Creative ideas for forced perspective trick photography from the internet by jimtmay

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Forced perspective is not a new phenomenon, before the days of digital special effects it is used
a lot in movies from the 1950s to make objects appear bigger or smaller than it really is. Many
years later, we all carry a camera in our pocket, so we have the ability to create these special
effect images ourselves.

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									    Creative ideas for forced perspective
    trick photography from the internet
                         Written by Jim T May (http://trick-photography.org)



Forced perspective is not a new phenomenon, before the days of digital special effects it is used
a lot in movies from the 1950s to make objects appear bigger or smaller than it really is. Many
years later, we all carry a camera in our pocket, so we have the ability to create these special
effect images ourselves.



There are no shortage of creative, outrageous, and just plain funny examples of forced
perspective trick photography that you can see on the Internet. You can literally spend hours
browsing for these pictures and see how people use their creativity to create their own unique
take using this trick photography technique. We'll explore some of the more creative ideas that
people have come up with.



Save the Leaning Tower of Pisa



Probably the most classic example (and overused!) are those of tourist photos holding up the
Leaning Tower of Pisa. Most days around that tourist attraction you'll see people taking forced
perspective photos with it, whether it is pushing, pulling, kicking, or hugging the tower. The
result is that you can find a lot of forced perspective images floating around the Internet of this
landmark.



Big and small people



Another popular forced perspective theme is to have giant people holding up smaller people on
the palm of their hands. Most of these pictures are usually taken at locations where the ground
is flat all the way to the horizon, like deserts, beaches, or salt flats. The results are often very
convincing, due to the flat and uninteresting ground that doesn't reveal much depth clues to
the viewer's eyes.



Giant hand from nowhere



These trick photos usually have a giant hand, most likely belonging to the photographer, that
interacts with the background in a clever way. The process is very simple, just position your
hand in front of the camera until it looks like it's doing something interesting with the
background and capture away. These include holding or pushing an impossibly large object,
pouring a waterfall from a water bottle, among others.



Fun with the sun



There are some great looking photos of people interacting with the sun, during sunset or
sunrise. The sun looks like a bright orange and white ball at these times, so you can position
yourself or your friend and treat it like a soccer ball or a firefly. You can get some great pictures
dark silhouettes interacting with the sun due to the low light condition.



Fluffy white cloud



We've all think we've seen certain objects or patterns formed by clouds in the sky before. Some
people see it as an opportunity for a forced perspective shot. Some of the more interesting
photos are those that hold up an object to the sky and use the cloud as an extension of that
object. For example, you can hold up an empty ice-cream cone to the sky and use the white
fluffy clouds to get a "cotton-candy in an ice-cream cone" picture.
Obscuring the source



Another common thing that people do is to obscure the source of something, say a water
fountain, rainbow, smoke, fire, and have it come out of their ears, mouth, and other body
orifices. The results are often comical rather than stunning.



Finally...



The variations and things that we could do with forced perspective are endless, and great photo
opportunities come and go all the time. Sometimes we even inadvertently capture a forced
perspective shot without even knowing it until we review the picture. So if you snap often
enough, you'll definitely end up with a great forced perspective shot!



Jim blogs about trick photography and special effects techniques, that people use to create stunning
photographs. You can sign up at his Trick Photography site to receive a free report on the top 10 trick
photography ideas for travel photos. Please feel free to share this document with your family and
friends if you think it’ll interest them, thanks!

								
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