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									                           ACS
                       Care Services



                  Occupational
                Health and Safety

                 Policy Statement
                   And Manual




ACS - Health & Safety Policy           Page 1 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
CONTENTS

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY STATEMENT ........................... 6
LEGAL DUTIES...................................................................................................................... 7
   ACS CARE SERVICES .............................................................................................................. 7
   ACS EMPLOYEES .................................................................................................................... 7
ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES FOR HEALTH AND SAFETY ................................ 8
   MANAGERS AND SUPERVISORS ............................................................................................... 8
   EMPLOYEES ............................................................................................................................ 8
ACCIDENT REPORTING ..................................................................................................... 9
   INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................................................... 9
   NOTIFIABLE ACCIDENTS/INCIDENTS ....................................................................................... 9
   PROCEDURE ............................................................................................................................ 9
   NEAR MISSES ........................................................................................................................ 10
   FORMS .................................................................................................................................. 10
DISPLAY SCREEN EQUIPMENT (WORKING WITH COMPUTERS) ...................... 11
   INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 11
   POSSIBLE EFFECTS ................................................................................................................ 11
   WORKSTATION ASSESSMENT ................................................................................................ 11
   EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS ................................................................................................. 11
     Screen ............................................................................................................................... 11
     Keyboard, mouse and other input devices ....................................................................... 12
     Work desk ......................................................................................................................... 12
     Work chair ....................................................................................................................... 12
     Environment ..................................................................................................................... 12
   WORK ROUTINE .................................................................................................................... 12
   EYE TESTS ............................................................................................................................. 12
   TRAINING AND INFORMATION ............................................................................................... 12
   FORMS .................................................................................................................................. 12
ELECTRICAL SAFETY ...................................................................................................... 13
   INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 13
   RISK MANAGEMENT ............................................................................................................. 13
   PORTABLE APPLIANCE TESTING (PAT) ................................................................................ 13
ENFORCING AUTHORITIES ............................................................................................ 14
   INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 14
   WORKPLACE AND ENVIRONMENT ......................................................................................... 14
   FORMS .................................................................................................................................. 14
FIRE – PREVENTION AND ESCAPE ............................................................................... 15
   INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 15
   THE REGULATORY (FIRE SAFETY) REFORM ORDER 2005 ..................................................... 15
   FIRE PROCEDURES ................................................................................................................ 15
   DISABLED PERSONS .............................................................................................................. 16
   FIRE FIGHTING ...................................................................................................................... 16
   FORMS .................................................................................................................................. 16
ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                                                                Page 2 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
FIRST AID ............................................................................................................................. 17
   GENERAL .............................................................................................................................. 17
   REQUIREMENTS..................................................................................................................... 17
   PROVISION OF INFORMATION ................................................................................................ 17
   DISPLAY OF NOTICES ............................................................................................................ 18
   ACCIDENT BOOK AVAILABILITY ........................................................................................... 18
   TRAINING AND COMPETENCE................................................................................................ 18
HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES - COSHH ........................................................................... 19
   INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 19
   COSHH PROCESS ................................................................................................................. 19
     Research ........................................................................................................................... 19
     Assessment ....................................................................................................................... 19
     Control measures ............................................................................................................. 19
     Exposure monitoring ........................................................................................................ 19
     Health surveillance .......................................................................................................... 19
     Information, instruction and training .............................................................................. 19
   STORAGE .............................................................................................................................. 19
   FORMS .................................................................................................................................. 20
HEALTH AND SAFETY INSPECTIONS .......................................................................... 21
   INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 21
   PURPOSE ............................................................................................................................... 21
   RECORDING .......................................................................................................................... 21
   FORMS .................................................................................................................................. 21
HIRE OF EQUIPMENT ....................................................................................................... 22
   INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 22
   RISK MANAGEMENT ............................................................................................................. 22
   TRAINING AND COMPETENCE................................................................................................ 22
   THE EQUIPMENT ................................................................................................................... 22
LONE WORKING................................................................................................................. 23
   INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 23
   RISK MANAGEMENT ............................................................................................................. 23
   SAFETY ARRANGEMENTS ...................................................................................................... 23
   SUPERVISION ........................................................................................................................ 23
   TRAINING AND COMPETENCE................................................................................................ 24
   FORMS .................................................................................................................................. 24
MANUAL HANDLING......................................................................................................... 25
   INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 25
   RISK MANAGEMENT ............................................................................................................. 25
   WORKPLACE AND ENVIRONMENT ......................................................................................... 25
   TRAINING AND COMPETENCE................................................................................................ 26
   THE EQUIPMENT ................................................................................................................... 26
   FORMS .................................................................................................................................. 26
MOBILE PEOPLE HOISTS ................................................................................................ 27
   INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 27
   RISK MANAGEMENT ............................................................................................................. 27
ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                                                                Page 3 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
   TRAINING AND COMPETENCE................................................................................................ 27
   THE EQUIPMENT ................................................................................................................... 27
NEW AND EXPECTANT MOTHERS ............................................................................... 28
   INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 28
   RESPONSIBILITIES ................................................................................................................. 28
   RISK ASSESSMENT ................................................................................................................. 28
   ASPECTS TO CONSIDER .......................................................................................................... 28
     Ergonomics ...................................................................................................................... 28
     Display Screen Equipment ............................................................................................... 28
     Manual handling .............................................................................................................. 28
     Hazardous substances ...................................................................................................... 29
     Work routine .................................................................................................................... 29
     Rest facilities .................................................................................................................... 29
   RESIDUAL RISK ..................................................................................................................... 29
   FORMS .................................................................................................................................. 29
PERSONAL SAFETY ........................................................................................................... 30
   INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 30
   PRECAUTIONS ....................................................................................................................... 30
RISK ASSESSMENT ............................................................................................................ 31
   INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 31
   RISK ASSESSMENT ................................................................................................................ 31
   METHODOLOGY .................................................................................................................... 31
   RISK MATRIX ........................................................................................................................ 32
   LIKELIHOOD .......................................................................................................................... 32
   IDENTIFY HAZARDS ASSOCIATED WITH THE ACTIVITY ......................................................... 32
   IDENTIFY WHO OR WHAT IS AT RISK .................................................................................... 32
   REVIEW CONTROL MEASURES .............................................................................................. 32
   DEVELOP AND IMPLEMENT FURTHER CONTROL ................................................................... 33
   MANAGE AND REVIEW THE ASSESSMENT ............................................................................. 33
   SERVICE USER’S PREMISES ASSESSMENT ..........ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED.ERROR!
   BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED.
   FORMS .................................................................................................................................. 33
SIGNAGE ............................................................................................................................... 34
   GENERAL .............................................................................................................................. 34
   REQUIREMENTS..................................................................................................................... 34
   SIGN SPECIFICATIONS ........................................................................................................... 34
TRAINING ............................................................................................................................. 35
   INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 35
   TRAINING REQUIREMENTS .................................................................................................... 35
   RECORDING .......................................................................................................................... 35
   FORMS .................................................................................................................................. 35
WORK RELATED STRESS ................................................................................................ 36
   INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 36
   STRESS MANAGEMENT ......................................................................................................... 36
WORKING AT HEIGHT ..................................................................................................... 37
ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                                                                Page 4 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
   INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 37
   EMPLOYER’S DUTIES ............................................................................................................ 37
   EMPLOYEES’ DUTIES ............................................................................................................ 37
   RISK MANAGEMENT ............................................................................................................. 37
   MEANS OF ACCESS ............................................................................................................... 37
WORKING TIME REGULATIONS 1998 .......................................................................... 38
   INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 38
   KEY POINTS........................................................................................................................... 38
   MANAGEMENT ...................................................................................................................... 38
YOUNG WORKERS ............................................................................................................. 39
   INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 39
   RISK ASSESSMENT ................................................................................................................. 39
   SIGNIFICANT RISK ................................................................................................................. 39




ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                                                              Page 5 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
Occupational Health and Safety Policy Statement
ACS Care Services is committed to ensuring the health, safety and
welfare of its employees so far as is reasonably practicable by
complying with all statutory health and safety requirements as a
minimum standard and proactively seeking to prevent work related injury
and ill health. The Company recognises its responsibility to visitors,
clients and others for ensuring that their health and safety is not affected
whilst on Company premises or by work undertaken by the Company’s
employees.

Furthermore ACS Care Services is committed to minimising the
environmental impact of its activities and will minimise waste, manage
energy consumption and positively contribute to the protection and
enhancement of the environment where possible.

ACS Care Services Management will ensure that appropriate risk control
systems are developed, maintained, appropriately reviewed and
effectively communicated to employees and all relevant parties.
Additionally the Company will provide the necessary information,
instruction and training to employees and others, including temporary
and sub-contracted staff, to ensure their competence with respect to
health and safety.

ACS Care Services Management is committed to consulting with
employees on any changes to operations that may affect their health
and safety. The management will maintain a current awareness of
legislative changes through its association with suitably qualified and
competent 3rd Party Advisors.

This Policy Document will be reviewed annually and any changes
communicated to staff and other relevant persons.



_______________________                                     ___________

Carol Townley                                               Date
Managing Director




ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                       Page 6 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
Legal Duties
ACS Care Services
In accordance with Section 2(2) of the Health & Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 and other associated
legislation/statutory instruments, the Company will, so far as is reasonably practicable protect the
health, safety and welfare of its employees by:
 Providing safe equipment and systems of work, to include the safe handling, storage and
     transportation of goods and materials.
 Providing sufficient information, training, instruction and supervision to enable all employees avoid
     hazards and to contribute positively to their own health and safety at work.
 Providing a safe and healthy working environment
 Continuing to monitor and review all systems of work to ensure continual improvement in health
     and safety performance

The Company further accepts it’s responsibilities to its employees and others as defined in Sections
2(3) and 3 of the Health & Safety at Work etc. Act 1974; namely:
 Section 2(3): To maintain an up-to-date, written Health and Safety Policy Statement supported
    by information on the Company’s organisation and arrangements for carrying out the Policy.
 Section 3: Not to expose any persons “not in the Company’s employment”, including the self-
    employed and public, to any risk

ACS Employees
In accordance with Section 7 and 8 of the Health & Safety at Work etc. Act 1974, employees are
expected:
 To take reasonable care of their own health and safety and that of other persons.
 To co-operate with their supervisors and managers as far as is necessary to carry out their own
    responsibilities successfully.
 Not to intentionally interfere with or misuse anything provided in the interests of health, safety and
    welfare.

Employees are also expected to comply with those additional duties imposed under the Management
of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999, namely:
 To only use equipment, materials or substances provided to them in accordance with any training,
    information or instruction given.
 To inform their employer (via designated reporting lines) of any risks or shortcomings identified
    within the workplace.




ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                               Page 7 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
Roles and Responsibilities for Health and Safety
Managing Director
The Managing Director of ACS Care Services will:
 Seek to promote an interest and enthusiasm for health and safety throughout the Company and
   be responsible for the overall implementation of the Company Health and Safety Policy and
   compliance with statutory obligations.
 Ensure there are sufficient competent health and safety advice and assistance from a
   combination of internal and external resources.
 Ensure that health and safety forms part of the agenda at relevant Management and Team
   meetings ensuring that responsibility is allocated for following up necessary actions.
 In conjunction with the appointed Competent Person and appropriate advisors, review health and
   safety standards and practices within the Company and review the effectiveness of the Policy and
   remedial actions on a regular basis.
 Ensure that insurance complying with the provisions of the Employer’s Liability (Compulsory)
   Insurance Regulations is maintained in force and that relevant insurance certificates are retained
   for 40 years.
 Will make adequate resources available to ensure the effective implementation of the Health and
   Safety Policy as necessary.

Managers, Team Leaders and Senior Carers
Managers, Team Leaders and Senior Carers employed by ACS will:
 Ensure that they are aware of the requirements of the Company Health and Safety Policy and the
   responsibility of individuals to implement the Policy.
 Provide leadership and promote responsible attitudes towards health and safety.
 Ensure that health and safety forms part of the agenda at all relevant meetings and any matters
   identified as requiring action are followed up.
 Provide new employees with induction training on all matters relating to health and safety.
 Ensure that Company procedures and control measures identified in risk assessments are
   implemented to a high standard.
 When purchasing materials, equipment etc, the Company’s health and safety requirements are
   specified, and that suppliers provide all necessary information and operating instructions so that
   their products can be used safely.
 Not use any hazardous substances unless an assessment under the Control of Substances
   Hazardous to Health Regulations has first been carried out.
 Ensure that staff report all accidents and incidents and that these are followed up as defined in
   the Policy.
 Only give tasks to personnel under their control who are competent and have the necessary
   information instruction and training.
 Ensure that all equipment used is in a serviceable condition, subjected to the necessary regular
   inspections and ensure that any defective equipment is withdrawn from service immediately.
 Liase with contractors and technicians working on the premises to ensure that they are aware of
   the emergency procedures and are operating in a safe manner.

Employees
All employees, either full or part time will:
 Familiarise themselves with the Company Health and Safety Policy and arrangements.
 Take reasonable care for the health, safety and welfare of themselves, their colleagues and any
     other person that may be affected by their work activities.
 Co-operate with managers and colleagues in matters of health and safety and proactively suggest
     any improvements that may be made to working practices in order to further improve safety.
 Use any equipment or substance provided by the Company in accordance with the relevant
     information, instruction or training and not interfere or misuse anything that is provided in the
     interest of health and safety.

ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                             Page 8 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
Accident Reporting

   IF FATAL, MAJOR INJURY OR DANGEROUS OCCURRENCE TRANSPIRES
              CALL THE EMERGENCY SERVICES IMMEDIATELY.

Introduction
Accidents and near miss incidents (where there is the possibility of an injury) must be reported and
adequately recorded to ensure the corrective actions are effective and to formulate an overall
company accident record for trend analysis. This will allow us to confirm the company’s safety
controls, culture and preventative measures taken are removing/ minimising the risks. This
requirement includes accidents occurring on a Service User’s premises

Typically, reported accidents will range from cuts and bruises to major injury. Near miss incidents
could be tripping over an object but no injury occurred. This also includes any road traffic accident /
vehicle when on company business.

Notifiable Accidents/Incidents
Under the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous occurrences Regulations 1995 (RIDDOR)
there is a duty to notify the Enforcing Authorities of any accidents causing either death, major injury,
over 3 days absence, certain diseases and defined dangerous occurrences.

Events which must be reported under RIDDOR are:
    A fatality.
    A major injury (e.g. fractures, dislocation, loss of sight or electric shock leading to
       unconsciousness).
    Any injury that results in the injured person being away from work or unable to do their normal
       work for more than 3 days, including non workdays.
    Any injury to a person not at work (e.g. client) that requires sending to hospital directly from
       the premises.
    Any defined reportable work related disease. This will be identified by a doctor and notified to
       the individual who must then report it.
    Any dangerous occurrence which does not result in a reportable injury but which clearly could
       have done – this list is quite extensive and the Company’s Competent Person will first check
       with the HSE.

RIDDOR accidents must be reported to the Managing Director in the first instance, she will assume
responsibility and complete the statutory report ensuring the incident is reported and investigated
accordingly.

Procedure
Where an accident has occurred, employees/ others may require first aid or hospital treatment. This
(unless the threat to another person’s health and safety is serious and imminent) is the over-riding
priority in all cases.

All accidents/near miss occurrences irrespective of nature must be reported by the respective
employee (or representative) to ACS by the fastest possible means and then followed up by a written
accident/ near miss report to the Managing Director.

It is also important for the injured person to record the accident in the statutory Accident Report Book
held by the First Aider. This may be carried out on behalf of the injured person (i.e. the first aider may
enter the details) if they are unable to do so themselves.




ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                                 Page 9 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
Where required by RIDDOR the Managing Director will report the incident to the appropriate authority
using the standard HSE form such as F2508 for accidents, near misses and dangerous occurrences
or via the web www.riddor.gov.uk

Included in the regulations is the provision for the reporting of injuries of a lesser nature resulting in a
subsequent inability to work normally for 3 days or more (including weekends or bank holidays). This
is more commonly known as a “3-day loss” accident.

In the event of a fatality, the area must not be disturbed without permission of the police or the
enforcing authority. The Managing Director and Health & Safety Advisor MUST be advised by phone
without delay.

All accidents and near miss incidents will be investigated by the Manager and corrective actions put in
place where applicable. This may require further discussion with the injured person(s).

Near misses
Where an incident happened but there was no damage to property or injury to a person, e.g. a flask of
boiling water was knocked over and only spilled onto the floor, not onto a person’s foot or hand, also
need to be reported to management and appropriate action taken to prevent a recurrence, possibly
resulting in injury.

Forms

A1 – Carer Accident Report

A2 – Service User Accident Report




ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                                  Page 10 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
Display Screen Equipment (working with computers)
Introduction
The use of Visual Display Units (VDUs) and other forms of Display Screen Equipment (DSE) is
governed by the Health and Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations 1992.

The Regulations aim to prevent problems associated with the use of DSE such as musculoskelatal
problems, visual fatigue, and stress. The likelihood of experiencing these is related mainly to the
frequency, duration, intensity and pace of spells of continuous use of the DSE, allied to other factors
such as the amount of discretion the person has over the extent and methods of display screen use
and, importantly, the provision of the correct equipment.

An item of Display Screen Equipment is any alphanumeric or graphic display system, regardless of
the display process involved, or in more friendly language a computer screen, CCTV screen,
microfiche readers etc.

A Workstation is defined as comprising display screen equipment, keyboards, mouse, telephones,
modem, printer, the office furniture and the immediate work environment around display screen
equipment.

A User means an employee who habitually uses DSE for a significant part of their normal work. It will
generally be appropriate to classify members of staff as users if most or all of the following criteria
apply:
 They depend on the use of DSE to do their job.
 They have no discretion as to the use or non-use of the DSE.
 They need significant training and/or particular skills in the use of DSE to do their job.
 They normally use DSE for continuous spells of an hour or more at a time.
 They use DSE in this way more or less daily.

Possible effects
The introduction of DSE has been associated with a range of symptoms related to the visual system
and working posture. These are often reflected in various types of bodily fatigue and mental stress
but are not unique to DSE work. Applying simple ergonomic principles to the design, selection and
installation of DSE, the design of the workplace and the organisation of the task, training and
guidance can reduce the risk to the user.

Workstation assessment
It is particularly important that employers and managers consider the possibility of musculoskelatal
disorders as a result of DSE use. Employers are required to conduct a specific assessment of each
individual’s workstation and remedy any shortcomings that may be identified.

These shortcomings may be overcome through the provision of suitable office furniture, advice on
workstation layout and work routine or may involve proactive health schemes.

Equipment requirements
Screen
The choice of the screen and equipment should be considered in relation to the work being
undertaken, the size of the screen is not defied in the Regulations but should be large enough for the
user to work comfortably. Screens should be capable of being adjusted for angle, height, brightness
and contrast and be free from glare or reflections.




ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                                Page 11 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
Keyboard, mouse and other input devices
Again choice should be dictated by the task and element of the system but the design should allow
quick, accurate input of information without discomfort. If a user is experiencing any pain from the
use of one particular style of keyboard or mouse an alternative should be considered.

Work desk
The actual size of the work desk is not specified but it must be large enough to allow the user to use
the DSE plus any other items in use (telephone, paper, document holder, files and so on). The size
must also allow the user sufficient space in front of the keyboard to support their wrists when typing.

Work chair
ACS will provide a suitable, comfortable chair as this is arguably the most important factor for the
DSE user. The chair must be fully adjustable for height, back adjustment and design to allow the user
to achieve a comfortable working position. Guidance must be made available to users on how to
operate the adjusters on the chair; frequently staff suffer discomfort because they are unaware of how
to adjust their chair correctly.

Footrests may also be necessary if the user cannot rest their feet flat on the ground with the chair at
the correct height for the desk.

Environment
The working environment is another key factor for user comfort and is governed by the Workplace
(Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992. Factors such as lighting levels, space, heating and
ventilation must be considered as part of the office planning and layout.

Work routine
The importance of taking regular breaks from DSE work cannot be over-emphasised. Managers
should ensure work routines that allow staff to:
 Incorporate micro-breaks into sessions at the computer
 A break of five to ten minutes in the work pattern after approximately every hour of inputting data
   or text.

Taking a break from DSE work does not mean staff have to stop work every hour, on the hour. It
means planning the work so that there are frequent breaks and incorporating other work, such as
telephone calls and paperwork so that they use different muscles and are not static.

Eye tests
At the request of the user and where a user experiences visual difficulties, which may be considered
to be caused by work on DSE, ACS will arrange an eyesight test, it may be necessary to repeat these
tests at regular intervals.

The cost of the test(s) and any special corrective appliances (normally spectacles) will be borne by
ACS; although in respect of spectacles the liability for costs is restricted to payment for the basic
prescribed lenses and frames, in other words not designer frames or lenses with optional treatments
deemed unnecessary for the work.

Training and Information
Employees will be given suitable and understandable information on how to set up their workstation
and any software used either in hard copy or by the use of an on-line programme.

Forms
D1 – Payment Application for Eye Test
D2 – Application for Eye Test
D3 – DSE Assessment



ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                                Page 12 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
Electrical Safety

Introduction
The risk of electrocution and electric shock are the main hazards associated with electricity, this risk is
controlled by protection against direct contact, through the provision of proper insulation and the
avoidance of indirect contact by good standards of earthing or double insulation. Other important
strategies for protecting people against electric shock include the use of correctly rated fuses, circuit
breakers, reduced voltage and the implementation of safe systems of work. Access to electrical risers
and switch panels is restricted to authorised persons only.

Risk Management
All users of electrical equipment, whether fixed or portable, should periodically check for signs of
damage to the equipment including the connecting lead and plug (such as staining from overheating)
and whether the cable sheath is correctly gripped at both ends. If the check reveals signs of damage
the equipment should be removed from service and the Line Manager informed.

All electrical equipment is subject to regular testing by contractors then labelled with the date of
testing and when it is next due.

No type of electrical repair must ever be attempted by any employee, however minor. If an item of
electrical equipment is damaged or faulty it is to be isolated from the supply if safe to do so and a
competent, registered electrical contractor engaged to undertake repairs.

Portable Appliance Testing (PAT)
All extension leads and portable electrical equipment electrical equipment is subject to regular testing
by contractors. All items should be uniquely identified, labelled with the date of testing and when it is
next due and recorded in a register.

ACS Care Services will endeavour to ensure that all portable electrical appliances are tested by a
competent person in line with current best practice. Records of testing will be retained at the
Company’s Office.




ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                                  Page 13 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
Enforcing Authorities

Introduction
All business activities are subject to statue conditions and rules. They must be complied with at all
times without exception. Inspectors, either employed by the Local Authority (LA) or the Health and
Safety Executive (HSE), carry out the enforcement of these “statue requirements”. These are
generally known as the “enforcing authority”.

Normally enforcement of the office environment is via the LA, the factory environment (an office within
the factory boundary is included in this category) will be enforced by the HSE.

Workplace and Environment
It is a general duty, so far as reasonably practicable for each employer to ensure the health, safety
and welfare arrangements/facilities are adequate and maintained correctly. Arrangements are to be
in place to provide training, instruction and methods of communicating H&S information such that an
employee (and others) has a safe place and system of work.

The employee must comply with the employer’s H&S arrangements and not to interfere with any not
interfere with any safety devices.

These conditions can be checked and the adequacy verified by the enforcing authority at any
reasonable time (normally during office hours). However, if a reportable accident has occurred, the
enforcing authority may require access to inspect the scene at any time.

These requests cannot be refused or obstructed. If necessary, the enforcing authority’s officer may
request police assistance.

The enforcing authorities may call and make arrangement with the employer to inspect the location or
can arrive unannounced. Any arranged date for an inspection visit must be communicated to the
client who, may wish to host the enforcing authority or delegate it. Any letters received from the
enforcing authority relating to health or safety issues, requests for action or any enforcement notices
must be acknowledged and actioned accordingly.

Forms
H2 – HSE Offices




ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                              Page 14 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
Fire – Prevention and Escape

Introduction

The risk of fire is present in almost every workplace; it can break out almost anywhere and can affect
everyone.

Fire, with the possible additional risk of explosion, is a much more acute problem where flammable
liquids and gases are used. Stringent precautions are required in these areas to ensure that no
sources of ignition occur. Welding and cutting equipment should never be used near flammable
liquids or combustible materials, unless adequate precautions are taken to prevent ignition occurring.

The Regulatory (Fire Safety) Reform Order 2005
Under The Regulatory (Fire Safety) Reform Order 2005 (RRO) a Fire Risk Assessment (FRA) is
required for all commercial and industrial premises (as well as certain other premises).

Responsibility for complying with the Fire Safety Order rests with the 'responsible person'. In a
workplace, this is the employer and any other person who may have control of any part of the
premises, for example, the occupier or owner. In shared premises ALL those responsible must take
all reasonable steps to work with each other.

The ‘responsible person’ must ensure a FRA is carried out that focuses on the safety in the event of a
fire of all 'relevant persons'. It should pay particular attention to:
• People at special risk e.g. young people, disabled persons and anyone with special needs,
• Means of detecting, raising and extinguishing any fire,
• Any dangerous substances likely to be on the premises,
• Emergency plans.

A competent person must also be appointed as the ‘responsible person’ to review and manage the
fire requirements of the company.

A fire risk assessment will help identify risks that can be removed or reduced and to decide the nature
and extent of the general fire precautions you need to take to protect people against the fire risks that
remain. Under the RRO if you employ five or more people you must record your risk assessment and
any significant findings.

ACS Care Services will ensure that a specific Fire Risk Assessment is undertaken for its premises by
a competent person and endeavour to ensure that, so far as is reasonably practicable, the risk of fire
in the premises is eliminated or reduced to an acceptable level. In addition the Company will ensure
that adequate fire detection and alarm systems are in place and maintained and that a means of
escape is available for all persons on the premises.

Fire Procedures
ACS will aim to ensure the safety of all persons on its premises by:
    Appointing a Responsible Person with sufficient training and knowledge.
    Complying with the Fire Risk Assessment recommendations.
    Ensuring that designated fire escape routes are kept clear of all obstructions i.e. carelessly
       positioned discarded boxes, waste, trailing cables etc.
    Installing appropriate signage in accordance with the Health & Safety (Safety Signs and
       Signals) Regulations 1996 - i.e. GREEN/WHITE Pictogram.
    Liasing with the Landlord to arrange regular maintenance and testing of all fire alarm/detection
       systems and fire fighting appliances in accordance with current best practice.
    Displaying Fire Action Notices in appropriate locations advising occupants of what to do in the
       event of a fire.


ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                                Page 15 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
       Ensuring that all employees are aware of what action to take in the event of a fire through
        appropriate information/training.
       Appoint Fire Wardens(s) to assist in the evacuation of the premises in the event of an
        emergency and/or evacuation drills.
       Liase with the Landlord to arrange evacuation drills annually and the details recorded - date
        carried out, whom co-ordinated by, time taken to fully evacuate, any notable incidents/non-
        compliance, etc.
       Regularly removing waste from the premises ensuring that there is no unnecessary build up of
        combustible materials.
       Not overloading electrical systems/circuits. The vast majority of fires originate from electrical
        faults
       Operating a blanket NO SMOKING policy and erecting appropriate signs to advise occupants
        and visitors accordingly.

Disabled Persons

The H&S Adviser, Fire Wardens and local Fire Brigade should all be involved in making arrangements
for assisting disabled persons in the event of a fire or other emergency. In certain premises specific
arrangements for persons unable to walk down stairs may be required in the form of designated “Safe
Areas”. Any persons unable to evacuate the building should remain in the designated ‘Safe Area’ and
await the arrival of the Fire Brigade.

If a person with a recognised disability is recruited, prior to their starting work or as soon as possible
after appointment, ACS will draw up a Specific Personal Escape Plans (PEP). This will be carried out
by the Responsible Person in conjunction with the disabled employee and made know to all those
who may be required to assist in the event of an emergency.

Fire Fighting

In all buildings, protection of human life must take priority over fighting fires. The person discovering a
fire must promptly initiate the emergency procedures listed above.

           Employees should, leave the building immediately and not attempt to fight

Forms
F1 – Fire Log Book




ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                                  Page 16 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
First Aid

                    First Aid is available from the Main Office.
General
The aim of the Health and Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981 is to ensue that all people at work are
adequately covered. This is designed to be flexible to ensure people in similar situations (i.e. working
remote from their normal location) are effectively covered to a similar standard. In practice this entails
the appointment of one or more trained First Aiders or Appointed Persons.

Requirements
The Manager shall ensure an assessment is carried out to identify what should be provided in order to
ensure compliance with the regulations.

The assessment must consider:
 The foreseeable hazards an employee is likely to encounter during their work.
 The numbers of employees.
 Nature of work.
 Size and distribution of the building.
 Distribution of employees within the building/ buildings.
 Hours of work including shift work.
 Distance from outside medical assistance.
 Consideration of additional and specific requirements (transportation of casualties, disposal of
   medical waste etc).

The Manager shall, based on the assessment, ensure adequate first aid facilities exist and are readily
available for their employees.

If necessary the Manager should consider the provision of first aid kits to employees working away
from the main location where it will be difficult to obtain first aid treatment. It may also be necessary
to ensure adequate training is provided to those employees.

Any special items (i.e. antidotes) may be kept available and if provided, the first aider must be
adequately trained in their administration.

As a guide on first aider ratios: - for those locations where:
     There are minimal risks.
     Low hazards/processes or substances.
     The first aider can easily and rapidly access all the location’s areas.
     The building layout is such that the occupation is not spread out or split over a number of
        floors.
     The accident records indicate the accident or incident levels are low.

Normally 1 first aider to 50 people should be sufficient and in the unplanned absence of the first aider,
an “appointed person” should be available to take charge of emergencies, facilities are available at all
times.

Provision of Information
The Manager is to ensure all employees are informed of the arrangements made for the provision of
first aid facilities and how they can obtain first aid treatment and assistance.




ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                                 Page 17 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
Display of Notices
With regard to ACS a notice sating the location of first aid facilities and the name of the Appointed
Person is prominently displayed in the Main Office.

Accident Book Availability
An Accident Book is kept by the Appointed Person with the First Aid Kit to record the following:
 Full name and address of the injured person.
 Their occupation
 Date of entry.
 Date and time of accident.
 Accident details, how it happened, what and where was the work, what was the circumstances.
 Signature of person making the entry (if different to the person being treated, the address is also
   to be given).

The accident book must comply with the requirements of the Data Protection Act, as such form BI 510
supplied by HMSO will be used for this purpose.

Training and Competence
All First Aiders will be trained and certificated in accordance with the regulations. This requires the
training to be carried out by a HSE approved body and is currently 4 days duration. A pass
(accompanied with a certificate) then allows the person to become a first aider.

All first aiders must only provide treatment that they have been trained and should refer all other
cases to a competent medical professional.




ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                              Page 18 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
Hazardous Substances - COSHH

Introduction
The Control of Substances Harmful to Health Regulations (COSHH) require that Managers prevent
the exposure of their staff to harmful substances or processes. Where this is not possible then the
exposure must be reduced to a level as low as is reasonably practicable, at least below the
Occupational Exposure Standards (OES). These regulations have been produced to provide a
framework for the management of the health risks produced by harmful substances.

The Company acknowledges that hazardous chemicals can cause serious injuries and ill health if not
used, handled or stored correctly.

Limited amounts of office consumables and cleaning materials are currently in use, these have been
assessed in accordance with the procedure below and both the assessment and Material Safety Data
Sheets are available to staff.

No new substances will be used by staff until a suitable assessment has been carried out; staff have
been advised not to use any unknown substance when in Service Use’s homes.

COSHH Process
Research
Before a suitable and sufficient assessment can be produced, the details of the substances to be
used, the place where the work is to be carried out and any other information which could affect the
exposure of a person to a harmful substance must be gathered.

Assessment
The assessment which must be documented is the heart of the COSHH regulations, it must be made
by a competent person prior to the work commencing. It must be reviewed regularly and when
changes have been made to the process or personnel.

Compliance with the assessment enables employers to demonstrate readily that all factors have been
considered and that they have adequate knowledge on which to base control measures to reduce and
control health risks associated with the work.

Control measures
If an assessment details any control measures these must be followed by the employee.

Exposure monitoring
If exposure monitoring is required to ensure that adequate control is being achieved, a sampling
regime, designed by a specialist such as an Occupational Hygienist must be implemented.

Health surveillance
If considered necessary to protect the health of employees, or the assessor is unsure the advice of an
Occupational Hygienist will be sought with regard to health surveillance. Employees must be allowed
access to their health surveillance records when requested.

Information, instruction and training
Employees exposed to harmful substances must be provided with such information, instruction and
training as is suitable and sufficient for them to know the risks to their health from that exposure and
the steps required to prevent or control it.

Storage
All substances must be stored according to:
 The manufacturer’s instructions.
 The findings of the COSHH assessment.

ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                               Page 19 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
   Any client or Landlord requirements.
   Product compatibility
   Danger to other persons from fumes or increased fire risk
   Fire protection and containment
   etc.

All products should be stored in appropriate cupboards or other specialised stores unless the risks
and quantities are low. Further advice and guidance is available from the Material Safety Data Sheet
(MSDS), the supplier or the internet.

Forms
C1 – COSHH Risk Assessment




ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                           Page 20 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
Health and Safety Inspections
Introduction
Health and Safety Management Systems and procedures can deteriorate over time or become
obsolete as a result of change. To prevent this, a regular inspection and review process is necessary
to provide feedback on how effectively the plans and components of the Policy are being
implemented.

As part of their daily routine, Managers will be expected to highlight and rectify any unsafe condition
they find. However, it is necessary to formally verify that procedures are in place and achieving what
they were designed to do (complied with) through regular inspections.

Purpose
Inspections should be designed to proactively highlight any foreseeable weakness in, for example:
 H & S training and education.
 Knowledge.
 Working practice and standards.
 Organisation and arrangements (e.g., inadequate staffing levels, defined and understood
    responsibilities).
 Maintenance standards.
 Statue/non-statute inspections.
 Documentation and record keeping (risk assessments, plant inspection records etc).
 Facilities (first aid, fire).
 Incorrect controls (when to start work, when to stop work, who to see for advice/ approvals etc).
 Reporting methods (accident/incident reports) and subsequent actions.
 Health and hygiene facilities.
 Protective measures (e.g. PPE).

Inspections should be planned and structured to obtain relevant information and likely causes of any
shortfalls identified. In all cases feedback must be given to the Manager responsible for the activity
being inspected in order that corrective action (if required) can be taken. Good points and initiatives
should also be recorded and fed back into the system as they can assist in achieving continuous
improvement.

Recording
Inspections should be documented and reviewed to ensure the findings have been actioned, to this
end ACS will use the accompanying Checklist/report.

Any shortfall that is considered to be an imminent risk to employees and others will immediately be
brought to the attention of the Managing Director. If considered sufficiently serious the work will be
stopped until the risk is within acceptable levels.

Inspections will be carried out by the Managing Director or another competent person with a sound
understanding of the work aspect being inspected.

Forms
H1 – Office Inspection




ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                                Page 21 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
Hire of Equipment
Introduction
Equipment may be hired in or supplied from reputable sources where there is a need for specialist
equipment, or where the work is carried out infrequently and it is not financially viable to purchase it.

Risk Management
The activity using the hired equipment must be risk assessed prior to the equipment being used.

Training and Competence
Adequate instruction and training must be provided to the operative to ensure they are aware of how
to use the equipment, the associated limitations, hazards and risk controls. This training may be
provided by the supplier.

The training and authorisation is to be entered onto the ACS training register.

The Equipment
All equipment must be supplied in a safe and operable state with all operating instructions and
associated test certificates necessary to allow the operator to work safely.

               IF THIS IS NOT SO, REFUSE TO ACCEPT THE PLANT/EQUIPMENT.

Everyone hiring equipment will usually be asked to sign a hire agreement, ensure that the terms and
conditions for use are read and understood before signing.




ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                                Page 22 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
Lone Working
Introduction
This section gives general guidance on working alone. It offers advice on issues, which managers
need to consider in respect of employees working alone with Service Users.

Risk Management
Establishing safe working arrangements for lone workers is no different from organising the safety of
other employees. The assessor must be competent and understand the work being undertaken.

In compiling the risk assessment the following should be considered:
 Does the workplace present a special risk to the lone worker?
 Can one person adequately control the risks of the job or are more people necessary?
 Is there safe access and exit for one person, especially at night?
 Does the work involve lifting persons too large for one person?
 Can one person safely handle any temporary lifting equipment such as a portable hoist?
 Is the person medically fit and able to work alone? {Check that lone workers have no medical
    conditions, which make them unsuitable for working alone. Seek medical advice if necessary.
    Consider both routine work and foreseeable emergencies, which may impose additional physical
    and mental burdens on the individual.}
 Is there any risk of violence?

Safety Arrangements
Lone workers should not be exposed to significantly more risk those employees who work together.
Precautions should take account of normal working conditions and foreseeable emergency situations,
e.g. fire, equipment failure, illness, accidents, violence.

Lone workers should be capable of responding correctly in emergency situations, therefore
emergency procedures should be established and employees trained to implement them. Information
about emergency procedures should be made available to lone workers who are visiting or working
on Service User’s premises.

Suitable systems should be devised to monitor the condition of lone workers (where possible, it
should be a minimum of hourly), and include at least a check at the end of the working period. In
addition it is desirable to consider procedures for:
 Supervisors to periodically visit and visually monitor people working alone
 Regular contact between the lone worker and supervisor using either a telephone, radio or other
    suitable method.
 Automatic warning devices, which operate if specific signals are not received periodically from the
    lone worker.
 Other devices to raise the alarm in the event of an emergency which may be operated manually
    or activated automatically by the absence of activity.

Supervision
Although it may not be practicable to constantly supervise lone workers, it is still a Manager’s duty to
provide appropriate control of the work. Supervision complements information, instruction and
training and helps to ensure that employees understand the risks associated with their work and that
the necessary safety precautions are carried out. It can also provide guidance in situations of
uncertainty.

The extent of supervision required depends on the risks involved and the proficiency and experience
of the employee to identify and handle safety issues. Employees new to the job, undergoing training,
doing a task which presents special risks, or dealing with new situations may need to be accompanied
at first. The extent of supervision required is a management decision. It should not be left to
ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                               Page 23 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
individuals to decide they require assistance. Safety supervision can generally be carried out when
visits are made to check the progress and quality of the work and may take the form of periodic site
visits coupled with discussions in which safety issues are assessed.

Training and Competence
Training is particularly important where there is limited supervision to control, guide and help in
situations of uncertainty. It may be critical to avoid panic reactions in unusual situations. Lone
workers need to understand fully the risks involved in the work, the necessary precautions and be
sufficiently experienced. Managers should establish clear procedures to set standards of what can
and cannot be done while working alone. They should specify how to behave in circumstances which
are new, unusual, or beyond the scope of training, e.g. when to stop work and seek advice.

Detailed instruction on the ACS Lone Working procedure is available in the Personnel Procedures
Manual.

The training is to be entered onto the ACS training register

Forms
R5 – Lone Worker Risk Assessment




ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                           Page 24 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
Manual Handling
Introduction
ACS Employees frequently have to manually handle Service Users of varying weights and sizes.

The Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992 aim to eliminate, or at least reduce, the risk of
personal injury to employees whilst undertaking their work activities. The emphasis is on
assessment/identification of risk associated with any given work related activity, following which
appropriate measures should be put in place to counter that risk. Unfortunately, despite modern
science and technology, not all handling operations can be mechanised and the need for manual
handling still remains.

Risk Management
A risk assessment must be carried out where there is the requirement to carry, move of lift anything.
Where the risk assessment has indicated if, when moving the object, it is likely to cause injury
controls must be introduced to reduce the risk as far as reasonably practicable. The person(s) who
will be carrying out the work should be involved in the risk assessment process.

A risk assessment should consider the following elements before attempting to move anything:

The task                                             The Load

Proximity of the load to the body.                   Weight.
Posture of the body.                                 Unwieldiness.
Twisting and stooping movement                       Difficult to grasp.
required.
Lifting/lowering.                                    Stability of load.
Distances.                                           Are contents liable to shift?
Pushing/pulling forces required.                     Is it sharp/hot or otherwise damaging?
Sudden shift of load from centre of
gravity.
Frequent/prolonged physical effort.
Insufficient rest/ recovery periods.
Handling whilst seated.
Handling by a team.
Job rotation.


The working environment                              The individual

Space constraints.                                   Physical suitability for task.
Uneven/slippery floor.                               Health problems.
Stability of the floor.                              Risk to pregnant employees.
Light conditions .                                   Training.
Extremes of temperature.


Workplace and Environment
In order to minimise the chance of injury to a person the following measures are to be taken:
1. Avoidance of manual handling by redesigning the tasks to avoid moving the load or by
    automation/mechanisation.
2. Assessment of risk – for any manual handling operation that cannot be avoided an assessment of
    the likely risks has to be made.
3. Reduction – take steps to reduce the risk of injury either through reducing the load itself, altering
    the environment or introducing some mechanical aid. Where a mechanical aid is introduced the
    hazards associated this that item must also be considered.
ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                               Page 25 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
4. Continually review the situation.

Training and Competence
Where manual handling is required ACS will provide full and comprehensive training.

If the use of mechanical aids (People Hoists) is involved, suitable training will also be provided on the
equipment to be used.

It is also the employee’s responsibility to attend training sessions and not to take risk, therefore
individuals must:
 Co-operate with ACS in the making of assessments.
 Make full and proper use of equipment and report any defects
 Inform their Manager of any medical/health/physical condition, which may affect their ability to
     carry out manual handling operations safely.

The training is to be entered onto the ACS training register.

The Equipment
All mechanical handling equipment must be suitable for the takes i.e. the safe working loads be
marked, all equipment tested and recorded on a regular basis

The equipment should be checked prior to use to ensure no obvious damage has occurred and any
defects reported immediately; the item must be removed from use until repaired.

Where specified, PPE must be worn

Forms
R2 - Moving and Handling Risk Assessment

R4 – Manual Handling Risk Assessment




ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                                Page 26 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
Mobile People Hoists
Introduction
Mobile hoists for lifting Service Users are classified as ‘Lifting Equipment’ and are governed by the
Lifting Equipment and Lifting Operations Regulations 1998 and the Provision and Use of Work
Equipment Regulations 1999.

Risk Management
Pre-planning of any lifting operation is essential and a requirement of the regulations. The overall risk
assessment should identify the specific hazards and the risk controls required.

The risk assessment and method statement should consider the following:
 Confirm the validity of the equipment certification
 Competence of the operator.
 A nominated person in charge of the lifting activity.
 Physical restrictions of area.
 Actions to be taken n the event of an equipment failure.
 Stability of the equipment.
 The person to be lifted.
 The Safe Working Load (SWL) of all parts of the equipment to be used.
 Other persons and equipment in the vicinity.

Training and Competence
All users of People Hoists must be trained and authorised by a competent person including refresher
training.

The training is to be entered onto the ACS training register.

The Equipment
The following equipment checks prior to use are essential control measures to ensure safe working.
 Certification and inspection records up to date.
 Inspection for defects to ensure that equipment is not badly worn, rusty or damaged, all safety
   features are operational.
 Clear written instructions on the safe use of equipment.
 Stability of the hoist and the security of person to be lifted.
 Controls to prevent unauthorised use.
 Regular maintenance of the equipment.
 Procedures for the reporting and correcting of defects.
 Suitable storage areas and facilities to ensure the equipment remains in a good condition.




ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                                Page 27 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
New and Expectant Mothers
Introduction
This section is intended to give advice regarding the health and safety of an employee during a period
of maternity absence ad should be read in conjunction with information provided by HR.

ACS understands the responsibilities that pregnant employees and new parents have outside of the
work place and aims to support employees through such times. The Company believes that this
support is beneficial and valued by the employee and in turn, helps to retain valuable skills in the
workplace.

Managers and employees should note that many of the benefits associated with maternity are subject
to both qualifying and notification requirements and as such it is important that the Managing Director
is contacted for further advice.

Responsibilities
Employees should notify their manager of their pregnancy so that a specific assessment of their work
can be undertaken and any necessary changes made as soon as practicable. Employees should
also inform their manager if they have been through labour in the last six months and/or are breast
feeding.

Risk assessment
When advised by a member of staff that she is in this category, ACS Care Services will undertake a
specific assessment of the risks (to both mother and baby) associated with the task or activity she will
be undertaking during the course of her working day. Where reasonably practicable to do so,
measures will then be taken to either eliminate any risk or at least reduce those risks to within an
acceptable limit.

The employee will be provided with comprehensive, relevant information and training on:
    Those risks identified in the risk assessment
    The control measures to be adopted to eliminate/reduce those risks.
    Details pertaining to First Aiders/Appointed Persons

Aspects to consider
Ergonomics
Studies have shown that the two aspects of work that most worry pregnant women are lifting and
standing for long periods of time. To address these concerns managers should look at the layout of
the workplace and the work routine.

Display Screen Equipment
DSE needs to be comfortable to use; as pregnancy develops the woman’s shape changes therefore
the workstation needs to be kept under review to ensure that it is being adapted to allow for the
changes needed.

HSE guidance reiterates that there is no risk of radiation from DSE; to reduce any risk of concerns
which could lead to harmful stress the employee should be made aware of this and if necessary
consult with her GP.

Manual handling
The amount, weight and frequency of items to be lifted and carried must be reconsidered together
with storage arrangements to minimise stretching and bending, as hormonal changes will affect the
ligaments. In addition changes to the woman’s size and the altered centre of gravity may lead to
postural problems, backache and greater susceptibility to injury when involved in manual handling
tasks.

ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                                Page 28 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
The risk will be reduced if the weight of items used and the distance equipment is carried is reduced.
Certain other activities may become more hazardous as the pregnancy develops such as work on
ladders or slippery surfaces; as the woman’s size increases agility reduces and balance alters, so
these sorts of activities may become more difficult to achieve safely.

Hazardous substances
Any work involving the use of hazardous substances must be reviewed, certain chemicals can have
adverse effects on the foetus and use or contact with these substances must be eliminated.

Work routine
Where the work involves intense pressure that could increase blood pressure advice should be
sought from an Occupational Health Adviser or the employee’s own doctor about how to manage the
situation.

The person could suffer from morning sickness and unusual tiredness that may affect her work and
any shift patterns.

Where possible give the employee some control over the way work is organised in order to help
reduce stress and lower their blood pressure.

Rest facilities
Employees must be allowed to use the company’s rest facilities and take breaks; seating will be
provided for all staff (this can be at their desks).

N.b. Rest facilities for pregnant women and nursing mothers should be conveniently situated in
relation to their work and sanitary facilities and include the facility to lie down.

Residual risk
If, having made all possible adjustment to the work, the risk to the woman remains unacceptable the
Managing Director will consult with the employee with a view to a transfer to a suitable alternative
work.

If a suitable alternative is not achievable, suspension from work on normal wages or salary may be
considered but this action should only be contemplated in extreme circumstances and must be carried
out with full and proper consultation.

Forms
R6 – New and Expectant Mother Risk Assessment




ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                               Page 29 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
Personal Safety
Introduction
It is a proven fact that slips, trips and falls are the greatest causes of accidents in working locations;
the primary cause is that of bad housekeeping. ACS employees are also at risk through the manual
handling needs of Service Users and should always refer to the Manual Handling Assessment and
procedures when undertaking these tasks.

Precautions
The following precautions should be adhered to reduce the risk of an accident:
    Keep work areas in a tidy and orderly state.
    Keep passageways, stairways, entrances and exits, in particular emergency exits clear and
         free from obstruction.
    Spillages should be cleared up immediately.
    The amount of stored goods and paperwork should be minimised.
    Objects should not be stored on top of high-level cabinets or be left on the floor (tripping
         hazard).
    Fill filing cabinets from the bottom upwards.
    Pullout drawers should be closed immediately after use.
    Electric and telephone cables should run tidily and not pose a tripping hazard.
    Ventilation grilles of electrical equipment must not be blocked and extraction vents regularly
         cleaned.
    Drinks should not be placed in the vicinity of electrical equipment.
    Where practicable electrical equipment should be switched off before leaving the premises
         unoccupied for any length of time (e.g. to go home).
    All furniture and other equipment must be maintained in good repair.




ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                                   Page 30 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
Risk Assessment
Introduction
This section is intended to assist Managers and Supervisors undertake meaningful Risk Assessments
relating to ACS operations.

Under the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999, all work hazards must be
recorded and analysed through the risk assessment process to ensure that appropriate risk controls,
competence or skills needed by operators and associated remedial action if appropriate are made
available.

Without an assessment of the possible risk relating from exposure to or the release of a hazard during
work, health and safety cannot be effectively and proactively managed. An objective assessment,
based on the experience and knowledge of the assessor, is in most cases adequate to identify an
appropriate course of action for managing the risk. Where there is any doubt, qualified advice or
measurement must be sought.

Risk Assessment
Risk assessment is an essential, proactive management tool, used to identify hazards and implement
risk controls prior to work activities being undertaken.

We instinctively undertake a risk assessment before carrying out most day to day activities; however
there is a legal requirement for assessments relating to work activities to be documented and made
known to all relevant parties.
  Hazard – is something that could cause harm, e.g. electricity, machinery, bright light, trailing cables
  etc.
  Risk – is the likelihood of that harm occurring.
  Risk Assessment – takes account of these two aspects together with the frequency of the event
  and the severity of the possible outcome.

Methodology
It is always advisable for assessors to discuss the assessment with the staff involved in the operation
being assessed; they are most likely to be able to identify the hazards and will in many instances
have the technical and local expertise to suggest control measures.

All work activity needs to be reassessed, not only current activities but also new work or planed work,
Managers should review the work activities they are assessing from input to output and identify the
relevant hazards at each stage of the operation, step by step, and consider the effectiveness of
existing risk controls and the consequences of anything happening that could lead to injury.

The results of this process will then enable an assessment to be made using the Risk Assessment
Matrix below.

ACS Care Services will use the attached Risk Assessment form as a template for assessing the risks
associated with its working activities and day-to-day operations. These assessments will be retained
on site and detail any remedial action required.




ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                                 Page 31 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
       Risk Matrix

                                                  RISK MATRIX
Consequences                                              Likelihood
                                                                                                      E. Has occurred
                                                                                  D. Occurs several
                      A. Never heard of   B. Heard of in      C. Has occurred                         several times in
      Harm            in industry         industry            in ACS
                                                                                  times a year in
                                                                                                      activity being
                                                                                  industry
                                                                                                      assessed
1.   No injury
2.   Slight injury                              Low
3.   Minor injury
4.   Major injury                                                Medium
5.   Fatality                                                                                              High
6.   Multi-fatality

       The left hand column ‘Consequences’ is used to indicate increasing severity of potential harm
       resulting from credible scenarios. The possible consequences should be used, i.e. consequences that
       could have resulted from the hazard if circumstances had been less favourable.

       The columns on the right signify the ‘Likelihood’ of the harm occurring. It is estimated on the basis of
       historical evidence or experience that the identified consequences have materialised within the
       industry or ACS.

       The resulting risk level is obtained by selecting an appropriate consequence row on the vertical axis
       of the Risk Matrix; the likelihood on the horizontal axis and reading the result at their intersection.

       E.g. A possible accident that could cause minor injury would score a risk rating of LOW.

       The findings and results should be recorded on the accompanying Risk Assessment Form and made
       known to all those involved with the activity.

       Each Risk Assessment Form should have a unique reference corresponding with the work activity.

       Identify Hazards Associated with the Activity
       For each activity identify the hazards which have the potential to cause injury, damage or impact to
       the environment. The starting point for this may be as simple as a walk around the area to observe
       your operation. Always consider reducing or removing hazards if possible but in many instances this
       will not be practical.

       Identify Who or What is at Risk
       Once the hazards have been identified consider who or what is at risk as a result of the activity. As
       well as the people carrying out the task consider everybody else who may be affected, service users,
       visitors, contractors, cleaners, public etc.

        Also evaluate the effects of unplanned occurrences such as emergency situations and the loss of
       critical services.

       Review Control Measures
       For many existing operations and activities, control measures will already exist or other assessments
       under COSHH or Noise may be in place.

       Cross-references can be made to more detailed assessments or controls where required.




       ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                                Page 32 of 39
       Issue 1 – March 2007
Determine if these measures are still valid and being implemented and are suitable and sufficient to
effectively protect everything identified as being at risk. It may be that as a result of reviewing control
measures, some hazards will be identified as not being adequately controlled.

When assessing any new activity industry standards, codes of practices, guidance notes etc., will help
to establish control measures.

Develop and Implement Further Control
Should the risks appear to be not effectively controlled, further measures need to be developed an
integrated into procedures to reduce the overall risks to an acceptable level.

Any shortfalls in risk controls and remedial actions should be noted and fed into the Company
business planning procedure.

Manage and Review the Assessment
To be effective risk controls must be managed and modified in line with any changes to work
activities, the introduction of new equipment or the availability of new technology.

Generally speaking where the levels of risk are assessed as:

        LOW – the activity should be managed with a view to continuous improvement;

        MED – further risk reduction measures should be planned, e.g. training, substitution of
        equipment, mechanical aids, personal protective equipment, waste management etc;

        HIGH – the situation is intolerable and alternative methods of work should be investigated

Assessments should be reviewed:
       Annually
       Following an associated incident, near miss or lost time accident.
       If anything significant such as change in environment or the introduction of new
          equipment.

Forms
R1 – Risk Assessment




ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                                  Page 33 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
Signage

General
All safety signs must comply with the Health & Safety (Safety Signs and Signals) Regulations 1996.
The purpose of these regulations is to ensure there is a common understanding of the sign’s purpose
and message.

A safety sign is a sign that gives a message about health or safety by a combination of geometric
form, colour and symbol, there are legally defined standards to follow, which are shown below. Text
may or may not be added in addition, but may never be used without the appropriate sign. More than
one sign may be used if this helps understanding. The wording on safety notices must be in English
and, if necessary, in other appropriate languages.

Requirements
Where a hazard has been identified that cannot be avoided or adequately reduced by alternative
methods; appropriate safety signage must be used. All signs, design, installation and positioning must
be suitable for the position, environment and message purpose.

Consideration should be given as to the positioning and proximity of signs. This is to ensure clarity of
the message and to avoid confusion.

Annual checks should be carried out on all signs to ensure their intended purpose is stall valid and
they are not hidden from view.

Sign Specifications


Prohibition Signs
The background colour must be white. The circular band and cross bar must be red.
If a symbol is used it must be black and placed centrally on the background and must not obliterate
the cross bar.

Warning Signs
The background colour must be yellow. The triangular band must be black.
The symbol, which is necessary to amplify the meaning of the sign, must be black and placed
centrally on the background.


Mandatory Signs
The background colour must be blue.
The symbol, which is necessary to amplify the meaning of the sign, must be white and placed
centrally on the background.


Safe Condition Signs
The background colour must be green.
The symbol or text, which is necessary to amplify the meaning of the sign, must be white. The shape
of the sign must be oblong or square as necessary to accommodate the symbol or text.



Fire Fighting Signs
The background colour must be red.
The symbol, which is necessary to amplify the meaning of the sign, must be white. The shape of the
sign must be oblong or square as necessary to accommodate the symbol or text.

ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                               Page 34 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
Training

Introduction
Suitable training of employees is a requirement of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 and all
associated Regulations.

Training Requirements

The level of training required will normally be determined by the task being undertaken and the
accompanying risk assessment; some may only require ‘On the Job’ training whilst other task may
necessitate formal and examined courses.

All staff should receive induction training on emergency procedures as soon as possible after starting
with the Company.

Most training will require a refresher session at some point.

Recording
All relevant courses and approvals should be recorded in the ACS Training Register.

Forms
T1 – Training Record




ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                             Page 35 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
Work Related Stress
Introduction
The demands of everyday life, both domestic and work, places stresses and pressures on everyone;
a certain amount is needed to promote a fulfilling life, but what is unique to individuals is the level of
stress which is right for them. Most of the time people are able to cope with the pressures and regain
equilibrium but when the pressures become unrelenting and unbearable they may cease to be able to
cope. It is at this stage that real distress is suffered and this is manifested by psychological ill health,
indicated by various symptoms of illness and a drop in work performance. It is crucial that this
process is halted at an early stage when measures can be taken to help the individual recover. Once
someone is suffering from the full effects of stress, then he or she is likely to need many months to
recover their health and be able to get back to work.

Stress Management
The Company acknowledges that people may suffer from stress at work for a variety of reasons, be
they work related or personal. The Company cannot be expected to exercise any control over matters
that are outside of work although it will endeavour to be sympathetic.

In managing work related stress, primary prevention is the most important aspect of a manager's
duties and the Company will endeavour to minimise the risk of work related stress, where reasonably
practicable to do so, by:
     Providing conditions that are conducive to work and that take account of the health, safety
        and welfare of all employees
     Showing that it takes stress seriously and shows understanding towards people who admit to
        being under too much pressure.
     Encouraging managers to have an open and understanding attitude to what people say to
        them about the pressures of their work and to look for signs of stress in their staff.
     Ensuring that employees have the necessary skills, training and resources that they need, so
        that they know what to do, are confident that they can do it and receive credit for it.
     Ensuring good two-way communication, especially at times of change and not be afraid to
        listen.




ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                                   Page 36 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
Working at Height
Introduction
The Work at Height Regulations 2005 apply to all work at height where there is a risk of a fall likely to
cause personal injury. The regulations place duties on employers, the self-employed, and any person
who controls the work of others (e.g. facilities managers or building owners who may contract others
to work at height) to the extent they control the work.

Definitions
     A place is ‘at height’ if a person could be injured falling from it, even if it is at or below ground
        level.
     ‘Work’ includes moving around at a place of work (except by a staircase in a permanent
        workplace) but not travel to or from a place of work.

Employer’s Duties
ACS will avoid work at height, however where that is not practicable it will ensure that:
    All work at height is properly planned (including emergencies and rescue) and organised.
    All work at height takes account of weather conditions that could endanger health and safety.
    Those involved in work at height are trained and competent.
    The place where work at height is done is safe.
    Where the risk of a fall cannot be eliminated work equipment or other measures will be made
       available to minimise the distance and consequences of a fall should one occur.
    Equipment for work at height is appropriately inspected.
    The risks from fragile surfaces are properly controlled.
    The risks from falling objects are properly controlled.

All training must be entered into the ACS Training Register.

Employees’ Duties
Employees are expected to:
    Report any safety hazard in accordance with the procedures detailed in this Manual.
    Use the equipment supplied (including safety devices) properly, following any training and
      instructions given to them.
    Not to attempt any work at height or climb on anything provide in a client’s premises.

Risk Management
Prior to any work at height a suitable and sufficient risk assessment must first be carried out by a
competent person and the appropriate controls implemented.

Means of Access
Access to work at height must be safe; when selecting equipment managers/supervisors must:
    Use the most suitable equipment.
    Give collective protection measures (e.g. guard rails) priority over personal protection
       measures (e.g. safety harnesses).
    Take account of:
           - the working conditions; and
           - risks to the safety of all those at the place where the work equipment is to be used.
    Ensure that all equipment, temporary structures (e.g. scaffolding), and safety features comply
       with the detailed requirements of Schedules 2 to 6 of the Regulations.

More detailed guidance is available and advice should be sought if managers and assessors are
unsure of the method to be used.

ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                                  Page 37 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
Working Time Regulations 1998
Introduction
The Working Time Regulations implement two European Directives on the organisation of working
time and the employment of young workers. The Regulations cover the right to annual leave, to have
rest breaks and limit the length of the working week.

Key points

       A 48-hour maximum working week. Employers have a contractual obligation not to require a
        worker to work more than an average 48-hour week.
       4 weeks' paid holiday.
       Minimum daily rest periods of 11 hours, unless shift-working arrangements have been made
        that comply with the Regulations.
       20-minute daily rest breaks after six hours' work, with young workers entitled to 45 minutes if
        more than four and a half hours are worked.
       A weekly rest period of 24 hours every seven days.

However:
    Employers have the right to ask their staff to enter into a written agreement to opt out of the
      48-hour limit, for a specific period or indefinitely.
    A worker is entitled to bring the agreement to an end without the employer's consent.

Management
ACS Care Services will ensure that its working practices comply with the requirements of these
Regulations.




ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                               Page 38 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007
Young Workers
Introduction
Employers must ensure that any young person who is employed or taken on work experience is
protected while at work from risks that may be more significant due to their lack of experience and
maturity.

Young Person
A Young Person is defined as being above the minimum school leaving age but less than 18 years
old.

Child
A child is someone who is below the minimum school leaving age.

Risk assessment
A risk assessment must be carried before the young person starts work to identify what risks are
apparent. The assessment must take account of existing control measures plus the person’s physical
and psychological capacity and the possibility that the risk may not be recognised due to the person’s
lack of experience or training.

It should also be noted that equipment bought for and designed for use by adults may not be suitable
and it may be necessary to make a special purchase.

If the person is classified as a child the risk assessment and any other relevant information must be
provided in writing to their parents (or guardians) before the child commences work.

Significant risk
If a significant risk remains after all controls have been implemented a child cannot be employed to
do the work.

In similar circumstances a young person may only be employed when:
      It is necessary for their training; and
      They are supervised by a competent person; and
      The risk is reduced to the lowest practical level.




ACS - Health & Safety Policy                                                               Page 39 of 39
Issue 1 – March 2007

								
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