EMERGENCY PLANNING FOR THE HOME - University of Michigan

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EMERGENCY PLANNING FOR THE HOME - University of Michigan Powered By Docstoc
					         Winter 2005 Wellness Program Series
             Tuesday, March 15th 5:30 pm



EMERGENCY PLANNING
     FOR HOME
   Are You Prepared?
                    Michael Lane
  Manager, Environment, Health and Safety Department
              University of Michigan-Flint


     Emergency planning strategies
     Safe chemical use, storage & disposal
     Plans, Kits, Supplies & other resources
  “… being prepared and
 understanding what to do
   during an emergency
reduces fear and anxiety…
and losses that accompany
       disasters…”
           Federal Emergency Management Agency
 Homeland Security Advisory
System & Recommendations…
“All Hazards Approach…”
EMERGENCY PLANNING STRATIGIES

   Types of emergencies “All Hazards Approach”
       fire, medical/poisoning, power outage, sever weather,
        threatening/suspicious person or activities, CBRNE/WMD
   Assess your risks and preparedness
       at home, in the car, special needs, ID high risk(s)
   Develop a plan
       evacuation route(s), medical first aid, phone numbers, nearest “safe
        meeting place”, shelter area, medicine, supplies, insurance
        coverage/policies
   Build an emergency kit(s), assemble supplies,
   Get Trained!
       CPR/ AED & Medical First Aid training
   Practice the Plan, Improve the Plan, Practice it Again
    EMERGENCY PLANNING STRATIGIES
       Assessing Risks and Preparedness
   Home Walk-Thru
       “…looking at your home through new eyes…” “What if…?”
       FEMA = 12 steps; ARC = 5 steps
   Identify hazard area(s)
       workshops, chemical storage, isolated areas, emergency exits, phones,
        2-3 story homes, pools, Identify special needs ~ elderly, young
        children, handicapped/disabled, neighbors too.
   Know the physical & health hazards
       Chemical labels, MSDSs
   Evaluate emergency supplies
       first aid kits, food/water supplies, generator, radio, batteries, medicines,
        response capabilities/training needed, survival for 5 days w/o power?
   Prioritize risks, action plan…
    EMERGENCY PLANNING STRATIGIES
      Make a Plan, Build a Kit, Get Trained!
   Elements of your home’s emergency plan...
       Floor plan, evacuation routes, shelter area, safe location, delegate
        roles/jobs, pets and neighbors too
   Contents of an emergency kit… (3-5 days)
       Water (2-3 qts/ person/day),
       ready-to- eat food, “comfort food”, high-energy/protein, vitamins,
        remember to rotate/refresh (6-8 months?)
       1st aid – large kit for home, small kit in car, medicine
       Cloths, bedding, tools,
       Phone numbers, address book, insurance policies, etc.
   Additional Supplies… “grab and go”
       Be prepared to collect valuables, documents, prescriptions, etc
   Training for all families
       CPR/AED, first aid, Citizen Corp (FEMA/LEPC)
Some Causes of Electrical Fires
Fire Extinguisher Selection & Use
   Four recognized classes of fire you should be aware of
    when selecting an appropriate extinguisher:
       Class A fire (usually fueled by combustibles such as paper, cardboard,
        wood or cloth) use a WATER type extinguisher
       Class B fire (Flammable liquids, gasses and grease) use a CO2 or DRY
        CHEMICAL extinguisher
       Class C fire (energized electrical equipment) use a CO2 or DRY
        CHEMICAL extinguisher
       Class D fire (metals and metal hydrides) use a SPECIAL DRY
        POWDER extinguisher
   ABC extinguishers can be used on Class A, B, C fires
   Always check the label & gage before use.
   Remember the “PASS Method” when operating a fire
    extinguisher…
Basic Steps in Using an Extinguisher
        “The PASS Method”
  PULL the pin.
 Remove the nozzle from its hook on the side of the extinguisher,

  hold it upright and AIM THE NOZZLE AT THE BASE OF
  THE FIRE. Do not aim the nozzle directly at the flames.
 Stand within 10 feet of the fire. Do not cause the fire to ignite

  other materials by blowing the fire w/ extinguisher
 SQUEEZE THE HANDLE together using short bursts.

 USE A SIDEWAYS SWEEPING MOTION, sweeping across
  the width & base of the fire, not up and down.
 Never fight a fire alone. As flames retreat, walk forward

  extinguishing the remaining flames until the fire is out.
   Always leave an escape path! Do not block yourself in!!
               Household Chemicals
   Selection
       use the least hazardous/toxic to get the job done… compare labels/MSDSs
       purchase only what you need/can use
   Storage
       Secure
       cool, well ventilated area, out of sunlight
       Separate incompatible materials
   Handling & Use
       use personal protective equip. ~ gloves, goggles, respirators, ear plugs…
       DO NOT MIX Chemicals.
       use in appropriate quantities, safe area, clean up after use
   Disposal or Recycling
       local/county household hazardous waste collections or “drop-offs”
       Donations if possible, talk with neighbors, church or community groups
   Teach kids through setting an example!
                      Chemical Safety
   Some Examples:
        flammable/combustible, corrosive, oxidizer, compressed gas, explosive
        carcinogen, toxic, sensitizer, irritant, reproductive toxin,
   Label Warnings or EPA “signal words” Caution, Warning, and Danger.
        Danger is the strongest signal word… be extremely careful using this
         product. If it is used the wrong way, you could get very sick, cause
         injury/illness for a long time, go blind or even die. It could also explode if
         they get hot.
        Warning is less strong than Danger, but it still means that you could get
         really sick or become seriously hurt. Also identifies products that can easily
         catch fire.
        Caution shows that the product could hurt you, but it is less harmful than
         products with a danger or warning signal word. Caution is used on products
         that could irritate your skin, make you sick if you breathed the fumes, or
         cause serious injury to eyes.
   Adults vs. children exposure/poisoning
      result of chemical concentration, metabolism & body weight
   Acute (immediate) or chronic (long term) effects
   Container compatibility
          Household Hazardous Waste
             Disposal & Recycling
Acceptable items:
   Household Chemicals: Ammonia cleaners, Air fresheners. Artist paints, Bleach, Brass,
    copper and silver polish, Chlorine cleaners, Old holiday decorations: artificial snow, glass
    frosting, Christmas bubble lights, Drain cleaner Nail polish and nail polish remove,
    Mothballs, Silica, Shoe polish, Stain removers, Tub and tile cleaners, Upholstery and carpet
    cleaner, Water repellants
   Household batteries: mercury, lithium, nickel cadmium, lead, silver oxide- no car batteries,
    please
   Automotive: Antifreeze, Brake fluid, Carburetor cleaner, Car polish and wax, Engine
    degreasers, Gasoline, Starter fluid, Transmission fluid, Oil filters
   Yard & Garden: Copper based algaecides, Fungicides, Garden moss killer, Insecticides,
    Insect repellant, Lime, Lye, Muriatic acid, Pool chemicals, Rodent killer,
   Home Improvement: Adhesives, Aerosol cans, Asphalt / roofing tar, Ballasts, Cutting oil,
    Driveway sealers, Hand cleaners, Halogen bulbs, HID lamps, Lacquers, Lubricating oils,
    Lighter fluid, Metal polish, Mercury vapor lamps, Silicones, Soot remover, creosote
    destroyer, Paint removers & thinners, Paint -- oil-based, Petroleum based solvents, Wood
    preservatives, Wood stain, Wood varnish
   Miscellaneous: Fluorescent lights, Photo chemicals, Mercury thermometers, Propane
    cylinders, Reactives,
Unacceptable items:
   No Business or Industrial Waste, Medical Waste, Radioactive Waste
   Explosives, Ammunition, Flares, Firearms, Latex paint, Asbestos, Motor oil,
    Syringes/Needles, Smoke alarms, Radon detectors, Carbon monoxide detectors
Unintentional Poisonings ~ 2001




               National Safety Council – 2004 report
Other Preparedness Planning Issues &
             Concerns
   Children and young teens…
   Individuals with disabilities…
   Severe or life threatening allergies…
   Pools…
   Bikes, other recreational activities…
   Power tools - LOTO
   Ladders
   Guns
                       FIREARMS
INCLUDES FIREARMS INJURIES IN OR ON HOME PREMISES—SUCH
   AS WHILE CLEANING OR PLAYING WITH GUNS. EXCLUDES
           DEATHS FROM EXPLOSIVE MATERIALS
          Helpful Products
   CO Monitors, Smoke detectors,
   Security lighting, motion detectors, alarms
   Second story escape ladders
   ANSI or NIOSH approved protective
    equipment
   Weather radio (w/ extra batteries)
   Generator
   Cell phone
        Health & Safety Resources
   Genesee County Health Dept: http://health.co.genesee.mi.us/
   Michigan Dept. of Community Health: http://www.michigan.gov/mdch
   EPA: http://www.epa.gov/
   EPA Concerned Citizens http://www.epa.gov/epahome/citizen.htm
   MDEQ; http://www.deq.state.mi.us/
   FEMA: http://www.fema.gov/ ,
    http://www.fema.gov/pdf/areyouready/areyouready_full.pdf
   American Red Cross : http://www.redcross.org/
   ARC – Local Chapter http://www.redcross.org/where/search.asp
   Local Fire Department http://www.cityofflint.com/fire/fire.asp
   CDC: http://www.cdc.gov/
   NIH: http://www.nih.gov/
   WHO: http://www.who.int/en/
   MSU Cooperative Extension Offices http://www.msue.msu.edu/home/
   UM-Flint EHS Dept
    http://www.umflint.edu/resources/offices/environment_health_and_safety/index.php
   National Safety Council Home Safety Check
    http://www.epa.gov/epahome/citizen.htm
   NSC Homepage http://www.nsc.org/
THANK YOU

				
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