Spinal Column (PowerPoint download) by jennyyingdi

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									Spinal Column
   Myotomes/Dermatomes
Myotomes- movement
Dermatomes- sensory
              Myotomes
C3,4,5   Shoulder Elevation

C5       Shoulder Abduction

C6       Elbow Flexion

C7       Elbow Extension

C8       Finger Flexion

T1       Finger Abduction
         Myotomes
L1,2,3   Hip Flexion

S1       Hip Extension
         Eversion
S1,2     Plantar flexion
L2,3,4   Hip Adductors
L4       Dorsiflexion/inversion
L5       Hip Abductors
         Great toe dorsiflexion
        Injuries/Conditions
Scoliosis
Spondylolysis
Spondylolysthesis
Pinched nerve
Stinger
Sciatica
Bulging disc
Paraplegia
Quadraplegia
                Scoliosis
Curvature of the spine
            Spondylolysis
Stress Fracture of
vertebrae.
          Spondylolisthesis
Fracture that also has
some slippage of the
vertebrae.
              Causes
Both spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis
are most common in football linemen and
gymnasts. These two sports involve
weight-loading, rotation, and
hyperextension (back-arching).
            Symptoms
Generally, the athlete will have pain
across the low back that may radiate down
to the buttocks. The muscles of the low
back will be in spasm, giving a flat
appearance to the normally curved lower
back.
Cervical Spine injury causes
Falls or collisions
Sudden twisting of the neck
C-Spine injury
C-Spine injury
 Symptoms of C-spine injury
Pain, usually a pinpoint spot.
Tingling in both arms and/or legs.
Decreased feeling in arms and/or legs.
Muscle weakness in arms and/or legs.
         Pinched Nerve
Occurs by pressure being put on a nerve.
Either by a bone, disc, or swelling.
        Signs/Symptoms
Muscle weakness
Tingling or numbness
Pain
              Sciatica
A protruding disk in your lower spinal
column pressing on the roots to your
sciatic nerve.
 Pain in your lower back or hip that
radiates down from your buttock to the
back of one thigh and into your leg.
              Sciatica
You may also feel weakness, "pins and
needles" numbness, or a burning or
tingling sensation down your leg.
You're most likely to get sciatica when
you're 30-50 years old.
              Stingers
The brachial plexus is an arrangement of
nerve fibers running from the spine (C5-
T1), through the neck, the armpit region,
and into the arm.
The nerves in the neck and shoulder are
over-stretched as the head is forced
sideways away from the shoulder.
         Signs/Symptoms
The athlete will experience sudden and severe
painful, stinging sensations in 1 of his arms
frequently lasting from seconds to minutes,
occasionally hours and less frequently days or
longer.
There is often associated weakness of the
muscles in the shoulder and arm that are
supplied by the injured nerve. The arm
symptoms are usually more severe than neck
pain.
         Signs/Symptoms
First time stingers will usually recover
quickly even without treatment, but there is
a greater risk of recurrent injury if left
untreated. Each additional stinger will
likely result in continued neurologic
impairment including muscle weakness.
          Herniated disc
Approximately 90% of disc herniations will
occur at L4- L5 or L5- S1.
Due to overuse, a disc may weaken and
the gel substance puts pressure on the
nerve.
             Parapalegic
Paraplegia is a condition in which the
lower part of a person's body is paralyzed
and cannot function.
It is usually the result of spinal cord injury.
           Quadraplegic
Quadriplegia is a symptom in which a
human experiences paralysis of all four
limbs, although not necessarily total
paralysis.
               Evaluation
History
Observation
Palpation
Stress Tests
               History
Athlete could walk into Training Room.
Athlete could be down on the field/court!
               History
Athlete walks into Training Room.
                History
Athlete down on field
Do not move this athlete until you
determine it is safe to do so.
Do not take off any equipment until you
determine it is safe to do so.
If you suspect a cervical spine injury,
make sure head is stabilized at all times!
C-Spine injury
           Observation
Deformity
Alignment
Posture/positions
Signs of trauma
Motionlessness
              Palpation
Very carefully
Palpate for pain over vertebrae.
Check for sensation
Check for movement
           Stress Tests
Active Range of Motion
Resistive motions
       Spine board video
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhQDm
60_Pxc



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6bi__R
FpypE&feature=related

								
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