Country Garden Montessori Academy by 6DJgJytp

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									                                         ADMINISTRATION



                    Principal                       Donna Hilsenteger
                    Vice-Principal                  Dan Hilsenteger
                    Administrator             Jacqueline Counsell




Purpose of this Course Calendar
This Course Calendar is a planning tool and is designed to help parents, students and teachers ensure
that today’s educational choices open the right doors to the future. This Calendar gives information
about the Ontario Ministry Education requirements for granting the Ontario Secondary School Diploma
(OSSD) along with an explanation of the graduation requirements unique to Country Garden
Montessori Academy. The Calendar also provides a comprehensive and in-depth listing of the
academic courses offered by CGMA Private School.




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                          CGMA Private School


Our Philosophy

It is the mission of our school to promote a student-focused climate, to not only encourage personal
growth, dignity and the life long pursuit of learning, but also to motivate students to become productive
members within a diverse society.


Expectations/Goals

CGMA Private School has established objectives to ensure that each student has the maximum
opportunity to learn. The achievement of these objectives depends upon the shared responsibilities of
students, teachers, and parents.

          To provide the tradition of excellence in academics and personal growth
          To develop a feeling of self-worth through accomplishments, discipline and respect for
           oneself and others.
          To encourage self-motivation so that students take a responsible role in their own education.
          To create a positive learning environment through shared responsibility of teachers, students
           and parents.
          To prepare students for the world of work by developing productivity, punctuality, and pride in
           work. .

Our students are expected to develop their potential as individuals and to become contributing,
responsible members of society, who will think clearly, feel deeply, and act wisely.


Availability of Courses

CGMA Private School has every intention of delivering the courses listed and described in this
calendar. However, we reserve the right to make the final decision as to whether a course will actually
run. To best meet the needs of the greatest number of our students, we base our decision on an
analysis on whether to run a course or class based on the best use of teachers and teaching space
with regard to student enrolment. A decision not to run a course is generally made by June, prior to
starting classes in September, and every effort is made to counsel the student into another course in
keeping with his overall academic goals.




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School Organization

CGMA Private School operates on the semester system. This school year is divided into two
semesters. Semester one extends from September to January and semester two from February to
June. Students study four full courses at one time.


Graduation Requirements for Ontario Secondary School Diploma

Credits are granted by the Principal on behalf of the Minister of Education and Training for courses that
have been developed or approved by the Ministry.
In order to receive an Ontario Secondary Schools Diploma (OSSD) under the Ontario Secondary
Schools, Grade 9-12: Program and Diploma Requirements (OSS), the student is expected to
successfully complete 30 credits from a variety of subjects. There are 18 compulsory credits and 12
elective ones. As part of the 18 compulsory credits listed on the chart you must complete one credit
from each of the three groups listed below. Depending on the course, these additional credits may be
taken in Grade 9, 10, 11 or 12.

Requirements of the Ontario Secondary School Certificate

The Ontario Secondary School Certificate will be granted on request to students who leave school
before earning the Ontario Secondary School Diploma, provided that they have earned a minimum of
14 credits, distributed as follows:

Compulsory Credits (total of 7)
           2 credits in English
           1 credit in Canadian History or Canadian Geography
           1 credit in Mathematics
           1 credit in Science
           1 credit in Health and Physical Education
           1 credit in the Arts or Technological Education
Elective Credits (total of 7)




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Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) Requirements

Subject Area
                                                                                          Credits
English (one credit at each grade level: 9-12)                                              4
French-as-a-Second Language                                                                 1
Mathematic (at least 1 credit in grade 11 or 12)                                            3
Science                                                                                     2
Canadian History (Grade 10)                                                                 1
Canadian Geography (Grade 9)                                                                1
Arts                                                                                        1
Health and Physical Education                                                               1
Civics and Career Studies (each worth .5 of a credit in grade 10)                           1

Compulsory Credits                                                                            18

Additional English or Third Language or Social Science or Canadian and World Studies
or Guidance and Career Education or Co-operative Education                                     1
                                                                               Additional Health and Physical Education
or Business Studies or The Arts
(music, art, drama, or dance) or Co-operative Education                                        1 Additional Science
(Grade 11 or 12) or Technological Education or Co-operative Education          1
Elective credits                                                                              12

Total                                                                                         30


                           Plus 40 hours of Community Involvement
  Plus, successful completion of the Provincial Secondary School Test of Reading and Writing
                                             Skills

Community Involvement Activities

As part of the OSSD diploma requirements, students must complete a minimum of 40 hours of
community involvement activities in addition to academic requirements. These activities may be
completed at any time during their years in the secondary school program.

The community involvement requirement is designed to encourage students to develop an awareness
and understanding of civic responsibility and of the role that they can play in supporting and
strengthening their communities. The requirement will benefit communities, but its primary purpose is
to contribute to student development by providing opportunities for students to learn about the
contributions they can make to the community to further develop their leadership skills.

Records of student community service involvement are maintained by the school office and those hours
will be summarized on the June Report Card each year.

Students, in collaboration with their parents, will decide how they will complete the community
involvement requirement.


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Community involvement activities may take place in a variety of settings, including businesses, not-for-
profit organizations, public sector institutions (including hospitals), and informal settings. Students may
not fulfill the requirement through activities that are counted towards a credit (cooperative education
and work experience, for example), through paid work, or by assuming duties normally performed by a
paid employee.

The requirement is to be completed outside students’ normal instructional hours – that is, the activities
are to take place in students’ designated lunch hours, after school, on weekends, or during school
holidays.

Students will maintain and provide a record of their community involvement activities. Completion of
the required 40 hours must be confirmed by the organizations or persons supervising the activities.
Documentation attesting to the completion of each activity must be submitted to the Principal by the
student. This documentation must include for each activity the name of the person or organization
receiving the service, the activity performed, the dates and hours, the signatures of the student and his
or her parents, and a signed acknowledgement by the person (or a representative of the organization)
involved. The Principal will decide whether the student has met the requirements of both the ministry
and the board for these activities.


Cooperative Education /Youth Apprenticeship

CGMA Private School will provide opportunity for our students to participate in Co operative Education
and Youth Apprenticeship programs, to complement their post secondary University, College, or
Workplace options. Further information regarding these programs is available through the school
office.

The Provincial Secondary School Literacy Test

All students who enter Grade 9 in the 1999 -2000 school year or in subsequent years must successfully
complete the provincial secondary school literacy test in order to earn a secondary school diploma.
Since students will normally take the literacy test when they are in Grade 10, the test will be
administered for the first time in 2000 - 2001 school year. The test will be based on the Ontario
curriculum expectations for language and communication-particularly reading and writing-up to and
including Grade 9.

The test will serve both to determine whether students have acquired the reading and writing skills
considered essential for literacy, and to provide confirmation that those students who have completed
the test successfully have attained the provincial expectations for literacy. The test will identify those
students who have not demonstrated the required skills and will identify areas in which these students
need remediation. This school will provide remedial assistance for students who do not complete the
test successfully. This assistance should be designed to help students improve their skills so that they
are better prepared to retake the literacy test. Once students have successfully completed the literacy
test, they may not retake the test in the same language (i.e. English or French).




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Policy on Substitutions for Compulsory Courses

Substitutions may be made for a limited number of compulsory credit courses. Remaining courses that
meet the compulsory credit requirements can be used in this capacity. To meet individual students’
needs, principals may replace up to three compulsory courses (or the equivalent in half courses) with
courses from the remainder of those that meet the compulsory credit requirements. In all cases,
however, the sum of compulsory and optional credits will not be less than thirty for students aiming to
earn the Ontario Secondary School Diploma and not less than fourteen for those aiming to earn the
Ontario Secondary School Certificate. Substitutions should be made to promote and enhance student
learning or to meet special needs and interests.

Documentation of any substitution for compulsory courses will be maintained within the student’s OSR.

Correspondence Courses

The TVO/Independent Learning Centre (ILC), distance education, & Independent Learning Study offers
secondary school credit courses for individuals who wish to work independently towards the secondary
school diploma. Current students at CGMA may take correspondence courses only in exceptional
circumstances. You can access the Independent Learning Centre Student Guide and/or the ILC
website at: http://ilc.edu.gov.on.ca/01/home.htm



Equivalency Credits (PLAR)

The Principal, with a thorough analysis of course content and assessment policies (PLAR), may grant
up to 26 equivalent credits toward the OSSD. The remaining credits will be chosen from the courses
offered at CGMA to obtain an OSSD. Equivalency credits are granted only for the purpose of placing
the student in appropriate courses.

Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) is the formal evaluation and credit-granting
process whereby students may obtain credits for prior learning. Prior learning includes the knowledge
and skills that students have acquired, in both formal and informal ways, outside an Ontario secondary
school. Students may have their knowledge and skills evaluated against the expectations outlined in
provincial curriculum policy documents in order to earn credits towards the secondary school diploma.
The Principal, with a thorough analysis of course content and assessment policies will develop a
standard for each course being considered for equivalency and apply this standard for all students.

 “Equivalency” credits to the CGMA program will be granted by the Principal. Students who are eligible
for equivalency credits are those who transfer to our school from schools outside Ontario. Equivalency
credits are granted for placement only. The Principal, in the process of deciding where the student
should be placed, determine as equitably as possible the total credit equivalency of the student's
previous learning, and the number of compulsory and optional credits still to be earned.

NOTE: Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) may allow for students to be granted up to
26 equivalent credits toward the OSSD as outlined in Appendix 8 - Program and Diploma
Requirements of Ontario Secondary Schools Grades 9 to 12 - 1999. Equivalency credits are granted
only for the purpose of placing the student in appropriate courses. The remaining credits will be chosen
from the courses offered at our school as well as options available through Ontario Ministry of
Education to obtain an OSSD.

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Definition of a Credit

A credit is granted in recognition of the successful completion of a course that has been scheduled for
a minimum of 110 hours. Credits are granted by a principal on behalf of the Minister of Education and
Training for courses that have been developed or approved by the ministry. A half credit may be
granted for each 55 hour part of 110-hour ministry-developed course. Half-credit courses must comply
with ministry requirements as outlined in the curriculum policy documents. Partial credits may be
granted for the successful completion of certain locally developed courses. See section 7.1.2: Locally
Developed Courses.

For the purpose of granting a credit, “scheduled time” is defined as the time during which students
participate in planned learning activities designed to lead to the achievement of the curriculum
expectations of a course. Planned learning activities include interaction between the teacher and the
student and assigned individual or group work (other than homework) related to the achievement of the
learning expectations in the course. Planned learning activities will be delivered through classroom
instruction and activities and/or through community placements related to work experience and
cooperative education.




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The Semester System

The school year is divided into two equal parts and a student is expected to complete half of his/her
program each semester. The first semester begins September 1 st and ends in January. The second
semester begins immediately following the conclusion of the 1st semester and ends at the conclusion of
the required time for the courses. Students may enter the program in the 1st or 2nd semester.

Types of Courses

Three types of courses are offered in grades 9 and 10:

          Academic courses emphasize theory and abstract problems.
          Applied courses focus on practical applications and concrete examples.
          Open courses are designed to prepare students for further study in certain subjects and to
           enrich their education generally.

Courses in Grades 11 and 12 are based upon the student’s destination:

          Workplace preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills
           needed for direct entry into the workplace or for admission to apprenticeship and other
           training programs
          University preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills
           they need to meet the entrance requirements for university programs
          College preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills
           they need to meet the entrance requirements for college programs
          University/college preparation courses include content that is relevant for both university and
           college programs.
          Open courses are appropriate for all students and are not linked to any specific
           postsecondary destination.




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Full Disclosure and Withdrawal From Courses


The Ministry requires failures and certain withdrawals from grade 11-12 courses to show on the Ontario
Student Transcript.

If a student earns a failing mark in a grade 11-12 course, this course and mark will be shown on his/her
official transcript.

If a student, eligible to do so, (successful completion of 24 credits), withdraws from a grade 12
course after five instructional days following the issue of the mid semester report card, this course and
the student’s mark at the time of withdrawal will be shown on her/his official transcript.
If a student, eligible to do so, (successful completion of 24 credits) withdraws from a grade 12
course before the five days following the mid-semester report card, the course and mark will not show
on his/her official transcript.
*Please consult the Principal for specific dates.




Course Selection Change Policy


Parents and students should be aware that courses are offered and student timetables are constructed
on the basis of their choices of subjects in the spring. Therefore, it is often not possible to
accommodate requests for course or level changes once decisions have been made concerning the
number of classes to be opened, the courses to be offered, the teachers and students timetabled,
etc.




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Prerequisite Requirements & Waiving Prerequisites

All prerequisite courses will be identified in ministry curriculum policy documents, and no course apart
from these may be identified as prerequisites. This school will provide parents and students with clear
and accurate information on prerequisites.

If a parent or an adult student requests that a prerequisite be waived, the principal will determine
whether or not the prerequisite should be waived. A Principal may also initiate consideration of
whether a prerequisite should be waived. The Principal will make his or her decision in consultation
with the parent or adult student and appropriate school staff.

Documentation of any waived prerequisites will be documented in the student’s Ontario Student Record
(OSR).

Access to Course Outlines

The courses offered by Country Garden Montessori Academy have been developed according to the
requirements of the Ontario Ministry of Education and then enriched to meet the standards of the
Academy. Unless otherwise indicated all courses are full-credit courses requiring 110 hours of study.
Should you wish to review a course of study for any of the courses listed here, please contact the
Principal. Parents and/or students who want to review Course Outlines may do so by contacting the
Principal. Course profiles may be viewed at the Ministry of Education website:http://www.edu.gov.on.ca




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Course Coding System

The course code consists of a course title and a five-character code. The Ministry of Education
designates the first five characters; the school or board determines the sixth character.

Code Characters         Explanation                                            Example - ENG 1D

1st, 2nd, and 3rd       Subject discipline of the course in letters            "ENG" indicates an
                                                                               English course

4th                     Grade level as a number * (see below)                  "1" grade 9 or first year
                        "1" grade 9 "3" grade 11
                        "2" grade 10 "4" grade 12

5th                     Type of course as a letter                             "D" Academic course
                        "D" Academic (grades 9 and 10)
                        "P" Applied (grades 9 and 10)
                        "4" Essential (grade 9)
                        "3" Essential (grade 10)
                        "O" Open (all grades)
                        "E" Workplace Preparation (grades 11 and 12)
                        "U" University Preparation (grades 11 and 12)
                        "C" College Preparation (grades 11 and 12)
                        "M" University/College Preparation (grades 11
                        and 12)

6th                     Board or school-designated character that
                        indicates credit value or may be used to
                        differentiate between courses with similar
                        codes



               In the case of a language course the fourth character refers to the level of proficiency




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COURSE LOAD


There is an expectation that students will take a full course load. Therefore, students must register in
and continue with a minimum of


          8 courses in Grade 9
          8 courses in Grade 10
          8 courses in Grade 11
          6 courses in Grade 12


Assessment, Evaluation and Examination Policies

Students are assessed and evaluated based on the Achievement Charts in the Provincial Curriculum
Policy Documents for the courses in which they are enrolled. Evaluation is based on the level of
achievement the student demonstrates in the skills and knowledge covered in a course. 70% of the
final mark is based on classroom work and is determined through a variety of methods such as ongoing
class demonstrations, presentations, essays, performances and classroom tests and quizzes. 30% of
the final mark is based on a final summative evaluation that may be determined through a variety of
methods in the latter portion of the course. These could include a portfolio, essay, examination and/or
demonstration. This final evaluation reflects the range and level of student skills and knowledge
towards the conclusion of the course.

At the beginning of each course, students receive an outline of the course evaluation from each
teacher. This outline includes the assessment of academic achievement and learning skills. Student
progress is formally reported to parents at mid-semester and end of semester. Formal parent-teacher
conferences occur after the distribution of mid-semester reports. The student agenda book outlines the
dates of the reporting periods and parent-teacher conferences.


Assessment is the process of gathering information from a variety of sources (including assignments,
demonstrations, projects, performances, and tests) that accurately reflects how well students are
achieving the curriculum expectations. Evaluation is the process of judging the quality of a student’s
work on the basis of established achievement criteria, and assigning a value to represent that quality.

Student achievement will be evaluated on the basis of four categories:

      Knowledge and understanding
      Thinking/inquiry/problem solving
      Communication
      Application

There are four levels of achievement for students who are passing this course:

      Level 1 (50-59%)
      Level 2 (60-69%)
      Level 3 (70-79%)
      Level 4 (80-100%)

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Level 3 is the provincial standard for student achievement.

Assessment strategies and tools will address the variety of teaching and learning styles as well as the
variety of expectations quality assessment can measure individual and group performance, and
individual performance within a group. A balanced assessment and evaluation program (each of
understanding, thinking, communication and application will be weighted equally) will include methods
to assess:
•   Understanding of Conceptual and Procedural Knowledge/Understanding, using tests, quizzes, and
    observation of performance tasks to assess students
•   Thinking/Inquiry/Problem Solving, and Application in unfamiliar settings, using performance
    assessments, observation, and conferencing to assess students
•   Communication, using journals, portfolios, performance assessments, observations, and
    presentations to assess students
•   Application in familiar settings, using tests, quizzes, and performance assessments to assess
    students
Assessment tools to be used throughout the course include:
•   the four-level Achievement Chart
•   rubrics (both teacher-created and student-generated)
•   checklists
•   rating scales
•   anecdotal comments
•   analytic marking schemes

A well-designed system of assessment, evaluation, and reporting based on clearly stated curriculum
expectations and achievement criteria allows teachers to focus on high standards of achievement for all
students and promotes consistency in these practices across Ontario.

An important goal of this course is to help students continue to develop their learning skills, which
include:
       Ability to work independently
       Ability to work in groups
       Organization skills
       Work habits
       Initiative
Strategies used to evaluate individual learning skills will include journals, portfolios, observations, and
conferencing. Learning skills will not be included in the student’s evaluation. Rather, these will be
assessed and evaluated to assist students to continue to improve their learning skills.




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Reporting Student Achievement

Student achievement must be communicated formally to students and parents by means of a Report
Card. The report card focuses on two distinct but related aspects of student achievement: the
achievement of curriculum expectations and the development of learning skills. The report card will
contain separate sections for reporting on these two areas. The report card will also include teachers’
comments on the students’ strengths, areas in which improvement is needed, and ways in which
improvement might be achieved. Separate sections are provided for recording attendance and
lateness in each course.

The report card provides a record of the learning skills demonstrated by the student in every course in
the following categories:

        Works Independently
        Teamwork
        Organization
        Work Habits
        Initiative

The learning skills are evaluated using a four-point scale (E – Excellent, G – Good, S – Satisfactory, N
– Needs Improvement). The separate evaluation and reporting of the learning skills in these five areas
reflects their critical role in students’ achievement of the curriculum expectations The evaluation of
learning skills should not be considered in the determination of percentage grades.



Equal Education Opportunity

The policy of the government of Ontario is that there be equal education opportunity in the province
and that it is inappropriate for any school to deny a student access to a course or a program solely on
the basis of the students gender, except where so described in the Ministry of Education guidelines. All
courses developed in this school are available to both male and female students.




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Student Responsibilities

Attendance: Regular, punctual attendance is essential for every student to achieve academic success.
Parents can help by ensuring that any absences are necessary and valid. If the process of learning is
disrupted by irregular attendance, learning experiences are lost and cannot be made up completely.
Students who habitually miss class will be disadvantaged in the evaluation processes because their
participation and daily work cannot be adequately assessed. Full attendance at school is vital for
maximum success. Important dates are identified in the monthly calendar to assist families when
planning special events. Absence from a final examination because of illness must be explained by a
doctor’s certificate.

Expectation Regarding Student Responsibility: It is the student's responsibility to be honest in all
aspects of academic work.

Code of Behaviour: The following behaviors are unacceptable: physical, verbal, sexual or
psychological abuse; bullying; or discrimination on the basis of race, culture, religion, gender, language,
disability, sexual orientation, or any other attribute.




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Code of Conduct

Introduction
     A school is a place that promotes responsibility, respect, civility and academic excellence in a
      safe learning and teaching environment
     All students, parents, teachers and staff have the right to be safe, and feel safe, in the school
      community. With this right comes the responsibility to be law-abiding citizens and to be
      accountable for actions which put the safety of others or oneself at risk.
     The Code of Conduct specifies the mandatory consequences for student actions that do not
      comply with the provincially-defined standards of behaviour. The standards of behaviour apply
      not only to students, but also to all school members, i.e. individuals involved in the school
      system- parents or guardians, volunteers, teachers and other staff members – whether they are
      on school property, on school buses or at school-authorized events or activities.

Guiding Principles

      All participants involved in the school - students parents or guardians, volunteers, teachers and
       other staff members- are included in this Code of Conduct whether they are on school property,
       on school buses or at school-authorized events or activities.
      All members of the school community are to be treated with respect and dignity, especially
       persons in positions of authority.
      Responsible citizenship involves appropriate participation in the civic life of the school
       community. Active and engaged citizens are aware of their rights, but more importantly, they
       accept responsibility for protecting their rights and the rights of others.
      Members of the school community are expected to use non-violent means to resolve conflict.
       Physically aggressive behaviour is not a responsible way to interact with others.
      The possession, use or threatened use of any object to injure another person endangers the
       safety of oneself and others.
      Alcohol and illegal drugs are addictive and present a health hazard. Schools will work
       cooperatively with police, drug and alcohol agencies to promote prevention strategies and,
       where necessary, respond to school members who are in possession of, or under the influence
       of, alcohol or illegal drugs.
      Insults, disrespect, and other hurtful acts disrupt learning and teaching in a school community.
       Members of the school community have a responsibility to maintain an environment where
       conflict and difference can be addressed in a manner characterized by respect and civility.




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Instructor Granted Extensions

It is up to the discretion of the teacher to grant extensions on deadlines. Special arrangements may be
made for extenuating circumstances such as legitimate absences, personal emergencies and
mitigating circumstances. Students should not assume that special arrangements will automatically be
made; therefore, they must discuss their unique situations with the teacher. The teacher, acting as a
representative for the Principal under the provisions of the Education Act, will determine if the situation
warrants a further extension. If in doubt, the teacher will consult the Principal. The decision rendered is
final.


Missed Assignments, Tests, Presentations Policy

      Students are expected to assume full responsibility for class attendance and are accountable for
       all work missed because of absences. Assignments are due as soon as the student returns to
       school with a legitimate reason. For prolonged absences, new due dates will be set.
      If students miss a test with legitimate reasons, they are responsible to write that evaluation on
       the day on which they return at a time set by the teacher. For prolonged absences, the teacher
       will use his\her professional judgment to set new test dates for that particular student. For
       students without legitimate absences, a zero will result even if the test is eventually required to
       be completed for learning purposes.
      Presentations are critical learning experiences and often involve more than one student;
       therefore, students without authenticated reasons for absences with be given zero if they are not
       present for a scheduled presentation. If applicable, the teacher will determine how or if that
       member’s absence affects the group’s total evaluation.

As in the late assignment policy, the teacher will have the authority to grant extensions or exemptions
for extenuating circumstances.


Ontario Student Record (OSR)

The Ontario Student Record (OSR) is the official school record for a student. Every Ontario school
keeps an OSR for each student enrolled at that school. The OSR contains achievement results, credits
earned and diploma requirements completed, and other information important to the education of the
student. Students and their parents (if the student is not an adult) may examine the contents of the
OSR. The Education Act and freedom of information legislation protect these records.

Our school will request and transfer OSR documentation according to the Ministry of Education OSR
guidelines.




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Ontario Student Transcript (OST)

The Ontario Student Transcript (OST) is the official record of courses successfully completed and
credits gained toward the Ontario Secondary School Diploma. Information is updated annually and is
part of the Ontario Student Record (OSR).

All Grade 11 and 12 courses are recorded on the student’s transcripts. This includes current, repeated,
and attempted courses. However, if a student withdraws from a course on or before 5 instructional
days after the first report card is issued, the course is not recorded on the transcript.


Roles and Responsibilities

The Principal provides a leadership role in the daily operation of a school by:

      demonstrating care and commitment to academic excellence and a safe teaching and learning
       environment;
       holding everyone under their authority accountable for their behaviour and actions;
      communicating regularly and meaningfully with all members of the school community

Teachers and School Staff, under the leadership of the Principal, maintain order in the school and are
expected to hold everyone to the highest standard of respectful and responsible behaviour. As role
models, staffs uphold these high standards when they:
    help students work to their full potential and develop their self-worth;
    communicate regularly and meaningfully with parents;
    maintain consistent standards of behaviour for all students;
    demonstrate respect for all students, staff and parents;
    prepare students for the full responsibilities of citizenship.

Students are to be treated with respect and dignity. In return, they must demonstrate respect for
themselves, for others and for the responsibilities of citizenship through acceptable behaviour. Respect
and responsibility are demonstrated when a student:
    attends all classes;
    comes to school prepared, on time and ready to learn;
    shows respect for themselves. For others and for those in authority;
    refrains from bringing anything to school that may compromise the safety of others;
    cooperates with the established rules and takes responsibility for his or her action.




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Parents play an important role in the education of their children and have a responsibility to support the
efforts of school staff in maintaining a safe and respectful learning environment for all students.
Parents fulfill this responsibility when they:
     show an active interest in their child’s school work and progress;
     communicate regularly with the school;
     help their child be neat, appropriately dressed and prepared for school;
     ensure that their child attends school regularly and on time;
     promptly report to the school their child’s absence or late arrival;
     become familiar with the Code of Conduct and school rules;
     encourage and assist their child in following the rules of behaviour;
     assist school staff in dealing with disciplinary issues.

Standards of Behaviour

       Respect, civility and responsible citizenship are the key factors in meeting the standards of
       behaviour of the school. All school members must:
        respect and comply with all applicable federal, provincial and municipal laws;
        demonstrate honesty and integrity;
        respect differences in people, their ideas and opinions;
        treat one another with dignity and respect at all times, and especially when there is
          disagreement;
        respect and treat others fairly, regardless of their race, ancestry, place of origin, color, ethnic
          origin, citizenship, religion, gender, sexual orientation, age or disability;
        respect the rights of others;
        show proper care and regard for school property and the property of others; take appropriate
          measures to help those in need;
        respect persons who are in a position of authority;
        respect the need of others to work in an environment of learning and teaching;
        refrain from the use of electronic devices such as pagers, cell phones or laser pointers;
        respect the needs of others to work in an environment that is conducive to learning and
          teaching.

Physical Safety

       All school members must:
            not be in possession of any weapon, including but not limited to firearms;
            not use any object to threaten or intimidate another person;
            not cause injury to any person with an object;
            not be in possession of , or under the influence of , or provide other with, alcohol or illegal
              drugs;
            not inflict or encourage others to inflict bodily harm on another person;
            seek staff assistance, if necessary, to resolve conflict peacefully.




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Harassment

 Definition: A vexatious comment or conduct, verbal or written, (remarks, slurs, references, jokes or
displays of offensive or derogatory material), that is known or ought reasonably to be known to be
unwelcome in that it may cause insecurity, discomfort, offence or humiliation to another.
Examples of harassment include but are not limited to:
     Sexual Harassment
     Racial Harassment
Should any person be a victim of harassment the following should occur:
     tell the harasser that the behaviour is not welcome and must stop
     keep detailed records of the incidents
Should the harassment not end, immediately contact a person in a position of supervision and trust.
     Students are encouraged to contact and inform any of the following, a parent/guardian, a
        classroom teacher or the principal.
     Teachers are encouraged to contact and inform a supervisor or the Principal.
Both parties have a right to a fair and impartial investigation. The primary intention of the procedure is
to stop harassment as soon as possible after an incident occurs.


Plagiarism

CGMA requires academic honesty from all students. This requires students to always submit original
work and to give credit to all research sources correctly and consistently. Detailed information on
plagiarism and how to avoid it may be obtained from your teacher.




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Definition of Plagiarism

Plagiarism is an act of theft known by many names: cheating, borrowing, stealing or copying.
Plagiarism is intentionally or unintentionally using another person’s words or ideas and presenting
these as one’s own. It includes submitting an essay written by another student, allowing a student to
submit your work, obtaining one from the many services provided on the Internet or copying sections
from various documents and not acknowledging the original source. It is a serious offence that may
result in significant academic consequences.


Procedure
    The teacher and student will meet to discuss the teacher’s concerns. The Principal may be
     involved.
    If the plagiarism is found to be intentional, the academic penalty will be a mark of zero and a
     record of this will be kept in the Principal’s office.
    If the plagiarism is found to be unintentional, the student will be given the opportunity to rewrite
     the paper by an agreed upon date, or receive a mark of zero.




Page 21 of 49
Course Codes
The Ministry of Education dictates that all Ontario Secondary Schools will use the same course coding
system.


Course Descriptions – Grade 9

Music, Grade 9, Open (AMU1O)

This course emphasizes the performance of music at a level that strikes a balance between challenge
and skill and is aimed at developing technique, sensitivity, and imagination. Students will participate in
creative activities that teach them to listen with understanding. They will also learn correct musical
terminology and its appropriate use.

Comprehensive Arts Grade 9, Open (ALC10)

This course integrates three or more of the arts (dance, dramatic arts, music, visual arts) and examines
the similarities and differences among these disciplines. Students will learn specialized arts vocabulary
while investigating traditional concepts, stylistic elements and principles unique to the various arts, as
well as applications of new technologies.

English, Grade 9, Academic (ENG1D)

This course emphasizes analytic reading, writing, oral communication, and thinking skills that students
need for success in secondary school academic programs and their daily lives. Students will study and
interpret texts from contemporary and historical periods, including plays, short stories, and short
essays, and will investigate and create media works. An important focus will be the correct and
effective use of spoken and written language.

French

Core French, Grade 9, Academic (FSF1D)

This course emphasizes the further development of oral communication, reading, and writing skills.
Students will build on and apply their knowledge of French while exploring a variety of themes, such as
relationships, social trends, and careers. Thematic readings, which include a selection of short stories,
articles, and poems, will serve as stepping stones to oral and written activities.

Math

Principles of Mathematics, Grade 9, Academic (MPM1D) revised

This course enables students to develop an understanding of mathematical concepts related to
algebra, analytic geometry, and measurement and geometry through investigation, the effective use of
technology, and abstract reasoning. Students will investigate relationships, which they will then
generalize as equations of lines, and will determine the connections between different representations
of a linear relation. They will also explore relationships that emerge from the measurement of three-

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dimensional figures and two-dimensional shapes. Students will reason mathematically and
communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.

Science, Grade 9, Academic (SNC1D)

This course enables students to understand basic concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space
science, and physics; to develop skills in the processes of scientific inquiry; and to relate science to
technology, society, and the environment. Students will learn scientific theories and conduct
investigations related to cell division and reproduction; atomic and molecular structures and the
properties of elements and compounds; the universe and space exploration; and the principles of
electricity.

Geography of Canada, Grade 9, Academic (CGC1D) revised

This course explores Canada’s distinct and changing character and the geographic systems and
relationships that shape it. Students will investigate the interactions of natural and human systems
within Canada, as well as Canada’s economic, cultural, and environmental connections to other
countries. Students will use a variety of geotechnologies and inquiry and communication methods to
analyze and evaluate geographic issues and present their findings.

Healthy Active Living Education, Grade 9, Open (PPL1O)

This course emphasizes participation in a variety of physical activities that promote lifelong healthy
active living. Students will learn movement skills and principles, ways to improve personal fitness and
physical competence, and safety and injury prevention. The student will investigate issues related to
healthy sexuality, causes of abuse and violence, the use and abuse of alcohol, tobacco, and other
drugs, and will participate in activities designed to develop goal-setting, communication, social skills
and personal competence. Aspects of this course may include career education, community
resources, and education for exceptional students.

Information and Communication Technology in Business, Grade 9, Open (BTT10)
revised

This course introduces students to information and communication technology in a business
environment and builds a foundation of digital literacy skills necessary for success in a technologically
driven society. Students will develop word processing, spreadsheet, database, desktop publishing,
presentation software, and website design skills. Throughout the course, there is an emphasis on
digital literacy, effective electronic research and communication skills, and current issues related to the
impact of information and communication technology.



Learning Strategies 1: Skills for Success in Secondary School, Grade 9, Open
(GLS10)

This course focuses on learning strategies to help students become better, more independent learners.
Students will learn how to develop and apply literacy and numeracy skills, personal management skills,
and interpersonal and teamwork skills to improve their learning and achievement in school, the
workplace, and the community. The course helps students build confidence and motivation to pursue
opportunities for success in secondary school and beyond.
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Course Descriptions – Grade 10


Music, Grade 10, Open (AMU2O)

This course emphasizes performance of music at an intermediate level that strikes a balance between
challenge and skill. Student learning will include participating in creative activities and listening
perceptively. Students will also be required to develop a thorough understanding of the language of
music, including the elements, terminology, and history.

Media Arts, Grade 10, Open (ASM2O)

This course will develop students’ artistic knowledge and skills by introducing them to current media
arts technologies and processes. Student learning will include the analysis, appreciation and
production of media art, using a variety of traditional techniques (e.g., photography, film, photocopy art,
video, analog sound recording) and emergent technologies (e.g., computer, digital camera, scanner,
multimedia, animation).

English, Grade 10, Academic (ENG2D)

This course extends the range of analytic, reading, writing, oral communication, and thinking skills that
students need for success in secondary school academic programs. Students will study and interpret
challenging texts from contemporary and historical periods, including novels, poems, plays and opinion
pieces, and will analyze and create effective media works. An important focus will be the thoughtful
use of spoken and written language.

French

Core French, Grade 10, Academic (FSF2D)

This course enables students to increase their knowledge of the French language, further develop their
language skills, and deepen their understanding and appreciation of francophone culture around the
world. Exploring a variety of themes, students will develop and apply critical thinking skills in
discussion, in their analysis and interpretation of texts, and in their own writing.

Math

Principles of Mathematics, Grade 10, Academic (MPM2D) revised

This course enables students to broaden their understanding of relationships and extend their problem-
solving and algebraic skills through investigation, the effective use of technology, and abstract
reasoning. Students will explore quadratic relations and their applications; solve and apply linear
systems; verify properties of geometric figures using analytic geometry; and investigate the
trigonometry of right and acute triangles. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their
thinking as they solve multi-step problems.


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Science, Grade 10, Academic (SNC2D)

This course enables students to develop a deeper understanding of concepts in biology, chemistry,
earth and space science, and physics; to develop further their skills in scientific inquiry; and to
understand the interrelationships among science, technology, and the environment. Students will
conduct investigations and understand scientific theories related to: ecology and the maintenance of
ecosystems; chemical reactions, with particular attention to acid-base reactions; factors that influence
weather systems; and motion.

Canadian History Since World War 1, Grade 10, Academic (CHC2D) revised

This course explores the local, national, and global forces that have shaped Canada’s national identity
from World War 1 to the present. Students will investigate the challenges presented by economic,
social and technological changes and explore the contributions of individuals and groups to Canadian
culture and society during this period. Students will use critical-thinking and communication skills to
evaluate various interpretations of the issues and events of the period and to present their own points
of view.

Healthy Active Living Education, Grade 10, Open (PPL2O)

This course emphasizes regular participation in a variety of enjoyable physical activities that promote
lifelong healthy active living. Student learning will include the application of movement principles to
refine skills; participation in a variety of activities that enhance personal competence, fitness, and
health; examination of issues related to healthy sexuality, healthy eating, substance use and abuse;
and the use of informed decision-making, conflict resolution, and social skills in making personal
choices.


Introduction to Information Technology In Business, Grade 10, Open (BTT20)

This course introduces students to the use of information technology in a business environment.
Students will learn how to use information technology in a work environment, perform electronic
research, communicate electronically, and use common business software. They will also explore
possible future occupations in information technology.

Career Studies, Grade 10, Open (GLC20)

This course teaches students how to develop and achieve personal goals for future learning, work and
community involvement. Students will assess their interests, skills and characteristics and investigate
current economic and workplace trends, work opportunities, and ways to search for work. The course
explores postsecondary learning and career options, prepares students for managing work and life
transitions, and helps students focus on their goals through the development of a career plan.
This is a half-credit mandatory course.



Civics, Grade 10, Open (CHV20) revised

This course explores what it means to be an informed, participating citizen in a democratic society.
Students will learn about the elements of democracy in local, national, and global contexts, about
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political decision-making processes in Canada. They will explore their own and others’ ideas about
civics questions, and learn how to think critically about public issues and react responsibly to them.
This is a half-credit mandatory course.

Technological Design, Grade 10 Open (TDJ20)

This course requires students to design and develop innovative products and services. Students will
learn the following: how to identify user needs related to specified design problems; the physical
properties of selected materials and their application in product design; techniques to create physical
products and services; various presentation techniques; how to test and evaluate design solutions; and
the implications of technology on the development of products or services. They will also become
award of design-related careers.


International Languages, Grade 10 Open (LBAA0-LYXA0)

This course introduces students to language elements they will need to begin to communicate with
native speakers. Students will participate in practical activities in which they can apply their knowledge
and skills and will begin to explore careers that require knowledge of the language of study. They will
explore aspects of the culture of countries where the language under study is spoken, including social
customs, music and food, by participating in cultural events and activities involving both print and
technological resources.




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Course Descriptions – Grade 11



Dramatic Arts, Grade 11, Open (ADA30)

This course requires students to create and perform dramatic presentations. Students will analyze,
interpret and perform works of drama from various cultures, including Western plays from around 1900.
Students will also do research on different acting styles and conventions for their presentations, create
original work and analyze the functions of playwright, director, actor, producer, designer, technician and
audience.

Prerequisite: Dramatic Arts, Grade 9 or 10, Open


Instrumental Music, Grade 11, University/College (AMU3M)

The program in music is intended to develop students’ understanding and appreciation of music
through practical and creative work. In the study of music, students will not only find a source of
enjoyment and personal satisfaction, but will further develop critical and creative-thinking skills,
problem-solving skills, and good work habits. They will continue to gain experience in working both
independently and with others, take increasing responsibility for their work, and learn more about
themselves and others through working collaboratively and studying aspects of music in society. An
important part of the Grade 11 and 12 music program is investigation of possible careers in or related
to music, both in the student’s communities and farther a field.

Prerequisite: Music, Grade 9 or 10, Open



Visual Arts, Grade 11, University/College (AVI3M)

This course provides opportunities for students to further develop their skills and knowledge in visual
arts. Students will explore a range of subject matter through studio activities and will consolidate their
practical skills. Students will also analyze art works and study aspects of Western art history, as well as
art forms from Canada and other parts of the world.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts, Grade 9 or 10, Open




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Financial Accounting Fundamentals, Grade 11, University/College (BAF3M) revised

This course introduces students to the fundamental principles and procedures of accounting. Students
will develop financial analysis and decision-making skills that will assist them in future studies and/or
career opportunities in business. Students will acquire an understanding of accounting for a service and
a merchandising business, computerized accounting, financial analysis, and ethics and current issues
in accounting.

Prerequisite: None



Marketing: Goods, Services, Events, Grade 11, College (BMI3C) revised

This course introduces the fundamental concepts of product marketing, which includes the marketing of
goods, services, and events. Students will examine how trends, issues, global economic changes, and
information technology influence consumer buying habits. Students will engage in marketing research,
develop marketing strategies, and produce a marketing plan for a product of their choice.

Prerequisite: None



Information and Communication Technology: The Digital Environment, Grade 11,
Open (BTA30) revised

This course prepares students for the digital environment. Using a hands-on approach, students will
further develop information and communication technology skills through the use of common business
software applications. The concept and operation of the e-business will be explored, and students will
design and create an e-business website. The skills developed in this course will prepare students for
success in the workplace and/or postsecondary studies.

Prerequisite: None



Physical Geography: Patterns,                 Processes        and     Interactions,      Grade      11,
University/College (CGF3M) revised

This course examines the major patterns of physical geography and the powerful forces that affect
them. Students will investigate the dynamic nature of the earth, the evolving relationship between the
planet and its people, and the factors that limit our ability to predict the changes that will occur.
Students will use a wide range of geotechnologies and inquiry methods to investigate the distribution
and interaction of the elements of their physical environment and to communicate their findings.

Prerequisite: Geography of Canada, Grade 9, Academic or Applied




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World History: To The 16th Century, Grade 11, University/College (CHW3M) revised

This course investigates the history of humanity from earliest times to the sixteenth century. Students
will analyze diverse societies from around the world, with an emphasis on the political, cultural, and
economic structures and historical forces that have shaped the modern world. They will apply historical
inquiry, critical-thinking, and communication skills to evaluate the influence of selected individuals,
groups, and innovations and to present their own conclusions.

Prerequisite: Canadian History Since World War 1, Grade 10 Academic or Applied



American History, Grade 11, University (CHA3U) revised

This course traces the social, economic, and political development of the United States from colonial
times to the present. Students will examine issues of diversity, identity, and culture that have influenced
the country’s social and political formation and will consider the implications of its expansion into a
global superpower. Students will use critical-thinking and communication skills to determine causal
relationships, evaluate multiple perspectives, and present their own points of view.

Prerequisite: Canadian History Since World War 1, Grade 10, Academic or Applied



Understanding Canadian Law, Grade 11, University/College (CLU3M) revised

This course explores Canadian law with a focus on legal issues that are relevant to people’s everyday
lives. Students will investigate fundamental legal concepts and processes to gain a practical
understanding of Canada’s legal system, including the criminal justice system. Students will use critical-
thinking, inquiry, and communication skills to develop informed opinions on legal issues and apply this
knowledge in a variety of ways and settings, including case analysis, legal research projects, mock
trials and debates.

Prerequisite: Canadian History Since World War 1, Grade 10 Academic or Applied




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Introduction to Anthropology, Psychology, Grade 11, University/College (HSP3M)

This course introduces the theories, questions, and issues that are the major concerns of anthropology,
psychology, and sociology. Students will develop an understanding of the way social scientists
approach the topics they study and the research methods they employ. Students will be given
opportunities to explore theories from a variety of perspectives and to become familiar with current
thinking on a range of issues that have captured the interest of classical and contemporary social
scientists in the three disciplines.

Prerequisite: None



English, Grade 11, University (ENG3U) revised

This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking
skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyze challenging literary texts
from various periods, countries and cultures, as well as a range of informational and graphic texts, and
create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using language
with precision and clarity and incorporating stylistic devices appropriately and effectively. The course is
intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 university or college preparation course.

Prerequisite: English, Grade 10, Academic



Canadian Literature, Grade 11, University/College (ETC3M)

This course emphasizes the study and analysis of literacy texts by Canadian authors for students with
special interest in Canadian literature. Students will study the themes, forms and stylistic elements of a
variety of literary texts representative of various time periods and of the diverse cultures and regions of
Canada, and will respond personally, critically, and creatively to them.

Prerequisite: English, Grade 10, Academic or Applied



Functions, Grade 11, University (MCR3U) revised

This course introduces the mathematical concept of the function by extending students’ experiences
with linear and quadratic relations. Students will investigate properties of discrete and continuous
functions, including trigonometric and exponential functions; represent functions numerically,
algebraically, and graphically; solve problems involving applications of functions; investigate inverse
functions; and develop facility in determining equivalent algebraic expressions. Students will reason
mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.

Prerequisite: Principles of Mathematics, Grade 10, Academic




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Functions and Applications, Grade 11, University/College (MCF3M) revised

This course introduces basic features of the function by extending students’ experiences with quadratic
relations. It focuses on quadratic, trigonometric, and exponential functions and their use in modeling
real-world situations. Students will represent functions numerically, graphically, and algebraically;
simplify expressions; solve equations; and solve problems relating to applications. Students will reason
mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.

Prerequisite: Principles of Mathematics, Grade 10, Academic, or Foundations of Mathematics, Grade
10, Applied



French, Grade 11, University (FSF3U)

This course draws on a variety of themes to promote extensive development of reading and writing
skills and to reinforce oral communication skills. Students will gain a greater understanding of French-
speaking cultures in Canada and around the world through their reading of a variety of materials,
including a short novel or a play. Students will produce various written assignments, including a formal
essay. The use of correct grammar and appropriate language conventions in both spoken and written
French will be emphasized throughout the course.

Prerequisite: Core French, Grade 10, Academic




Healthy Active Living Education – Fitness, Grade 11, Open (PPL30)

This course focuses on the development of a healthy lifestyle and participation in a variety of enjoyable
physical activities that have the potential to engage students’ interest throughout their lives. Students
will be encouraged to develop personal competence in a variety of movement skills and will be given
opportunities to practice goal-setting, decision-making, social and interpersonal skills. Students will also
study the components of healthy relationships, reproductive health, mental health and personal safety.

Prerequisite: None



World Religions: Beliefs,               Issues      and     Religious       Traditions,      Grade      11,
University/College (HRT3M)

This course enables students to discover what others believe, how they live, and to appreciate their
own unique heritage. Students will learn about the teachings and traditions of a variety of religions, the
connections between religion and the development of civilizations, the place and function of religion in
human experience, and the influence of a broad range of religions on contemporary society. This
course also introduces students to skills used in researching and investigating world religions.

Prerequisite: None
Page 31 of 49
World Religions: Beliefs and Daily Life, Grade 11 Open (HRF30)

This course introduces students to the range and diversity of world religions, and examines how
systems of belief affect individual lives and social relationships. Students will learn about a variety of
religious beliefs, teachings and traditions, and practices. This course also helps students to develop
skills used in researching and investigating topics related to world religions.

Prerequisite: None



Biology, Grade 11, University (SBI3C)

This course furthers students’ understanding of the processes involved in biological systems. Students
will study cellular functions, genetic continuity, internal systems and regulation, the diversity of living
things, and the anatomy, growth and functions of plants. The course focuses on the theoretical aspects
of the topics under study, and help students refine skills related to scientific investigation.

Prerequisites: Science, Grade 10, Academic



Chemistry, Grade 11, University (SCH3U)

This course focuses on the concepts and theories that form the basis of modern chemistry. Students
will study the behaviors of solids, liquids, gases, and solutions; investigate changes and relationship in
chemical systems; and explore how chemistry is used in developing new products and processes that
affect our lives and our environment. Emphasis will also be placed on the importance of chemistry in
other branches of science.

Prerequisites: Science, Grade 10, Academic



Physics, Grade 11, University (SPH3U)

This course develops students’ understanding of the basic concepts of physics. Students will study the
laws of dynamics and explore different kinds of forces, the quantification and forms of energy
(mechanical, sound, light, thermal, and electrical), and the way energy is transformed and transmitted.
They will develop scientific-inquiry skills as they verify accepted laws and solve both assigned problems
and those emerging from their investigations. Students will also analyze the interrelationships between
physics and technology, and consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society
and the environment.

Prerequisites: Science, Grade 10, Academic



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Technological Design, Grade 11, University/College (TDJ3M)

This course provides students with opportunities to apply the principles of technological design to
challenges in communications, manufacturing, electronics, transportation, architecture, industrial and
consumer products, health and safety equipment, and environmental services. Students will identify
user needs, estimate labor and material costs, analyze material characteristics, and illustrate design
solutions, using traditional and computer-based methods. They will also acquire the basic design skills
required for postsecondary studies in engineering, manufacturing, architecture, and construction.

Prerequisite: None



Communications Technology, Grade 11, University/College (TGJ3M)

This course examines communication systems and design and production processes in the areas of
electronic, live, recorded, and graphic communications. Students will develop knowledge and skills
relating to the assembly, operation, maintenance, and repair of the basic and more complex
components of a range of communication systems. Students will also study industry standards and
regulations and health and safety issues, and will explore careers, the importance of lifelong learning,
and the impact of communications technology on society and the environment

Prerequisite: None



International Languages, Level 3, Open (LBAC0/LYXC0)

This course provides students with opportunities to further develop their communication skills in the
international language and to increase their confidence in applying them in a variety of practical
situations, including contexts related to future employment. Students will engage in a variety of
activities and use resources that will allow them to use the language in various real-life situations. They
will also continue to explore aspects of the culture of countries where the language is spoken, and
investigate careers that require facility in the language.

Prerequisite: International Languages, Level 2, Academic or Open



Science, Level 3, University/College (SNC3M)

This course enables students, including those who do not intend to pursue science-related programs at
the postsecondary level, to increase their understanding of science and its technological applications.
Students will explore a range of topics, including the safe use of everyday chemicals; the science of
nutrition and body functions; waste management; the application of scientific principles in space; and
technologies in everyday life and in relation to social and environmental issues.

Prerequisite: Science, Grade 10, Academic or Applied
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Entrepreneurship: The Enterprising Person, Grade 11, Open (BDP30)

This course examines the importance of enterprising employees in today’s changing business
environment. Students will learn about the skills and attributes of enterprising employees, the
distinguishing features of their work environments, and the challenges and rewards of becoming an
enterprising person. Students will also have an opportunity to demonstrate and develop enterprising
skills by planning and organizing a school or community event.

Prerequisite: None



Information and Communication Technology: The Digital Environment, Grade 11,
Open (BTA30)

This course prepares students for the digital environment. Using a hands-on approach, students will
further develop information and communication technology skills through the use of common business
software application. The concept and operation of e-business will be explored, and students will
design and create an e-business website. The skills developed in this course will prepare students for
success in the workplace and /or postsecondary studies.

Prerequisite: None



Marketing: Goods, Services, Events, Grade 11, College (BMI3C)

This course introduces the fundamental concepts of product marketing, which includes the marketing of
goods, services, and events. Students will examine how trends, issues, global economic changes, and
information technology influence consumer buying habits. Students will engage in marketing research,
develop marketing strategies, and produce a marketing plan for a product of their choice.

Prerequisite: None



Photography, Grade 11, Open (AWQ3M)

Students will learn camera operation and handling, film processing and darkroom printing, digital camera and
computer manipulation techniques. The aesthetics and history of photography, composition, lens selection,
lighting and print quality will be applied using the elements and principles of design. Students will accumulate a
portfolio of work meeting entrance requirements in photography at the post-secondary level. Possibilities in
employment and vocational applications will be explored. Students must have their own 35mm camera and
digital cameral. Material fees: $75.00
Prerequisite: None




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Health Care, Grade 11, College (TPA3C)

This course focuses on human anatomy, physiology, and basic medical terminology. Students will learn about
the relationship between lifestyle and personal health, and conventional and alternative methods of disease
prevention and treatment. They will also investigate health care procedures and equipment in nursing, medicine,
and dentistry; examine health and safety issues in health care and the environmental and societal impacts of
biotechnology; and explore various career opportunities in the health care field.

Prerequisite: None




Page 35 of 49
Course Descriptions – Grade 12



Music, Grade 12 University/College (AMU3M)

This course emphasizes the appreciation, analysis, and performance of various kinds of music, including
baroque and classical music, popular music, and Canadian and non-Western music. Students will perform
technical exercises and appropriate repertoire, complete detailed creative activities, and analyze and evaluate
live and recorded performances. They will continue to increase their understanding of the elements of music
while developing their technical and imaginative abilities.

Prerequisite: Music, Grade 9 or 10, Open



Visual Arts, Grade 12 University/College (AVI4M)

This course focuses on the refinement of students’ skills and knowledge in visual arts. Students will analyze art
forms; use theories of art in analyzing and producing art; and increase their understanding of stylistic changes in
modern and contemporary Western art, Canadian (including Native Canadian) art, and art forms from various
parts of the world. Students will produce a body of work demonstrating a personal approach.

Prerequisite: Visual Arts, Grade 11, University/College Preparation or Open



Media Arts, Grade 12 Open (ASM40)

This course emphasizes the development of the knowledge and skills required for the production of interactive
media art forms (e.g., interactive art installations, interactive videos, simulations, network art). Students will
analyse and evaluate media art works, and will create their own works using a variety of technologies and
processes (e.g., computer graphics, photo imaging, digital video production techniques, electro-acoustics).
Students will maintain a portfolio of their media art works.

Prerequisite: Any Grade 11 course in the Arts



Healthy Active Living, Grade 12 Open (PPL40)

This course focuses on the development of a personalized approach to healthy active living through participation
in a variety of sports and recreational activities that have the potential to engage students’ interest throughout
their lives. Students will develop and implement personal physical fitness plans. In addition, they will be given
opportunities to refine their decision-making, conflict-resolution, and interpersonal skills, with a view to enhancing
their mental health and their relationships with others.

Prerequisite: None




Page 36 of 49
Exercise Science, Grade 12 University (PSE4U)

This course focuses on the study of human movement and of systems, factors, and principles involved in human
development. Students will learn about the effects of physical activity on health and performance, the evolution
of physical activity and sports, and the factors that influence an individual’s participation in physical activity. The
course prepares students for university programs in physical education, kinesiology, recreation, and sports
administration.

Prerequisite: Any Grade 11 university or university/college preparation course in science, or any
Grade 11 or 12 open course in health and physical education



Analyzing Current Economic Issues, Grade 12 University/College (CIA4U)

This course investigates the nature of the competitive global economy and explores how individuals and
societies can gain the information they need to make appropriate economic decisions. Students will learn about
the principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics, apply economic models and concepts to interpret
economic information, assess the validity of statistics, and investigate marketplace dynamics. Students will use
economic inquiry and communication skills to analyze current economic issues, make informed judgments, and
present their findings

Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and World Studies,
English or Social Sciences and Humanities



The Environment & Resource Management, Grade 12 University/College (CGR4M)

This course investigates the complexity and fragility of ecosystems and the pressures human activities place on
them. Students will examine ecological processes, the principles of sustainability, and strategies for resource
management, with a focus on the challenges of environmental degradation and resource depletion. Students will
use geotechnologies and skills of geographic inquiry to explain and evaluate various approaches to achieving a
more sustainable relationship between people and their environment.

Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and World Studies,
English or Social Sciences and Humanities



World History: The West and The World, Grade 12 University/College (CHW3M)

This course investigates the history of humanity to the 16th century. Students will analyze diverse societies from
around the world, with an emphasis on the political, cultural, and economic structures and historical forces that
have shaped the modern world. They will apply historical inquiry, critical-thinking, and communication skills to
evaluate the influence of selected individuals, groups, and innovations and to present their own conclusions.

Prerequisite: Canadian History in the Twentieth Century, Grade 10, Academic or Applied




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Canada: History Identity and Culture, Grade 12 University (CHI4U)

This course examines the evolution of a Canadian national identity. Students will learn how modern Canada was
shaped by the interaction among Aboriginal peoples, the French, the English and the subsequent immigrant
groups. This course will enable students to evaluate major social, economic and political changes in Canadian
history from pre-contact to the present. The understanding students gain through their examination of Canada’s
historical and cultural roots will allow them to formulate a definition of what it means to be Canadian.

Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and World Studies,
English, or Social Sciences and Humanities



Canadian and World Politics, Grade 12 University (CPW4U)

This course examines national and international political issues from a variety of perspectives. Students will
learn about the rights and responsibilities of individuals, groups, and states within the international community;
analyse the different ways in which Canada tries to settle its conflicts with other nations; and evaluate the role of
nationalist and internationalist ideologies in shaping relations among states.

Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and World Studies,
English, or Social Sciences and Humanities



English, Grade 12 University (ENG4U) revised

This course emphasizes consolidation of literacy, critical thinking, and communication skills necessary for
success in academic and daily life. Students will analyze a range of challenging literary texts from various
periods, countries, and cultures; interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts; and create oral, written,
and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using academic language coherently and
confidently, selecting the reading strategies best suited to particular texts and particular purposes for reading,
and developing greater control in writing. The course is intended to prepare students for university, college, or
the workplace.

Prerequisite: English Grade 11 University



The Writers Craft, Grade 12 University (EWC4U)

This course emphasizes knowledge and skills related to the craft of writing. Students will analyze models of
effective writing; use a workshop approach to produce a range of works; identify and use techniques required for
specialized forms of writing; and identify effective ways to improve the quality of their writing. They will also
complete a major paper as part of a creative or analytical independent study project and investigate
opportunities for publication and for writing careers.

Prerequisite: English, Grade 11 University




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Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course, Open (OLC40)

This course is designed to help students acquire and demonstrate the cross-curricular literacy skills that are
evaluated by the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT). Students who complete the course
successfully will meet the provincial requirements for graduation. Students will read a variety of informational,
narrative, and graphic texts and will produce a variety of forms of writing, including summaries, information
paragraphs, opinion pieces, and news reports. Students will also maintain and manage a portfolio containing a
record of their reading experiences and samples of writing. Eligibility requirement: Students who have been
eligible to write the OSSLT at least twice and who have been unsuccessful at least once are eligible to take the
course. (Students who have already met the literacy requirement for graduation may be eligible to take the
course under special circumstances, at the discretion of the principal.)




Principles of Financial Accounting, Grade 12 University/College (BAT4M)

This course introduces students to advanced accounting principles that will prepare them for postsecondary
studies in business. Students will learn about financial statements for various forms of business ownership and
how those statements are interpreted in making business decisions. This course further develops accounting
methods for assets and introduces accounting for partnerships, corporations, and sources of financing.

Prerequisite: Intro to Financial Accounting, Grade 11 University/College Preparation



Entrepreneurial Studies: Venture Planning, Grade 12 College (BDV4C)

This course focuses on the application of entrepreneurial characteristics and skills. Students will learn how to
develop a venture plan. In making the plan, they will consider available resources, analyse the potential market
base, identify legal requirements and available financing, evaluate all aspects of the plan, and identify the
management skills and technology that would be required in carrying out their plan.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Entrepreneurial Studies, Grade 11, College Preparation



Introduction to International Business, Grade 12 University/College, (BBB4M)

This course provides an overview of the importance of international business and trade in the global economy
and explores the factors that influence success in international markets. Students will learn about the techniques
and strategies associated with marketing, distribution, and managing international business effectively.

Prerequisite: Any University, University/College, or College course in Business Studies or Canadian
World Studies




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Business Leadership: Management Fundamentals, Grade 12 University/College,
(BOH4M)

This course focuses on the development of leadership skills used in managing a successful business. Students
will analyse the role of a leader in business, with a focus on decision making, management of group dynamics,
workplace stress and conflict, motivation of employees, and planning. Effective business communication skills,
ethics, and social responsibility are also emphasized.

Prerequisite: None



Advanced Functions, Grade 12 University (MHF4U)

This course extends students experience with functions. Students will investigate the properties of polynomial,
rational, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; broaden their understanding of rates of change; and develop
facility in applying these concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes
necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended both for students who plan to study
mathematics in university and for those wishing to consolidate their understanding of mathematics before
proceeding to any one of a variety of university programs.

Prerequisite: Functions, Grade 11, University Preparation, or Mathematics for College Technology,
Grade 12, College Preparation



Geometry & Discrete Mathematics, Grade 12 University (MGA4U)

This course enables students to broaden mathematical knowledge and skills related to abstract
mathematical topics and to the solving of complex problems. Students will solve problems
involving geometric and Cartesian vectors, and intersections of lines and planes in three-space.
They will also develop an understanding of proof, using deductive, algebraic, vector, and indirect
methods. Students will solve problems involving counting techniques and prove results
using mathematical induction.

Prerequisite: Functions and Relations, Grade 11, University Preparation



Mathematics of Data Management, Grade 12 University (MDM4U)

This course broadens students’ understanding of mathematics as it relates to managing information.
Students will apply methods for organizing large amounts of information; apply
counting techniques, probability, and statistics in modeling and solving problems; and carry
out a culminating project that integrates the expectations of the course and encourages perseverance
and independence. Students planning to pursue university programs in business, the
social sciences, or the humanities will find this course of particular interest.

Prerequisite: Functions and Relations, Grade 11, University Preparation, or
Functions, Grade 11, University/College Preparation


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Calculus and Vectors Grade 12 University (MCV4U)

This course builds on students’ previous experience with functions and their developing understanding of rates
of change. Students will solve problems involving geometric and algebraic representations of vectors, and
presentations of lines and planes in three dimensional space; broaden their understanding of rates of change to
include the derivatives of polynomial, rational, exponential and sinusoidal functions; and apply these concepts
and skills to the modeling of real-world relationships. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical
processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended for students who plan to study
mathematics in university and who may choose to pursue careers in fields such as physics and engineering.

Prerequisite: Principals of Mathematics, Grade 10 Academic



Biology, Grade 12 University (SBI4U)

This course provides students with the opportunity for in-depth study of the concepts and processes associated
with biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations in the areas of metabolic
processes, molecular genetics, homeostasis, evolution, and population dynamics. Emphasis will be placed on
achievement of the detailed knowledge and refined skills needed for further study in various branches of the life
sciences and related fields.

Prerequisite: Biology, Grade 11 University



Chemistry, Grade 12 University (SCH4U)

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of organic chemistry,
energy changes and rates of reaction, chemical systems and equilibrium, electrochemistry, and atomic and
molecular structure. Students will further develop problem-solving and laboratory skills as they investigate
chemical processes, at the same time refining their ability to communicate scientific information. Emphasis will
be placed on the importance of chemistry in daily life, and on evaluating the impact of chemical technology on
the environment.

Prerequisite: Chemistry, Grade 11, University Preparation



Physics, Grade 12 University (SPH4U)

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of the concepts and theories of physics. Students
will explore further the laws of dynamics and energy transformations, and will investigate electrical, gravitational,
and magnetic fields; electromagnetic radiation; and the interface between energy and matter. They will further
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develop inquiry skills, learning, for example, how the interpretation of experimental data can provide indirect
evidence to support the development of a scientific model. Students will also consider the impact on society and
the environment of technological applications of physics.

Prerequisite: Physics Grade 11, University Preparation



Earth and Space Science, Grade 12 University (SES4U)

This course focuses on the Earth as a planet, and on the basic concepts and theories of Earth science and their
relevance to everyday life. Students will examine the Earth’s place in the solar system and, after a general
introduction to Earth science, will explore in more detail the materials of the Earth, its internal and surficial
processes, and its history. The course draws on astronomy, biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics in its
consideration of geological processes that can be observed directly or inferred from other evidence.

Prerequisite: Science Grade 10, Academic



Medical Technology, Grade 12 College (TPT4C)

This course focuses on human physiology, pathology, and immunology. Students will learn about accepted
medical care practices, current technological advances in health care, and how to perform various procedures
and use tools and equipment in the field of health care. Students will also design solutions to common medical
and health care problems, investigate career opportunities, and examine laws and safety standards in the health
care industry and the impact of this industry on the environment
.
Prerequisite: Health Care, Grade 11, College.



Philosophy: Questions and Theories, Grade 12 University (HZT4U)

This course addresses three (or more) of the main areas of philosophy: metaphysics, logic,
epistemology, ethics, social and political philosophy, and aesthetics. Students will learn critical thinking
skills, the main ideas expressed by philosophers from a variety of the world’s traditions,
how to develop and explain their own philosophical ideas, and how to apply those ideas to
contemporary social issues and personal experiences. The course will also help students refine
skills used in researching and investigating topics in philosophy.

Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in social sciences and
humanities, English, or Canadian and world studies


Challenge and Change in Society, Grade 12 University/College (HSB4M)

This course examines the theories and methodologies used in anthropology, psychology, and sociology to
investigate and explain shifts in knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviour and their impact on society.
Students will analyse cultural, social, and biological patterns in human societies, looking at the ways in which
those patterns change over time. Students will also explore the ideas of classical and contemporary social
theorists, and will apply those ideas to the analysis of contemporary trends.

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Prerequisite: Any University or University/College preparation course in Social Sciences and
Humanities, English, or Canadian and World Studies




Food and Nutrition Sciences, Grade 12 University/College (HFA4M)

This course examines various nutritional, psychological, social, cultural, and global factors that influence
people’s food choices and customs. Students will learn about current Canadian and worldwide issues related to
food, frameworks for making appropriate dietary choices, and food-preparation techniques. This course also
refines students’ skills used in researching and investigating issues related to food and nutrition.

Prerequisite: Any University or University/College preparation course in Social Sciences and
Humanities, English, or Canadian and World Studies




Issues in Human Growth and Development, Grade 12 University/College (HHG4M)

This course offers a multidisciplinary approach to the study of human development throughout the life cycle, with
particular emphasis on enhancing growth and development. Students will examine how early brain and child
development are linked to lifelong learning, health, and well-being, and will develop child-care and human-
relationship skills through practical experience in a community setting. This course also refines students’ skills
used in researching and investigating issues related to human growth and development

Prerequisite: Any University or University/College preparation course in Social Sciences and
Humanities, English, or Canadian and World Studies



Canadian & International Law, Grade 12 University (CLN4U)

This course examines elements of Canadian and international law in social, political and global contexts.
 Students will study the historical and philosophical sources of law and the principles
and practices of international law and will learn to relate them to issues in Canadian society and
the wider world . Students will use critical-thinking and communication skills to analyze legal
issues , conduct independent research, and present the results of their inquiries in a variety of
ways.

Prerequisite: Any University or University/College preparation course in Canadian and World
Studies, English, or Social Sciences and Humanities




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Guidance

Each student in the school is associated with a member of staff - his teacher - who is particularly in
charge with assisting the student in making decisions concerning his academic program and progress.
The teacher is the primary contact for home/school communication relating to academic achievement.



Academic Resources

Information literacy refers to the ability to acquire, critically select and effectively use and communicate
information in ways which promote knowledge, highly level thinking skills and wisdom. The teacher will
ensure that a strong print collection is available for students to meet a wide variety of curricular needs.
Students become more competent users of information and thus, better able to successfully complete
research assignments required in their courses. The school offers students the access to CD-ROMS,
videos, encyclopedias and other media resources. The school offers access to the internet. The use
of computers is limited to research and educational matters only.




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                                 The Co-Curricular Program

We are members of the Small School Athletic Federation (S.S.A.F.) which gives the students the
opportunity to participate in fall, winter and spring sporting activities.

                                  School Clubs & Activities

                                       Student Council

                                         Chess Club

                                     Yearbook Committee

                                        Project Share

                                       Social Committee

                                          Tech Crew

                                  Environmental Nature Club

                                           Events

                                           Art Show

                                    Graduation Ceremony

                                   Thanksgiving Food Drive

                                      Special Assemblies

                                           Ski Trips

                                       Winter Carnivale

                                 Christmas Basket & Toy Drive

                                        Music Concert

                                      Grade 8 Orientation



Page 45 of 49
                          Course Selection Summary

                                     Grade 9
                                       English

                                        Math

                                      Science

                                       French

                                     Geography

                                Physical and Health
                                    Education
                                   +2 optional


                                          8
Arts:
ALC101, AMU101
Physical and Health Education:
PPL101
Business Studies
BTT101
Please note that 2 courses listed as optional in grades 9 and 10 are part of the compulsory
requirements for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma: Arts, Physical and Health Education. It is
recommended that the compulsory requirements in both cases be met by the end of Grade 10.




Page 46 of 49
                          Course Selection Summary


                                     Grade 10
                                       English

                                        Math

                                      Science

                                       History

                             Civics and Career Studies

                                     +3 optional


                                          8
Arts:
ASM20, AMU201
Physical and Health Education:
PPL201
Business Studies
BTT201
Technological Design
TDJ20
French
FSF2D1
International Languages
LBAA0-LYXA0
Please note that 2 courses listed as optional in grades 9 and 10 are part of the compulsory
requirements for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma: Arts, Physical and Health Education. It is
recommended that the compulsory requirements in both cases be met by the end of Grade 10.




Page 47 of 49
                    Course Selection Summary


                            Grade 11
                              English

                                  Math




                             +6 optional


                                   8

English:
ENG3U1, ETC3M1
Mathematics:
MCR3U1, MCF3M1, MBF3C1
Science:
SNC3M1, SBI3C1, SCH3U1, SPH3U1
Canadian and World Studies:
CHW3M1, CHA3U1, CGF3M1, CLU3M1
Arts:
AMU3M1, AVI3M1, ADA301
Social Sciences and Humanities:
HSP3M1, HRT3M1, HRF301
Physical and Health Education:
PPL301
Business Studies
BAF3M1, BMI3C1, BTZ301, BTA301
Technological Education
TDJ3M1, ICS3M1
French:
FSF3U1
International Languages
LBAC0-LYXC0

Page 48 of 49
                       Course Selection Summary


                                  Grade 12
                                   English




                                  +6 optional


                                      7

English:
ENG4U1, EWC4C
Mathematics:
MHF4U, MGA4U, MDM4U, MCV4U
Science:
SBI4U, SCH4U, SPH4U, SES4U
Canadian and World Studies:
CIA4U, CGR4M, CHW3M, CLN4U
Arts:
AMU4M1, AVI4M1
Social Sciences and Humanities:
HZT4U
Physical and Health Education:
PSE4U
Business Studies
BAT4M, BOH4M
Technological Education
TPT4C




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