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					MESOAMERICAN BIOLOGICAL CORRIDORS
            PROJECT



       NATIONAL REPORT FOR


              BELIZE

            DECEMBER 2000
FINAL REPORT OF THE MESO AMERICAN BIOLOGICAL CORRIDORS
                        PROJECT


                         Prepared by

               The Wilderness Group Consulting
                       Evaristo Avella
                        Allan Herrera
                         Dr. Ed Boles

            Technical Advice: Mr. Rafael Manzanero

                     November 23, 2000
                                 BACKGROUND

INTRODUCTION


Several precursory steps took place prior to today’s initial phases of Belize’s
Mesoamerican Biological Corridors Project. Belize signed the Convention on
Biological Diversity on June 13, 1992 in Rio de Janeiro Brazil and ratified it on
December 1993. This was followed by the formation of an interim National
Biodiversity Committee in 1995 (Jacobs et. al, 1998). The Belize National
Protected Areas System Plan, prepared by the NARMAP Project in 1995, was a
comprehensive report outlining protected areas guidance, management
objectives, managerial structure, resource requirements, gaps, needs and the
general integration and improvement of the National Protected Areas System of
Belize.

In July 1996, The Belize National Report on The Mesoamerican Biological
Corridors Project was Prepared, with the Belize Country Feasibility Study
following in November 1996. In January 1998, the Government of Belize
submitted its first Interim Report to the Convention on Biological Diversity.

Belize has signed several important agreements on Biodiversity at the regional
level. In 1992, Belize signed the Central American Agreement on Biodiversity,
and the Alliance for Sustainable Development (Alides) in 1994. Belize is also
party to the CITES Convention (1981), RAMSAR (1989) and The International
Convention for the Regulation of Whaling (1982).

In 1998 Belize completed the Belize Biodiversity Strategy and Belize Biodiversity
Action Plan, under the guidance of the National Biodiversity Committee, Ministry
of Natural Resources and The Environment.

In 1999, Belize formed its Technical Advisory Committee whose main aim was
the guidance of the Programme for the Consolidation of the Mesoamerican
Biological Corridor (Project RLA/97/G31). The Participative Planning Process of
the MBC includes the characterization of Biological Corridors Project within the
two priority areas for Belize: (i) The Selva Maya and (ii) the Gulf of Honduras
priority areas. This is facilitated through the establishment of Belize’s country
Office for the Mesoamerican Biological Corridors project and the selection of its
Liaisons Officer.

In October 2000, the selection of the National Consultancy Team was conducted
with the objective of assisting in the Participative Planning Processes for Belize.
PURPOSE

The Mesoamerican Biological Corridor (MBC) is an important initiative within the
context of the Central American Integration System aimed at the conservation of
the biological diversity of the region. This program seeks to provide technical
assistance that will allow the Governments of the Mesoamerican Region as well
as Civil Society to actively participate in the establishment of the MBC as a
system that integrates, conserves and utilizes biodiversity within a framework of
the priorities of economic, social and sustainable development of the region.

One of the most important objectives of this project is to develop strategic action
plans of the MBC in all its member countries. This process will involve
consultation with all stakeholders in order to assist in defining the thematic and
geographic priority areas of Belize. It is expected that alliances and partnerships
will be formed as a part of this process, which will enhance the consolidation of
the MBC.


The Concept of Biological Corridors

         The Mesoamerican Biological Corridors (MBC) is: “An organized and
         consolidated Land Use System, comprised of natural areas under special
         management regimes (multiple use buffer zones and interconnectivity
         areas), that yield a number of benefits and environmental services to the
         Central American and world community; facilitating social consciousness
         in order to promote the investment in the conservation and sustainable
         use of the natural resources and biodiversity, with the objective of
         contributing to the improvement of the quality of life of the inhabitants of
         the region.” (From Mesoamerican Biological Corridors Project Proposal,
         1997).

Goals:

The MBC is a long-term project (20-40 years) aimed at conserving the region’s
biodiversity and to promote its use in a sustainable manner by the people for
their own benefit. The establishment of corridors will facilitate links for the free
movement of species of plants and animals, a natural requirement for the
survival of species. A biological corridor is established by voluntary type of
actions that will lead to the achievement of a balance between economic and
environmental benefits. These links can be between protected areas and
between private properties. These corridors are also established for the sake of
connectivity and representation of the resident species of plants and animals.
Public participation is an integral part of the planning and design of biological
corridors since people depend and use the natural resources to support
themselves.
General Objective:

The general objectives of the Participative Planning Process is to coordinate and
facilitate a process of wide participation in a series of local and national
workshops with the different stakeholders in the areas of the MBC, through which
the priority areas of the MBC are to be identified as well as the prioritization of
actions in these areas and how to consolidate the MBC, in order to begin the
preparation of the Regional Strategic Plans of the MBC.

Specific Objectives:

   1. Based on the initial proposal on the MBC in each country, analyze and
      agree at the national level on the strategic vision and concept of the
      Mesoamerican Biological Corridor.

   2. Analyze and agree on the various modalities of corridors to be
      implemented in each country, taking into consideration the criteria as
      defined by the MBC.

   3. Identify and define geographically the priority areas of the MBC at the
      national level.

   4. Characterize the priority area in each country, from the ecological, social,
      economic and institutional perspective.

   5. Identify pilot sites for the monitoring of protected areas and corridor
      formation or consolidation processes within the priority areas in Belize.



Principal Assumptions for the Process:

      1. The MBC has identified Priority Areas at the regional level. These
         priority areas are made up of protected areas, corridors or connectors
         between them and multiple use zones. Each country can have one or
         more priority areas, depending on the connections between trans-
         boundary areas.

      2. This planning process is based on the adoption of a common
         conceptual framework in the entire region, thus facilitating the analysis
         and prioritization based on principles and criteria for the design of
         biological corridors. In each country efforts made in the past defined
         the starting point for the analysis, which this process pursues to
         develop. That starting point identified a network of biological corridors.
           3. Since the purpose of this process is to have a Regional Strategic Plan,
              initial work in each country will concentrate on the Regional Priority
              Areas; Selva Maya (west and Norwest) and Gulf of Honduras in the
              case of Belize.


                 II.    SUMMARY OF THE NATIONAL MBC PROPOSAL

2.1        General Ecological Context


Belize is located on the Southeastern edge of the Yucatan Peninsula, being
bordered to the North by Mexico, to the South and west by Guatemala and to the
East by the Caribbean Sea. Belize is located between 15° 52´ 9" and 18° 29' 55"
North latitude and 87° 28" and 89° 13' 67" West Longitude. Belize has 8,867
square miles including 266 square miles of islands. Geographically and
politically, Belize comprises a part of the Central American mainland as well as of
the Caribbean Basin (Figure 1.0).

Belize is divided into six political districts, each with a town as its capital. The
Capital of Belize, Belmopan, is located in the geographical center of the country,
having been designated the new capital (before the official capital was Belize
City) after the passing of Hurricane Hattie in 1961.

Stopped

Most of Belize consists of limestone karst topography. The land consists chiefly
of flat or gently undulating terrain, to the North, with higher elevations to the
South and West. The Maya Mountain Massif is the dominant feature of the
inland region. The remaining north and south of the country consists of low-lying
plains, a large percent of which consists of coastal plains. Belize’s coast is the
site for most of the Belize Barrier Reef System, also known regionally as the
“Gran Arecife Maya”.

Nine land regions have been distinguished based on their topography,
vegetation, soils and habitats, as follows:

      1.      The upland massif of the Maya Mountain Land System. This includes
              the Maya Mountains, and the Mountain Pine Ridge. The geology of
              Maya Mountain Massif consists of a Carboniferous and Permian
              metasidements with granite intrusions. The soil type consists of steep
              slopes and shallow soils, which are leached, acidic in nature, of poor
              agricultural value and relatively abundant in biodiversity.

      2.      A soil type governed by its geology characterizes the five Hills Land
              Regions. The landscape in this region is hilly, with thick beds of
     cretaceous limestones (King and others, 1992).       The five Hills Land
     Regions are as follows (Figure 2):

     (i)     Bravo Hills. This region is located in the northwest of the
             country.
     (ii)    Central Foothills. This region is located in the northern flank of
             the Maya Mountain Massif.
     (iii)   Western Foothills. The Western Foothills comprise the Vaca
             Plateau and the Chiquibul National Park.
     (iv)    Eastern Foothills. This region overlooks the coastal plain.
     (v)     Southern Foothill. This region is located in Northwestern Toledo
             District.

3.   The coastal plains comprise the three coastal plains land system
     identified by King et al (1993). These are:

     (i)     Northern Coastal Plain.
     (ii)    Central Coastal Plain.
     (iii)   Southern Coastal Plain.
Figure 1: Location Map of Belize.
2.2    Socio-Economic Activity

The population of Belize is 240,204 (CSO 2000). This represents an inter-censal
growth rate of 2.7% since the last census in 1991. The Belize District has the
largest population with 28%, the Cayo District 22%, Orange Walk has 16%,
Corozal has 14%, Stann Creek has 10.3% and the Toledo District has 9.7%.
Belize has a larger rural population (52%) than urban (48%) who live in towns
and the Cities of Belmopan and Belize.

The priority area of Selva Maya, found mostly in the Orange Walk and Cayo
Districts comprise 38% of the total population, while the Port Honduras area
found in the Toledo District, comprises 9.7% of the population. The Selva Maya
Priority area of Belize comprises a total of 46,365 males (19.3% of the total
national Population), and 45,089 females (18.8% of the total national population).
The Port Honduras area (Toledo District) consists of 11,722 males (4.9% of the
total national population) and 11,575 females (4.8% of the total national
population).

The Belizean economy is heavily dependent on external trade. Belize is a
developing country with a human development index of 0.806 in 1995. The per
capita GDP in 1998 was $2,307 US. The unemployment rate is 12.8% in 1999, a
decline from 14.3% in 1998 (CSO, 2000).

In 1998, the Agriculture Industry was reported as accounting for 15.2% of
Belize’s Gross Domestic Product (National Human Development Report, 1998).
Agriculture products were also responsible for more than 84% of all domestic
export earnings and for more than 25% of all jobs (National Human Development
Report, 1998). Therefore, these facts indicate that agriculture was the most
important sector of Belize at that time.

The Cayo and Orange Walk Districts are dependent on tourism and agriculture.
Tourism visitors to the Cayo District are attracted for its scenic views, rainforest
cover and archaeological sites, while the Orange Walk District is visited for the
archaeological site at Lamanai and the eco-activities at La Milpa, Programme for
Belize. Agriculture still remains the most important economic sector of both
these districts, however. The Cayo and Orange Walk Districts are considered an
important agricultural District. Most of the agricultural production in the Cayo
District takes place in the fertile soils of the Belize River Valley, the Belize River
being the largest watershed in Belize, while the Orange Walk District agriculture
is practiced throughout the rural plains. Principal agricultural activity of the Cayo
and Orange Walk Districts include beef cattle industry, swine and poultry rearing,
citrus production, maize and bean production, and vegetable and fruit production,
and dairy, beef and pork rearing. The Orange Walk District is known for the
extensive production of sugar cane.

In the Toledo District (the Port Honduras Area), the economic activities are
dependent on tourism at archaeological sites, and cultural Mayan villages, as
well as marine tourism activities including diving etc. Agriculture production in
this district consists of milpa (slash and burn) farming, to produce mainly corn,
and beans and rice as a cash crop (MAFC Agriculture/Fisheries/ Cooperative
Sector Policy, 1999).

2.3   Biological Diversity Issues

According to the Belize Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan, 1998, Belize has
high habitat diversity as those of Mesoamerican countries. Most terrestrial plant
species are found in northern Central America and also have distribution in the
warmer Americas. However, the restriction of distribution of habitats has a
characteristic biogeographical affinity, which includes the ranges of the
Caribbean/Yucatec range, Atlantic Northern Central American range and the
Greater Peten Range (NBSAP, 1998, pp.5).

2.4   The National Protected Areas Systems.


3.0   METHODOLOGICAL FRAMEWORK


3.1   Introduction

The consulting team was provided with a methodological framework by which it
was to guide itself during the preparation of the activities in connection to the
preparation of the participatory planning process of the MBC.                This
methodological framework provided by the ROCU was intended not only to assist
the consulting team in maintaining a standard, regional approach but was also
intended in facilitating the delivery of a sound final product.

3.2   Objectives of the Process

The following are the principal objectives that guided the planning process of this
stage of the MBC.

1.    Based on the initial proposal on the MBC in each country, analyze and
      agree at the national level on the strategic vision and concept of the
      Mesoamerican Biological Corridor.

2.    Analyze and agree on the various modalities of corridors to be
      implemented in each country, taking into consideration the criteria as
      defined by the MBC.

3.    Identify and define geographically the priority areas of the MBC at the
      national level.
4.       Characterize the priority area in each country, from the ecological, social,
         economic and institutional perspective.

5.       Identify pilot sites for the monitoring of protected areas and corridor
         formation or consolidation processes within the priority areas in Belize.

3.3      Principal Activities

The principal activities that were identified by the ROCU are as follows:

      1. Carry out a series of local and national workshops that will involve the
         various national stakeholder groups (NGOs, specialists, institutions,
         projects, commissions, etc) in order to analyze the priorities and define the
         priority areas in Belize.

2.       Classify and define the modalities or types of corridors in each priory area.

4.       Prepare maps of the priority areas, delineating and defining corridors
         (scale 1:250,000, except in special cases where a higher scale may be
         necessary). The main input for this map will be the latest vegetation or
         land use maps in each country.

5.       Characterize the priority areas, using an information sheet for each site
         within the priority area (an information sheet for corridors, one for
         protected area and another general one for the priority area).

6.       While collecting information for the priority areas, emphasis will be placed
         on segregating the information based on gender, especially information
         related to access to natural resources.

7.       Identify sites with potential of becoming pilot sites or focal points within
         priority areas. This will be based on the gathered information, as well as
         on the dynamics of the stakeholders of the area.

8.       Prepare a Final Report based on the proposed Table of Contents Format
         contained in the annexes. The outputs will be a national document and
         other separate documents for each priority area.

3.3      The following assumptions were considered during the implementation of the
         process:

         (i) The MBC has identified Priority Areas at the regional level. These
             priority areas are made up of protected areas, its corridors or
             connectors between them and multiple use zones. Each country can
             have one or more priority areas, depending on the connections
          between trans-boundary areas. Belize has two priority areas: The
          Selva Maya Area and the Port Honduras (Gulf of Honduras Area).

      (ii) This planning process is based on the adoption of a common
           conceptual framework in the entire region, thus facilitating the analysis
           and prioritization based on principles and criteria for the design of
           biological corridors. In each country efforts were made in the past and
           which define the starting point for the analysis, which this process
           pursues to develop. That starting point identified a network of biological
           corridors.

      (iii) Since the purpose of this process is to have a Regional Strategic Plan,
            initial work in each country will concentrate on the Regional Priority
            Areas; Selva Maya (west and Norwest) and Gulf of Honduras in the
            case of Belize.

      (iv) This planning process serves as a promoter or catalyzing agent for
           institutional strengthening of the national programs of the MBNCV in
           each country.

      (vii)    For the implementation of activities, a national (workshops,
               meetings and data gathering) the national consultant will report to
               the NLO-MBCP. This person will be responsible to collect
               information and summarize it and fill the information sheet for each
               national priority area, as well as consolidate it into a national report.

      (viii)   The process in the countries will be supervised by the ROCU, by its
               participation in workshops or meetings in all countries through its
               various specialists or the Regional Director. In order to monitor and
               assess methodologically the process, the ROCU will contract a
               regional consultant who will tie all ends and consolidate a regional
               report.


3.4   METHODOLOGY OF THE PROCESS

3.4.1 COORDINATION & SUPERVISION

      The overall regional coordination of the participative planning process will be
      conducted by the ROCU. The local coordination is to be conducted by
      coordinating committee comprised of members from the Technical Advisory
      Committee (TAC) and the National Selecting Committee (NLC) as well as the
      National Liaisons Officer (NLO). In order to coordinate this process in all 8
      countries, a timetable has been prepared for supervision by the NLO.
   The ROCU Specialist on Natural Resource Management and Protected Areas
   conducted the preparation of the TOR for the local consultants. The TOR was
   reviewed and agreed on by the NLOs of each country. Contracting the consulting
   team and review of administrative issues was coordinated between the ROCU and
   UNDP-Belize and UNDP-ELS. For the purpose of the supervision and
   coordination of the consultants’ work, selecting some members of the NSC and
   TAC of the MBC-Belize formed an Ad-hoc Committee. Implementation of
   activities and monitoring of the process was conducted by the NLO and ROCU, in
   order to guarantee the achievement of the final outputs and products, which are
   detailed below:


                   (i)     1 NATIONAL REPORT,
                   (ii)    1 FINAL REPORT ON EACH NATIONAL PRIORITY
                           AREA,
                   (iii)   MAPS OF NATIONAL PRIORITY AREAS WITH
                           PROPOSAL OF CORRIDORS,
                   (iv)    AIDE MEMOIRE/PROCEDINGS OF WORKSHOPS
                           AND MEETINGS,
                   (v)     BASIC CHARACTERIZATION OF PRIORITY
                           AREAS, AND;
                   (vi)    IDENTIFICATION OF A NETWORK OF ALLIANCES
                           WITH LOCAL AND NATIONAL STAKEHOLDERS
                           OF THE MBC.



3.4.2     Time Frame For Consultancy

The consulting team from the Wilderness Group Consulting, were notified
officially of their selection for the services of methodologist/facilitator of the
participate planning processes on the 28th of September 2000. The Team
Leader signed a contract on the 29th of September 2000. The work was
expected to be completed by November 30th, 2000, with the consultants being
available for comments and inputs during the first week of December of the
same year. However, the time frame for the completion of the final report was
delayed for two reasons: delays due to problems associated with the passing
of Hurricane Keith in Early October, and regional delays from decisions made
that would I effect change final delivery dates. At a regional meeting, it was
decided that the time for completion of the final report was to be extended. In
particular, the National Consultation workshop would now be held in January
instead of late November.

As soon as this decision was passed on to the consulting team, the
adjustments were made. The new date for the national consultation
workshop was then set for January 10th, 2001, and the date for final
   document submission was set for January 21st, 2001.

   During the period of data gathering, meetings, site visits to offices, and
   literature searches were conducted in various parts of the country. It is
   recognized that in Belize the availability of data is not straightforward. Data is
   available at the head quarters of various agencies, institutions and
   individuals, but it must either be photocopied or borrowed for use. The
   availability of information, especially those that are available in electronic form
   is a particular problem due to software compatibility, the agency or person’s
   lack of willingness to distribute information, and the relative size of information
   that cannot be readily stored in 3.4 mb diskettes (the use of cds are not
   common in all offices).

3.4.3 Identification of Participants.

   In Belize, the identification of stakeholders is relatively straightforward.
   Agencies, Institutions and individuals involved in the environmental processes
   have already established, for the most part, initial contact with a wide variety
   of stakeholders. For example, the local initiatives of the Northern Corridor
   being conducted by Programme for Belize, has an established list of
   participants who are always willing to participate at the planning processes.
   Whenever this list is made available, additional stakeholders are included in
   order to ensure greater participation.

   The identification of local and national stakeholders was done by firstly
   preparing a list of all potential contributors in the planning process, preparing
   a list of participants for local workshops, and preparing a list of bibliography
   and individuals, institutions and agencies who may have available copies of
   the documents. At all stages, the identification of the stakeholders and the
   final preparation of stakeholder lists was verified in consultation with the NLO,
   whose extensive experience in the field facilitated the process.

   As part of the list of tasks for the participatory process, a series of three (3)
   local workshops and one national workshop was planned. The workshops
   were to be held one each for the Northern region, one for the central region
   and one for the southern region, and finally a national workshop to be held in
   Belmopan. A separate list of stakeholders was prepared for each region, as
   well as for the national workshop. For complete list of those invited and
   consulted, see Appendix C.


   3.4.4     Workshop Organization

   Initially, three local workshops were planned. However, the first workshop
   planned for the northern region was poorly attended with only eight (8)
   participants attending. This is the region that experienced the greatest impact
   on the mainland due to the passing of Keith, and the logistical arrangements
   such as communication and transportation was being complicated at this
   time, due to the fact that the area was still in a state of recovery. However,
   the consulting team decided that it was very important to include a greater
   number of participants at consultation meetings. For this reason, two
   additional meetings for the northern region were held in combination with
   personnel from the NLO’s office.

   A separate meeting was then held in Orange Walk Town, which resulted in
   greater participation, and one at the Village of Blue Creek, Orange Walk
   District. In addition, a further presentation was made by one of the team
   members at a training forum in the Cayo District. This totaled the number of
   local meetings to six (6) instead of the original three (3) in addition to the
   national workshop.

   The main items in the agenda for workshop organization were as follows:

   (i)      Welcome & Introduction by team member,
   (ii)     Objectives & Purpose of workshop by team member,
   (iii)    The concept of the MBC, by team member,
   (iv)     The regional perspective by the NLO,
   (v)      Presentation of initial findings & data sheets
   (vi)     Presentation of proposed corridor routes
   (vii)    Presentation by participating agencies on their activities
   (viii)   Resolutions and conclusions.

   However, it should be noted that the additional three (3) meetings were
   conducted by a presentation format followed by a plenary session.

3.4.5 Report Development & Preparation

   The consulting team included four principal experts, each with his own
   capabilities, experiences and field of expertise. As a result, each had
   extensive knowledge of a different region of the country, and hence of a
   different corridor route that was being proposed. Therefore, the principal
   team members were assigned the collection of data pertaining to the region
   he was familiar with. This facilitated logistical arrangements required for
   contact with individuals and organizations, and facilitated the knowledge of
   what literature was available and where. It also assisted greatly due to the
   fact that team members had first hand experience of the region he had
   worked with before.

   After initial gathering of a list of reports in the form of a bibliography,
   individuals or agencies possessing or having the reports available were
   contacted, interviewed or visited for the collection of data. Data was
   compared and entry of information into the sheets provided for each individual
      protected area was begun.

      Information was provided by several agencies included the following: the
      Land Information Center (LIC), the Belize Audubon Society (BAS) data base,
      the Programme for Belize Publications, The Southern Regional Development
      Project, formerly ESTAP (SRDP), CARD, The Department of Environment’s
      Library and others.

      The gathering of data was then followed by the entry of data in the sheets for
      the purpose of characterization of protected areas, followed by compilation of
      data for proposed corridor routes, followed by the entry of data and report
      preparation for the two priority areas (Selva Maya & Gulf of Honduras).

      The preparation of maps was done by the LIC, in consultation with the NLO
      and the consulting team.

      The preparation of the final report was commenced, with final inputs obtained
      from the national workshop as well as the local workshops.


4.0      CURRENT DEFINITION OF THE STRATEGIC NATIONAL MBC
         PROPOSAL.


4.1          Inputs for the Conceptual Discussion

In 1999, Belize formed its Technical Advisory Committee whose main aim was the
guidance of the Programme for the Consolidation of the Mesoamerican Biological
Corridor (Project RLA/97/G31). The Participative Planning Process of the MBC
includes the characterization of Biological Corridors Project within the two priority areas
for Belize: (i) The Selva Maya and (ii) the Gulf of Honduras priority areas. This is
managed and coordinated by Belize’s country Office for the Mesoamerican Biological
Corridors project and facilitated by consultants in the field.

In previous phases of the MBC, the concept of the MBC were often discussed as
an “extension of protected areas”, whereby protected areas will be linked via the
acquisition of private property for conservation purposes. This initial concept has
now been discarded and is no longer considered viable nor expected to meet
with political and social support.

Today’s concept, as defined by the ROCU, takes a totally different approach,
emphasizing the MBC as a community led initiative and community driven
program.

The MBC is a long-term project (20-40 years) aimed at conserving the region’s
biodiversity and to promote its use in a sustainable manner by the people for
their own benefit. The establishment of corridors will facilitate links for the free
movement of species of plants and animals, a natural requirement for the
survival of species. A biological corridor is established by voluntary type of
actions that will lead to the achievement of a balance between economic and
environmental benefits. These links can be between protected areas and
between private properties. These corridors are also established for the sake of
connectivity and respresentation of the resident species of plants and animals.
Public participation is an integral part of the planning and design of biological
corridors since people depend and use the natural resources to support
themselves.


4.2    National Political Support and Institutional Framework.

4.2.1 National Political Support

Belize has signed several important agreements on Biodiversity at the regional
and international levels. The Government of Belize signed the Convention on
Biological Diversity in 1992. In January 1998, the Government of Belize
submitted its first Interim Report to the Convention on Biological Diversity.

In 1992, Belize signed the Central American Agreement on Biodiversity, and the
Alliance for Sustainable Development (Alides) in 1994. Belize is also party to the
CITES Convention (1981), RAMSAR (1989) and The International Convention for the
Regulation of Whaling (1982). In March 2000 Belize declared the Crooked Tree
Wildlife Sanctuary as its first RAMSAR site.

In August of 2000, Belize launched the Mesoamerican Biological Corridors
project as agreed at a regional level.

The institutional framework supporting the protected areas network was described by
Wilson 1995, as “diffuse, spanning three different departments within three different
ministries” (Wilson, 1995). Today, the supporting institutional framework is similar, with
the exception of an important network of NGOs who assist in the management of
protected areas, thereby lending significant support to the management of the protected
areas of Belize.       Other departments and quasi-governmental bodies, both within or
associated with the three "primary" minis-tries or with others, have functions that touch
to a greater or lesser degree upon protected area

4.2.2 Protected Area Policy


 Specific policy aimed at consolidating the management and institutional support for the
 protected areas of Belize is absent. However, the government, in recognition of the lack
 of a clear set of policy on the management and institutional support for protected areas,
 has established the National Protected Areas Policy Committee (NPAPC). This
 committee established in October 1998, and was charged the responsibility of
 formulating and development of a national policy for the management and
 administration of Belize’s National Parks and other protected areas. While the work of
 this committee is not conclusive, its final report is expected soon. The draft policy,
 therefore, becomes the closest policy document on protected areas management.

 One of the mandates given to the NPAPC, was to formulate and develop a
coherent and comprehensive policy for the establishment, management and
administration of National Parks and other protected areas in Belize bearing in
mind that the main purposes of management can be identified as:


1.0   Scientific Research
2.0   Wilderness Protection
3.0   Preservation of species and genetic diversity
4.0   Maintenance of environmental services
5.0   Protection of specific natural and cultural features
6.0   Tourism and recreation
7.0   Education
8.0   Sustainable use of resources from natural ecosystems
9.0   Maintenance of cultural and traditional attributes


 Some of the principal recommendations being considered in this policy document are as
 follows:

      (i)     The establishment of an agency to oversee the management and
              development of protected areas.

      (ii)    The establishment of a National Parks Service under the jurisdiction of the
              agency responsible for overseeing the affairs of protected areas
              management and development. The principal function of the national
              parks service is to consolidate the management of protected areas by
              coordinating efforts between agencies, donors, and institutions and to
              carry out the mandate of the protected areas authority.

      (iii)   The establishment of a clear set of legal framework guiding the
              reservation or de-reservation of protected areas. The idea is that the de-
              reservation of national lands under protected area status should not be
              conducted except if it is for an over riding need of national interest and
              only after adequate public consultation and the required environmental
              and/ or ecological studies have been conducted,

      (iv)    The strengthening of the financial mechanisms, such as user fee, and
              service fees should be conducted in order that resources are available for
              protected areas management,
 Presently, policy is expressed by individual ministries or departments, as specific
 statements and/or explicit in legislation, to address statutory duties. Three government
 departments, the Forest Department, Fisheries Department and Department of
 Archaeology, each within a different Ministry, have direct responsibility for protected
 area designation and management.

 2.2.3 Protected Areas Legislation.

Currently, the laws of Belize allow for a number of protection classification ranging in
Use from recreational use, research and wilderness protection. These measures are,
however, dispersed amongst several agencies, including the NGO community. Co-
management agreements between government and NGOs have been carried out
successfully for years. The Belize Audubon Society, for example, manages several
protected areas including the Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary, the Half Moon Caye
Natural Monument, and others.

There are several legislation governing the establishment and management of protected
areas. These are the Fisheries Act, the National Parks Systems Act and the Ancient
Monuments and Antiquities Act. In addition, Belize has a comprehensive set of laws
pertaining to natural resources management.
   Table 2.0:     Principal Legislation and their Respective Roles in Natural
                  Resources Management.

LEGISLATION             IMPLEMENTING            ROLES IN NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT
                        AGENCY
Environmental           Department   of         Provides for the general management of our natural resources &
Protection Act, 1992    Environment             Environment, prudent use of its resources & Pollution Control
                                                - Provides penalties for environmental crimes

Environmental           Department         of   -   Increased the Penalties for violators of Environmental Laws
Protection              Environment
Amendment        Act,
1998
Environmental           Department         of   Makes the EIA process mandatory for all new development.
Impact Assessment       Environment
Regulations, 1995
Pollution               Department         of   Deals with general pollution including noise pollution, air & water
Regulations, 1996       Environment             pollution. Etc.

Effluent Limitations    Department         of   Sets standards for discharge of effluents into the environment by
Regulations, 1995       Environment             industry.

Public Health Act,      Public       Health     Regulates the service industry and sets public health standards
1971                    Department
Wildlife  Protection    Forestry Department     An act to provide for the conservation, restoration &
Act, 1981                                       development of wildlife, for the regulation of its use, controls
                                                hunting etc.
National       Parks    Forestry Department     An act for the preservation & protection of highly important
Systems Act, 1981                               natural & cultural features
                                                - Regulation of scientific, educational & recreational use of
                                                    Protected Areas
                                                - “National Park System” includes all national parks, nature
                                                    reserves, wildlife sanctuaries and natural monuments
National Monuments      Archaeology             Protection of National Monuments & Antiquities
& Antiquities Act,      Department
1972,
Revised 1980
Fisheries Act, 1948     Fisheries               Regulates the fishing industry
                        Department              - Declares a marine protected area via a Statutory Instrument.

Protected       Areas   PACT Office             Collects PACT      Fee    directed   towards    Protected    areas
Conservation    Trust                           management
Act, 1995
Coastal         Zone    Coastal        Zone     -   Wide provisions for recommending zoning & development in
Management       Act,   Management                  the coastal zone,
1998                    Authority               -   Monitoring & scientific research in the coastal zone

Land Utilization Act,   Land      Utilization   Regulates the use and distribution of land
1992                    Authority
Forest Act, 1960:

The Forest Policy, of Belize is implemented through the Forest Act, 1990, and
allows for the establishment of Forest Reserves on national lands. The purpose
of the reserves is to ensure an adequate and increasing supply of timber and
other forest products for economic purposes. Nature conservation, tourism and
environmental protection are also of recognized concern. De-reservation should
only occur "as a result of over-riding public necessity" and is executed by Order
published in the gazette. The Forest Reserves are the only terrestrial reserves
allowing controlled extractive use.

National Park Systems Act, 1981:

The National Park Systems Act, 1981, provides for the creation of orthodox protected
areas. Four categories are strictly defined in law:

 Nature Reserve: An area reserved as a scientific reserve for the protection of biological
communities or species and maintenance of natural processes in an undisturbed state.
Permissible activities include scientific study, education and maintenance of genetic
resources. A management plan is required before development of visitor facilities.

National Park: An area for the protection and preservation of natural and scenic values of
national significance and for the benefit and enjoyment of the general public. Permissible
activities are as for a nature reserve, with the addition of, and emphasis upon, tourism and
recreation. Fishing is permissible under special permit.

Wildlife Sanctuary: An area reserved for nature conservation reserve for the protection of
nationally significant species, wildlife habitats and physical features. Management
objectives are similar to those of a National Park.

National Monument: The purpose of a National Monument is to protect and preserve
nationally significant natural features of special interest or unique characteristics, to
provide opportunities for interpretation, education, research and public appreciation.
This designation is designed to cover physical features as against biological values but is
otherwise equivalent (and subject to the same management emphasis) as a national park.

Areas designated under the National Parks Systems Act may only lie on National Land.
No specific provision is made for marine areas but the definition of National Land does
cover the seabed and the designation has been applied to marine areas in Half Moon Caye
National Monument, as it would to the extension of Laughing Bird Caye National Park.
Management may be devolved upon third parties. Fishing permits may be issued in any
protected area established under the Act, except for Nature Reserves.
Fisheries Act, 1977:

The Fisheries Act applies to coastal waters within the Exclusive Economic Zone and can
be extended by Ministerial Order to any inland water. The Marine Reserves, permitted
under the Act through an amendment made in 1983, are established for the specific
purposes of conservation of marine fauna and flora, preservation of fish breeding grounds
and habitat, promotion of scientific study, natural regeneration of aquatic life in areas
where it has been depleted, and enhancement of beauty. The marine reserves may also
incorporate, as appropriate, adjacent areas of land. The Marine Reserves allow for
multiple use. There is an interesting difference in the establishment procedure between
the national park group and the Marine Reserves. In the former case, the area is
designated and then a management plan must be drawn up prior to installation of
infrastructure or visitor facilities. In the latter, the planning and public consultation
procedure is completed prior to reserve establishment.

Ancient Monuments and Antiquities Act, 1981:

This act will be replaced by the National Institute of Culture and History. However, it is
expected that the mandates for the protection and management of ancient monuments and
antiquities will not change.

The main thrust of management within the Archaeological Reserves is towards protection
of, and research into, their cultural values. They therefore differ fundamentally from the
other protected areas although they can be accommodated within them, as with Caracol in
the Chiquibul National Park.


National Lands Act, 1992:


The National Lands Act supercedes the older Crown Lands Ordinance but continues to
provide for the Bird Sanctuaries that were created under it. The terms of designation of
the areas does not provide detail on management provisions. Some of these sites are now
contained within larger designated or prospective conservation areas.

Lands Utilization 1981:

This legislation gives authority to the Minister responsible for Lands, the Minister Of
Natural Resources, to declare Special Development Areas. Within an SDA, which is
subject to Development Plans, use may be restricted to specific purposes. An SDA can
therefore be construed as an instrument for landscape protection and may include
protected areas or zones. The SDA law, however, is considered a weak legislation in
Belize, and its requirements have not been fully enforced.

Other legislation also impinges upon protected areas and environmental issues. The
Maritime Areas Act provides for environmental protection in the Exclusive Economic
Zone and is under the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Statutory responsibility for mineral
exploration and extraction lies with the Minister responsible for mines and minerals
(Minister of Science and Transport) and there are specific response regulations with
regard to environmental protection. The Environmental Protection Act is implemented
by the Minister responsible for the Environment (Minister of Natural Resources,
Environment and Industry).

There is no special legal provision for protected areas on private land. The basis for
management lies in the rights of ownership, modified in certain cases by the terms of
special agreements made with the Government of Belize. The following three sites
illustrate different options that have been employed.


     Rio Bravo Conservation and Management Area (RBCMA): The RBCMA is owned
     managed by a Belizean non-profit company, Programme for Belize (PfB). Under
     terms of a formal Memorandum of Understanding with Government of Belize.

    -. Shipstern Nature Reserve: the Swiss-based International Tropical Conservation
    Foundation (ITCF) owns Shipstern.

     Community Baboon Sanctuary: The basis of Community Baboon Sanctuary
     management lies in voluntary agreements with individual land-owners in a group of
     villages on the Belize River, by which the individuals agree to manage their lands
     under principles that favor conservation purposes, and particularly conserve the
     riparian forest habitat of the black howler monkey.

In addition, other landowners manage their land, in whole or part, as reserves. These are
described and managed as such. This is most commonly the case where the landowner is
involved in educational or tourism activity. Examples include the Bull Run property
(which formerly included the Thousand Foot Falls which was acquired in 2000 for
conservation purposes), Monkey Bay Wildlife Sanctuary, Belize Zoo and Tropical
Education Center, and the newly formed Golden Stream Corridor Preserve. Some of
these areas have considerable conservation and amenity value.


2.2.3.1       Other Important Natural Resources Legislation of Belize



       The Government of Belize has a firm policy towards natural resources
       management and environmental protection. The Government of Belize has
       established laws, regulations, guidelines and standards that govern the rational use
       of its natural resources. These laws and regulations are implemented by
       Government Departments with the assistance of NGOs and local communities.
       Belize has formal and informal agreements with the NGO community for the
       assistance in the management of its natural resources.
       Agencies which do not have legislation empowering to manage protected areas
       but are involved in natural resources management or strengthen the management
       of protected areas include the Department of Environment, The Coastal Zone
       Management Authority & Institute, the Land Utilization Authority, the Geology
       and Petroleum Department, the Public Health Department.

The Environmental Protection Act
      The Belize Environmental Protection Act, (No. 22 of 1992) relates to the
      preservation, protection and improvement of the environment, the rational use of
      our natural resources, and the control of pollution.

Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations
       This regulation was enacted in 1995. It has the clear rules, which governs the
       type and size of development that requires an EIA, and requires the preparation of
       EIAs for activities or projects near, or impacting on, protected areas.

Effluent Limitations Regulations.
       This regulation determines the standards for the discharge of effluents that are
       permissible for several types of industries.

The Land Utilization Act
      The Land Utilization Act (1981) executed by the Ministry of Natural Resources,
      provides for measures to govern the use and development of land, and introduces
      measures for the conservation of land and watersheds.

The National Lands Act (1992)
      According to the National Lands Act, “National Lands” means all lands and sea
      bed, other than reserved forest within the meaning of the Forest Act, including
      cayes and parts thereof not already located or granted, and includes any land
      which has been, or may hereafter become escheated to or otherwise acquired by
      Government of Belize. These lands are classified as town lands, suburban lands,
      rural, including pastoral lands, mineral lands and beach lands. The minister
      responsible is empowered to appoint a National Lands Advisory Committee to
      advise him generally on matters relating to land.

The Mines and Minerals Act
      The extraction of all non-renewable resources except petroleum is regulated by
      the Mines and Minerals Act (1988). The government owns all minerals under
      public and private lands, and, minerals are reserved from all future grants of state
      lands. The act provides for licenses and royalties for the taking of minerals, and
      prohibits the pollution of any river, stream or watercourse.

The Pubic Health Act
      The newly revised Public Health Act authorizes the Ministry of Health, and
      Sports to issue regulations to prevent, control, or reduce contamination of the air,
      soil or water, and prohibits improper disposal of medical or infectious wastes.
The Forests (Protection of Mangroves) Regulations (1989).
      These regulations prohibit any “alteration” of mangroves on any land except with
      a permit. (Alteration means cutting and defoliating, but does not include selective
      trimming.) The proximity of the proposed project to coastal and reef areas known
      to be of outstandingly high ecological value, and existing or proposed plans such
      as barrier reef regional management and development plans are among the factors
      considered in issuing or denying permits for mangrove alteration.

The Coastal Zone Management Act

       The newly established Coastal Zone Management Authority and Institute
       conducts scientific research which is used to provide technical advice,
       recommendation of zoning schemes and the provision of guidelines for
       coastal development within Belize. This agency, while not regulatory in
       nature, is important in its monitoring responsibilities of the marine
       resources.

2.5    Strategic Vision of the MBC

2.5.1 The Government Sector

       Government’s Role in natural resources management is mostly as a policy
       formulation and agent of the legal jurisdiction on matters pertaining to the
       establishment and management of protected areas. The government
       concentrates its efforts mostly towards the management of forest reserves
       where the use of forest products, including timber harvesting, is the
       priority, from the revenue – generating base. Government, however,
       facilitates various instruments that stimulate the improvement for the
       management of protected areas and is the principal agent overseeing the
       MBC.

2.5.2 The Private Sector

       Private sector initiatives, particularly in the tourism industry, have been
       supportive of the initiatives that contribute to the rational use of the
       resources and the conservation of protected areas. This sector falls within
       the types of activities that would become conducive to the development of
       the MBC.

2.5.3 The NGO Community. This sector is critically important to the success of
      the MBC. The NGO community of Belize plays an important catalyst in
      the enhancement of protected area management mechanisms.

2.5.4 The Agriculture Sector. This sector is one of the most important sectors
      requiring greater effort and participation in the development of the MBC.
      Sustainable agriculture activities will be required to assist in the success of
      the MBC.


3.0   Definition and Characterization of the Priority Corridors.

      3.1      The Regional Priority

      The two priority areas that have been defined by the ROCU are the Gulf of
      Honduras area and the Selva Maya, both of tri-national importance and
      linkages. The Selva Maya region (North and West) enjoys linkages with
      the Mayan Biosphere Reserve (Peten, Guatemala), and the Mexico. The
      Gulf Honduras is an area with marine influence between the countries of
      Belize, Guatemala and Honduras.

      3.2      Priority Area at National Level

      3.3      Synthesis of Diagnosis For Selva Maya.

      The Selva Maya is considered a critical corridor since it represents a large
      unbroken area of rainforest.

4.0   Threats and Opportunities.

      4.1      Threats

      The threats to biodiversity have been summarized in the Belize
      Biodiversity Strategy, 1998. It should be pointed out that these threats as
      described in the Belize Biodiversity Strategy are not necessarily threats to
      the MBC. However, it is important to cite these threats, as some pose a
      threat to the successful implementation of the MBC. These are listed as
      follows:

      (i)      Land clearing and agriculture;
      (ii)     Aquaculture,
      (iii)    Tourism,
      (iv)     Dredging and sand mining,
      (v)      Oil spills and bilge disposal,
      (vi)     Inadequate municipal waste disposal,
      (vii)    Over-harvesting and inappropriate harvesting,
      (viii)   Unsustainable fishing practices,
      (ix)     Indiscriminate killings and hunting’s,
      (x)      Poaching,
      (xi)     Introduction of exotic species,
      (xii)    Natural disasters,
      (xiii)   Lack of knowledge on biological resources,
      (xiv)   Lack of appropriate laws, policies and enforcement, and;
      (xv)    Culture consumerism.

      It is important to note that a few of these threats, if managed properly, can
      become an opportunity. An example is the tourism activities and the
      agriculture activities. Eco-tourism, when issues such as carrying capacity,
      zoning and planning are properly addressed, can become sustainable
      form of economic growth for a country. The agriculture sector, using
      techniques that are sustainable, can also replace non-sustainable
      practices such as clear cutting.


4.2       Opportunities


      Belize’s priority area is the Selva Maya (North & West), and Port
      Honduras area. These two areas play a critical role in the development of
      Belize’s sustainable development agenda, as well as its commitments
      towards the fulfillment of its obligations under the international and
      regional agreements.
                                    ANNEX A
                                   BIBLIOGRAPHY



King, R.B., Pratt, J.H., Warner, M.P. and Zisman, S.A., (1993) Agricultural Development
Prospects in Belize. NRI Bulletin 48. Chatham, UK: Natural Resources Institute.

Government of Belize, 1998. The National Biodiversity Strategy.

Government of Belize, 1998. The National Biodiversity Action Plan.

Zisman, Simon. The Directory of Belizean Protected Areas and Sites of Nature
Conservation Interest. Second Edition, Belmopan, 1996.

Government of Belize, Environmental and Social Technical Assistance Project. Regional
Development Plan for Southern Belize. Belmopan, April 2000.

McGill, J.A., Consultancy Report No. 13, Report of the Rural Physical Planner. Special
Development Areas. The Formulation of Development Plans for Monkey River, Burrell
Boom/Hattieville/Ladyville, Manatee, Corozal District East and Cayo District West
SDAs. Belmopan, 1994.

Bird, N.M., The Forest of Northern Columbia River Forest Reserve. The Forest Planning
and Management Project, Ministry of Natural Resources, Belmopan, Belize. Internal
Report Series Volume 4 January to April 1993.

Belize Electricity Limited. Macal River Upstream Storage Facility. Environmental
Impact Assessment Final Report. October 1998.

Natural Resources Institute. Management Plan for Mountain Pine Ridge Forest Reserve.

Programme for Belize. Rio Bravo Conservation and Management Area. Management
Plan, Third Edition, 1996.

Toledo Institute for Development and Environment consultancy for Environmental Social
and Technical Assistance Project. Rapid Assessment of the Deep River, Maya
Mountains, and Swasey Bladen Forest Reserves.

Miller, B.W., and Miller, C.M. Wildlife Conservation Society. National Protected Areas
System Plan Complete Report with Technical Annexes, Volume 3 Zoological Report.

Rogers A.D., Sutton, D.A. Stafford, P.J., Report of the Joint Services Scientific
Expedition to the Upper Raspaculo River, Belize Central America April-June 1993.
Bijleveld C.F.A. The Vegetation of Shipstern Nature Reserve. August 1998.

Belize Audubon Society. Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary Management Plan.

Bladen Consortium, Forest Department. Bladen Nature Reserve Management Plan.1998.
           ANNEX B

MAP OF PROTECTED AREAS OF BELIZE
           ANNEX C
LIST OF STAKEHOLDERS AT WORKSHOPS
         LIST OF PERSONS WHO ATTENDED THE CONSULTATION WORKSHOP IN
                  ORANGE WALK TOWN, HELPAGE CENTER ON 10/11/00


NO.   NAME                ORGANIZAT     POSITIO     ADDRES      TEL.    FAX    E –MAIL
                          ION           N           S           (501)   (501   (Small caps)
                                                                        )
1     Allan Herrera       Wilderness    Consultan
      (Presenter)         Group         t
                          Consulting
2     Evaristo Avella     Wilderness    Consultan   No. 3       09-     09-    Wilderness@btl.n
      (Workshop           Group         t           Linda       22927   2367   et
      Coordinator)        Consultants               Vista St.           1
                                                    Santa
                                                    Elena,
                                                    Cayo
                                                    Dist,

3     Anselmo             MBC           NLO         76          08-     08-    Envicp@btl.net
      Castaneda                                     Orange      22534/  2397   Anselmo.castane
      (Presenter)                                   St.         0149154 6      da@biomeso.net
                                                    Belmopa
                                                    n
                                                    P.O. box
                                                    179
4     Glennis             MBC           Coordinat                              mbcbelize@yaho
      Castellanos                       or                                     o.com
5     Granville Garnett   Maskall
                          Village
6     Raul Villatoro      Progresso
                          Village
7     Adriel Caal         Progresso
                          Village
8     Daisy Magana        Progresso
                          Village
9     Guadalupe           Progresso
      Magnana             Youth Group
10    Zoe Walker          Wildtracks/
                          Fireburn
                          Village
11    Paul Walker         Wiltracks/
                          Fireburn
                          Village
        LIST OF PERSONS WHO ATTENDED THE CONSULTATION WORKSHOP IN
        ORANGE WALK TOWN, LA IMACULADA CONFERENCE CENTER 2/12/00


NO.   NAME              ORGANIZAT     POSITIO     ADDRES      TEL.    FAX    E –MAIL
                        ION           N           S           (501)   (501   (Small caps)
                                                                      )
1     Allan Herrera     Wilderness    Consultan
      (Presenter)       Group         t
                        Consulting
2     Evaristo Avella   Wilderness    Consultan   No. 3       09-     09-    Wilderness@btl.n
      (Workshop         Group         t           Linda       22927   2367   et
      Coordinator)      Consultants               Vista St.           1
                                                  Santa
                                                  Elena,
                                                  Cayo
                                                  Dist,

3     Anselmo           MBC           NLO         76          08-     08-    Envicp@btl.net
      Castaneda                                   Orange      22534/  2397   Anselmo.castane
      (Presenter)                                 St.         0149154 6      da@biomeso.net
                                                  Belmopa
                                                  n
                                                  P.O. box
                                                  179
4     Glennis           MBC           Coordinat                              mbcbelize@yaho
      Castellanos                     or                                     o.com
5     Zoe Walker        Wildtracks                            041-           Wildtracks@btl.n
                                                              2031           et
6     Juan Aldana       Shipstern
                        Village
7     Guadalupe         Progresso                             03-            LupeMagana@btl
      Magana            Youth Group                           36007          .net
8     Elvis Cowo        Progresso                             03-            LupeMagana@btl
                                                              36007          .net
9     Raul Cruz         Progresso
                        Youth Group
10    Mirna Morales     San Felipe
                        GREG
11    Laetitia Solis    Programme                             02-     02-    Pfbel@btl.net
                        for Belize                            75615   7563
                                                                      5
12    Ramiro Peralta    GREG                                  03-     03-
                                                              12068   1206
                                                                      8
13    Juan Velas        RHECO
14    Pedro A S         RHECO                     San         014-
                                                  Lazaro      1519
15    Pedro             RHECO                     San         37038
                                                  Lazaro
16   Joyce Smith       PG to        Rancho     081-
                       Presarer     Dolores    2016
17   Christine Smith   PG to        Rancho     081-
                       Preserar     Dolores    2016
18   Oscar Pollard     BONCA        Lucky      021-
                                    Strike     2017
                                    Village    015-
                                               1174
                                               02-
                                               24127
19   Charles Bolgrow                Double
                                    Head
                                    Cabbage
20   Laura Pech        Yo Creek     Yo Creek   03-
                       Women        O.W.       32013
                       Group        DIST.
21   Francisca         Yo Creek     Yo Creek   03-3013
     Castillo          Women        O.W.
                       Group        Dist.
22   Paul Walker       Wildtracks              041-      Wildtracks@btl.n
                                               2031      et
23   Lincoln Sealy     Fireburn                014-
                                               7782
        LIST OF PERSONS WHO ATTENDED THE CONSULTATION WORKSHOP IN
        SAN IGNACIO TOWN, LOG CAB INNS 25/11/00



NO.   NAME              ORGANIZAT     POSITIO     ADDRES      TEL.      FAX    E –MAIL
                        ION           N           S           (501)     (501   (Small caps)
                                                                        )
1     Allan Herrera     Wilderness    Consultan
      (Presenter)       Group         t
                        Consulting
2     Evaristo Avella   Wilderness    Consultan   No. 3       09-       09-    Wilderness@btl.n
      (Workshop         Group         t           Linda       22927     2367   et
      Coordinator)      Consultants               Vista St.             1
                                                  Santa
                                                  Elena,
                                                  Cayo
                                                  Dist,

3     Anselmo           MBC           NLO         76          08-     08-      Envicp@btl.net
      Castaneda                                   Orange      22534/  2397     Anselmo.castane
      (Presenter)                                 St.         0149154 6        da@biomeso.net
                                                  Belmopa
                                                  n
                                                  P.O. box
                                                  179
4     Rafael
      Manzanero
5     Jaime M.Vega      THF/Corners                           092-             Foundation@btl.n
                        tone                                  4594             et
                        Foundation
6     Tom Quebec        Janus                                 091-004          Janus.bel@janus
                        Foundation                                             web.org
7     Godsman Ellis     BELPO                                 092-             Belpo@btl.net
                                                              3264
8     Candy Gonzalez    BELPO                                 092-             GEOCAN@BTL.
                                                              2476             NET
9     Jose A Molina     Chairman
                        Sebua
10    Eulalio Garcia    Belize                                092-
                        Marketing                             3372
                        Board
11    Mario Azueta      Chairman                              014-
                        Duck RUN 1                            6595
12    Teny Topalian     Belize                                08-
                        National                              23329            ttopalian@moes
                        Commission                                             .gov.bz
                        er for
                        UNESCO
13    Omar Figueroa     BWB-ASF                               09-       09-    Omarf@btl.net
                                       24416   2441
                                               7
14   Mario Teul         BWB-ASF        09-
                                       24416
                                       014-
                                       4449
15   Plutarco Moralez
16   Maria Garcia       Izamna         091-           Tanah-
                        Society        2023           info@awrem.com
17   Derrick Chan       Belize River   093-           Fcd@btl.net
                        Keeper         2657
                        FCD/Succotz
18   James              Geologist      091-           Junglejim@bte.n
     Cavanaugh          Casa Maya      2020           et
19   Erica Gardner      Environment                   Cherica@hotmail.
     de Chuc            al El Pilar                   com
                        Research




20   Chris Minty        Las Cuevas     093-           CUEVAS@btl.net
                        NNM            3779
21   George P.Boiton                   092-           Miner/prospector
                                       2666
        LIST OF PERSONS WHO ATTENDED THE CONSULTATION WORKSHOP IN
        BLUE CREEK VILLAGE ON 2/12/00



NO.   NAME              ORGANIZAT     POSITIO     ADDRES      TEL.    FAX    E –MAIL
                        ION           N           S           (501)   (501   (Small caps)
                                                                      )
1     Evaristo Avella   Wilderness    Consultan   No. 3       09-     09-    Wilderness@btl.n
      (Workshop         Group         t           Linda       22927   2367   et
      Coordinator)      Consultants               Vista St.           1
                                                  Santa
                                                  Elena,
                                                  Cayo
                                                  Dist,

2     Glennis           MBC           Coordinat                              mbcbelize@yaho
      Castellanos                     or                                     o.com
3     James             Forest
                        Department
4     Johan Heide       Blue Creek
                        Village
5     Isaac Bergen      Blue Creek
                        Village
6     Peter Rempel
7     Benjamin Wiebe
8     Peter Jehrs
9     Jacob Hiebert
10    Johan Buerdart
11    Cornelio Rempel
12    David B. Dyck
12    Johan Rempel
      B.

				
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