Interactive

Document Sample
Interactive Powered By Docstoc
					Interactive Lectures

Valerie Freeman & Jennifer Haywood
    Dept. of Linguistics TA Workshop
       University of Washington
           September 23, 2011


                                       1
                 Agenda
• Interactive slides
  – Practice: Improve a slide
• Interactive class time
  – Group work




                                2
                Tips: Slide Layout
•   Not too much text or information at once
•   Short sentences, bulleted lists
•   Font not too small (24+) or stylish (=hard to read)
•   Text not light or clashing with background
•   No busy, cramped, or dark background




                                                          3
                Tips: Slide Layout
•   Not too much text or information at once
•   Short sentences, bulleted lists
•   Font not too small (24+) or stylish (=hard to read)
•   Text not light or clashing with background
•   No busy, cramped, or dark background




                                                          4
                Tips: Slide Layout
•   Not too much text or information at once
•   Short sentences, bulleted lists
•   Font not too small (24+) or stylish (=hard to read)
•   Text not light or clashing with background
•   No busy, cramped, or dark background
    – Solid, light colors for background, dark text easier
      on the eyes than dark background with light text


                                                             5
               Tips: Animations
• Use simple animations, and sparingly
   – Gate list items with ―appear‖ animation
   – Many other animations are distracting

• Use color, arrows, boxes to enhance, highlight
  areas as you explain
• Slide transitions often detract/distract
   – If used, make sure transitions make things easier to
     follow, not harder


                                                            6
Tips: Illustrations
 Associate new material with something easy to
  remember:
   older material
   students’ lives/interests


 Short quotes
   Use to drive home a point – concisely
   Good if funny or surprising



                                                  7
Tips: Illustrations
 Relevant pictures (clip art, comics, photos)
   Clearly related to material: helps students link
    new info to their old knowledge
   Something they recognize (cartoon, celeb)

   Funny, illustrative, simple, clear

   Not too big, complicated, cluttered, cramped

   If necessarily complicated, highlight parts or build
    it up as you go; keep location on slides the same

                                                           8
         Left hemisphere: Language
   Broca’s area:                   Wernicke’s area:
    Responsible for speech           Responsible for speech
    production and                   comprehension and
    articulation; controls use       selection of words
    of inflectional, function        from mental lexicon
    morphemes
             Front                        Back




                                                             9

Paul Broca                                        Karl Wernicke
         Left hemisphere: Language
   BROca’s area:        Wernicke’s area:

    PROduction            comprehension



             Front             Back




                                                  10

Paul Broca                             Karl Wernicke
 Read small text aloud
 Explain relation to subject matter
                                       11
Tips: Sound and Video
 Short, relevant examples
 Do a sound/video check before each class
 Have web links open in background before you start
 Avoid making your slides on a (type of) computer
 different from the one you use in class
 Save audio/video files in an easy-to-find spot near
 your slides, in case your embedded links don’t work
 Have a backup plan (how to manage w/o the clips)


                                                        12
Degrees of mutual intelligibility
"Jackie Ham came in here Saturday night. That kid
drove his mom out. He said, ‗I had to get out of the
house — Mom‘s been hollerin‘ and cussin‘ at me all
day. She was behind the counter; she said, ‗It‘s a lie,
Jack! He said, ‗Who‘s that, Mom?‘" (Tangier Island, VA)
http://youtu.be/AIZgw09CG9E

"High tide on the sound side, last night the water fire,
tonight the moon shine. No fish. What do you suppose
the matter, Uncle Woods?" (Ocracoke, NC)
http://youtu.be/jXs9cf2YWwg

                        Dialect continuum              13
        Interviews with aphasics
   Which aphasia do they have?
       What are their symptoms?
       What can and can‘t they say?


   ―Tono tono‖ http://youtu.be/Fw6d54gjuvA




                         Neuro: Aphasia       14
               Boring slides
• Divide into groups of 2-3
• Pick a slide to improve




                               15
                Ambiguity
• Hershey bars protest




                         Syntax   16
           Verbs
hypernym   hyponym
move       dance
cut        slice
motate     drive




            Semantics   17
                Count vs. mass nouns
•   ‘chair’ (count) vs. ‘furniture’ (mass)
•   plural form? chairs, *furnitures
•   a__
     – a chair
     – *a furniture
•   every__
     – every chair
     – *every furniture (every bit of furniture)
•   much__
     – *much chair (many chairs)
     – much furniture
•   enough__
     – *enough chair (enough chairs)
     – enough furniture
•   bare noun
     – *I want chair.
     – I want furniture.
•   the__
     – the chair
     – the furniture
•   some__
     – some chair
                                           Semantics   18
     – some furniture
How does a spell checker work?
•   Compares input text to a dictionary (+ morphological analyzer) to detect
    nonwords

•   Runs error types in reverse (insertion, deletion, transposition, substitution)
    to come up with candidate corrections

•   Compares candidate corrections to dictionary to find viable alternatives

•   Ranks candidate corrections according to probability (frequency of that word
    in context)

•   What about irregular morphology?

•   What about spelling mistakes which result in other actual words (e.g.,
    three/there, stationery/stationary)?

                                       CompLing                                      19
              Language isolate
• No known related languages
  – Basque (France, Spain)
  – Sumerian (extinct lg. of Iraq)




                         Historical   20
   Stages of language acquisition
• All (normal) children go through same stages
  of acquisition in same order
• Age at which they reach stage and rate of
  progression through the stages can vary




                     Acquisition                 21
       Code Switching / Mixing
• Using more than one language within a
  conversation or utterance
  – Sabes mi school bus no tiene un stop sign
• Some think this suggests one language
  system, but children as young as 4 mos. can
  differentiate languages
  – …so why mix the two together?



                        Acquisition             22
      Interactive Class Time
 What are ways to get students energized?
   Brainstorm together: students call out ideas,
   you or a student write on board
   Give a minute to think, then call on people
   randomly or in order around the room
   Group work: Worksheets, practice skills, games




                                                     23
Why group work?
 Active, learner-centered
 Increases student engagement
  with content
 Increases student self-sufficiency
  & confidence
 Helps shy/reticent students
 Develops useful social & work
  skills
Types of in-class group work
Review  of concepts
Application of concepts
Practice
Discussion
Setting it up
 Present  task clearly (give example)
 Give time limit
 Consider having students work
  alone first (think-pair-share)
 Consider having students move
  around to form groups
 Remind students to introduce
  themselves to group members
Supervising group work
Circulate and listen
 Ssare more likely to ask questions
 Problems can be addressed
 ◦ Ss not on task
 ◦ Incorrect information
 ◦ Stuck or frustrated students
 But   don’t hover!
Supervising group work
Time management
 Keep  an eye on progress
  ◦ Monitor slower/faster groups
  ◦ Adjust timing
 Have task for early finishers
 Give 2-minute warning
Debriefing
 Have  students share product
 Have students report on discussion
 Call on different groups for answers
 Have students write on board
 Ask for questions
 Summarize, restate or rephrase
  when needed
Potential problems
 Students  don’t want to
  participate
 Students dominate


 Others?
 Solutions?
Think about your experience…
with in-class group work.
• What has worked well for you?
• What problems have you
  encountered?

(Now discuss with a partner.
Make a list of problems and possible
 solutions.)

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:4
posted:3/18/2012
language:
pages:31