts to align professional competencies across early childhood systems.

    ♦ Met periodically with the department of Public Instruction’s administrators responsible for public
      library services.

    Services to Children with Disabilities
    ♦ Continued to serve on the Governor’s Birth to Three Interagency Coordinating Council.

    ♦ Participated in efforts to develop a set of statewide assessment guidelines for early childhood education
      and care.

    ♦ Served on a Wisconsin leadership team attending an Inclusion Institute in Chapel Hill, South Carolina.

    Services to Homeless Children and Families
    ♦ Worked closely with the department of Public Instruction’s liaison to public school programs serving
      children affected by homelessness.

    ♦ Sponsored dissemination of the “In Their Own Voices” videos to Wisconsin Head Start programs.

    ♦ Included representation from services to homeless children and families on the HSSCO advisory
      Committee.


    Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and
    decisions.
    ♦ Continued to serve on the leadership committee for the Wisconsin early Childhood Collaborating
      Partners, a state network of Wisconsin organizations, agencies, and individuals concerned with young
      children and families.

    ♦ Served on the Steering Committees for t.e.a.C.H, r.e.W.a.r.d., the registry, the Professional
      development Initiative (PdI), Strengthening Families, and other statewide early childhood initiatives.

    ♦ Consulted regularly with the deputy Secretary of the department of Workforce development.
                                                                              AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   339




Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
♦ On September 25th, the HSSCO partnered with the National Committee for economic development
  to host an economic summit on early education for southeastern Wisconsin. This important event was
  attended by over 150 community leaders, including business, local elected officials, Chamber of Commerce
  representatives, United Way, economic development, Head Start and other early childhood leaders, and
  school district officials. Featured guest speakers and panelists included the following:

             ♦ Jeffrey Joerres, CeO and President, Manpower International

             ♦ James doyle, Governor of Wisconsin

             ♦ Charles Kolb, President, Committee for economic development

             ♦ dan Pedersen, President, Buffett early Childhood Fund

             ♦ Steven Barnett, director, National Institute for early education research

             ♦ Sister Joel read, Chair of the education Committee, Greater Milwaukee Committee

             ♦ robert dugger, Managing director, tudor Investment Corporation

             ♦ dennis Mueller, Vice President, Quanta Services, Inc.

             ♦ Helen Johnson-Leopold, Chair of the Johnson Foundation and the Johnson Financial
               Group

♦ The HSCCO continued to provide funding to support extended contracts for five regional collaboration
  coaches (plus Milwaukee). regular planning calls were held for the regional coaches and representatives
  from the funding organizations.

♦ The HSCCO director continued to serve on the Office of Head Start Professional education Network
  and e-rate Work Groups.

♦ The HSSCO co-facilitated formation of a state partnership team to attend the HSSCO networking and
  partnership meetings held in Washington, d.C. in January 2007.


Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
families in your State.
♦ Participated in the development, training-for-trainers curriculum, and ongoing revision of the Wisconsin
  Model early Learning Standards, including printing and dissemination in Spanish.

♦ Continue to serve on the t.e.a.C.H. advisory Committee which provides higher education scholarship
  support to early childhood professionals, including those from culturally diverse populations.

♦ Served on the WeCCP leadership team overseeing revision of a number of key interagency agreements.
340 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
    coming year?
    The focus of the Wisconsin Head Start-State Collaboration Office will continue to build on current efforts
    across the priority areas and to strengthen early childhood partnerships. In particular, efforts are expected to
    focus on the following areas:

    ♦ Continuing to polish and implement the re-design of the Wisconsin early Childhood Collaborating Part-
      ners to include all five components of the early Childhood Comprehensive Systems initiative.

    ♦ Building and sustaining cross-sector community collaboration and use of regional coaches.

    ♦ Increasing support in the business community for early childhood as an economic development strategy.

    ♦ Facilitating policies that support collaboration, community approaches, and blended funding.

    ♦ Continuation of cross-sector professional development.

    ♦ revision/development of selected state-level interagency agreements.
                                                                            AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS                 |   341




                                     Wyoming


Collaboration Director
                                     The Wyoming HSSCO was without a director from December
Rick Hufnagel                        2005 until May 2006. From May 2006 through June 2006, the
university of Wyoming                HSSCO assessed the relationship the Office had with the Head
                                     Start community, other early childhood education agencies, state
Wyoming Institute for Disabilities
                                     agencies, and the Governor’s Office. The following report reflects a
Department 4298                      rebuilding and reintroduction process that occurred over a six-
1000 east university Avenue          month period.
laramie, WY 82071
Phone: 307-766-2454
fax: 307-766-2549                    Briefly describe your accomplishments in the following
rhufnage@uwyo.edu                    areas. Where possible, indicate the goals from your work
http://wind.uwyo.edu/headstart/      plan and the desired and actual outcomes.

Lead Agency Contact                  Help build early childhood systems and access to comprehensive
                                     services for all low-income children. Include a description of how you
laurie Westlake                      are supporting Head Start/Child Care/Pre-kindergarten collaborations
Phone: 307-766-2456                  at the local level, as well as your efforts to involve Head Start programs
fax: 307-766-2549                    in State Pre-kindergarten initiatives.
laurie@uwyo.edu
                                     Currently the State of Wyoming does not have mandatory
                                     kindergarten or pre-kindergarten. during the 2006 session,
ACF Regional Contact                 the State legislature provided money to conduct a study of the
                                     current state of child care in Wyoming. The HSSCO attended
Al Martinez                          legislative committee hearings and forwarded meeting notes to
Office of Head Start                 all the Head Start grantees.
Region VIII
1961 Stout Street                    Encourage widespread collaboration between Head Start
Office 926                           and other appropriate programs. Describe your accom-
Denver, CO 80294                     plishments and outcomes in the eight priority areas.
Phone: 303-844-1172
fax: 303-433-4288
                                     Health Care
al.martinez@acf.hhs.gov              ♦ The Collaboration Office purchased and distributed 20
                                       oversized teeth/toothbrush combinations to be used in
                                       conjunction with the “tooth truth from Gilley the Gator”
                                       booklet that were also distributed to Head Start grantees.
                                       The Collaboration Office hopes that these materials will
                                       help supplement and strengthen the oral health curriculum
                                       that centers are currently using.
342 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    ♦ The HSSCO participated on the Oral Health Coalition. The State Oral Hygienist is finishing up the
      hiring of three new COHC and is hoping to have them in the field by the end of the year. One hygienist
      has been in place in Sheridan and Johnson counties for over a year, and the other three will be covering
      Sweetwater/Sublette, albany/Carbon, and Hot Springs/Fremont counties. These three hygienists will be
      able to assist Head Start families on a more frequent basis in those counties that have been identified as
      having the greatest need.

    ♦ The HSSCO became a member of the KidCare/CHIP advisory board and Steering Committee. a col-
      laboration between the department of Health and Head Start grantees resulted in establishing Head Start
      centers as registration sites for the KidCare/CHIP program.

    Welfare
    The HSSCO partnered with the Wyoming Community action Partnership to support four statewide training
    seminars focusing on “Bridges out of Poverty: Strategies for Professionals and Communities.”
    Participants included Head Start grantees, social workers, and educators.


    Facilitate Head Start’s involvement in the development of state policies, plans, processes, and decisions.
    The HSSCO met with all the relevant state agencies involved in delivering services to low-income children
    and families to begin to re-establish relationships that had not been ongoing. The HSSCO will continue to
    develop these relationships over the next year.


    Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
    The HSSCO has re-established a strong working relationship with Head Start grantees, the WHS associa-
    tion, state agencies, early childhood advocacy groups, and early childhood educators. The HSSCO has estab-
    lished an advisory board that is meeting on a regular basis to inform the Office’s efforts to develop collabora-
    tive strategies that effect low-income children and families.


    Briefly describe your efforts to support the coordination of Head Start services to Hispanic children and
    families in your State.
    Nothing at this time has been accomplished in this area.


    How do your responses to the questions above impact your approved work plan for the current or
    coming year?
    Through re-establishing relationships with the early childhood education community, the HSSCO has helped
    reinvigorate involvement of Head Start in state planning efforts and through collaboration with the HSSCO
    advisory plan developed the next five-year refunding plan.
collaboration with
   regional offices
344 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices
                                      AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   345




Collaboration with
regional Offices

Describe how you have supported and collaborated with the Regional
Office on national and regional priorities (e.g. Fatherhood, Faith-Based
and Community, Healthy Marriage, Youth and Rural Initiatives and TA
Network, professional development, Community Action Agencies, State
Head Start Association, and other activities).

Alabama
Fatherhood
The Collaboration Office ensures representation and partici-
pation of Head Start in the Statewide Fatherhood Initiative.
Programs and individual males receive recognition and news-
letters and grant opportunities, and resources are disseminated
to strengthen local fatherhood programs.

T/A Network
activities continue in the implementation of a state t/a plan
to include emergency preparedness; State association support;
professional development systems development; resource iden-
tification; and strengthening state and local partnerships.

Faith-Based and Healthy Marriage Initiatives
Initiatives are addressed in the areas of homelessness, welfare,
education, and child care. auburn University and the depart-
ment of Human resources have state grants that include Head
Start and other community organizations.

Technology
Grant provided to include Head Start and Caa in the
alabama resource Management System. an MOa outlines
specific information for posting and access. This electronic
data system allows state agencies and participating community
groups to locate programs and identify needed statistical data
for grants and community assessment.
346 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Alaska
    Both region X and aIaNPB have collaborated with our State Collaboration and State Head Start Offices
    to address alaska specific issues, as well as the aCF priorities. aside from additional resources (both hu-
    man and monetary), they have continued to aid our work on issues around differences between the regional
    grantees, State structural changes, changes in the structure of the alaska Head Start association (outcome
    5 goal 3), as well as the ta changes. all issues have been met with open dialogue and face-to-face involve-
    ment (a rarity in alaska due to geography). Our State Office support has been strong around rural initiatives
    as that is the nature of alaska. Fatherhood has continued a strong commitment in 2006 with the inclusion
    of a Fatherhood strand in the 2006 alaska Head Start Leadership Conference. This year has seen the con-
    tinued development of a close and responsive working relationship between the Collaboration Office and the
    ta system. They developed and implemented strategies to allow greater involvement in aCF priorities as
    well as strengthening our link to both regional offices in the planning of the 2006 alaska State Head Start
    Leadership Conference.

    also, 2006 has seen continued support for the Faith Based and Community Initiative, the Collaboration
    director as an ex-Officio member of the State task Force and liaison to the State’s newly formed office of
    Faith Based and Community Initiatives opened in 2005. Professional development continues to be an issue
    of concern and high involvement. We continue our involvement in alaska’s System for early education
    development (Seed) to a variety of distance delivery projects with the alaska University system and to our
    cross-educational agency shared training projects.


    Outcome 5, Goals 2, 5, and 6


    American indian/Alaskan Native
    ♦ By invitation of the region VIII regional Office ta Liaison and the South dakota Head Start associa-
      tion President, the aIaN-Cd met with the South dakota Head Start directors association to share
      information on the role of the aIaN-Cd. The majority of those in attendance were non-tribal HS direc-
      tors. The group discussed collaboration and put forth several suggestions on how they might increase col-
      laboration between tribal and non-tribal HS directors in South dakota. to help increase understanding
      of tribal programs, a tribal director graciously offered to host the next SdHSda meeting, an invitation
      eagerly accepted by the group.

    ♦ The aIaN-Cd also received invitations to attend other State Head Start association meetings to pro-
      mote State/tribal collaborations.


    Arizona
    The HSSCO director participated in quarterly meetings with region IX, as well as the HSSCO national
    meeting.


    Arkansas
    ♦ arkansas HSSCO worked with the arkansas Head Start association in planning for and hosting the
      arkansas Head Start annual training Institute held in Hot Springs in July. a recognition luncheon
      was held in conjunction with the Institute in honor of Head Start teachers and staff who had completed
      degrees during the past two years. Seventy-seven teachers and staff were in attendance for the recognition
      luncheon, with a total of 92 honorees who attained degrees.
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   347




♦ routine communication with liaison from Booz-allen-Hamilton, contractor for region VI aCF Head
  Start, to arkansas HSSCO, which includes ongoing discussion of current state initiatives in early care and
  education as well as ideas for involvement in various statewide activities and HSSCO priorities, including
  State quality approval certification process for increasing the number of Head Start programs in arkansas
  with State quality approval.

♦ Participant in financial management training provided by WIPFLi and Howard Gesbeck, Jr. on the “re-
  view of OMB Circulars Plus Head Start Issues.” This was a collaborative effort that the MOU workgroup
  planned for through supplemental grant funding, but was not held until april. Other participants included
  representatives from Community action agencies, Head Start, state agencies, and ta specialists.

♦ MOU Workgroup held quarterly conference calls to discuss continued collaborative efforts among Head
  Start, Community action, Community Services, and Child Care. Plans being made to update current
  MOU agreement in 2007.

♦ Participated in arkansas Community Services Block Grant Program Implementation assessment (PIa).


California
♦ There were several highly publicized changes of grantees and the resulting transfers of child care licenses
  which caused program disruptions for some Head Start families. The HSSCO worked with the region
  IX Office and California’s Community Care Licensing division on a MOU intended to smooth such
  transfers in the future.

♦ The HSSCO, HSa, region IX program staff, and taN continued to meet quarterly with our regional
  partners to discuss emerging regional and state issues.


Colorado
Given the transition activities occurring within the HSSCO there is little information available regarding the
specifics to answering this question. However, at the region VIII Head Start Growing Together conference
the HSSCO director was involved in the selection of the 100 plus workshops that were made available. These
included workshops on fatherhood initiatives, promoting healthy marriage, youth initiatives, professional
development, and child development.


Connecticut

Goal

OHS priorities are integrated into the work of Head Start in Connecticut.


Accomplishments

♦ received $2,500 grant from the association of State and territorial dental directors (aStdd) for Pre-
  natal Oral Health Project. established contracts and coordinated implementation and reporting of grant
  activities for the two participating early Head Start grantees.

♦ Helped facilitate the creation of the State’s Head Start association – Community action agency associa-
  tion Memorandum of Understanding, which was signed on april 3, 2006.
348 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    ♦ Gathered and reported information to OHS on state e-rate activities and processes and provided infor-
      mation to Head Start programs.

    ♦ Supported Ct Head Start association’s annual conference through provision of resources, materials, and
      supplies.

    ♦ Continued to participate on the New england Head Start association Board as HSSCO representative
      and regularly participate in NeHSa activities and events.

    ♦ Participate regularly in OHS and region I meetings including HSSCO grantee meeting June 21-23,
      region I meetings in Nashua, May 25, and Boston, September 19-20, and on scheduled conference calls.

    ♦ Co-sponsored with the region I HSQI several technical assistance cluster sessions, including Program
      Self-assessment, Serving Homeless Families, and enrollment and attendance.


    Delaware
    National Initiative(s):

    ♦ expanding Opportunities(see disabilities)


    Regional Initiatives:

    ♦ Linked I Am Moving, I Am Learning to State Initiative

    ♦ Facilitated Linkages between fatherhood efforts and Head Start/State Pre-Kindergarten programs in
      Sussex County


    District of Columbia
    The HSSCO worked with local grantees and delegates to customize and implement the initiative I am
    Moving, I am Learning, which is a regional training program developed and piloted in region III. The dC
    HSSCO was represented at the training of trainers in april 2006.

    The dC HSSCO has developed a strong partnership with the Head Start technical assistance Network in
    region III. We engage in common planning and strategizing in order to provide consistent support and col-
    laborations for the district of Columbia Head Start community.


    Florida
    The SCO director developed a technical assistance and Planning calendar with the ta Network in conjunc-
    tion with the region IV Office of Head Start. Quarterly meetings to communicate and plan with the ta
    Network were held to work on the three priorities in the technical assistance and Planning calendar. The
    ta Network is included on the listservs maintained by the Head Start-State Collaboration Office and is an
    integral part of the SCO disaster Preparedness Plan.

    The Florida Head Start-State Collaboration Office worked very closely with the Florida Head Start asso-
    ciation (FHSa) on a wide array of activities. This collaboration ensures that grass roots Head Start input is
    provided in policy discussions. The work of the Head Start-State Collaboration Office would not be possible
                                                                                 AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   349




without this relationship. The FHSa provided in-kind match for the Head Start-State Collaboration Office
grant.

One of the main collaborative efforts between the Head Start-State Collaboration Office and the Florida
Head Start association was the production and distribution of the 2005-2006 Portrait of Our Head Start
Children’s Outcomes. The SCO also supports the work of the FHSa research Committee and its annual
research Conference. The SCO partnered with the ta Network and the FHSa in planning the 9th annual
Florida Head Start association training Institute.

The HSSCO facilitated a meeting with representatives of Florida association of Community action (FaCa),
the Florida department of Community affairs, the Office of early Learning, and a local Head Start grantee
to meet with a representative of redlands Christian Migrant association who delivered a presentation on
a Family Service Worker Credential program. Quarterly meetings were held with the executive director of
FaCa to plan for more collaboration between Head Start and community action agencies.


Georgia
♦ Serve as a contact and resource for dissemination of national and regional aCF initiatives. Provide regular
  updates by attending association board meetings (attended 2 regional association board meetings), sending
  listserv and email information (new system, first message was sent after January 1st), responding to ques-
  tions and answers as necessary, and participating in as many joint-activities as possible.

♦ Participate in all major early care and education professional development initiatives in Georgia with
  Head Start, PK, CC, and dOe partners (3 conferences, 2 meetings).

♦ attend collaboration meetings to clarify information and offer alternative solutions to existing problems or
  concerns throughout Georgia (3 meetings).


Hawaii
The HSSCO has collaborated with the regional Office in phone conferences with the Office of Head Start
and with state partners on oral health issues in Hawaii. Quarterly meetings for collaboration directors with
region IX staff are held in San Francisco. These meetings are scheduled so that a half day is dedicated to par-
ticipation with the regional training and technical assistant team. These quarterly meetings have proved to
be very valuable to the HSSCO’s effectiveness in joint activities with both the HSaH President who attends
and Hawaii’s t/ta Specialist. These activities included t/ta to Head Start program staff and 619 preschool
staff on emerging challenges in the department of education/Head Start inclusion classrooms.


idaho
during the early Years Conference, the region X ta team provided strong presentations in the areas of the
development of math and science concepts and early numeracy and Literacy Mentor Coaching. Lunch tables
were arranged for ta staff to meet with Idaho Head Start staff around literacy mentoring, fatherhood initia-
tives, and family services.

The Idaho Head Start association hired a new executive director this year who serves on the Collaboration
advisory Council and meets regularly with the Collaboration director for collegial support. The Collabora-
tion director frequently serves as a presenter on early childhood and state systems issues at the association
meetings. The Collaboration worked with the Idaho Head Start association to fund, develop, and distribute
the Idaho Head Start data Book.
350 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    illinois

    IL HSSCO Goal #5:

    to support, coordinate, and ensure Head Start and early Head Start participation in IL profes-
    sional and leadership development initiatives and systems.

    ♦ Worked with the IL Head Start association to maintain the IL Head Start Web site (www.ilheadstart.
      org), produce a semi-annual newsletter, strategic planning, a statewide Parent Leadership Institute, and
      coordination/representation with the many partner groups.

    ♦ Worked with the IL Head Start training system to implement the IHSa/taS/HSSCO coordination plan
      and participated in one region 5 meeting of the collaborative group.

    ♦ Participated in the IL Professional development advisory Council (www.ilgateways.com) and developed
      the pilots for levels 2 + direct route and institutional credentials.


    indiana
    ♦ The director participated in region V Head Start, ta Network/aCF all staff meeting in Chicago.

    ♦ The Collaboration Office works with the regional Office in regards to the annual grant and supplemental
      funding.

    ♦ The Collaboration Office director is working with Karen Yoder, region V Oral Health Contractor from
      Indiana University, to define oral health needs in Indiana and how they might best be met.

    ♦ The director participates in monthly conference calls with the region V Collaboration directors and
      participated in regional conference calls on Child Care, early Childhood, and Oral Health.

    ♦ The Collaboration Office has contracted for services with the Indiana Head Start association. Contracted
      services included:

                  ♦ Maintenance of Web site

                  ♦ Quarterly IHSa Newsletters

                  ♦ Professional development

    ♦ The director met monthly with IN Head Start association directors and attended many of the board and
      cluster meetings.

    ♦ The director attends quarterly meetings with the BaH training staff.

    ♦ The Collaboration Office created and distributed materials on community action agencies with programs
      that may be of interest to Head Start families.

    ♦ The Collaboration Office met the director of, and distributed materials from, the Indiana Community
      action agency on grants available to programs.
                                                                                    AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS          |   351




iowa
Iowa HSSCO worked closely with the regional Office in 2006, meeting three times for face-to-face meetings
along with SCO colleagues from other states in the region. regional priorities have included implementing
a risk assessment process to improve PrISM results. This priority connects with the Iowa HSSCO objective
to support Iowa Head Start agencies and Iowa Head Start association in their efforts to meet and exceed the
expectation of the Head Start Program Performance Standards. Survey results indicate that 93 percent believe
that the HSSCO has been somewhat or very effective in meeting this objective. In 2006, no Iowa program
receiving a Federal monitoring visit had a single area of non-compliance reported.

Iowa HSSCO has supported a number of other national and regional priorities. In Fatherhood, the SCO
identified a local qualified expert on the value of the fatherhood role in children’s lives and arranged for his
services to be available to Head Start programs in Iowa.

In Professional Development, the HSSCO Coordinator served on a number of professional development
system committees working on a strategic plan to develop a comprehensive early childhood professional
development system. The committee established spending priorities for a new state investment of $2.2 million
obligated for early childhood professional development, including supporting specific projects that address
training gaps in the field, as well as a broader system development effort.

Iowa HSSCO also supported the early Childhood alliance, a group of community college early childhood
faculty, in a gathering to support their work on developing a common core of courses associated with their
early childhood degrees.

The HSSCO Coordinator served as chair of t.e.a.C.H. early Childhood Iowa. In 2006, this project suc-
cessfully completed its first self-study and was re-licensed. The HSSCO Coordinator took a leadership role in
assisting the project’s transfer to the Iowa association for the education of Young Children, a move that took
effect January 1, 2007.

Iowa HSSCO issued guidance on how Head Start teachers can convert an initial license into a Standard State
of Iowa teacher’s License when they lack supervision requirements from trained administrators.


State Association

Iowa HSSCO believes a strong State association is provides the most valuable tool for developing Head
Start-State Collaboration. In 2006, the Office supported Iowa Head Start association’s efforts to reorga-
nize and increase its activities. It is now poised to hire an executive director for the first time in 2007. Iowa
HSSCO made a concerted effort to provide regular communication about state activities with the association’s
members throughout the year.

The most significant achievement in partnership with IHSa was developing and publishing the 2005 Iowa
Head Start annual report. (Copies are available at www.iowaheadstart.org.)


CAP Agencies

to support Community action agencies in Iowa, Iowa HSSCO continued to offer on-site management
consulting for two agencies. The HSSCO also arranged and facilitated a meeting between CaP directors
and Head Start directors (also with Iowa Community empowerment State Coordinator), and brokered an
arrangement whereby ICaa’s executive director and lobbyist would also served as the formal representative of
Iowa Head Start association to the 2007 legislature.
352 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Kansas
    The region VII office and ta Network participated in planning the Kansas Fatherhood Summit and at-
    tended some of the Head Start Collaboration Council meetings. They also participated in updating the
    Memorandum of agreement for early intervention services for children birth to five years of age. The ta
    Network participates as ex-officio on the Kansas Head Start association Board, Oral Health Kansas meetings
    and plans to participate in writing a grant to promote early childhood inclusion in Kansas.


    Kentucky
    ♦ KY HSSCO has developed a partnership with Mountain Mission development Corporation, an interde-
      nominational, non-profit, 501 (c) (3) corporation that works in cooperation with all entities and resources
      for the benefit of the people of eastern Kentucky.

    ♦ KY HSSCO has supported a training partnership between Kentucky’s training and technical assistance
      Network and the five early Childhood regional training centers

    ♦ KY HSSCO attends quarterly planning meetings between the representatives of the Kentucky t&ta
      network and the executive director of the Kentucky Head Start association.

    ♦ attends Kentucky Head Start association meetings and serves on KS Head Start association executive
      committee.


    Describe additional activities and successes in the past year.
    ♦ KY HSSCO attended National Head Start Collaboration director’s meeting in June 2006 and served on
      the planning committee for that meeting.

    ♦ KY HSSCO was one sponsor for the 2006 Infant-toddler Institute and served on the Institute’s planning
      committee.

    ♦ KY HSSCO continues to support the PNC Bank Volunteer effort.


    Louisiana
    Healthy Marriage
    Continue to support and distribute material/marriage/curriculum material to Head Start grantees for parents
    and staff.

    TA Network
    establish regular meetings with ta liaison to discuss issues, concerns, and needs. Continue to distribute rel-
    evant information for distribution to grantees as it relates to funding, grant opportunities, and training.

    CAP Agencies
    Support CaP agencies conference and work collaboratively with said agency to enhance public awareness and
    improve shared governance.
                                                                                          AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS   |   353




Head Start Association
♦ attend region VI Board meetings, national meetings, and Louisiana Head Start Board meetings.

♦ Collaborate with division of early Childcare and early Childhood education to sponsor child care
  workshop presenters at association’s annual conference

♦ Provide information as needed to the Head Start association regarding various state initiatives and
  projects.

Professional Development
♦ Promote the enrollment of Head Start staff and child care providers in Louisiana Pathways.

♦ Promote the universities and community colleges articulation agreement discussions.

Youth and Rural Initiatives, Regional Priorities, Faith Based and Community Legislation
♦ Continue to keep abreast of existing initiatives and proposed initiatives and participated as appropriate in
  implementing the initiatives; and provide relevant information and data as needed to other partners and
  stakeholders.


Maine
♦ Supported region I ta Network by meeting with the ta staff on a regular basis and including them in
  important training policy groups such as the early Care and education training Coordination team, the
  Higher education Committee, and the ta Network. Collaborated with the ta staff on cluster meetings
  with the Head Start programs in Maine.

♦ The Maine Infant and toddler Specialist funded through our office supports the meetings of early Head
  Start program leaders and facilitated their connection to the Maine Home Visiting task Force. This con-
  nection encouraged the early Head Start staff to attend training offered by the Home Visiting task Force.

♦ Presented information on Maine Head Start Programs to the National advisory Committee on rural
  Health and Human Services for their 2007 report to the Secretary of the U.S. department of Health
  and Human Services.


Maryland
Fatherhood
♦ The HSSCO continues to provide relevant information on fatherhood activities, such as the fatherhood
  conference by the Maryland Child Care resource Network and county-wide activities through Head Start
  and Judy Center Partnerships.

♦ Information on fatherhood programs and initiatives is shared and then discussed at Md Head Start as-
  sociation administrator meetings.
354 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Faith-Based And Community
    ♦ Faith-based grantees/delegates in Catholic and Baptist churches are active on state-funded projects and
      provide leadership in community partnering.

    ♦ Outreach and embracing community services, including faith-based efforts, are a topic of conversation at
      Md Head Start association administrator meetings.

    Healthy Marriage
    ♦ The Collaboration Coordinator works with Catholic Charities on healthy marriage strategies.

    ♦ relevant State and national information on the benefits of marriage for mothers and children was dis-
      seminated.

    Youth And Rural Initiatives And TA Network
    ♦ The HSSCO director visited rural Head Start programs in Western Maryland, Southern Maryland, and
      the eastern Shore, facilitating partnerships with the public schools.

    ♦ The HSSCO director works with Brenda Coakley of the Migrant and Seasonal Head Start Collaboration
      director, to ensure that the interests of children in families working in migrant and seasonal programs are
      included in state policies and decisions.

    ♦ The HSSCO director and Maryland ta Specialists meet regularly to discuss grantee needs and strategies
      for addressing those needs, including for areas of non-compliance such as oral health treatment.

    Professional Development
    ♦ The Collaboration Coordinator facilitated the Head Start Leadership Symposium and Oral Health
      Forum. approximately 200 Head Start staff attended workshops on management, program, and health
      topics.

    ♦ Information on a variety of professional development opportunities is shared with Head Start/early Head
      Start grantees and staff via an email distribution list and a training calendar from the resource and referral
      network.

    ♦ The ta Specialists provide information and assistance to the HSSCO to facilitate opportunities for meet-
      ing identified professional development needs.

    Community Action Agencies
    ♦ The Collaboration Coordinator served on the planning committee for the annual joint conference by the
      Maryland association of Community action Programs (CaP) and MHSa. Workshops, meetings, and
      other activities are geared to promote joint learning and mutual outcomes for children and families.

    ♦ The Collaboration Coordinator assisted in initiating the revision and renewal of the MCaP and Md
      Head Start association agreement to further state and local partnerships, including joint planning and
      referrals for at-risk families.
                                                                                AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS           |   355




Head Start Association
♦ Mrs. Zang presents collaboration information and opportunities via email and at regular Md Head Start
  association meetings, conducting discussions on relevant issues.

♦ She was part of the planning team for a Maryland Head Start association retreat, partially funded with
  Head Start-State Collaboration Supplemental Grant funds, and helps the Md Head Start association
  achieve the objectives of their 3-year strategic plan.

♦ as noted above, Ms. Zang served on the MCaP/Md Head Start association conference planning committee.

♦ regularly scheduled meetings/calls are held with the President of the Md Head Start association and
  other contacts occur when needed.


Massachusetts
The HCCSO has supported several Head Start grantees by helping to coordinate the various state and Fed-
eral services available to programs experiencing difficulty. For example:

♦ This year a Head Start program rescinded its Federal Head Start grant. The HSSCO has supported the
  programs, the Federal and state staff, and Head Start Quality Initiative as work was done to transition the
  programs to the intermediate contractor until the grants could be re-bid.

♦ In another case, a Head Start program decided to close two sites and move them into a better facility in
  the next town. This move caused significant concerns on the part of the public school system from where
  the children were moved. The HSSCO helped support communication between the Head Start program,
  the eeC, and the local public school superintendent regarding the closure of the Head Start sites and the
  move of the children enrolled to the alternate sites. Those with IePs, or families who wanted to remain
  in town, were transitioned into the public school program. Long term collaboration is planned to resolve
  future issues related to the closure of the site.

♦ HSSCO acted as the intermediary between a Head Start grantee, eeC, region I Office of Head Start
  and the Head Start Quality Initiative to help resolve management issues when it was determined that the
  program was not fully billing the State for grant funds awarded to the agency. The situation now seems to
  be on the track toward resolution.


Michigan
The Michigan HSSCO has collaborated with the region V Office on a number of initiatives.

Fatherhood
The region V office has sponsored monthly fatherhood conference calls in region V. The HSSCO has sup-
ported access to these conference calls.

Social/Emotional
region V office and the region V ta team have sent members to Michigan to assist with the statewide
discussions and forums.
356 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    TA Network
    The HSSCO has been having monthly update meetings with the BaH ta system specialists.

    Head Start Association/CAP Agencies
    The HSSCO director attends the joint quarterly meetings of MI Head Start association/MCaaa. The
    HSSCO director serves as a liaison between Federal, state, and local initiatives.

    Migrant and Seasonal Head Start
    The HSSCO director has been working extensively with Brenda Coakley (Migrant and Seasonal Head Start-
    State Collaboration director), Susan rohrbough (NCCIC) and other Michigan partners on early childhood
    and care issues for our migrant and seasonal children.

    Federal Initiatives
    The region V Office has a listserv where we receive information about grant opportunities, professional
    development information around priority areas, and conference information that helps assist the HSSCO
    director.


    Migrant
    annually, the MSHS Collaboration Office reviews its multi-year work plan with the regional Office (Office
    of Head Start, Migrant and Seasonal Program Branch Chief ), assessing accomplishments and revising, as
    necessary, priorities and goals.

    2006 regional Office priorities included the awarding of funding for increasing MSHS nationwide which
    included three states previously not providing services to migrant farm worker children and their families and
    oral health. The MSHS Collaboration Office planned and facilitated migrant Head Start expansion orienta-
    tion conference calls with the grantee, regional Office staff, Head Start-State Collaboration Office directors
    in Iowa, Oklahoma, and Nevada, and the state-identified key stakeholders.

    The Collaboration Office’s role as it relates to the Oral Health Initiative grants is to support linkages that
    have been developed with the states’ dental/oral health office (through the Head Start-State Collaboration
    Office director), provide support to the MSHS oral health team and to the taC-12 health content specialist,
    and assist in identifying resources to ensure successful grant implementation.

    The MSHS Collaboration Office director continues to be invited to, and participates in, state Head Start
    association conferences and receives requests to conduct MSHS site visits with state active and potential
    partners: delaware, North Carolina, South Carolina, Maryland, and Michigan.


    Minnesota
    ♦ attended the regional meeting with region, Booz allen Hamilton staff, and HSSCOs from the region to
      discuss issues related to our region. Have encouraged additional support to Head Start in regard to finan-
      cial management in response to this meeting.

    ♦ Forwarded information about these initiatives to Head Start programs.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS         |   357




♦ Met quarterly with ta network and State Head Start association.

♦ Participated in professional development planning for child care system and trainings provided at MN
  Head Start association. Maintained a relationship of trust and cooperation with Office of economic
  Opportunity where the CSBG funding is administered to ensure that we are supporting Head Start in a
  similar manner.


Mississippi
The Collaboration Office director is a Board member of region IV and attends quarterly meetings and is a
member of the State t&ta Planning team. The Collaboration director also attends national meetings of the
Office of Head Start. The Collaboration Office collaborates with Mississippi State University’s early Child-
hood Institute and the National rural early Childhood Institute in Mississippi. The Collaboration director
attends and reports office activities at quarterly meetings of the Mississippi Head Start association directors.
The Collaboration director is included in the planning of state and local Head Start association functions
and events including two annual state conferences.


Missouri
♦ The Collaboration Office participated in regular executive planning meetings with the professional devel-
  opment system for the state of Missouri-Opportunities in a Professional educational Network (OPeN).

♦ The Collaboration Office in concert with region VII aCF, Office of Head Start, and region VII Head
  Start association assisted in planning, organizing and supporting a directors Caucus for Head Start di-
  rectors throughout region VII. The HSSCO serves in an ad hoc position on both region VII Board and
  MHSa Board of directors.

♦ The HSSCO and MO Head Start association planned and implemented regular Peer-to-Peer Network-
  ing sessions that were designed to give Head Start staff an opportunity to network and receive information
  based upon national priorities, regional priorities, and the needs of Missouri.

♦ The HSSCO, MO Head Start association, department of Mental Health, and region VII t/ta sup-
  ported a four- session Mental Health Series which served as a springboard for future activities.

♦ The Collaboration Offices from region VII, region VII staff, and t/ta network staff partnered to share
  information on aCF regional priorities and how the three entities could partner to support Head Start
  grantees in the states.


Montana
In region VIII, teleconferences are convened at least every other month. The regional Office makes an effort
to send a representative to attend the quarterly Head Start association meeting. When requests are made of
the Collaboration Office by the region, the HSSCO complies. The regional staff is responsive and support-
ive. The HSSCO and regional Office cooperated on the Fatherhood strategic planning that took place in
2006. The HSSCO meets often with the ta network representatives, either by phone, email, or in person, and
they attend all of the Head Start association meetings; they are also very supportive and responsive, and it is a
pleasure to work with all of them. The HSSCO has not targeted any of the other listed priorities individually;
most are integrated in all that the HSSCO does. For example: the entire state of Montana is rural or frontier.
Consequently, all work incorporates and considers rural issues such as isolation, communication, relationships,
trusted leadership, transportation, and individual community protocol.
358 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    Nebraska
    The Head Start-State Collaboration Office contracted with the Nebraska Children & Families Foundation
    Fatherhood Initiative to conduct a Head Start Father Factor Survey for all Head Start grantees to explore
    attitudes and behaviors toward fathers. data were compiled and analyzed and presented at the 2005 Head
    Start association Conference. In 2006, follow-up was individualized support and/or training to grantees that
    requested. a presentation on follow-up activities was made at the 2006 HaS Conference.

    The HSSCO conducted a follow-up meeting regarding the MOU between Head Start and Community
    action during the 2006 annual HSSCO “State of the State” Networking Session. Based on the action plan
    and MOU, stakeholders expressed that they had adequate information to continue to integrate information
    and guidance into their work. discussion continues regarding a “Phase II” of the MOU that would be more
    broadly representative of early care and education partners, including Leas, and enhancing language related
    to child care services.


    Nevada
    The HSSCO and region IX Nevada Lead worked collaboratively to request approval of the Nevada ap-
    prenticeship program’s Child development Specialist certificate as a state issued Cda alternative. In addition,
    program managers from both the Nevada Child Care apprenticeship Program and the teaCH program
    made presentations at the december Head Start association meeting at the request of the HSSCO direc-
    tor. Most grantees set up times when the apprenticeship and teaCH programs could come talk with their
    teachers. Finally, the higher education panel convened during the december Partnership committee meeting
    during which collaborations previously known only by participating organizations were widely shared. The
    Community College of Southern Nevada and UNLV were both able to present their long-standing collabo-
    rations with Las Vegas grantees (both eOB and CdI), linking HS teachers to degrees. UNr presented its
    OHS grant-funded program providing support to Spanish- speaking Head Start teachers. a list of strategies
    was generated for use in stimulating discussion between individual grantees and their respective Nevada State
    Higher education (NSHe) eCe degree program.

    The Nevada Head Start association President and the HSSCO director have begun negotiating the pos-
    sible sharing of space which would provide the HS association with some consistent revenue in addition to
    membership dues. The HSSCO would then remain in reno and not move to Carson. Negotiations regarding
    this possibility continue.


    New Hampshire
    ♦ SFI provides specific strategies and methods early childhood programs can utilize to enhance family
      engagement including attending to healthy marriage, fatherhood, and community partnerships. One of
      the ten exemplar Programs is a faith-based shelter for homeless families, and three of the ten are based in
      rural communities where formal family assistance resources are scarce.

    ♦ The Collaboration administrator works with the Family Services administrator at dCYF who admin-
      isters the Family resource Centers throughout NH. These 17 centers provide a wide array of services
      and referral connections to additional services including those listed as the aCF priorities. Collaboration
      between the Collaboration administrator and the Family Services administrator has resulted in better
      coordination between the Family resource Centers and Head Start programs.
                                                                                  AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   359




♦ The Collaboration administrator developed a team including the domestic Violence Prevention Coordi-
  nator, The Child Welfare Staff training administrator, the State Substance abuse Prevention Coordina-
  tor, and a member of the domestic Violence Service Coalition to investigate the potential of bringing
  Safe Families, Safe Homes to New Hampshire. Safe Families, Safe Homes, an intensive training series
  developed specifically for Head Start Family Service and other program staff, was developed at University
  of Southern Maine. It is anticipated that this investigation will be complete in September 2007, and an
  appropriate implementation plan, if one is warranted, will be completed shortly thereafter.


TA Network

♦ The Collaboration administrator teamed with the New england regional Head Start ta Network to
  host a State Cluster Meeting on data analysis in Head Start Program evaluation and Improvement
  Plans. This day-long event, developed and implemented by the ta Network, provided information regard-
  ing use of specific Head Start Program evaluation tools to determine systemic issues that need to be
  improved. Four of the six Head Start programs were represented at the event.

♦ The Collaboration administrator continued to work with the two ta specialists assigned to NH Head
  Start programs on specific SFI initiatives. each enlisted in specific technical assistance projects to enhance
  the capacity of Head Start and child care centers to support families. These projects were completed at the
  end of 2006.

♦ The Collaboration administrator continued to meet quarterly with the two ta specialists. The meetings
  served to clarify roles and expectations, share plans and information, and develop the base for future col-
  laborative efforts.


Professional Development

♦ The Collaboration administrator provided the Head Start PowerPoint presentation to several classes in
  the early Childhood educator programs in institutions of higher education. The presentations sparked
  increased interest in Head Start as a potential employer of newly graduated early childhood educators and
  improved knowledge and understanding regarding Head Start Program Performance Standards.

♦ The Collaboration administrator also provided mentorship through the eeIN Mentorship program for a
  group of 12 professionals including Head Start, child care, early childhood mental health, and early inter-
  vention staff on how programs can plan and implement SFI.

♦ The Collaboration administrator provided in-service training for early intervention providers and child
  care professionals on the topic of building relationships with families in early childhood programs.


Legislation

The Collaboration administrator regularly reviewed legislative issues with the director of dCYF.


Head Start Association

The Collaboration administrator attended the monthly meetings of the Head Start directors association
and the Head Start-State Parent advisory Council. The Collaboration administrator engaged both groups
in ongoing planning and feedback regarding collaboration activities.
360 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    New Jersey
    The regional Office invited State Head Start association Presidents, and State Collaboration directors to
    discuss current issues facing their states, and the regional Office discussed their priorities and how to incor-
    porate these strategies in each state.


    New Mexico
    ♦ The Collaboration Office provided information and follow-up support for a Healthy Marriage grant op-
      portunity for grantees, which was actually funded for a state grantee.

    ♦ Maintained communication through e-mails, phone calls, and meetings with the t/ ta assigned to the
      Collaboration Office.

    ♦    attended an early Childhood Higher education retreat to discuss and begin revising course work,
        including special education.


    New York
    Career and Professional Development

    Earlychildhood.org—The Collaboration Project continues to maintain and improve www.earlychildhood.org.
    This Web site provides a one-stop location for information on early childhood career development. This year
    significant changes were made to the Web site to make it more accessible to individuals with disabilities and
    to add new sections to provide information on: the Family development Credential, the trainers’ Credential,
    the Family Child Care Credential, and on model community-based activities to improve the quality of early
    childhood services and career development opportunities. In addition, the “Comparison of early Childhood
    Program Standards” was updated to include new Head Start transportation regulations and new NYSaeYC
    Program accreditation Standards. In the fall of 2007, a new database of registered and credentialed trainers
    will be added.

    Trainers’ Credential—New York State has taken several steps (i.e., educational Incentive Program, New York
    State association for the education of Young Children’s credentialing programs) to emphasize college credit
    bearing coursework and credentialing programs as the preferred forms for early care and education career and
    professional development. However, there remains a significant role for non-college based training in both
    program quality improvement and individual provider’s professional development. In response to this need, a
    wide array of training opportunities has been developed.

    Unfortunately, the quality of these training opportunities varies as much as the type of training available. This
    forces programs and individual providers to struggle with determining what training program and which
    trainer will meet their needs. too often the training chosen is of poor quality and valuable resources are mis-
    spent. to help programs and providers identify quality training opportunities, work has begun, under the
    auspices of the NYS Head Start Collaboration Project, to establish a trainers’ credential and registry.

    The New York State trainers’ Credential is a competency-based program for people providing training in
    early care and education. The credential program will validate the trainer’s education and experience with chil-
    dren and/or families or in a specialized content area and evaluate the trainer’s competence in preparing and
    implementing professional development experiences that result in increased knowledge, improved professional
    practice, and eventually in higher quality programs for children and families. It is a voluntary, competency-
    based credential that is divided into three levels to accommodate trainers with varying levels of education,
                                                                                   AnnuAl StAte PROfIleS            |   361




expertise and training experience. The trainers’ registry will make it easier for individuals and organizations
seeking program and professional development training to locate trainers with the education, experience, and
expertise needed to provide high quality training.

Community Action Agencies—The Head Start Collaboration director works closely with the director of the
division of Community Services who oversees the Community Services Block Grant. This included pre-
senting information on Collaboration Project activities at meetings of the Community Service Block Grant
advisory Board and the regional office staff of the NYS division of Community Services.

Head Start Association—The Collaboration Project director works closely with the members of the NYS
Head Start association. This includes frequent communication with the association executive Committee
and attending state and regional meetings of the association. The Collaboration project has developed and
maintains an e-mail list of all Head Start program directors in the State and others and uses that list to pro-
vide information on project activities, state programs and policy changes, and funding information.


North Carolina
The HSSCO’s support of the national priorities in collaboration with many of the entities named above is
embedded in the previous sections of this report and described at length. absent from the previous narrative
is the Office’s collaboration with Community action agencies (Caa). The HSSCO has continued its work
with Caas through the unified planning grant. The HSSCO has contributed to the joint planning of Head
Start programs and Caas, resulting in the development of training on leadership for Head Start and Caa
staff; a brochure outlining the characteristics of the two groups; and the beginnings of a revised strategic plan
encompassing objectives from both groups.

The HSSCO in North Carolina experienced a transition during 2006. For several months in that year, the
position was vacant as the Office was being transferred from the division of Child development to the Office
of School readiness. In the interim, the work of the HSSCO was carried forward by the executive director
and assistant director of the Office of School readiness. a great deal of collaboration and coordination with
the regional and national offices occurred during this time to ensure that the priority areas for the HSSCO
were properly addressed. This also included attending conferences and meetings and participating in confer-
ence calls.


North Dakota
Fatherhood
The HSSCO contracted with the North dakota State University extension Service with dr. Sean Brotherson
to conduct a statewide (inclusive of tribal programs) survey, to collect data, and to write a report addressing
Father Friendly assessments of Head Start and early Head Start programs and staff.

Healthy Marriage
This initiative has been included in the North dakota Fatherhood Initiative through the services provided
through North dakota State University extension Service Parenting education Centers across the State.

Rural Health Network Initiatives
The HSSCO administrator provided leadership, as a state-level stakeholder during the rural Health Net-
work Initiative meeting. The rural Health Network is a collaborative organization formed to integrate sys-
362 |   Head Start State Collaboration Offices




    tems of care and strengthen the rural health care delivery system across the state. The purpose of the network
    is to: achieve efficiencies; expand access to, coordinate, and improve quality of services; strengthen rural health
    care system; and do together what is difficult alone. regional focus groups for the rural Health Network are
    scheduled, and the North dakota Head Start association portfolio holder for rural health has been invited to
    attend, as have tribal Head Start directors.

    State Head Start Association
    The HSSCO administrator has attended and provided reports to the North dakota Head Start association,
    the Northern Plains Native american Head Start directors association, and the region VIII Head Start
    directors meetings.

    Community Action Agencies
    The Caas are represented as stakeholders on the Healthy Nd early Childhood alliance.

    Professional Development
    The HSSCO provided funding ($5,000) for the initial installment of the eventsPro software for the CCr&r
    to implement the Professional development system. The eventsPro software will include: manage train-
    ing data, maintain a Web-based training registration providers and trainers, provide training opportunities
    to meet licensing requirements through Web-based coursework, provide linkages with systems that provide
    on-line classroom training, and allow providers to access their own training records. also, under Professional
    development—The HSSCO contracted with the North dakota State University data Center to facilitate the
    collection, preparation, and dissemination of the 2006 North dakota Head Start and early H