harps msg by 47Oamd7h

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									harps-msg - 2/15/08
Medieval harps. Sources. String sources.

NOTE: See also the files: bardic-msg, music-bib, music-msg, song-sources-msg,
singing-msg, instruments-msg, p-songs-msg, flutes-msg.

************************************************************************
NOTICE -

This file is a collection of various messages having a common theme that I have
collected from my reading of the various computer networks. Some messages date back to
1989, some may be as recent as yesterday.

This file is part of a collection of files called Stefan's Florilegium. These files
are available on the Internet at: http://www.florilegium.org

I have done a limited amount of editing. Messages having to do with separate
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The comments made in these messages are not necessarily my viewpoints. I make no
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Please respect the time and efforts of those who have written these messages. The
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Thank you,
    Mark S. Harris                  AKA:  THLord Stefan li Rous
                                          Stefan at florilegium.org
************************************************************************

From: billmc at microsoft.UUCP (Bill MCJOHN)
Date: 15 Jul 91 00:43:19 GMT
Organization: Microsoft Corp., Redmond WA

dlc at hpfcso.FC.HP.COM (Kevin MacKinnon/Dennis Clark) writes:
>   Also, I have heard folk say that the double and triple strung harp   (made to
> make the harp more chromatic) is not period. Most notably the Welsh    versions
> of that harp. My studies have shown that it is believed that double    and maybe
> even triple strung harps did exist in period. In 14th century Spain    to be
> precise.

The triple harp is basically a baroque instrument. It was developed
in Italy towards the end of the sixteenth century, and spread to
England and Wales in the early part of the seventeenth century. It
became popular with the Welsh, who modified it further (giving it
the high-headed form they favored). Cheryl Fulton gives a discussion
of the instrument in the notes to her recording "The Airs of Wales"
(Which is, as one would expect from Cheryl, an absolutely fabulous
recording.)

The double harp is another matter. There is a partially surviving
Italian instrument--the Galilei harp--which I think dates from the
end of the sixteenth century. There are also Spanish references to
the double harp in the sixteenth century.

However, the most intriguing reference I've run across is in Craig
Wright's _Music at the Court of Burgundy_. Discussing Baude Fresnel,
a harper who held the prestigious position of chamber valet, Wright says:

   "The harp purchased in May 1392 at a cost of fifty francs,
    for example, was <<une grande harpe double, ouvree bien
    richement de bois,>> whereas the harp Baude had in his
    possession in the spring of 1395 was decorated with wood
    carvings and had gold tuning pins and four rows of strings."

My French is pretty spotty, but the first instrument is clearly a big
double harp. This doesn't necessarily mean a multi-row harp like
the sixteenth century double harp, but given the rich use of chromatic
notes in French secular music around 1400, it seems reasonable that
the foremost harper at the court of Burgundy would have an instrument
with some chromatic capabilities. (Especially if Baude Fresnel was
the same person as the composer Baude Cordier, who wrote some of that
highly chromatic music. This identification is not secure, but
Wright provides some appealing although circumstantial evidence.)
I would further speculate that the harp with four rows of strings
actually had four half-rows (a main and second course for each hand),
making it in effect a double harp.

Bill McJohn
who is learning to play the double harp
and will probably go blind because of it.

From: moss at cs.umass.edu (Eliot Moss)
Date: 16 Jul 91 03:12:46 GMT
Organization: Dept of Comp and Info Sci, Univ of Mass (Amherst)

I don't have dates and such handy, but can add some tidbits regarding styles
of double harps.

The "Welsh" (originally Italian) triple harp has three rows of strings,
entirely parallel. The outer rows ring the same notes, and allow interesting
repetitive effects; they are generally tuned to the diatonic scale of the key
to be used. The middle row has the accidentals ("black notes" for you piano
types, roughly speaking (i.e., if you're in the key of C)). On some triple
harps the outer rows are not doubled all the way to the ends of the
instrument, so there are places where there are only two rows.

Anyway, back to double harps ... Some double harps are like a triple harp with
an outer row left off, namely, all the strings are vertical. The Spanish (and
perhaps Italians) also used cross strung doubled harps. Here one row is fasten
to the soundboard on the left side and to the top on the right side. Likewise,
the other row is fastened to the soundboard on the right side and the top on
the left side. Thus, the rows cross about halfway between the soundboard and
the tuning pins. The neat thing about this arrangement is that it is easy to
play any note with either hand by moving the hand high or low as necessary.

Double and trpiple harps are an approach to playing more chromatic music on
what was originally a diatonic instrument; pedal harps are a more modern
approach, though they are believed to have originated in primitive form in
Bavaria in the 1620s. Depending on how you define "period", pedal harps might
then be period, but not the kinds of pedal harps we see today. Going further
back, an alternative to double or triple stringing that was sometimes used was
to add a fret below the tuning pin. This allows a sharped note to be played
with one hand while the other hand holds the strings against the fret. I have
seen South American players use a hand held "fret", namely a sharp edged metal
bar attached to a ring on their finger that they can press against a string to
sharpen it. (The edge runs parallel to the finger; the whole device is



Edited by Mark S. Harris             harps-msg              Page 2 of 13
normally out of the way toward the back of one's hand.) It would not surprise
me if such devices were period also, but it may be very hard to verify.

Regards to all harpers and harp enthusiasts .....

Aell Aethelwita, called Ellethel
--

                J. Eliot B. Moss, Assistant Professor
                Department of Computer and Information Science
                Lederle Graduate Research Center
                University of Massachusetts
                Amherst, MA 01003
                (413) 545-4206, 545-1249 (fax); Moss at cs.umass.edu


Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
From: rvoris at world.std.com (Rebecca A Voris)
Subject: Re: Looking for a Harp
Organization: The World Public Access UNIX, Brookline, MA
Date: Tue, 7 Dec 1993 04:11:04 GMT


In article <Phyllis_Gilmore.1105583316A at nntp.rand.org> Phyllis_Gilmore at rand.org
(Phyllis Gilmore) writes:

>   Sylvia Woods, who is (I'm fairly certain) in Pasadena, CA--She has a great
>   catalog. If I can find my copy of her latest catalog (BIG if), I'll try
>   to remember to post the address.
>
>   Philippa

The Sylvia Woods catalogue is the ultimate and canonical source for
harp accessories, music, and coffee mugs. It offers harps from a
couple of different makers. These harps are toward the high end of
the price range. I believe that the Sylvia Woods people believe that
they are good harps. but I have never seen one personally to know for
certain.

On the other hand, I can say many good things about Argent Fox, who
made the harp I bought at Pennsic. I have been trying to find their
card, with no luck yet. You could look them up in the Pennsic
booklet, if you have one, but they've moved since Pennsic. If I find
the address I'll post it.

If you want to see a lot of pictures of harps and get the addresses of
a lot of manufacturers, you should get a year's membership in the
International Folk Harp Society, which will send you the Folk Harp
Journal. I don't have an address for this, either, and if anyone out
there does I wish they'd post it so I can subscribe myself.

Godith Anyon
Carolingia


From: hrjones at uclink.berkeley.edu (Heather Rose Jones)
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Re: Looking for a Harp
Date: 7 Dec 1993 17:03:05 GMT
Organization: University of California, Berkeley




Edited by Mark S. Harris             harps-msg              Page 3 of 13
*Heather* <hbloom at moose.uvm.edu> wrote:
>     A friend of mine is interested in buying a harp. I was wondering if
>people would email me snail mail addresses and any information they might
>have about places that sell harps.
>-Heather MacLeod

 I highly recommend checking out the catalogs of the following two
companies:

Lark in the Morning
PO Box 1176 Mendocino CA 95460

Sylvia Woods Harp Center
PO Box 816 Montrose CA 91021-0816

This is, of course, biased towards those companies relatively local to
me and with which I have had dealings. My strongest advice to anyone
buying a harp (and I've given this lecture more times than I can count)
is to take along with you someone who has experience with a lot of types
of harps and who has been playing for a while. I've known too many
beginners who say, "well, I just want something small and inexpensive to
start with" or "I'm sure it'll sound better when I've learned how to
play it". Unlike many instruments, skill in playing has little effect on
the basic tone of a harp. If it sounds plinky and weird when you buy it,
it will always sound plinky and weird. Make sure you buy something with
good tone to start with so you'll have the encouragement to continue.

Keridwen ferch Morgan Glasfryn (Who plays a Dusty Strings 36F and a
Saga wire-strung)


Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
From: afk at tdat.ElSegundoCA.NCR.COM (Art Kaufmann)
Subject: Re: Looking for a Harp
Date: Tue, 7 Dec 93 10:17:46 PST

In article 93Dec6231104 at world.std.com, rvoris at world.std.com (Rebecca A Voris)
writes:
>
>In article <Phyllis_Gilmore.1105583316A at nntp.rand.org> Phyllis_Gilmore at rand.org
(Phyllis Gilmore) writes:
>
>>   Sylvia Woods, who is (I'm fairly certain) in Pasadena, CA--She has a great
>>   catalog. If I can find my copy of her latest catalog (BIG if), I'll try
>>   to remember to post the address.
>>
>>   Philippa
>
>The Sylvia Woods catalogue is the ultimate and canonical source for
>harp accessories, music, and coffee mugs. It offers harps from a
>couple of different makers. These harps are toward the high end of
>the price range. I believe that the Sylvia Woods people believe that
>they are good harps. but I have never seen one personally to know for
>certain.
>
>On the other hand, I can say many good things about Argent Fox, who
>made the harp I bought at Pennsic. I have been trying to find their
>card, with no luck yet. You could look them up in the Pennsic
>booklet, if you have one, but they've moved since Pennsic. If I find
>the address I'll post it.
>



Edited by Mark S. Harris             harps-msg              Page 4 of 13
>If you want to see a lot of pictures of harps and get the addresses of
>a lot of manufacturers, you should get a year's membership in the
>International Folk Harp Society, which will send you the Folk Harp
>Journal. I don't have an address for this, either, and if anyone out
>there does I wish they'd post it so I can subscribe myself.
>
>Godith Anyon
>Carolingia

The International Folk Harp Society was founded by Sylvia Woods and Sylvia Fellows. SF
is active in the SCA here in Caid. You can reach her at:

    IFHS
    %Sylvia Fellows
    4718 Maychelle Drive
    Anaheim CA 92807-3040

BTW if you can't find Sylvia Woods in Pasadena CA, try Glendale CA. I don't have
her catalog handy.
---
Colin Graham                   | Art Kaufmann
Caid                           | afk at ElSegundoCA.NCR.COM
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
From: LOVELACE at HOLONET.NET
Subject: Re: Looking for a Harp
Originator: lovelace at giskard.holonet.net
Organization: HoloNet National Internet Access System: 510-704-1058/modem
Date: Wed, 8 Dec 1993 22:52:37 GMT

*Heather* <hbloom at moose.uvm.edu> wrote:
>A friend of mine is interested in buying a harp. I was wondering if
>people would email me snail mail addresses and any information they might
>have about places that sell harps.
>-Heather MacLeod

I was at the Darkover convention in Baltimore last week and ran into
someone from Rocky Mountain Enterprises that sells celtic harps. They
also sell everything from guitars to lutes to dulcimers to lyres, etc...
You can write them for a catalog at:

Rocky Mountain Enterprises
364 West 13th Ave
Homestead, PA 15120

I think there might be a charge for the catalog but I'm not sure.
----------------------------------------------------------------
Tanner Lovelace |                     | lovelace at cuc.edu
Takoma Park     | Barony of Storvik   | lovelace at holonet.net
Maryland        | Kingdom of Atlantia | lovelace at sol.cs.utc.edu
----------------------------------------------------------------


From: hrjones at uclink.berkeley.edu (Heather Rose Jones)
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Re: Looking for a Harp
Date: 9 Dec 1993 05:04:22 GMT
Organization: University of California, Berkeley




Edited by Mark S. Harris             harps-msg              Page 5 of 13
In article <CHqnJq.Jr7 at iat.holonet.net>, <LOVELACE at HOLONET.NET> wrote:
>
>I was at the Darkover convention in Baltimore last week and ran into
>someone from Rocky Mountain Enterprises that sells celtic harps. They

This is MY PERSONAL OPINION (to which I am entitled) ...
I would not recommend the harps made by Rocky Mountain Enterprises to
anyone seriously interested in playing the instrument. They are tinny
in sound, clunkily constucted, have a non-standard string spacing (meaning
you won't be able to transfer easily to other instruments), and have
serious problems holding their tuning. As someone who has tried out
harps by a wide variety of makers ... they just don't sound good. And you
can do much better for the same amount of money.

Keridwen ferch Morgan Glasfryn


Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
From: tbarnes at silver.ucs.indiana.edu (thomas wrentmore barnes)
Subject: Re: Looking for a Harp
Organization: Indiana University
Date: Fri, 10 Dec 1993 16:34:33 GMT

      Argent Fox Music
      Lord Rathwin Durand/Dan Speers

      908 E. 14th St.
      Bloomington Indiana
      47408

      He sells good beginner's harps for c. $300. (I'm not sure of the
exact prices). He also might have a catalog or a price list. He also
sells at Pennsic.

      Lothar \|/
              0


From: FC080401 at ysub.ysu.edu
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Re: Looking for a Harp
Date: Fri, 10 Dec 93 16:15:02 EST
Organization: Youngstown State University

Greetings!

I had already sent this via email, but I might as well hop on the
bandwagon and post it as well:

A member of my household is a harp maker. He works in cherry, walnut,
mahogany... and probably other woods that I can't think of right now. :)
He does mail order, made-to-order (you should have seen the Celtic knotwork
harp he had at Pennsic!), and takes plastic. All work done from scratch,
not from kits. His mundane coordinates are:

Orion's Creations
c/o Jim Kirchner
1338 E. Crawford Ave.
Milwaukee, WI 53207

I'm no harp expert, but I can tell you that he _always_ sells out of



Edited by Mark S. Harris               harps-msg            Page 6 of 13
small harps at Pennsic ($325).     He does both nylon and brass strung.

Tarna of Warhaven


From: torin.ironbrow at sfnet.COM
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: HARP STRINGS
Date: 19 Jan 1994 15:31:21 -0500
Organization: SF NET San Francisco's Coffee House Connection

Greetings Yaakov!

Wow I actually have the chance to help somebody else on the Rialto this soon
after getting on. I am lucky enough to have a place that is very close that
sells Phosphor-Bronze strings (at least that was what they were described to me
as) and I was able to restring my borrowed harp with them.
They are:

Amazing Grace Music
111 Red Hill Av.
San Anselmo, CA 94960
1-415-456-0414

The nice people at the store told me that these strings are use frequently in
Indian (Asian Sub Continent) musical instruments. That may help you as well.

In service:
Torin Ironbrow              Todd Rich
Caldarium/Mists/West        Torin.Ironbrow at sfnet.com


From: FC080401 at ysub.ysu.edu
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Harp strings (was: Lots)
Date: Thu, 20 Jan 94 13:01:44 EST
Organization: Youngstown State University

Yaakov wrote:
>
>          Harps- At War, I bought a lap harp from Argent Fox.
>          Wonderful work, and I am very happy with my baby (my wife
>          thinks its disgusting that I lavish such attentions on it).
>          One little item: it has brass strings. The local good music
>          store had never heard of a metal strung harp before, and has
>          no clue where I can get strings. Since they break with
>          unfortunate regularity, does anyone know a good supplier?
>
If Argent Fox can't supply you, try Orion's Creations. Orion also sells
at Pennsic, and I remember hearing him talk with other gentles about
strings. I believe you need the diameter and length, but I'm no expert.
(When it comes to harps, I'm not even a novice.)

Orion's mundane coordinates are:

Orion's Creations
c/o Jim Kirchner
1338 E. Crawford Ave.
Milwaukee, WI 53207

Hope this helps!



Edited by Mark S. Harris                harps-msg              Page 7 of 13
Tarna of Warhaven


From: corliss at hal.PHysics.wayne.EDU (David J. Corliss)
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Harps at War
Date: 20 Jan 1994 15:00:53 -0500
Organization: The Internet

As one who both plays and builds harps, I must say that I am very impressed
with the work from the Argent Fox. The instruments are sound, beautifully
made, and have a lot of "life" in them (can't think of a better term than
that).

I have always found Robinson's Harp of Mount Laguna, CA, to be an excellent
source for strings, other hardware, and good advice. They are some of the most
helpful people I have met in the area of instrument building and maintenance.

Beorthwine of Grafham Wood


From: corliss at hal.PHysics.wayne.EDU (David J. Corliss)
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Harp Pegs
Date: 1 Feb 1994 14:10:43 -0500
Organization: The Internet

Ray Wakeland asks:

1) How did tuning pegs work? Modern harp tuning pegs are basicly a bolt...

2) How did they cut wood thin enough....

---------------------------------------------------------------

Modern tuning pegs are not bolts or screws of any kind. They work on friction
alone. Some have slight ridges to enhance friction but these are still not
screws. These _harp_ pegs are not to be confused with _zither_ tuning pins
which are, in fact, screws, and are sometimes used by makers of folk
instruments. These are inappropriate for harps and should not be used. I know
of no manufacturer of instruments (Lyon & Healy, Salvi, ect) who uses zither
pins. The medieval pins were much like the modern ones in design: passing
_through_ the neck of the instrument, slightly tapered, having a small hole
for the string passing through the smaller end and square cut to accomodate
a tuning wrench at the other. The materials differ from the modern: medieval
harp pegs were of bronze, ivory, bone, or durable wood (here, I do not know
what kind of wood; i should think that birch would be suitable).

Wood was thinly cut then just as it is now: it is planed. The only difference
today is that power tools are available for this task.

         ......this has been a public service message from the Middle Kingdom
College of Sciences.........

                                      Beorthwine


From: sbloch at ms.uky.edu (Stephen Bloch)
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca,rec.music.early
Subject: Re: HISTORICAL HARPS
Date: 31 Jan 1994 00:51:29 -0500



Edited by Mark S. Harris             harps-msg              Page 8 of 13
Organization: University Of Kentucky, Dept. of Math Sciences

Sharon Stanfill <sharons at juliet.ll.mit.EDU> wrote:
>Anyone out there interested in Pictish harps? A Scottish maker has started
>doing reconstructions. I can email details to anyone interested.
>Basically - these are small nylon or gut strung harps based on the earliest
>known depiction of a triangular harp in Britain. They are not cheap, but
>are interesting.
>
>Nesta ferch Meriadoc Hartley
>sharons at juliet.ll.mit.edu

I assume the lady is talking about the Ardival workshop. I just heard
about these in a mailing from Antique Sound Workshop (1080 Beacon
Street, Brookline, MA 02146), from which I paraphrase the following.

The harps in question were designed by Tim Hobrough based on the famous
Nigg Stone, a Pictish carving dating from about 800 A.D. Apparently,
Hobrough was an excellent instrument designer but a lousy businessman,
so when he was making the things himself their quality and availability
were inconsistent. He teamed up with the Dunn family (who formerly
supplied him with wood), and they're now producing harps of consistent
quality and delivering them on time. There are several models:

a 19-string, nylon-strung triangular harp
a 19-string, gut-strung triangular harp
a fancier 19-string, gut-strung triangular harp (with "a hand-hewn and
tapered soundbox")
a 23-string, gut-strung triangular harp
a 19-string, wire-strung medieval Celtic harp
a nylon-strung Renaissance harp
and two gut-strung models based on 19th-century Scottish originals.

Only the triangular harps have prices given in this mailing; they
range from $500-1300, depending on who you are, which you buy, and
when you buy it.

I have no connection with Antique Sound Workshop other than being on
their mailing list; I've never actually bought anything from them
other than a catalogue (which is impressive).

--
                              Stephen Bloch
                             sbloch at s.ms.uky.edu


From: corliss at hal.PHysics.wayne.EDU (David J. Corliss)
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Harps
Date: 24 Mar 1994 13:17:19 -0500
Organization: The Internet

Torin Ironbrow has written of the quality of the harps from Argent Fox Music.
I have noticed this gentle's work for some time and, as someone who has
recieved some recognition for builing harps himself, I must say that these
instuments are excellent! They are carefully and solidly constructed, well
researched, and pleasant in their tone. I would certainly recomemed them to
someone seeking to buy a harp, but with work so good, they can not remain so
inexpensive for long.

Beorthwine of Grafham Wood



Edited by Mark S. Harris             harps-msg                 Page 9 of 13
From: chandra at seds.lpl.arizona.EDU (Chandra Savage)
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Re: Celtic Harp plans
Date: 27 Nov 1995 19:07:17 -0500
Organization: The Internet

>Greetings to all from
>Yeoman Lord Aldebaran of Arcadia
>
>Does anyone have plans for building a Celtic Harp?, or know where I could
>find same?

Here are three sources:
Boulder Early Music Shop
2010 14th St.
Boulder, CO 80302

They have blueprints for 31-string and 36-string "Gothic Harps"

Cambria Harp Kits
Phone or write for a free catalog to:
Glenn J. Hill
809 W. 1st St.
Phoenix, OR 97535
(503)535-7700

Robinson's Harp Shop
33908 Mt. Laguna Dr.
P.O. Box 161
Mt. Laguna, CA 91948

They don't specifically advertise plans, but I'm pretty sure they carry them.

Hope this helps!

Sionnan Mac an t-Sabhaisigh
Kingdom of Atenveldt
Barony of Tir Ysgithr


From: margritt at mindspring.com (Margritte)
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Re: Celtic Harp plans
Date: Wed, 29 Nov 1995 01:54:19 -0500
Organization: MindSpring Enterprises

IArcadia at mindlink.bc.ca (Ross W. Powell) writes:
>Greetings to all from Yeoman Lord Aldebaran of Arcadia
>
>Does anyone have plans for building a Celtic Harp?, or know where I could
>find same?

Here are some resources you might want to look into:

The Historical Harp Society now has a page on the World Wide Wed courtesy
of Henry Houh. The URL is:
http://www.tns.lcs.mit.edu/harp/HHS

Also, MUSICMAKERS KITS, INC has just opened a Home Page on the World Wide



Edited by Mark S. Harris                harps-msg          Page 10 of 13
Web. Their location is:
http://www.primenet.com/~musikit/

I have a harp made from a MusicMaker kit, and I highly recommend them.
They sell blueprints, too, if you want to make one from scratch, but a kit
is probably easier for the first time.

And finally, my personal favorite: the harp mailing list. These people
are super-helpful. They can give you advice about how to get started, how
to buy a harp, etc, etc.

To unsubscribe or to subscribe to the harp list, please email to:
harp-request at mit.edu

Also, get a catalog from the Sylvia Woods Harp Center (1-800-249-0325).
Sylvia Wood's "Teach Yourself to Play the Folk Harp" is a good starting
book.

-Margritte (margritt at mindspring.com)


Date: Sun, 03 Jan 1999 12:33:55 -0800
From: "J. Kriss White" <jkrissw at earthling.net>
To: dayleandken at ibm.net (Rhieinwen & Umberto),
        blkhrse at pacifier.com (Jill & Ralph Mason),
Subject: Biblical harps, anyone?

I just came across this interesting web site, from a couple in Israel who
make the ancient style of harp: http://www.virtual.co.il/arts/harrari/
They offer insured, worldwide shipping.

Lord Daveed of Granada, mka J. Kriss White,
Barony of Calafia, Kingdom of Caid
email - jkrissw at earthling.net || AOL IM - jkrissw    ||   ICQ #1824702

From: lindahl at pbm.com (Greg Lindahl)
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Period Welsh harp music
Date: 29 Oct 2000 21:57:49 GMT

For those of you interested in period Welsh harp music, the following
CD is an extremely excellent rendition of some of the music in the ap
Huw manuscript, which is the oldest known manuscript recording the
Welsh harp tradition. This CD is great for not only showing that the
Ap Huw stuff is quite playable (and much of it would make great music
to sing a ballad to), but also it's an excellent example of how music
has evolved between the 16th century and the 19th century. The "other
world" is a set of 18th/19th century welsh harp manuscripts. If you
play a few tracks of each for someone, and then play random tracks and
ask which century the piece is from, most people will be able to hear
the difference.

Taylor, William. Two Worlds of the Welsh Harp (CD). Dorian Recordings,
1999. Includes Gosteg Dafyyd Athro, Y ddigan y droell, Kaniad y gwynn
bibydd, Kaniad ystafell, Kaniad bach ar y gogower, and Kaingk Dafydd
Broffwyd. The other material on the CD comes from the volumes of
Edward Jones' _Musical and Poetical Relicks of the Welsh
Bards_.

For more info on the ap Huw manuscript, please see:
http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/ap_huw/



Edited by Mark S. Harris             harps-msg               Page 11 of 13
-- Gregory Blount


From: DC <uboru at erols.com>
Newsgroups: rec.org.sca
Subject: Re: Period Welsh harp music
Date: Tue, 31 Oct 2000 16:42:27 -0500

It's a good CD, though Taylor's translation of the manuscript is not
held to be absolutely correct by all scholars, there are other
interpretations available. But...I do love the sound of a bray harp.


From: Martha Schreffler <mot at swbell.net>
Date: August 11, 2006 3:12:41 PM CDT
To: bryn-gwlad at lists.ansteorra.org
Subject: [Bryn-gwlad] Harpsicle

People often ask me if I can recommend an affordable harp - unfortunately, the least
expensive well-made harps are generally out of pocketbook range for those asking! For
a long time the notoriously unreliable rosewood harps have been the only source of
harps under $500.

I recently learned about the "Harpsicle" (comes in assorted eye-popping colors) made
by the Wm Rees Company, a reputable harp manufacturer.
http://harpsicleharps.com/home.htm. Depending on the number of sharping levers, a 26-
string harp ranges from $295 (no levers), $495 (C,F), $534 (C,F,B) to $729 (full
levers).

I thought I'd give one a try - I'd like an inexpensive harp for outdoor SCA events.
I've ordered one in natural wood for my birthday. I'm expecting it sometime next
week. If you're thinking of getting a harp sometime in the future, check with me for
an opinion - it almost sounds too good to be true!

Amata


From: Robin Craig <robinec at cox.net>
Date: August 12, 2006 12:58:01 PM CDT
To: Barony of Bryn Gwlad <bryn-gwlad at lists.ansteorra.org>
Subject: Re: [Bryn-gwlad] Harpsicle

That does sound like a good deal! I was very very lucky with my rosewood harp (I
think she was made in Guatamala). Not only is she reliable but I got her for under
$300 with levers. Of course, I purchased her in person and not mail-order, so I was
able to see her and play her before buying.   Having said that, I see that these
Harpsicles come in 3 1/2 octaves and my rosewood is only 2 1/2 octaves which does make
her more difficult to play.   I may have to save up for one of these also!! Its nice
that they have straps and lap bars to help support them too!!

-Robin


From: Martha Schreffler <mot at swbell.net>
Date: August 21, 2006 8:37:06 AM CDT
To: Stefan li Rous <StefanliRous at austin.rr.com>
Subject: Re: [Bryn-gwlad] Harpsicle

Stefan li Rous <StefanliRous at austin.rr.com> wrote:




Edited by Mark S. Harris                harps-msg          Page 12 of 13
<<< I've only played the guitar and that was years ago. What's the difference between
the different sharping levers? none, "C,F", "C,F,B", full? When do they get used? Is
there any disadvantage, other than price, in having the fuller sets?

   Stefan >>>

Levers are not modern but they are out of SCA period. That would be the only
disadvantage if you were a stickler about such things. The purpose of levers is to
change the string half a step - in the case of C,F you get a C sharp and F sharp when
you lift the lever. In the case of B, if you keep the lever up and tune it to B and
then lower the lever, it goes down half a step and gives you B flat.

If you get the "none" then the harpsicle is closest to a period gothic harp. You would
achieve sharps and flats by retuning before a song or by pressing against the string
just under the pin the string winds around (this harp has no bridge pins). The ones
with sharping levers do have bridge pins (i.e. a pin right under the pin the string
wraps on) so you can't press against the string with your finger - you use a lever.

I have found that I most often sharp C and F and flat B. So, the harpsicle I've
purchase is the C,F,B one. I'd had bought full levers if I'd had the money but it
wasn't worth it to me in this instance. All my other harps have full sets.

<the end>




Edited by Mark S. Harris             harps-msg             Page 13 of 13

								
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