Mock Trial unit - NMLCSS

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Mock Trial unit - NMLCSS Powered By Docstoc
					                                                                                          David Johnson
                                                                           ELA/Social Studies Consultant
                                                                                Career Technical Center

Overarching Question:

                 How do we know that our legal system is fair and just?



                          Participate as a member of
                                    society



                                   Participating
                                    in Civic Life

        Apply questioning and                         Determine the credibility
    evidence to real life scenarios                         of evidence



Questions to Focus Assessment and Instruction:

1) How is evidence collected and evaluated by those involved in a trial?

2) How do stakeholders in a trial prepare for their role?

3) What makes a legal system fair?




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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
Unit Abstract:

        This unit was written with a focus on Career Technical Students in a Public Safety setting to
potentially identify various ways in which students in this class may be called upon to serve, (i.e. as
lawyers, witnesses, etc.) The unit is slowed down to allow for a deep understanding of how to comb
through evidence, determining the difference between relevant and irrelevant facts, critical thinking to
come to a conclusion that is supported by evidence, and a great deal of students thinking on their feet.

         Students begin by examining four case studies. A collaborative approach is taken for the first
two, and the second two allow for independent practice. From there, we begin to break down the
various components of the trial itself. Students will collaboratively write an opening statement together
in class to begin looking at the various components that are necessary (i.e. taking a stand, supporting
with evidence, identifying the opposing point of view, summing up in a conclusion) before gaining
independent practice.

         Students then have an opportunity to learn about the direct and cross examination of a witness
by seeing examples first, and then practicing on their own. From there, a lesson on closing statements
will allow for students to practice both preparing for and writing a closing statement on the fly.

         Before jumping right into the conducting of an actual Mock Trial, students will have the
opportunity to be walked through an entire trial process with a practice trial based on Keyed In. This
will occupy several class periods and go through each step in the process. The final assessment comes
when an actual trial based off of a case study kids have not seen is conducted in class.
                            1
Social Studies Standards:

        Responsibility of Citizenship:

       5.4.2 – Describe the importance of citizens’ civic responsibilities including obeying the law, being
informed and attentive to public issues, monitoring political leaders and governmental agencies,
assuming leadership when appropriate, paying taxes, registering to vote and voting knowledgably on
candidates and issues, serving as a juror, serving in the armed forces, performing public service.

       5.4.3 – Explain why meeting personal and civic responsibilities is important to the preservation
and improvement of American constitutional democracy.

        Rights of Citizenship:



1
         The author of this unit is interpreting HSCE in a specific way for identification purposes. Public
policy in this unit is referring to the laws in question throughout the Mock Trial unit, as laws are
generally considered “public policy.” The High School Content Expectations designated as being taught
throughout the course of the unit are relevant if interpreted so.



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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
        5.3.1 Identify and explain personal rights (e.g., freedom of thought, conscience, expression,
association, movement and residence, the right to privacy

        5.3.7 – Using the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, and Eighth Amendments, describe the rights of
the accused; and using case studies and examples, explore the limit and scope of these rights.

        Civic Inquiry:

         6.1.2 - Locate, analyze, and use various forms of evidence, information, and sources about a
significant public policy issue, including primary and secondary sources, legal documents, non text based
information, and other forms of political communication.

        6.1.4 – Address a public issue by suggesting alternative solutions or courses of action, evaluating
the consequences of each, and proposing an action to address the issue or resolve the problem.

        6.1.5 – Make a persuasive, reasoned argument on a public issue and support using evidence.

Career and College Readiness Standards:

        RH.11-12.1 – Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary
sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

        RH.11-12.2 – Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source;
provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among key details and ideas.

       RH.11-12.3 – Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which
explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.

        RH.11-12.7 – Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse
formats and media (e.g. visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or
solve a problem.

        RH.11-12.8 – Evaluate an author’s premises, claims, and evidence by corroborating or
challenging them with other information.

       RH.11-12.9 – Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a
coherent understanding of an idea or event, noticing discrepancies among sources.

        WHST.11-12.1 – Write arguments focused on discipline specific content.

        WHST.11-12.4 – Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization,
and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

         WHST.11-12.7 – Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question
(including a self generated question) or solve a problem, narrow or broaden the inquiry when
appropriate: synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject
under investigation.


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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
        WHST.11-12.8 – Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital
sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in
terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to
maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a
standard format for citation.

        WHST.11-12.9 – Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and
research.

MCCTE Standards:

       I . Achieve additional academic knowledge and skills required to pursue the full range of career
and postsecondary education opportunities within a career cluster.

        III. Solve problems using critical thinking skills (analyze, synthesize, and evaluate) independently
and in teams. Solve problems using creativity and innovation.

         V. Understand roles within teams, work units, departments, organizations, inter-organizational
systems, and the larger environment. Identify how key organizational systems affect organizational
performance and the quality of products and services. Understand global context of industries and
careers.


Key Concepts:
jury
direct examination
cross examination
plaintiff
defendant
rights of the accused
witness
case study
breaking and entering
malicious destruction of property
opening statement
court procedure
closing statement
paralegal

Duration: 15 Class periods

Materials:
Case Study 1 – No Cause for Celebration
Case Study 2 – A Late Night for Gertie
Case Study 3 – A Murder Most Fowl
Case Study 4 – Keyed In
Case Study 5 – Trouble for Travis
Case Study 6 – Blaze of Glory

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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
Thinking Like the Prosecution (Handout)
YouTube clip – Opening statement http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1s0WpKURSV8&feature=related
(or other teacher provided resource)
Sample Opening Statements
Opening Statement PowerPoint
10 Common Objections (Handout)
Jury Note Taking Sheet
YouTube Clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4jD4SgHyM2k Showing a direct examination
YouTube Clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZCEbwlwihbg&feature=related Showing a fictional
trial (play setting) for Objection practice
Objectionable Examples Script
Witness Statements (Handout)
Closing Statements (Handout)
Keyed In Trial Walkthrough
Case Study 5 Trial

Unit Development References
(Wiggins & McTighe, Understanding by Design, 1996), (Wiggins & McTighe, Understanding by Design:
Professional Development Workbook, 2004)

Lesson Sequence:
         Lesson 1 –No Cause for Celebration – In lesson one, Students are able to practice the skills
necessary to really kick this unit off, and together as a class are walked through the first case study, as
well as the questions of focus. The lesson begins with the distribution of the handout of Case Study 1 –
No Cause for Celebration. Students are instructed to read once to build familiarity with the text, then a
second time to begin actually highlighting the important information. Students will then engage in a
large group analysis of the case study and determine what the facts in the case are, what they still need
to know, who they believe perpetrated the crime, the evidence that supports that conclusion, and of
course, what crime was committed in the first place. Students record the class answers on their
individual handouts which are graded as pass/fail.

        Lesson 2 – A Late Night for Gertie – In this lesson, students are once again practicing the skills
necessary for the following modules in the unit. This time, students are presented with a case with
fewer concrete details, and are partnered up into groups of 2-3 members. The lesson begins with the
distribution of handout Case Study – A Late Night for Gertie. Students are instructed once again to
individually read the handout for familiarity first, then a second time for the identification of important
information. Students will then collaboratively in groups determine what crime was committed, what
the facts in the case are, what they still need to know, and who they believed perpetrated the crime and
why. Students record the group answers on their individual handouts which are graded for content this
time.

          Lesson 3 – A Murder Most Fowl – In this lesson students are once again putting the necessary
skills for later modules to the test, this time individually. Students are presented with another case
study with fewer concrete details than in Lesson Two. This time instead of working collaboratively in
groups, students are allowed only the opportunity to discuss once they themselves have recorded their
own answers. Students are invited to read twice, once for familiarity, once for evidence, and then given
time to complete the required components on their own. A class discussion of the crime, the facts, the
perpetrator, and the evidence is then conducted and students have the opportunity to add to their lists

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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
before handing in. Handouts are graded for content, with more weight on missing and incomplete
answers this time around.

        Lesson 4 – Keyed In - In this lesson, students are given one final case study to complete the
same steps that were conducted in Lessons 1-4, only this time discussion of the overview will not take
place until after the response sheets have been collected. Student handouts are graded more harshly
this time around.

         Lesson 5 – How to Write an Opening Statement – In this lesson students move beyond the
basics of case studies, into actually writing opening statements as if they were a prosecuting attorney.
The lesson begins by taking a look at the PowerPoint – How to Write an Opening Statement. It
continues by revisiting Case Study 1 – No Cause for celebration. After a brief review on the facts in the
case, students are then prompted to write an opening statement for Case Study 1 as if they were the
prosecuting attorney. Student responses are graded for effort to meet the required components of an
opening statement, and as such are pass/fail. When responses have been returned to students with
feedback, students are then further directed to review one of the other case studies (2, 3, 4) and write
an opening statement for the case of their choosing, combining the facts as well as the required
components of an opening statement. These responses are graded for content.

        Lesson 6 – Direct and Cross Examination – In this lesson students move on to how to properly
examine a witness on the stand. The lesson begins with one of several examination clips from YouTube
and moves then to include the handout “10 Common Objections”. Two students from the class are
selected to read aloud a script while the rest of the class listens for opportunities to object. Students are
then invited to think about what questions they might ask witnesses in one of the four case studies were
they the prosecuting attorney, the defense attorney. In partners, they are given a statement by one of
the witnesses (or accused) from one of the case studies and asked to role-play the roles of lawyers and
witnesses in determining how to ask questions on the fly based on what is said, and in preparing
questions in advance. The next part of the lesson asks students to work collaboratively to write
questions based on a statement that could be used in a trial setting, avoiding the most common
objectionable question types. These will be handed in for review and given a pass/fail grade.

         Lesson 7 – Closing Statements – In this lesson students will learn how to craft a closing
statement. These are tough to write on the onset of a trial because of the facts that are often brought
to light during the trial itself. Students will need to understand that they’ll want to have one prepared in
advance but be able to add to it as need be. The lesson will begin by showing several closing statement
examples from YouTube as well as some student samples based off of Case Study 1. From there,
students will revisit their previous opening statements and write a closing statement based off of the
trial transcripts provided.

         Lesson 8 – Practicing for the Event – In this lesson students get a chance to actually practice the
various steps in a trial using Case Study 5, over a multi-day process which will allow for them to be
guided through the trial process with guidance and support. Students will be presented with a case
based around Case Study 4. Two students will be selected to be the trial lawyers on both sides, and
certain students will be witnesses and the defendant. Remaining class members will be members of the
jury and will have to use the Jury note taking sheet to keep the information straight. Students will then
have to deliberate under the microscope of the class to decide if the burden of proof was reached.



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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
       Lesson 9 – The Trial – In this lesson, students will actually complete the steps in the trial. The
guidance and support piece will be taken from students and they will be “on their own.”

         Lesson 10 – Critical Writing - In this lesson, students will complete the unit by writing an ACT
style writing based around the overarching question for the unit. Students will be able to use a great
deal of experience, from the early case studies all the way through one or two different Mock Trials to
draw evidence from to support their overall position.




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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
                        Lesson 1: No Cause for Celebration
Big Ideas of the Lesson
         How relevant information can be both explicit and inferred from a text.

Lesson Abstract: In lesson one, Students are able to practice the skills necessary to really kick this unit
off, and together as a class are walked through the first case study, as well as the questions of focus.
The lesson begins with the distribution of the handout of Case Study 1 – No Cause for Celebration.
Students are instructed to read once to build familiarity with the text, then a second time to begin
actually highlighting the important information. Students will then engage in a large group analysis of
the case study and determine what the facts in the case are, what they still need to know, who they
believe perpetrated the crime, the evidence that supports that conclusion, and of course, what crime
was committed in the first place. Students record the class answers on their individual handouts which
are graded as pass/fail.


Standards
         HSC.6.1.2 - Locate, analyze, and use various forms of evidence, information, and sources about
a significant public policy issue, including primary and secondary sources, legal documents, non text
based information, and other forms of political communication.

        RH.11-12.1 – Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary
sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

         WHST11-12.7 – Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question
(including a self generated question) or solve a problem, narrow or broaden the inquiry when
appropriate: synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating an understanding of the subject
under investigation.

        WHST11-12.8 - Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital
sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in
terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to
maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a
standard format for citation.

Key Concepts
witness
case study
defendant
breaking and entering

Instructional Resources
No Cause for Celebration Handout


Lesson Sequence


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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
       1.    Begin by walking students through the major ideas of today’s lesson, that they will be able
            to leave today with the knowledge to help lay the foundation for the Mock Trial unit as a
            whole.
       2.   Continue by having students review why it’s a good idea to read things once for information
            and familiarity before reading again for focus.
       3.   Distribute handout 1 – No Cause for Celebration and have students read twice, once for
            familiarity, once for information, highlighting the important information as they went.
       4.   As a class, ask “What crime was committed?” Have students jot their answers down on the
            handout.
       5.   As a class, ask “What are the facts in this case?” Have students answer this question
            collaboratively, writing the information down on the board. In addition, as information that
            they may not have highlighted is brought to light, have them go back and highlight again.
       6.   As a class, ask “What do we still need to know?” Have students answer this question
            collaboratively, writing down the information from the board.
       7.   As a class, ask “Who do you believe perpetrated the crime?” There may be two answers in
            this case study, either Harold Hobo, or some combination of the boys. The key comes in the
            next question
       8.   As a class, ask “Why?” and list all the evidence that could be used to convict one of the
            possible perpetrators.
       9.   Have students finish recording their answers and turn in as a pass/fail assignment.

Assessment

       1. The handout, having been constructed as a whole class effort can be used as the assessment
          piece, and graded as a pass/fail.
       2. If necessary, an Exit Slip can be designed around any of the big ideas for the lesson.




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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
                          Lesson 2: A Late Night for Gertie
Big Ideas of the Lesson
         How relevant information can be both explicit and inferred from a text.

Lesson Abstract: In this lesson, students are once again practicing the skills necessary for the following
modules in the unit. This time, students are presented with a case with fewer concrete details, and are
partnered up into groups of 2-3 members. The lesson begins with the distribution of handout Case
Study – A Late Night for Gertie. Students are instructed once again to individually read the handout for
familiarity first, then a second time for the identification of important information. Students will then
collaboratively in groups determine what crime was committed, what the facts in the case are, what
they still need to know, and who they believed perpetrated the crime and why. Students record the
group answers on their individual handouts which are graded for content this time.


Standards
         HSC.6.1.2 - Locate, analyze, and use various forms of evidence, information, and sources about
a significant public policy issue, including primary and secondary sources, legal documents, non text
based information, and other forms of political communication.

        RH.11-12.1 – Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary
sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

         WHST11-12.7 – Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question
(including a self generated question) or solve a problem, narrow or broaden the inquiry when
appropriate: synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating an understanding of the subject
under investigation.

        WHST11-12.8 - Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital
sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in
terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to
maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a
standard format for citation.

Key Concepts
armed robbery

Instructional Resources
A Late Night for Gertie

Lesson Sequence
        1. Begin by walking students through the major ideas of today’s lesson, that they will be able
           to leave today with the knowledge to help lay the foundation for the Mock Trial unit as a
           whole by revisiting the process used on the last lesson’s activity.
        2. Continue by having students review why it’s a good idea to read things once for information
           and familiarity before reading again for focus. Remind them how the information from the
           last lesson changed as the whole class perspective was brought in.

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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
       3. Distribute handout 2 – A Late Night for Gertie and have students read twice, once for
           familiarity, once for information, highlighting the important information as they went.
       4. Have students break into partners and work out the answers together before the whole
           class setting.
       5. As a class, ask “What crime was committed?” Have students jot their answers down on the
           handout.
       6. As a class, ask “What are the facts in this case?” Have students answer this question
           collaboratively, writing the information down on the board. In addition, as information that
           they may not have highlighted is brought to light, have them go back and highlight again.
       7. As a class, ask “What do we still need to know?” Have students answer this question
           collaboratively, writing down the information from the board.
       8. As a class, ask “Who do you believe perpetrated the crime?” Michael Moneybags is the
           obvious suspect but students may formulate a different one.
       9. As a class, ask “Why?” and list all the evidence that could be used to convict one of the
           possible perpetrators.
       10. Have students finish recording their answers and turn in as a pass/fail assignment.

Assessment

       1. The handout, having been constructed as a whole class effort can be used as the assessment
          piece, and graded as a pass/fail.
       2. If necessary, an Exit Slip can be designed around any of the big ideas for the lesson.




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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
                           Lesson 3: A Murder Most Fowl
Big Ideas of the Lesson
         How relevant information can be both explicit and inferred from a text.

Lesson Abstract: In this lesson students are once again putting the necessary skills for later modules to
the test, this time individually. Students are presented with another case study with fewer concrete
details than in Lesson Two. This time instead of working collaboratively in groups, students are allowed
only the opportunity to discuss once they themselves have recorded their own answers. Students are
invited to read twice, once for familiarity, once for evidence, and then given time to complete the
required components on their own. A class discussion of the crime, the facts, the perpetrator, and the
evidence is then conducted and students have the opportunity to add to their lists before handing in.
Handouts are graded for content, with more weight on missing and incomplete answers this time
around.

Standards
         HSC.6.1.2 - Locate, analyze, and use various forms of evidence, information, and sources about
a significant public policy issue, including primary and secondary sources, legal documents, non text
based information, and other forms of political communication.

        RH.11-12.1 – Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary
sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

         WHST11-12.7 – Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question
(including a self generated question) or solve a problem, narrow or broaden the inquiry when
appropriate: synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating an understanding of the subject
under investigation.

        WHST11-12.8 - Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital
sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in
terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to
maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a
standard format for citation.

Key Concepts
malicious destruction of property

Instructional Resources
A Murder Most Fowl Handout

Lesson Sequence
        1. Distribute handout 3 – A Murder Most Fowl and have students read twice, once for
           familiarity, once for information, highlighting the important information as they went.
           Students will then answer the questions individually.
        2. As a class, ask “What crime was committed?” Have students jot their answers down on the
           handout.


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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
        3. As a class, ask “What are the facts in this case?” Have students answer this question
           collaboratively, writing the information down on the board. In addition, as information
           that they may not have highlighted is brought to light, have them go back and highlight
           again.
        4. As a class, ask “What do we still need to know?” Have students answer this question
           collaboratively, writing down the information from the board.
        5. As a class, ask “Who do you believe perpetrated the crime?” There may be two answers in
           this case study, either Harold Hobo, or some combination of the boys. The key comes in
           the next question
        6. As a class, ask “Why?” and list all the evidence that could be used to convict one of the
           possible perpetrators.
        7. Have students finish recording their answers and turn in as a pass/fail assignment.

Assessment

        1) The handout, having been constructed as a whole class effort can be used as the
           assessment piece, and graded as a pass/fail.
        2) If necessary, an Exit Slip can be designed around any of the big ideas for the lesson.




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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
                                     Lesson 4: Keyed In
Big Ideas of the Lesson
         How relevant information can be both explicit and inferred from a text.

Lesson Abstract: In this lesson, students are given one final case study to complete the same steps that
were conducted in Lessons 1-4, only this time discussion of the overview will not take place until after
the response sheets have been collected. Student handouts are graded more harshly this time around.

Standards
         HSC.6.1.2 - Locate, analyze, and use various forms of evidence, information, and sources about
a significant public policy issue, including primary and secondary sources, legal documents, non text
based information, and other forms of political communication.

        RH.11-12.1 – Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary
sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

         WHST11-12.7 – Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question
(including a self generated question) or solve a problem, narrow or broaden the inquiry when
appropriate: synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating an understanding of the subject
under investigation.

        WHST11-12.8 - Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital
sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in
terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to
maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a
standard format for citation.

Key Concepts
malicious destruction of property

Instructional Resources
Keyed In Handout

Lesson Sequence
        1. Distribute handout 4 – Keyed In and have students read twice, once for familiarity, once
           for information, highlighting the important information as they went. Students will then
           answer the questions individually. Have students turn in their completed handouts
           BEFORE going over as a class.
        2. As a class, ask “What crime was committed?”
        3. As a class, ask “What are the facts in this case?”
        4. As a class, ask “What do we still need to know?”
        5. As a class, ask “Who do you believe perpetrated the crime?”
        6. As a class, ask “Why?” and list all the evidence that could be used to convict one of the
           possible perpetrators.




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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
Assessment

        1. The handout, having been constructed as a whole class effort can be used as the
           assessment piece, and graded as a pass/fail.
        2. If necessary, an Exit Slip can be designed around any of the big ideas for the lesson.




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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
             Lesson 5: How To Write An Opening Statement
Big Ideas of the Lesson
         What is the purpose of an opening statement?
         What role do facts play in a lawyer’s opening statement?

Lesson Abstract: In this lesson students move beyond the basics of case studies, into actually writing
opening statements as if they were a prosecuting attorney. The lesson begins by taking a look at the
PowerPoint – How to Write an Opening Statement. It continues by revisiting Case Study 1 – No Cause
for celebration. After a brief review on the facts in the case, students are then prompted to write an
opening statement for Case Study 1 as if they were the prosecuting attorney. Student responses are
graded for effort to meet the required components of an opening statement, and as such are pass/fail.
When responses have been returned to students with feedback, students are then further directed to
review one of the other case studies (2, 3, 4) and write an opening statement for the case of their
choosing, combining the facts as well as the required components of an opening statement. These
responses are graded for content.

Standards
       HSC.6.1.5 – Make a persuasive, reasoned argument on a public issue and support using
evidence.

        WHST.11-12.1 - Write arguments focused on discipline specific content.

        WHST.11-12.4 - Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization,
and style are appropriate to task, purpose and audience.

         WHST.11-12.7 – Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question
(including a self generated question) or solve a problem, narrow or broaden the inquiry when
appropriate: synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject
under investigation.

        WHST.11-12.8 – Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital
sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in
terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to
maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source, and following a
standard format for citation.

        WHST.11-12-9 – Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and
research.

Key Concepts
opening statement
rights of the accused

Instructional Resources
Thinking Like The Prosecution Handout
Case Studies 1-4 for Practice

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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
Writing an Opening Statement PowerPoint
YouTube clip – Opening statement http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1s0WpKURSV8&feature=related
(or other teacher provided resource)
Student Examples (as necessary)

Lesson Sequence
        1. Begin by showing students the PowerPoint presentation on how to write an opening
           statement, being sure to hit home the major points to include (background on the case
           interwoven into the summary of who did it, the major evidence required to satisfy burden of
           proof, the opposing point of view, and the conclusion.
        2. Show the YouTube clip referenced in Instructional Resources to students. Have them
           identify where the participant identifies the major points.
        3. Provide students with student examples from the Resource section if needed. Again, have
           them identify the parts which successfully meet the requirements, as well as the places for
           improvement.
        4. Review the facts in Case Study 1 – No Cause for Celebration. Include the identification of
           the potential culprits, and the evidence that supports.
        5. Have students write their own opening statements, giving them 15-20 minutes to complete
           (Since this is essential an ACT practice prompt, forcing them to think in a 30 minute window
           is a good thing…if students need more time beyond 15-20 minutes give it to them, but be
           wary of more than 30.) These will be graded on a pass/fail basis. (Practice)
        6. Dissect several student examples in class if time permits.
        7. Have students continue the process by picking one of the other case studies to write an
           example for. These will be graded.
        8. Follow up after grading with more student examples where the strengths and weaknesses
           are discussed.

Assessment
       1. The first sample written should be considered practice to gauge where students abilities
          are. Subsequent samples can be graded for content and clarity.




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                     Lesson 6: Direct and Cross Examination
Big Ideas of the Lesson
         How is relevant information used in a case?
         How do lawyers prepare for witness examination?


Lesson Abstract: In this lesson students move on to how to properly examine a witness on the stand.
The lesson begins with one of several examination clips from YouTube and moves then to include the
handout “10 Common Objections”. Two students from the class are selected to read aloud a script
while the rest of the class listens for opportunities to object. Students are then invited to think about
what questions they might ask witnesses in one of the four case studies were they the prosecuting
attorney, the defense attorney. In partners, they are given a statement by one of the witnesses (or
accused) from one of the case studies and asked to role-play the roles of lawyers and witnesses in
determining how to ask questions on the fly based on what is said, and in preparing questions in
advance. The next part of the lesson asks students to work collaboratively to write questions based on a
statement that could be used in a trial setting, avoiding the most common objectionable question types.
These will be handed in for review and given a pass/fail grade.

Standards
         HSC.6.1.2 - Locate, analyze, and use various forms of evidence, information, and sources about
a significant public policy issue, including primary and secondary sources, legal documents, non text
based information, and other forms of political communication.

        RH.11-12.1 – Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary
sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

        RH.11-12.2 – Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source;
provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among key details and ideas.

       RH.11-12.3 – Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which
explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.

        WHST.11-12.9 - Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and
research.

Key Concepts
direct examination
cross examination
plaintiff
defendant

Instructional Resources
10 Common Objections
Scripts for practice
Witness Statements
YouTube Clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4jD4SgHyM2k Showing a direct examination

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YouTube Clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZCEbwlwihbg&feature=related Showing a fictional
trial (play setting) for Objection practice

Lesson Sequence
        1. Begin by showing initial example from YouTube (direct examination) to get a sense beyond
           just Law and Order on what types of questions are asked, and how witnesses respond when
           on trial.
        2. Produce “10 Common Objections” handout and distribute to students. Briefly go over each
           of these common objections to ensure students understand the process.
        3. Show second clip of the fictional play. Have students identify times in the 5 minute clip
           when an objection should occur, and match to one of the of the objections on the sheet.
        4. As the teacher, act out with a student the trial based on the script. Have students voice
           OBJECTIONS as if they were the opposing counsel throughout the script for practice.
        5. Move into proper questioning techniques. Identify how lawyers might develop questions to
           ask a witness on the stand which do NOT meet any of the conditions for an objection.
        6. Produce two witness statements. Have students partner up and practice proper questioning
           techniques where one is the lawyer questioning the witness (based only on what is on the
           sheet) and then switching so both receive practice. Students should take time to prepare
           questions in advance. These questions may be turned in for grading.


Assessment
          1.   Exit Slips may be developed over any of the big ideas for this lesson.




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                             Lesson 7: Closing Statements
Big Ideas of the Lesson
         How does a closing statement add to your overall argument in a case?
         What is the purpose of a closing statement in a trial?

Lesson Abstract: In this lesson students will learn how to craft a closing statement. These are tough to
write on the onset of a trial because of the facts that are often brought to light during the trial itself.
Students will need to understand that they’ll want to have one prepared in advance but be able to add
to it as need be. The lesson will begin by showing several closing statement examples from YouTube as
well as some student samples based off of Case Study 1. From there, students will revisit their previous
opening statements and write a closing statement based off of the trial transcripts provided.

Standards
         HSC.6.1.2 - Locate, analyze, and use various forms of evidence, information, and sources about
a significant public policy issue, including primary and secondary sources, legal documents, non text
based information, and other forms of political communication.

       HSC.6.1.5 – Make a persuasive, reasoned argument on a public issue and support using
evidence.

        RH.11-12.1 – Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary
sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

        WHST11-12.8 - Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital
sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in
terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to
maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a
standard format for citation.

Key Concepts
closing statements

Instructional Resources
Opening Statements written for previous lesson

Lesson Sequence
        1) Begin by having students take out their opening statements from the previous lesson and
           review the elements that must go into the drafting and creation of a successful opening
           statement.
        2) Inform students that while an opening statement and a closing statement should include the
           same information, that you can’t come fully prepared for a closing statement because of the
           nature of an actual trial. Ask students why this might be. (Good answers include
           statements like: “different facts may come out in the case, a witness may change their
           story, new information is introduced, etc.”
        3) On the board, write a collection of “new information” for each of the case studies. You
           could, for example, use information collected from students “information we still need to

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          know” section on the first four case studies to come up with some answers to that. Tell
          students that this information came out in the trial, and that they have to revise their
          closing statements to fit the information accordingly.
       4) Have half of the class practice as the defense attorneys, the other half as the prosecution.
          Give them no more than 5 minutes to prep their closing statements (based on their
          openings) and then deliver as a class.

Assessment

             1) Closing statements may be collected for proper assessment.




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                          Lesson 8: Practicing for the Trial
Big Ideas of the Lesson
         How to use a variety of evidence to prepare for a trial.

Lesson Abstract: In this lesson students get a chance to actually practice the various steps in a trial using
Case Study 5 or 6, over a multi-day process which will allow for them to be guided through the trial
process with guidance and support. Students will be presented with a case based around Case Study 5
or 6. Two students will be selected to be the trial lawyers on both sides, and certain students will be
witnesses and the defendant. Remaining class members will be members of the jury and will have to
use the Jury note taking sheet to keep the information straight. Students will then have to deliberate
under the microscope of the class to decide if the burden of proof was reached. During the work
sessions, jurors will be paralegals.

Standards
        HSC.5.4.2 – Describe the importance of citizens’ civic responsibilities including obeying the law,
being informed and attentive to public issues, monitoring political leaders and governmental agencies,
assuming leadership when appropriate, paying taxes, registering to vote and voting knowledgably on
candidates and issues, serving as a juror, serving in the armed forces, performing public service.

       HSC.5.4.3 – Explain why meeting personal and civic responsibilities is important to the
preservation and improvement of American constitutional democracy.

        HSC.5.3.1 Identify and explain personal rights (e.g., freedom of thought, conscience, expression,
association, movement and residence, the right to privacy

        HSC.5.3.7 – Using the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, and Eighth Amendments, describe the rights
of the accused; and using case studies and examples, explore the limit and scope of these rights.

         HSC.6.1.2 - Locate, analyze, and use various forms of evidence, information, and sources about
a significant public policy issue, including primary and secondary sources, legal documents, non text
based information, and other forms of political communication.

        HSC.6.1.4 – Address a public issue by suggesting alternative solutions or courses of action,
evaluating the consequences of each, and proposing an action to address the issue or resolve the
problem.

       HSC.6.1.5 – Make a persuasive, reasoned argument on a public issue and support using
evidence.


Key Concepts


Instructional Resources (Pick one or both)
Case Study 5 – Trouble for Travis

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Case Study 6 – Blaze of Glory

Lesson Sequence
           1) Distribute Case Study 5 or 6 to students and inform them that this is the practice session
              for the actual Mock Trial. Case Study 5 or 6 will be used, and any additional information
              that is necessary will be given to students at the beginning.
           2) Divide students up into groups. You will have two lawyers for each side who may take
              turns doing the specifics, though one should provide the opening and the other the
              closing statements.
           3) Choose who will be the class witnesses. Instruct students that those who have this part
              will be required to learn what is on their sheets in advance.
           4) The rest of the class will be Jury members for this activity. Today however, they will be
              divided up to either team as paralegals who will be helping the lawyers pick out the
              important facts.
           5) The remainder of session 1 will be spent preparing for the trial.
           6) On the second day, the students will be conducting the trial itself.

Assessment

             1) Students performance at the trial may be measured by the rubrics provided.




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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
                                     Lesson 9: The Trial
Big Ideas of the Lesson
         Is the defendant given a fair and just trial?

Lesson Abstract: In this lesson, students will actually complete the steps in the trial. The guidance and
support piece will be taken from students and they will be “on their own.”

Standards
        HSC.5.4.2 – Describe the importance of citizens’ civic responsibilities including obeying the law,
being informed and attentive to public issues, monitoring political leaders and governmental agencies,
assuming leadership when appropriate, paying taxes, registering to vote and voting knowledgably on
candidates and issues, serving as a juror, serving in the armed forces, performing public service.

       HSC.5.4.3 – Explain why meeting personal and civic responsibilities is important to the
preservation and improvement of American constitutional democracy.

        HSC.5.3.1 Identify and explain personal rights (e.g., freedom of thought, conscience, expression,
association, movement and residence, the right to privacy

        HSC.5.3.7 – Using the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, and Eighth Amendments, describe the rights
of the accused; and using case studies and examples, explore the limit and scope of these rights.

        WHST.11-12.8 – Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital
sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in
terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to
maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a
standard format for citation.

        WHST.11-12.9 – Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and
research.

Key Concepts

court procedure

Instructional Resources (Pick one or both)
Case Study 5 – Trouble for Travis
Case Study 6 – Blaze of Glory
Michigan Criminal Law and Police Procedure. (Steffel, 2010)

Lesson Sequence
           1) Set up classroom like a courtroom (as close as possible)
           2) As students come in, have them go to their designated areas (jury box for Jury,
              witnesses on the various sides, lawyers and defendant to their tables, etc.)
           3) Have baliff announce entry of the judge.

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           4) Once the judge has read the charges against the defendant, you can move into opening
              statements, direct and cross examination, closing statements, and jury deliberation.

Assessment
               1) Students performance at the trial may be measured by the rubrics provided.




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                               Lesson 10: Critical Writing
Big Ideas of the Lesson
         Our legal system, while not without flaws, is used because the system hears both sides and
             weighs the evidence before reaching a verdict.

Lesson Abstract: In this lesson, students will complete the unit by writing an ACT style writing based
around the overarching question for the unit. Students will be able to use a great deal of experience,
from the early case studies all the way through one or two different Mock Trials to draw evidence from
to support their overall position.

Standards
        HSC.6.1.4 – Address a public issue by suggesting alternative solutions or course of action,
evaluating the consequences of each, and proposing an action to address the issue or resolve the
problem.

        HSC.6.1.5 – Make a persuasive, reasoned argument on a public issue and support using evidence

        WHST.11-12.4 – produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization,
and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

         WHST.11-12.7 – Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question
(including a self generated question) or solve a problem, narrow or broaden the inquiry when
appropriate: synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject
under investigation.

        WHST.11-12.8 – Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital
sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in
terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to
maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a
standard format for citation.

        WHST.11-12.9 – Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and
research.

Key Concepts


Instructional Resources (Pick one or both)
Writing Prompt

Lesson Sequence
              1)   Explain to students that today they will be culminating the justice system unit by
                   writing on a topic. Go over expectations for writing with students before
                   distributing the prompt.
                2) Distribute Writing Prompt worksheet to students.

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               3) Students will have remainder of the hour to complete the prompt.

Assessment
               1) The prompt is centered around the focus question for the unit. This is the
                  assessment for the unit as a whole.




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                                  Case Study – No Cause for Celebration

Overview of the crime

        July 4th 2011 was the home of Buick Michigan’s annual “Fireworks in the Park!” program which
was entering its 16th year. This year’s program began at 5:00 p.m. with a parade led by Buick Central
High School’s marching band. A community barbeque followed the parade, hosted by some of the local
businesses, and a local band called “Gearbox” was set to perform from 8:00 p.m. until dusk when the
celebration ended with the annual fireworks show.

        Free parking was provided in several locations with free bussing services offered between
events to those who made use of it. The lots close to the activities filled up quickly, so several lots away
from the action were utilized by many of the people seeking to attend the festivities.

        The Young family arrived at one of the outer parking facilities at approximately 4:45 that
afternoon. There’s was one of the only cars there, and to keep the car from getting too hot, they
elected to park underneath the shade of one of the trees at the far end of the parking lot. The family,
consisting of Doug Young (32), Diana Young (31) and their two children Dexter (11) and Destiny (8)
unpacked their gear from their mini-van, and boarded one of the busses. They arrived just in time to
see the parade begin.

        The parade ended up starting late, as four members of the drum section had not arrived. It was
determined that their car that had transported them there had been in an accident coming to the
meeting point. In addition, there had been a brief city-wide power failure when one of the floats
created by the local high school had inadvertently gotten caught in wires on its way to the parade. The
power company had briefly shut down electricity to the entire town while fixing the problem. The
parade began at 5:20, close to half an hour late.

         At approximately 5:45, the Young children began to get hungry, so the family left the parade
early to get a jump on the barbeque which was taking place several blocks away. As they made their
way through the crowds, Diana Young realized she had left her purse in the van, and wanted to find a
way back to get it, as it contained an envelope with the money they had set aside for refreshments that
night. Doug decided it wasn’t worth fighting against the crowd again and decided to go to an ATM to
withdraw enough money for them to eat and gain admission to the Gearbox concert.

        Doug found an ATM machine and reached into his pocket to grab his wallet, when his phone
began to buzz. Opening it, he saw that he had received over the last twenty minutes, almost 20 text
messages from his wife’s phone. Most of these were lewd and vulgar in nature. Realizing that his wife’s
phone was in their car, he began to worry. He withdrew $60 from his account, explained the situation
to his wife, and told her to go to the barbeque with the kids, and that he would catch up later.

          Doug reached the car approximately half an hour later, at around 6:25 p.m. There was broken
glass all around the passenger side. The window had been smashed open by a large rock, and his wife’s



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purse was missing, the glove compartment was ransacked, and the children’s SpongeBob Squarepants
television set had been taken.

        Doug immediately called the authorities and waited for them to arrive.

Witnesses

        Local transient Harold Hobo was in the park at around 5:00, checking the trash bins on the
outskirts of the lot for empty returnable bottles. Harold witnessed two teenage boys in marching band
uniforms walking around the parking lot, looking in car windows. Harold left this part of the park as the
boys were approaching him in the vicinity of the Young family minivan. When he returned later, he saw
that the window had been smashed in by a rock, and left the area.

         Gertrude Gossip, a local business leader and owner of “Gertie’s Cuppa Joe!” a coffee shop very
close to the parking lot claimed that she heard a loud shattering noise as she was closing up shop to
deliver the coffee pots for the community barbeque. Looking outside she didn’t see anything
immediately wrong. She claims that a few minutes later, Harold Hobo arrived and wanted to buy a slice
of her world famous Strawberry Rhubarb pie for the road, one of his favorite things there. He paid with
a twenty dollar bill, which was more money than she had ever seen him with.

Other Evidence

        The parking lot is usually monitored by video surveillance. Due to the power outage, feeds were
unavailable from approximately 5:00-5:30. At 4:50, one of the cameras on the outskirts of the parking
lot recorded a car accident, where a group of four teenagers had hit another vehicle. The teenagers,
who were on their way to the parade, had exchanged phone numbers and insurance information with
the driver of the other vehicle. There was no major damage to either car, and both drivers left the scene
without notifying law enforcement officers. The car that had been hit was seen leaving before the
power failure. The car with the teenagers was still on the premises when the feeds were cut off.

          Teddy Teenager, a member of the marching band who was in the car accident was found with
Diana Young’s cellular phone. Teddy claimed that he had found the phone on the ground and had used
it to call his mother to let her know why he was late to the parade. He admitted that he had been in the
parking lot with another student: Travis Troublemaker, looking for an unlocked car with a cell phone in
order to make an emergency call. None of the boys had their cell phones on them.

         Travis Troublemaker had been bounced from school to school over the last few years due to
problems with law enforcement. His last run in with the law had taken place a year ago in a neighboring
community. He was currently on probation for breaking into cars in that community, but had managed
to stay out of trouble in his new school, even joining the marching band this year. Travis was in
possession of approximately $100 in cash, which he claimed he had earned by working odd jobs for his
neighbors over the last few weeks.

         Diana Young’s purse had been found near one of the trash bins on the outskirts of the parking
lot. It was empty, and there were several redeemable pop bottles strewn around it.

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                                                              NAME:___________________________




Questions (2 points each)

   1)   What was the crime committed in this case study?




   2) What are the FACTS in this crime?




   3) What do you still need to know?




   4) Assuming that all the information you need to answer this is provided in the case study, who do
      you believe perpetrated the crime?




   5) What evidence supports your answer to #3?




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                                    Case Study – A Late Night for Gertie

Overview of the crime

        On the night of October 15, 2011 Gertrude Gossip, owner of the local coffee shop “Gertie’s
Cuppa Joe” was working late and alone. It had been a particularly busy night and she had found herself
short staffed due to an outbreak of food poisoning which had befallen much of her staff who had gone
out to celebrate a staff member’s birthday two days prior. Gertrude had only a few customers left in
her store and, having not been needed for the last twenty minutes, decided to begin prep-work to close
down the coffee shop.

        Gertrude gave the coffee shop a quick scan before heading to the back office where she had
easy access to the small kitchen. There were still four customers left, Michael Moneybags, and Diana
Young who each sat alone with computers and headphones, and a couple who sat smiling at one
another from across the table, laughing, joking, and occasionally leaning in to whisper something to one
another. Diana had several books spread out across the table and was working on what Gertie assumed
was something for her Masters Class. Michael, someone whom Gertie did not know well had his bank
book out and was scowling the whole time.

        While in the back, Gertrude began pouring ingredients for her world famous bread bowls, which
were made from scratch daily. The dough, which had to be allowed to rise all night long in order to be
ready for the baker in the morning, took her almost twenty minutes to mix. During this time she
remained away from the cash register and front counter, assuming that should anyone need any service
they would use the “ring for service” bell.

         When Gertrude finally emerged from the back, the first thing she noticed was that all the tables
were now empty except for Michael Moneybags who sat furiously typing away on his keyboard. Noting
that it was 9:45 and that the coffee shop didn’t officially close until 10:00, Gertrude went about cleaning
counters and taking bus tubs full of dishes into the back of the house. She very much wanted the lone
man to leave so she could close up early and go home to her cat Mr. Muffinboots.

          About ten minutes passed, and Gertie had stayed busy enough that she hadn’t yet noticed if
anyone was still there. While cleaning the coffee machine next to the register, Gertrude had her back to
the main counter. She suddenly felt something hard pressing up against her back, and a gruff male’s
voice barked “Don’t turn around.” The man demanded all the money from the register. Gertrude
opened the register and removed the tray which she handed to the man without once turning around.
The man instructed her to sit on the floor and wait for ten seconds before standing up. When she did
finally, he was gone.

       When she stood up again, the door to the shop opened once again and Michael Moneybags who
had been typing on his keyboard returned. He looked shaken and smelled strongly of cigarettes.
Gertrude screamed at him to get out, which he did, leaving his laptop on the table albeit grudgingly.

        Gertrude then called 911.


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Witnesses

        A shop owner across the street, at Polly’s Pastries who had also been working late saw a
suspicious looking man standing outside of Gertie’s Cuppa Joe around 9:50. He was tall, but she was
unable to determine anything else due to the darkness.

        Michael Moneybags, the man who had been working on sorting out his finances at the coffee
shop that late was called in for questioning. He was able to get his laptop back the next day but Police
wanted to know what he had seen. He said that while he was outside smoking a cigarette a man had
entered and left the coffee shop in a hurry. The man had knocked him over when he ran out of the shop
and had dropped something plastic and heavy on the ground. The man quickly grabbed it and ran off.
Michael says he had run off in the direction of the parking lot behind the building. Michael was unable
to describe the man as anything other than “Tall.” Claiming that it was dark.

        The young couple who had been on a date at the Cuppa Joe café that night had left and walked
down by the lake, which butted up to the parking lot behind the building. They saw a man matching
Michael Moneybag’s description walking towards his car carrying a large black bag. He was noticeably
agitated about something.

        Diana Young had ridden her bicycle to the shop and had taken a shortcut home. She did not see
anything suspicious, other than local transient Harold Hobo rifling through a trash bin presumably
looking for pop bottles.

Other Evidence

      Security cameras in the parking lot showed the young couple walking by the lake, and Michael
Moneybags approaching his car with a black bag.

        The till from the cash register was found empty behind the building.




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                                                              NAME:___________________________




Questions (2 points each)

   1)   What was the crime committed in this case study?




   2) What are the FACTS in this crime?




   3) What do you still need to know?




   4) Assuming that all the information you need to answer this is provided in the case study, who do
      you believe perpetrated the crime?




   5) What evidence supports your answer to #4?




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                                    Case Study – A Murder Most Fowl

Overview of the crime

         Local chicken farmer Carl Clucker had had a terrible day. He had gone to the local Laundromat
to get his jeans washed, and came home to find that those darn teenagers had once again driven their 4
wheelers across his hay field. The four teens, all boys from local families lived in close proximity to the
Clucker farm and were chased off their neighbors properties on multiple occasions. The teens, Travis
Troublemaker, Larry Loiterer, Terry Trespasser and Michael Menace all denied having run their vehicles
over the Clucker fields when Carl went to their houses.

        Deciding instead that being Mr. Nice guy wasn’t cutting it, Carl went to the local sheriff’s office.
Daniel Deputy was sent out to investigate. He matched the tread of the tires to two of the vehicles,
ones owned by Terry Trespasser and Michael Menace. Both boys were brought in for questioning and
sent home later that night.

        While the boys were being questioned, Carl went back into town to get some groceries, when
he noticed local transient Harold Hobo walking around in what appeared to be a pair of his jeans. Since
he had left his laundry in the dryer and run home only to get the shopping list his mother had prepared
for him, he raced back only to find that all of his clothes were gone. He also reported this to the police.

        That night, while Carl was asleep he was awakened at approximately 1 a.m. to a loud noise
coming from the chicken coop. He could hear the chickens making a loud ruckus, and thought several
times that he heard loud voices coming from the coop. He finally sat bolt upright in bed when he heard
a loud woman’s voice scream “GET OUT! GET OUT NOW!” He recognized the voice of his mother Carla.

        He grabbed his shot gun and proceeded to run outside in his pajamas, just in time to see two
figured race from the chicken coop into the woods in the direction of the Menace household. Upon
investigating further, he found that all of his prized chickens had had their necks snapped.

        Carl immediately called the police.

Witnesses

        Gertrude Gossip, a neighbor had been outside at one a.m. searching for her lost cat, Mr.
Muffinboots. She told police that she saw a lone figure walking in the woods in the direction of the
Clucker household. Whomever it was, she said “smelled strongly of laundry soap.”

         Carla Clucker, Carl’s mother claimed she had gotten up to get a midnight snack and saw
flashlights outside. She grabbed a frying pan, her weapon of choice and snuck out to see what was
going on. When she arrived most of the chickens were already dead. She screamed at the two figures
she saw to “GET OUT NOW!” and was soon after joined by her son Carl.

Other Evidence



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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
        Tina Troublemaker had grounded her foster son Travis when Carl came over to complain about
the hay fields that afternoon. After dinner she had marched him up to his bedroom and put a chair
against the door, so she was certain that he had been in his room all night.

         Lisa Loiterer had done a similar thing with her son Larry, only instead of locking him in his room,
she had driven him to his father’s house four towns over and dropped him off there for the weekend.
Larry’s father Lewis corroborated that Larry had been there all night.

        Michael Menace claimed that he had gone to bed early, and since his parents both worked late
that night, he was home alone in the house.

        Terry Trespasser claimed he had left the house to shoot pool at a local restaurant. The
bartender on duty that night did not remember seeing him there, but claimed it was so busy it was
possible he hadn’t seen Terry.




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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
                                                              NAME:___________________________

Questions (2 points each)

   1)   What was the crime committed in this case study?




   2) What are the FACTS in this crime?




   3) What do you still need to know?




   4) Assuming that all the information you need to answer this is provided in the case study, who do
      you believe perpetrated the crime?




   5) What evidence supports your answer to #4?




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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
                                          Case Study – Keyed In

Overview of the crime

         Sally Oletimer, a local retiree who spent most of her days frequenting Gertie’s Cuppa Joe, was
headed to a garden club meeting at the civic center. She had just left the coffee shop and made her way
down to the parking lot as fast as her walker could take her. Her car, a blue Cadillac, was parked right
next to the building in a handicapped spot. Having left a lot of room between her car and the building
itself she didn’t feel the need to walk around her car, she took the shortcut, throwing her walker in the
back seat before carefully sitting down.

         Sally drove to the civic center taking mostly side streets to avoid heavy traffic. She was running
late (as usual) and didn’t want to get confused at stoplights. There were always young kids in their
flashy cars behind her honking and shooting dirty looks at her if she paused for even a second after the
light turned green.

        Along the way she realized she had forgotten to take her medication, so she stopped very
quickly at her house, almost running over a long haired cat she recognized as Mr. Muffinboots, the
“perpetually lost” cat of Gertrude Gossip’s. She grabbed her walker and entered her house, parking on
the street nearest to the entrance to the house as she often did when she was in a hurry. A few minutes
later she emerged and once again hopped into her car without looking at the passenger side door.

          She made it to the Civic Center and walked in, late as usual. The women, mostly retirees drank
tea, ate cookies, and talked about their plans for their gardens the following spring. Most of them were
a little on edge as the annual carnival was setting up outside and several teenagers were smoking near
the entrance, shouting mean things at the women as they entered.

        Sally, a sassy old woman, had yelled back at some of the boys on her way in. They had gotten
very quiet, and then laughed her off, taking a drag off their cigarettes and walking away. Sally, unlike
many of the other women had never been frightened by some of the local town ruffians, and as such,
they usually didn’t trouble her.

         Sally’s dear friend Nancy Noticer needed a ride back to her house, so the two women strolled
out of the garden club meeting a few hours later together. Sally had agreed to give Nancy a ride. As
they approached her car slowly, they talked about the local crime spree...the hold up at Gertie Gossip’s
coffee shop, the killing of chickens on the Clucker farm, and the theft of money from the Young family’s
van at the Independence day celebration. “This town is going to heck!” Nancy had said, shaking her fist
at the sky.

         As they reached the car, Sally went over to the driver side and started to get in, but stopped
herself as she looked at Nancy’s white face. Upon going over to investigate, she saw that someone had
taken a key and dug it in to the side of her vehicle. This had not been an accident either. It had been
done multiple times with varying degrees of strength.

        Sally borrowed Nancy’s “celly phone” and called 911

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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
Witnesses

       Harold Hobo, local transient had been sleeping outside of Gertie’s Cuppa Joe. He claimed to
have seen a local factory worker, Lyle Lineman, looking in cars in the parking lot.



         Lyle was questioned by the police and told them that he had been walking around the parking
lot looking for his car. His wife had needed it earlier and had promised to leave it for him behind
Gertie’s Cuppa Joe. The car, an old Blue Cadillac looked a lot like Sally’s and he had peered in the
window quickly realizing that it wasn’t his. He claims to have moved on from there.



        Carnival workers claimed to have seen several teenage boys smoking near the entrance to the
Civic Center as they were setting up that day. Sally told police that she did not believe any of the boys,
Travis Troublemaker, Larry Loiterer, Michael Menace, or Vinny Vandal had perpetrated the crime.
Despite their histories she said, they knew not to make her angry.

         Each of the boys was questioned. They admitted to being in the vicinity of the parking lot and
that they had been watching the carnival set up. They each denied having keyed Sally’s car. Here are
their statements:

        Travis Troublemaker- I saw her enter the center. My friends and I were there and were
watching the workers set the carnival up. It was awesome! One guy tripped over one of those big
power cords and fell in one of the bucket seats for the Ferris Wheel. I laughed so hard! Did I see anyone
key her car? No, I was too busy flirting with some of the ladies. They were hot! I did yell at her when
she came in but that’s because I used to rake her yard. We’re tight. I didn’t mean anything by it.

          Larry Loiterer - I don’t remember seeing her enter. I was too busy watching them set up the
Ferris Wheel. There were a lot of cars in the lot. I don’t remember hers. I did walk around the lot a
little bit without the group. I was bored. There was nothing interesting going on.

        Michael Menace - I kept yelling at the women as they entered because sometimes people give
me money to make me go away. Yes, I remember Sally. She called me a hoodlum. I thought it was
funny so I walked away with my friends. There were these hot girls who were a part of one of the
shows, I was more interested in them.

       Vinny Vandal - I know what my last name is, but it’s French. We were smoking ciga-I mean, we
were reading bible verses outside of the Civic Center. We didn’t once yell anything at the women. They
were too nice. If anything, I wanted to help them cross the street.




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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
Other Evidence

        The cameras in the parking lot behind Gertie’s Cuppa Joe did not get a clear enough view of
Gertie’s car where it was parked. They did pick up a figure who looked in the window on the driver’s
side and who then walked around to the passenger side and peered in for several moments but could
not see if any damage was done to the car at that point.

        There were no cameras at the civic center parking lot, but a security camera outside of the drug
store across the street did pick up two boys walking around the parking lot. Police were able to identify
them as Vinny Vandal and Larry Loiterer




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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
                                                                NAME:___________________________

Questions (2 points each)

   1.   What was the crime committed in this case study?




   2.   What are the FACTS in this crime?




   3.   What do you still need to know?




   4.   Assuming that all the information you need to answer this is provided in the case study, who do
        you believe perpetrated the crime?




   5.   What evidence supports your answer to #4?




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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
                                     Thinking Like The Prosecution

Assignment:

        Taking one of the case studies we’ve looked at in class (With the exception of “No Cause for
Celebration”) you will create an opening statement that a prosecuting attorney might deliver in a trial.
See rubric below.



                            A Late Night for Gertie:         Armed Robbery

               A Murder Most Fowl:                      Malicious Destruction of Property

        Keyed In:                                Malicious Destruction of Property



Useful Information:

        A Late Night for Gertie:

        Armed robbery is a robbery that involves the use of an offensive weapon. Many would-be
robbers who try to commit robbery using a toy gun that looks like a real one have been very surprised to
find that they are being charged with armed robbery. A toy gun or anything else that looks like a real
gun can bring on a charge of armed robbery. Some unlucky people have been arrested for armed
robbery simply for having their hand in their pocket.

        Armed robbery is sometimes referred to as an aggravated form of theft or larceny as it implies
the use of force. It usually atttracts a greater punishment in the criminal codes where it is accompanied
by the use or presence of a dangerous weapon. Most criminal codes specifically define this form of
aggravated robbery as distinct from robbery.

       In order for the Prosecution to prove their case at Court, they must prove each of the following
matters beyond a reasonable doubt.

        The accused:

                (1) is or pretends to be armed with a dangerous or offensive weapon or instrument; or

                (2) is in company with one or more persons: or

                (3) at or immediately before or immediately after the time of the robbery wounds or
        uses personal violence to any person.



       It will be necessary for the prosecution in every offence to prove that the accused was the
person who committed the offence. Click here to learn more about identification evidence.




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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
          A Murder Most Fowl and Keyed In:

        The intentional destruction of property is popularly referred to as vandalism. It includes
behavior such as breaking windows, slashing tires, spray painting a wall with graffiti, and destroying a
computer system through the use of a computer virus. Vandalism is a malicious act and may reflect
personal ill will, although the perpetrators need not know their victim to commit vandalism. The
recklessness of the act imputes both intent and malice.

        Because the destruction of public and private property poses a threat to society, modern
statutes make vandalism a crime. The penalties upon conviction may be a fine, a jail sentence, an order
to pay for repairs or replacement, or all three. In addition, a person who commits vandalism may be
sued in a civil tort action for damages so that the damaged property can be repaired or replaced.

          To obtain a conviction the prosecution must ordinarily prove that the accused damaged or
destroyed some property, that the property did not belong to the accused, and that the accused acted
willfully and with malice. In the absence of proof of damage, the defendant may be guilty of trespass,
but not vandalism. If there is no proof that the defendant intentionally damaged the property, the
defendant cannot be convicted of the crime but can be held liable for monetary damages in a civil
action.



SET UP:

              Begin by taking your stand. In this case, it is pre-determined depending on your case.
               For example, if we were using the first case study, your position would be that Travis
               Troublemaker is guilty of the crime in which he was accused.
              Tell us the evidence. What evidence supports the fact that the defendant is guilty? This
               is not a time to speculate. This is the time to say, with a purpose, that the defendant is
               guilty. If you’re going to call any witnesses to the stand during the course of the trial,
               tell us what they’re going to say.
              Anticipate what your opposition is going to say: “The Defense is going to say that Travis
               is innocent of this crime, and that he was not involved in it at all.” And refute it... “This
               is simply not true. The security cameras showed Travis in the vicinity, …”
              Finish with a conclusion. “Throughout the course of this case, I will prove each of the
               following pieces of evidence... ...if I successfully prove these things you must return a
               guilty verdict.”




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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
                               10 Common Objections
      Objection                                        Definition

      Relevance           Something is irrelevant if it does not serve to help prove or
                          disprove the elements of the crime that the defendant is being
                          charged with.

Leading Witness           A leading question suggests the answer one expects to hear; "You
                          were at the victim's home that night, weren't you?" The lawyer
                          should not be doing the testifying.

Hearsay                   Hearsay is a statement made by someone other than the witness
                          testifying and offered to prove its own truth. There are some
                          exceptions.

Asked and Answered        Lawyers will often try to emphasize a point by repeating the
                          question that elicited a crucial answer. Some limited repetition is
                          allowed, but most courts will sustain an objection if the question
                          has been asked two or three times. But you can “cycle.”

Badgering Witness         An argumentative question is where counsel states a conclusion
                          and then asks the witness to argue with it, often in an attempt to
                          get the witness to change their mind. Also known as "badgering"
                          the witness.


Premature—No              The question is asked before a context has been laid to show that
Foundation                the witness has the ability to credibly speak to an issue.




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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
Calls for Speculation     Anything that invites a witness to guess is objectionable.
                          Speculation as to what possibly could have happened is of little
                          probative value. Some leeway is allowed for the witness to use
                          their own words, and greater freedom is allowed with expert
                          witnesses.

Narrative                 Object on the response of the witness when they start telling
                          everything in their statement from one question. Make them
                          break up their testimony into small parts.

Asks for Opinion of       Opinion testimony is proper only in the area of expertise or
Unqualified Witness       specialized knowledge that an expert witness is qualified in. Lay
                          witnesses may give opinions only when their perception is helpful
                          to the jury; e.g., time, distance, speed, sobriety.

Confusing                 The question is asked too fast, or the question is too ambiguous
                          for the witness to correctly answer it.



(ONeill, 10 Common Objections, 2011)




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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
Witness Statement – Carla Clucker

Statement taken: September 17, 2011

        I went to bed around 10:30 p.m. on September 16th, 2011. I was exhausted and really wanted to
get some sleep because I had a long day ahead of me. I was asleep as soon as my head hit the pillow.
The windows were open because it was a warm night, and I like the sound of the forest around our
house at night, particularly in the fall. I was awakened at approximately 1:00a.m. by the sound of the
chickens squawking in the hen house outside my window. It is rare for me to hear them at night, which
is why my sleep was interrupted. It was unusual for the chickens to make that much noise in the night,
but not completely unheard of, so I didn’t think anything of it at the time.

         I decided I needed a drink of water and possibly a snack…we had had pizza for dinner that night,
and I felt hungry enough to have another slice. I wandered into the kitchen, which was just outside the
door to my bedroom and opened the fridge to pull out the pizza box. It was then that I noticed what
looked like a flash of light from the windows.

        I put the box down on the counter and I looked out the window in the direction of the chicken
coops. I could see clearly, the beams of two flashlights outside. Not wanting to alert anyone to my
presence, I hunted in the dark for something I could use as a weapon. I found the large cast iron skillet I
had made breakfast with that morning drying on the dish rack and grabbed it by the handle before using
the back door to the house, which was just off of the kitchen, to investigate.

         I made it to the chicken coop and tripped over a branch in the yard. I fell into the fence creating
a loud noise. The lights shone right in my face! I was temporarily blinded, but I did see two figures
standing over the chickens. From what I could see in the light, most of the chickens were dead. At that
point I yelled for help and told the figures to get out now. I would have hit them with the frying pan if I
could have, but they were too quick for me. Carl came out a minute or two later but whoever it was was
already gone.




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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
Witness Statement – Carl Clucker

Statement Taken: September 17, 2011

        I had gone to bed early because I had to get up early the next morning to go into town to meet
with my doctor. I had been having chest pains as of late and wanted to make sure that it wasn’t
anything more serious than heartburn. I’ve been under a lot of stress lately, you know? Anyway, I was
in the upstairs bedroom sleeping away when I woke up with a start. I swore I could hear some voices
coming from the coop.

        I tried to tell myself it was nothing, but all of a sudden, I could hear my mom call out from
outside. She was loud and noticeably upset about something.

        I had just enough time to look out the window. I could see the beams of flashlights from within
the chicken coop. I distinctly heard my mother yell “GET OUT! GET OUT NOW!” and knew that there
was some trouble going down.

        I raced downstairs and made it out the door in time to see the flashlight beams pointed on the
ground, bopping up and down as two very dark figures ran into the woods. They were fast, and they
were definitely up to no good. I have no idea where they went once they made it too the room. I ran
inside and called 9-11 and tried to calm my mother down.




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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
Witness Statement: Doug Young

Statement Taken: July 4, 2011

         My wife and I had reached the Fireworks in the Park celebration a little behind schedule. We
had missed out on parking in the main lots close to the action because it took awhile to get the kids
together. We reached the outer parking facility at approximately 4:45 p.m. There weren’t that many
cars in the lot, and we decided to park near a shade tree at the back of the lot because we were already
late, and it was so hot that day we didn’t want the car to be sweltering when we got back.

        We made it onto the waiting bus just in time to be shuttled across town for the start of the
parade. We saw the parade get started, and enjoyed what we were able to see. Luckily it had started
much later than expected. The parade was only about ¼ through when Dexter (my son) began to get
fidgety. He always gets fidgety when he’s hungry. We decided to leave the parade and find one of the
street vendors and get dinner earlier than we had planned. As we were walking, my wife realized that
she had left her purse in the car.

        We decided to find an ATM machine instead of going all the way back to the car. Granted, we
don’t have a lot of money, but we did at least have enough that we could withdraw some money and
make a deposit again later. I withdrew enough for dinner and tickets to the Gearbox concert.

        I also noticed that my phone was buzzing. When I opened it up, I realized it must have been
buzzing a lot but I hadn’t noticed because we were constantly being bumped by people at the parade. I
saw that they were all from my wife, and that they were rude and vulgar. They said things like “What r u
wearing?” and some that were a lot cruder than that. I gave the money to my wife and told her what
was happening. She took the kids and went to get dinner, I ran back to the car.

        When I got there at about 6:25, I found broken glass all around the passenger side. The window
had been smashed in by a large rock. No one else was around. My wife’s purse was missing, and I
found the glove box ransacked. The Children’s SpongeBob Squarepants television set had also been
taken. I immediately called the police and waited for them to arrive.




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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
State your name for the record and spell your last name please.

Tell us why you were in the parking lot that day?

Why did you decide to park in the back of the parking lot?

About when did your wife realize she had left her purse in the car?

What happened next?

How much money did you withdraw?

What did some of the texts say?

After you noticed the texts, what did you do?

When did you arrive at the scene?

What did you find?

What did you do?

Did you see the defendant, Travis Troublemaker at the scene?




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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
Witness Statement – Michael Moneybags

Taken October 16th, 2011



        I had been having some trouble with my finances lately, and I needed a quiet place to get things
under control. I went to Gertie’s Cuppa Joe on the 15th so I could do just that, work over my finances. I
got there at about 7 p.m. after a long day at work. It was hard to concentrate, but I worked hard on it
anyway.

        I went through my bank statements and found that the number of overdrafts I had had over the
last month wasn’t quite adding up. I noticed some interesting charges on my back statements which led
me to believe that someone else might have been using my bank account. I was recently divorced, and
wondered if my ex-wife had figured out my new pin numbers. She had maxed out several credit cards in
our name when we were married, and I knew she was having trouble with her finances as well.

         I tried calling some of this information in to the companies, but they were closed for the night. I
kept getting automated machines. It was making me really irritated. I went outside at about 9:30 to
smoke a cigarette, and a man dressed in dark clothing walked by me. It was dark, and I didn’t get to see
much more of him than that because most of the businesses had already closed and were dark. The
store fronts were dark making it hard to see.

        I smoked two cigarettes, and was outside for about fifteen minutes. When I was getting ready
to come back inside, I ran right into a man in dark clothing who knocked me to the ground. He took off
running after that. I yelled some obscenities at him, and got back up to go inside and collect my stuff. I
wasn’t going to get anything else done that night.

       As soon as I walked in, I knew something was wrong. Gertie was wide eyed and furious. She
was always so nice to everyone, even if she was always up in our business. She yelled at me to get out. I
asked her if I could get my laptop first, but she was shrieking so loudly, I knew something must have
been the matter. I walked out and picked up my laptop from the police the next day.




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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
Witness Statement – Polly Pumpernickel

Statement Taken October 15, 2011



        I was working hard on the bread dough for the next morning, and decided that I needed a break.
This was at about 9:50. All of the other businesses had closed down and I knew that the only other
person who would be around at this point was Gertie, who was always working late these days.

         I was out front turning off all the lights and making sure the door was secured, when I saw him.
A tall man who I couldn’t make out in the shadows. He seemed to be peering inside Gertie’s Cuppa Joe
like he was trying to decide something. He was smoking a cigarette, and I remember just shivering
because he looked like he was up to no good. It looked like he was looking in windows and trying to find
something of value.

         I watched him for several long minutes before coming inside to call Gertie to warn her. I made
my way to the phone but realized I didn’t have the number handy. I searched through the phone book
to find it as frantically as I could, casting an eye back out to the streets whenever possible to see if I
could see anything else. It was really dark.

       By the time I found her phone number, Gertie had been robbed. I locked up, called the police,
and went over to comfort the poor woman.




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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
                                     Case Study 5 – Trouble for Travis

Overview of the Crime

        The Cook family, consisting of Christopher and Connie, both in their mid thirties, and their two
daughters Clara and Corrine live in a small house in the middle of Buick Michigan. The area is mostly
nice, and is very close to both the junior and senior high schools, and one elementary school.

        There are many people who live in the neighborhood, and while generally nice, the area in
which they live is on the most direct path into the downtown area from the high school. Because of this,
many teens walk by the area. Most of them go about their business and head into town, but some loiter
and have been chased off out of yards.

        On the evening of December 15, 2011, the Cook family was headed out to a Christmas program
at the Cook’s youngest daughter’s school. The family, who had spent most of the day wrapping
presents, cleaning the house, and baking Christmas cookies was looking forward to a pleasant evening
away from home.

        After the concert was over however, they returned to find their house an absolute wreck. The
front door had been forced open, apparently by a garden trowel which had been left by the door. The
cookies they had baked were thrown on the floor. The presents were all unwrapped, and half of them
were missing. Wrapping paper was strewn around the room.

        The Cook Family called the police, who arrived at the scene a half an hour later.

Statements:

Christopher Cook

        We had left the house at approximately five forty. We had to get to the Junior High School for
the Christmas concert, which stated at six thirty. Clara was in it and she had to be there at six sharp to
warm up.

        I arrived home at about 8 p.m. to find the door had been forced open. On the ground lightly
dusted with some fresh snow, I found a garden trowel which we had left outside to chip ice off of the
steps. It was off to the side, and out of immediate view. The door frame had several large gashes in it.

       When we walked in the door, we knew immediately we had been robbed. My wife and
daughters had been making Christmas Cookies all day, and we found them in a pile on the floor. The
stand mixer which we had used to make the cookies was on the floor in two pieces. It had broken the
ceramic tiles that it landed on.

       When we investigated the living room, we found that the presents had been unwrapped and
strewn about. Anything that was clothing or school related was still there, but we had bought both of
our daughters iPod touches and these were gone. A family gift, a desktop computer was also missing.
We also were missing almost $400 in gift cards to the mall in Traveller’s City.

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Wexford-Missaukee Career Technical Center – Public Safety Program “Mock Trial Unit”
        Upon looking through the living room we also noticed that most of our DVD collection had been
taken as well. We called the police as quickly as possible and waited for them to arrive.

Darren Deputy

       I arrived on the scene at approximately 8:45 p.m. after responding to a call to investigate a
breaking and entering at the Cook home. Christopher Cook walked me through the crime scene. The
doorway had been forced open, and there were several large gashes in the doorframe from where
whomever perpetrated the crime had tried to get the metal in to force the doorway open.

         In surveying the kitchen, cookies were both half eaten and completely demolished on the floor.
In addition to this, there was a broken stand mixer on the floor which had been pushed off of the table,
presumably in a fit of anger. The mixer’s weight combined with the height from which it had fallen had
broken two of the floor tiles. I dusted the mixer for prints.

       The living room was where things got really bad. It was completely trashed. There was
wrapping paper everywhere and gifts strewn about the room. The Cooks claimed they had not touched
anything since arriving home.

        Their DVD shelves were almost completely bare, though the thieves had left the entire series of
Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman alone. I dusted these for prints as well. In all, I only got one partial print
out of the entire house that didn’t end up belonging to a member of the Cook family.

         I then walked around the neighborhood and asked some of the neighbors what they had seen.
The direct neighbor to the left of the Cook residence had been out all night, and had seen nothing. The
neighbor to the right of the Cook residence however, had seen a large black pickup truck parked outside
of the Cook home for approximately thirty minutes. She had noticed a young teenager entering and
exiting the house, but had thought nothing of it at the time.

        Traffic cameras from the lights in the area picked up the black pickup truck. We did not see it
parked at the Cook house, however, there was approximately a thirty minute window between when
The truck was caught on Tendril street at 7:15 and when it emerged again on Marshall ave at 7:45.
When we ran the plates we saw that they belonged to Travis Troublemaker. I brought him in for
questioning.

Nancy Neighbor

        I had gone outside to enjoy a cigarette on my porch and to look at the neighborhood lights. The
only house that was dark that night was the Cook family home. I knew they were gone to the concert. I
used to attend, but couldn’t hear “Hark the Herald Angels Sing” sung by middle school students any
longer.

        I did however notice a black pick up truck parked outside. I knew the eldest daughter Corrine
dated a boy from the high school, and assumed at the time that it must have been him dropping her off



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or picking up something from the house for her. I did see him walking from the house at one point with
something in his hands. I was unable to see what.



Parker Pawnguy

         A young man came into my store with a stack of DVDs. Quite the collection. I asked him why he
was selling them, he said that he was trying to get his truck fixed and he didn’t watch these anymore.
Quite the crazy collection for a teenage boy. Everything from Transformers, to Harry Potter, to Greys
Anatomy. Anyway, he said his name was Travis and we talked for a little bit while I looked at the quality
of the discs. They were in relatively good condition, and I felt bad for the poor kid with his messed up
truck. I gave him about $5 per DVD. A total of about $100 in all.

Travis Troublemaker

        I had gone into town that night to rent some movies. I was bored and my mom was out. I
rented a couple of action flicks, don’t remember the name. They sucked. I drove through town the long
way because I wanted to look at the Christmas Lights.

       Yes, a few days later I sold a stack of DVDs. Most of them were my foster mom’s. Some of them
were mine. I didn’t like them. We didn’t need them, and I needed to get my truck fixed.

        This iPod? Yeah, I’ve had it for awhile. It’s great, but I don’t have a lot of music yet. I’ve been
working in people’s yards during the spring and summer months, but I take the winter off, so I didn’t
have a lot of money to spend at iTunes, you know? Plus, the desktop computer I had just bought for
school didn’t have a lot of software on it either, and I haven’t had time to rip all my old CD’s to it yet.

        I absolutely did NOT break into that house. I don’t even know who the Chef family is.

Tina Troublemaker

         My son went into town to get some movies. I was out that night, I had gone to work at three
o’clock, before he was even home from school, but I know he likes to spend his Wednesday nights
watching movies. He says he went around the block looking at the lights and I believe him. I bought him
the hp computer a month ago for school. I don’t know where he got the iPod touch but I know he
worked hard all summer long.

        When I got home at 10:00 at night Travis was home watching movies.




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Evidence




                                                                                          The
                                                                                          Cook
                                                                                          Family
                                                                                          DVD
                                                                                          collecti
                                                                                          on
                                                                                          (from
                                                                                          Insuran
                                                                                          ce
                                                                                          Claim)




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1       CITIZEN KANE                                   1941


2       CASABLANCA                                     1942


3       THE GODFATHER                                  1972


4       GONE WITH THE WIND                             1939


5       LAWRENCE OF ARABIA                             1962


6       THE WIZARD OF OZ                               1939


7       THE GRADUATE                                   1967


8       ON THE WATERFRONT                              1954


9       SCHINDLER'S LIST                               1993


10      SINGIN' IN THE RAIN                            1952


11      IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE                          1946


12      SUNSET BLVD.                                   1950


13      THE BRIDGE ON THE RIVER KWAI                   1957


14      SOME LIKE IT HOT                               1959


15      STAR WARS                                      1977


16      ALL ABOUT EVE                                  1950


17      THE AFRICAN QUEEN                              1951


18      PSYCHO                                         1960


19      CHINATOWN                                      1974


20      ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST                1975


21      THE GRAPES OF WRATH                            1940


22      2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY                          1968




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23      THE MALTESE FALCON                             1941


24      RAGING BULL                                    1980


25      E.T. THE EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL                     1982


26      DR. STRANGELOVE                                1964


27      BONNIE AND CLYDE                               1967


28      APOCALYPSE NOW                                 1979


29      MR. SMITH GOES TO WASHINGTON                   1939


30      THE TREASURE OF THE SIERRA MADRE               1948


31      ANNIE HALL                                     1977


32      THE GODFATHER PART II                          1974


33      HIGH NOON                                      1952


34      TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD                          1962


35      IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT                          1934


36      MIDNIGHT COWBOY                                1969


37      THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES                    1946


38      DOUBLE INDEMNITY                               1944


39      DOCTOR ZHIVAGO                                 1965


40      NORTH BY NORTHWEST                             1959


41      WEST SIDE STORY                                1961


42      REAR WINDOW                                    1954


43      KING KONG                                      1933


44      THE BIRTH OF A NATION                          1915




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45      A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE                       1951


46      A CLOCKWORK ORANGE                             1971


47      TAXI DRIVER                                    1976


48      JAWS                                           1975


49      SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARFS                1937


50      BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID             1969


51      THE PHILADELPHIA STORY                         1940


52      FROM HERE TO ETERNITY                          1953


53      AMADEUS                                        1984


54      ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT                 1930


55      THE SOUND OF MUSIC                             1965


56      M*A*S*H                                        1970


57      THE THIRD MAN                                  1949


58      FANTASIA                                       1940


59      REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE                          1955


60      RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK                        1981


61      VERTIGO                                        1958


62      TOOTSIE                                        1982


63      STAGECOACH                                     1939


64      CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE THIRD KIND             1977


65      THE SILENCE OF THE LAMBS                       1991


66      NETWORK                                        1976




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67      THE MANCHURIAN CANDIDATE                       1962


68      AN AMERICAN IN PARIS                           1951


69      SHANE                                          1953


70      THE FRENCH CONNECTION                          1971


71      FORREST GUMP                                   1994


72      BEN-HUR                                        1959


73      WUTHERING HEIGHTS                              1939


74      THE GOLD RUSH                                  1925


75      DANCES WITH WOLVES                             1990


76      CITY LIGHTS                                    1931


77      AMERICAN GRAFFITI                              1973


78      ROCKY                                          1976


79      THE DEER HUNTER                                1978


80      THE WILD BUNCH                                 1969


81      MODERN TIMES                                   1936


82      GIANT                                          1956


83      PLATOON                                        1986


84      FARGO                                          1996


85      DUCK SOUP                                      1933


86      MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY                           1935


87      FRANKENSTEIN                                   1931


88      EASY RIDER                                     1969




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89      PATTON                                         1970


90      THE JAZZ SINGER                                1927


91      MY FAIR LADY                                   1964


92      A PLACE IN THE SUN                             1951


93      THE APARTMENT                                  1960


94      GOODFELLAS                                     1990


95      PULP FICTION                                   1994


96      THE SEARCHERS                                  1956


97      BRINGING UP BABY                               1938


98      UNFORGIVEN                                     1992


99      GUESS WHO'S COMING TO DINNER                   1967


100     YANKEE DOODLE DANDY


101     Greys Anatomy Seasons 1-4


102     Family Guy Season1


103     Family Guy Season 2


104     Family Guy Season 3


105     Terminator


106     Terminator 2


107     Terminator 3


108     Terminator Salvation


109     Desperate Housewives Season 1


110     Desperate Housewives Season 3




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111       Desperate Housewives Season 4


112       House Season 1


113       House Season 2


114       Alias – The Complete Series


115       Lost – The Complete Series


116       Smallville – The Complete Series


Estimated Worth of DVD Collection: $3500



Items Stolen/Destroyed (From Insurance Claim)



Kitchen Aid Stand Mixer $300

iPod Touch 5th Generation (2) $500

hp Pavillion Desktop Computer $600




Items Sold to Parker Pawnguy (From Invoice dated December 18th, 2011)



Alias – Seasons 1-4

Lost – The Complete Series

Terminator

Terminator 2

Terminator 3

Tootsie

M*A*S*H*

City Lights

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West Side Story

E.T.

A Clockwork Orange

Shrek Forever

Toy Story 3

Star Wars Episodes IV-VI

Greys Anatomy Seasons 1-4

The Office Seasons 1-5

30-Rock Season 1-4



Items found with Travis Troublemaker (No receipts, from search of home)

Hp Pavillion desktop computer (new)

iPod touch (5th Generation)

Gift cards totaling $100




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Map of the Area




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                                      Case Study 6 – Blaze of Glory



Overview of the Crime

        On the night of December 15, 2011 police and fire officials responded to a call to a rural dwelling
on the eastern outskirts of Buick Michigan. The house, which was owned by Daniel Doomed, had
recently been vacated due to family financial troubles.

       The blaze, which had been going for a long time before a report from a neighbor on the
opposite side of the small forest had noticed anything was wrong, was put out before the woods behind
the house caught fire. The recent snowfall had helped with this as well.

       The Doomed family had arrived on the scene as the blaze was in the last stages of being put out.
The family had been staying with family friends on the opposite side of town.

         Investigators were able to determine that a gas leak from the propane line was responsible for
starting the fire. The copper pipe leading to the stove had been frayed, and the electric water heater,
which had been recently and incorrectly installed by Daniel Doomed had kicked on. Police were unable
to rule out arson as a possible cause.

        There were no injuries, however, the house was completely destroyed.



Statements:

        Daniel Doomed – I had gone to the store to pick up a few things my family needed. We had
been staying at Frederick Familyfriend’s house for the last few days because the bank had informed us
we had until January 19 to completely vacate the house. Things have been rough for awhile. We
weren’t making ends meet and we had received our final notice on our mortgage, not to mention calls
from a collection agency regarding several credit cards we had maxed out. We had packed up
everything we knew we could take that morning. We had sent our daughters off to school and as we
were slowly unpacking in the basement, we began to realize there were some things we needed. My
wife also realized that her wedding ring was gone. She said that she had put it on the counter next to
the stove when she was doing dishes, and in the rush to leave, she had forgotten it.

         I was in a rush to make sure the girls got home from school on time, so I went into the house to
look for the ring. It wasn’t where she said it was, but I could see it in the crack between the stove and
the counter. I had to pull the stove out to get it, but I got it and returned. I decided to go to Meijers
after dinner.

        When the girls got home, we ate dinner with the Fred and his wife, and after I had helped my
wife put the girls to bed, I went out to Meijers to buy the things we needed. I bought some
underclothes for everyone in the family, as well as some socks, some food just in case we overstayed

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our welcome, and some sleeping bags. When I was done, I drove around a little bit trying to clear my
head. I eventually ended up getting close to being out of gas, so I filled up at Wesco and went home.

        I hadn’t been home longer than fifteen minutes when we received a phone call from the people
who lived on the opposite side of the small forest behind our house, Nick Neighbor. He said that our
house was on fire, and that the police and fire department were on their way.

        It took us a little while to get out there. My wife and I got into a huge argument about whether
or not to wake the girls. We got into our truck, a white 1990 Chevy Blazer and sped off to the scene.
When we got there, the fire was in the final stages of being put out. We watched our home smolder
and burn. At that point, there wasn’t much left in my heart but numbness.



        Denise Doomed – We had packed up our bags earlier that day and moved off to a friend’s, but
when we got there and unpacked, Daniel insisted that we needed things. I didn’t know if we did or not,
but he was so insistent, and so nervous. Truthfully, I knew how he felt, because I was nervous myself.
We weren’t thinking that this would ever happen to us, you know? We had worked hard, and things just
spiraled out of control. I realized while we were unpacking that I had left my wedding ring on the
counter. I told Daniel and he promised to get it for me.

         We spent most of the day unpacking and once Daniel brought the girls home from school, we
ate dinner and Daniel left again. He left when we were done eating, which was around 6:15. He didn’t
get back until later. It was almost ten o’clock at night. At that point, we were both going to head to
bed. I had been waiting up for him even though I was exhausted. When we were just about to brush
our teeth however, the phone rang. Fred came downstairs about a minute later, white as a sheet. He
told us that our house was on fire and that police and firemen had been called to the scene. Daniel ran
upstairs to talk to the neighbor who had called in person, and I started to throw my regular clothes back
on.

         He came downstairs in a panicked rage. We argued about whether or not we should get the
girls up. We ultimately decided to let them have one last semi-normal night’s sleep and Fred agreed to
watch them for us. We went to the house and…it was terrible. I’ve never seen anything like it. You
never think it’ll happen to you.



        Pete Policeman

        I heard the report come in over the radio, and I made it to the scene before anyone else had.
When I arrived, the house was already in a blaze. The firemen arrived at 10:00 p.m. and began their
work immediately. By the time the family had arrived at the scene, it was about 10:30 and the fire was
mostly contained. Both of the family members seemed overly agitated. This was normal under the
circumstances, but Daniel didn’t seem to be in as great a degree of shock as his wife. He kept asking if
we knew how it had happened, and I told him that the investigator had not been able to conduct his

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investigation yet. He was irritated by my answer and kept asking the firemen, who finally had me escort
both of them back to their vehicle.

        When the investigator gave us his findings, we began to grow suspicious that the fire might not
have been an accident. The water heater had been very obviously improperly installed, and, when it
kicked on, had caused sparks which ignited the gas, which had been seeping into the house for at least
two hours. As we looked into Mr. Doomed’s finances, we began to see that with the house entering
foreclosure, the state of his credit report and the number of collection agencies after him, we felt we
had enough evidence to charge him with arson. If there was one thing that night I could have done
differently, it would have been to give Mr. Doomed a breathalyzer test.



        Isaac Investigator

         I was at the scene with Pete Policeman, and observed the following when I arrived. The fire
looked like it had caused the most damage in the kitchen area, which, upon further investigation,
proved to be the source. An improperly installed water heater at the entrance to the kitchen had
created enough spark to ignite propane coming from the Stove. There did not appear to be any
indication of forced entry into the house, but there were two pairs of recent tire tracks in the snow near
the driveway, both belonging to the same vehicle, more than likely on two different trips. The tread
matched the tires of the 1990 Chevy Blazer which was owned by the Doomed family.

        We pulled local traffic cameras. While there were not any on the back roads leading to the
Doomed family home, we did see the 1990 Chevy Blazer traveling down Marshall Street at
approximately 3:00 in the afternoon, returning a little while later at 3:30. This is consistent with the end
time of the local middle school, and the amount of time that Mr. Doomed claimed he had been in the
house earlier. The same Chevy Blazer was later seen travelling down Marshall street again at
approximately 7:30 p.m. It did not return until 9:22.



        Nicholas Neighbor

        I was doing my normal evening routine where I watched the news and tried to drink a glass of
wine. You know. For my health? Anyway, there was a loud roar at about 9:30 that night, and I looked
outside my back porch to see a lot of smoke.

        I grabbed my cell phone and ran through the small forest behind my house to see what the
trouble was. It was the Doomed family home! They had always been good and decent neighbors, and I
knew they’d been going through a rough patch. I felt so bad for them! I hoped no one was home at the
time.

         I tried calling Daniel’s cell phone, but the number was disconnected, so I ran back to my house
to call 911 from my home phone. That was at about 9:40. I remembered seeing a Facebook post from

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Denise then, saying that they were staying with the Familyfriends, so I looked up their number in the
phone book to call them and let them know their house was on fire!

        I didn’t see or hear anyone at any point before that, but I wouldn’t, you know? My house is on
the other side of the trees. I was glad to hear that everyone was alright. My prayers and thoughts go
out to them in this time of need.




        Frederick Familyfriend

          I have been friends with the Doomed family for years. Their name is definitely ironic given what
has happened to them recently. It is a terrible tragedy. When I heard about their financial problems, I
first tried to offer them a little money. Daniel’s mom had practically raised me from a kid. My dad was
never around and my mom didn’t work or take care of us. Daniel refused, but a few weeks later asked
me if they could live in our basement for a little while. It was my pleasure to be able to help them.

        Trouble was, when he arrived, he was agitated. Very agitated. I had initially chalked this up to
the situation they had found themselves in. I wonder now however, if it wasn’t because he was
planning to set the house on fire! I heard him and his wife arguing as they were unpacking things in the
basement, but I just left them alone. They were going through enough.

          He left to pick up the girls from school. He mentioned that he would be stopping by the house
briefly, but he didn’t seem to return with anything. Later after a very tense dinner, he left to go to
Meijers. He didn’t come back for three hours. We only live about twenty minutes away, so I found this
a little odd.

        I got the call from Nick Neighbor at about 9:55. When I went down to tell them, Denise was
instantly in shock. Daniel on the other hand…it didn’t even seem to register.

        I love the Doomed family, but I can’t say with a great deal of certainty that he didn’t do this.




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Evidence




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The Doomed family vehicle, 1990 Chevy Blazer.




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 Daniel Doomed

 16245 East Fireproof Lane

 Buick, MI 49601                  Statement Date: January 5, 2012




 Charges                          Cost        Date

 ******Payment, Thank you!        -150         12/4/2011

 Meijers                          250          12/5/2011

 Wesco                            49.51        12/5/2011

 Ferrellgas Propane               896.15       12/6/2011

 Consumers Energy                 $142.61      12/7/2011

 ATT                              $201.15     12/11/2011

 Meijers                          $198.47     12/15/2011

 Wesco                            $59.14      12/15/2011




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 Balance                          $4,512.16

 Minimum Due                           $169

 Payment Due Date                 1/19/2012




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Daniel Doomed,

You have been repeatedly warned that you have failed to make payments as per the
conditions laid down according to the law of the state of Michigan. Payments for your
residence at:


 16245 East Fireproof Lane

 Buick, MI 49601



Have not been received in six months. You have until December 19, 2011 to repay the outstanding
balance of $6,195 or your property will be seized.



Sincerely,




Bradley Banker




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Dear Daniel

How can we try to persuade you to pay your delinquent account?

We have tried many suggestions for extending the payment period,
for making the monthly payments smaller, for getting help from
lenders, and for at least discussing this matter with us. Now we
have exhausted our own resources.

We have to seek help from outside our own company. We have
consulted with our collection agency and they told us that we
have several avenues available to us for collecting our money.
We are very uncomfortable with the thought of going to court
and, therefore, hope you resolve this outstanding balance today.

To avoid legal action, we must have your check for $15,516 on or
before December 31, 2011 (date).

Sincerely,



Constance Collector




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    12/15/2011 7:18 pm


 canned goods        0.51

 canned goods        0.51

 canned goods        0.51

 canned goods        0.51

 canned goods        0.51

 liquor             21.99

 Coleman slpbg     $45.00

 Coleman slpbg     $45.00

 clothing           $9.99

 clothing           $9.99

 clothing           $9.99

 clothing          $15.99

 clothing          $15.99

 clothing           $9.99

 clothing          $11.99

 Total             198.47

 Credit Card      $198.47




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    Jury Note-taking Sheet                          Name:_________________________

What are the charges against the defendant?
1.____________________________________________________________________
2.____________________________________________________________________
3.____________________________________________________________________
What are the elements of these charges? (Circle each that applies)
1 Guilty mind ( intent to do a crime)
2 Guilty Act (proof the defendant did something, it wasn't someone else)
3 Duty (proof that the defendant had an obligation to do something)
4 Breach of Duty (proof the defendant didn't fulfill their obligation)
5 Causation (proof the defendant's breach caused the problem, not something else)
6 Damages (proof that the plaintiff really had something bad happen to them)


What is the level of proof needed for this trial? B.A.R.D. or Preponderance of Evidence?


Next as each witness testifies, take quick notes of the significant things they said, try to
figure out which things prove or disprove each element above, you will be able to use
these notes during deliberations. (Minimum 3 per witness)


Plaintiff Witness 1 ____________________________




Plaintiff Witness 2 ____________________________




Plaintiff Witness 3 ____________________________




Plaintiff Witness 4 ____________________________


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Plaintiff Witness 5____________________________




Defense Witness 1 ____________________________




Defense Witness 2 ____________________________




Defense Witness 3 ____________________________




Defense Witness 4 ____________________________




Defense Witness 5 ____________________________




(ONeill, Jury Note Taking Sheet, 2011)

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                                 End of Unit Writing Prompt

Many people feel that the legal system in the United States is second to none.
They believe that given problems in the rest of the world, the United States’
system hears both sides and allows for the truth to come out in the course of the
trial. Other people feel that our system is not fair and just, that guilty people
come away free a large portion of the time, and that innocent people have been
sent to jail for crimes they did not commit. In your opinion, is our legal system
fair and just?

In your essay, take a position on this question. You may write about either one of
the two points of view given, or you may present a different point of view on this
question. Use specific reasons and examples to support your position.




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Sample Work

Thinking Like The Prosecution

Ladies and Gentlemen of the jury Id like to start off with saying thank you for the service that you are
giving us today. My name is ***** and I am the prosecuting attorney for the case that I am presenting
to you today. On July 4th, 2011 there was a breaking and entering that caused the Young family to lose
one hundred dollars, a cell phone and lastly Perce. The crime occurred in the parking lot by “Gerties
Cuppa Joe”. There was a rock believed to be thrown through the window of the Young’s mini-van. I
believe the Defendant is guilty. We have police statements stating that Travis Troublemaker who is the
defendant was in the parking lot of where the crime occurred. This Statement will also say that Mr.
Troublemaker had $100 in cash in his pocket when he was questioned by the police. I will also be
presenting another Police Statement that will say Mr. Teenager who is Mr. Troublemaker’s friend, which
they were looking for an unlocked car so they could call in an accident that they had been in. Also so
they could call there parents so they knew what was going. Mr. Troublemaker does have prior bad acts.
His lat run in with the law was about a year ago when he had broken into houses. He is currently on
probation. The Defense attorney is going to try and prove that he did not do the crime but my evidence
will show that he did. If I successfully prove the elements of the crime, fit the evidence to the person
and convince you the jury to find this young man guilty you will come back with a Guilty verdict. Thank
you for your time.


                                 Case Study – No Cause for Celebration

         Good evening ladies and gentleman my name is ***, I am the prosecuting attorney and today I
will be telling you how Travis Troublemaker is guilty of breaking and entering into a motor vehicle along
with stealing $60, a purse, a phone, and a sponge bob T.V set. Travis is in the marching band which was
supposed to perform around five, but do to a small car accident he was in with three other boys he was
running late. His friend Teddy Teenager was in the same car accident who supposedly found Diana
young’s phone lying on the ground and had used it to call his mother and let her know what had
happened. But prior to that Diana’s husband claimed to have received vulgar text messages from his
wife’s phone. Cameras in the parking lot had been cut off due to power outages and the last thing on it
was four teenagers that were in the minor car accident. I will be bringing Teddy Teenager to the stand
where he will say that he had been in the parking lot with another student: Travis Troublemaker, looking
for an unlocked car with a cell phone in order to make an emergency call. None of the boys had their
cell phones on them. Travis was also found with $100 on him after being investigated. Which he said he
had earned working for his neighbors. You could say Harold Hobo was guilty of this crime because he
was found with $20 and that the purse was found by a trash bin with renewable bottles. Harold is a man
that has no income except for pop bottles and stuff he finds in the trash, is it not possible that he had
saved up his money just to enjoy a nice piece of pie? And the purse, Travis Troublemaker could have
easily ditched the purse by the trash bin. Next witness I will bring to the stand is Harold Hobo who has
said he was in the park at around 5:00, checking the trash bins on the outskirts of the lot for empty
returnable bottles. Harold witnessed two teenage boys in marching band uniforms walking around the
parking lot, looking in car windows. Harold left this part of the park as the boys were approaching him


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in the vicinity of the Young family minivan. When he returned later, he saw that the window had been
smashed in by a rock, and left the area. And as I had said before the parade was running late it had
started at 5:20 instead of its usual time at 5:00 and in between this time is when the crime had
happened. So members of the juror please see to it the evidence I had brought up successfully will bring
Travis Troublemaker to a guilty verdict. Thank you.




        Ladies and gentelmen of the jury, my name is **** and I am the prosecuting attorney. I am
here because this boy, Travis Troublmaker is guilty of breaking into a car and stole from it. The car was
in a parking lot and was broken into. A cell phone and a purse were taken from the car, and one of the
boys was fount with position of the cell phone. The purse was emptied of the money inside of it and
travis was found with 100 dollars in his position, he clamed to have got it from doing yard work for
nabors which is being looked into. Folks 100 dollars is a little much for a boy to be caring around
wouldn’t you say? Now. When you hear the defence something will be brought up the Harold could be
responsible because he had a twenty dollars which is more than anyone had ever seen him with. But
there was much more than 20 dollars taken from the purse and the boys had the cell phone. Not to
mention Travis has a history of breaking into cars and stealing. the boys say that they found the cell
phone but in fact they admit that the had been looking into cars trying to find a cell phone, the boys say
it was because they had been in an accident and needed to call there mothers and tell them that they
were ok. If in fact this is true they should have contacted police and got that taken care of with them,
not go around looking for a cell phone to steal. The purse was found by a trash can with pop bottles
around it, which people think it was Harold because he collects cans, but wouldn’t you think that
someone who is homeless even though they had 20 dollars they would still want to collect cans for
more money, Harold wouldn’t have just left cans if he had been the one who dumped the purse.



Opening Statement: No cause for celebration

        Ladies and Gentlemen of the jury my name is *** and I am representing the state. Your opinion
is needed today in this case between the Young family and Travis Troublemaker, and I would hope that
you take into consideration all that I and the defense council have to say before you make a verdict. Let
me enlighten you with some background on the case before we start today. On July 4th, 2o11 between
the times of 5: oo p.m. and 5:3o p.m. a Larceny was committed in the parking lot behind Gerties Cuppa
Joe. Now the Young family had parked under a shade tree in the back of the parking lot earlier at around
4:5o p.m. Today I will prove that the Defendant, Travis Troublemaker, did in fact commit this crime and
that the evidence I will be presenting proves beyond a reasonable doubt that the Defendant is guilty.

        The evidence supporting this verdict is as follows;

     Travis Troublemaker was found with $1oo dollars on his person;
     Witnesses posted him by the car around the time of the incident;


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     His friend, Teddy Teenager, who was with him the entire duration of the incident admitted to,
      and was in possession of the Young’s’ cell phone;
     Travis admitted to “looking” for unlocked vehicles.


        The Defense will try to make it look like Travis was just an innocent civilian looking for a phone
so he could alert his parents or guardian of the accident he was just in, but when something as innocent
as needing a phone turns into Larceny! Then we have an issue.

Mock Trial Photos




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Section 5 – references
                                            Bibliography
ONeill, J. (2011, November). 10 Common Objections. Mock Trial Toolkit. Melvindale, MI.

ONeill, J. (2011, November). Jury Note Taking Sheet. Mock Trial Toolkit. Melvindale, MI.

Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (1996). Understanding by Design. Alexandria: ASCD.

Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (2004). Understanding by Design: Professional Development Workbook.
       Alexandria: ASCD.




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