Docstoc

Law BA

Document Sample
Law BA Powered By Docstoc
					PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION




PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION FOR:
BA Combined Honours Law Joint
BA Combined Honours Law Subsidiary

Date updated: September 2010



1)     PROSPECTUS INFORMATION

Awarding Institution                       University of Winchester

Teaching Institution if different

Programme Accredited By

Title of Final Award                       B.A. Law and (joint Field 2)
                                           B.A. (Main field) with Law (subsidiary)
Title of Programme                         B.A.

UCAS code (or other code if relevant)      Law and Archaeology (MV14)
                                           Law and Business Management (MN12)
                                           Law and Childhood, Youth & Community
                                           Studies (M51)
                                           Law and Creative Writing (MW18)
                                           Law and Drama (MW14)
                                           Law and Education Studies (MX13)
                                           Law and Education Studies (Early
                                           Childhood) (MX1H)
                                           Law and English (MQ13)
                                           Law and Ethics & Spirituality (MV16)
                                           Law and Film Studies (MP13)
                                           Law and History (MV11)
                                           Law and Journalism (MP15)
                                           Law and Leisure Management (MN1F)
                                           Law and Media Production (MP1H)
                                           Law and Media Studies (MPC3)
                                           Law and Performing Arts (MW1K)
                                           Law and Politics & Global Studies (ML12)
                                           Law and Psychology (MC18)
                                           Law and Social Care Studies (ML15)
                                           Law and Sports Development (MC1P)



B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                      1
                                                 Law and Sports Studies (MC16)

Relevant QAA Subject Benchmarking                Law (for Joint Honours only)
Group




2)       PROGRAMME AIMS AND LEARNING OUTCOMES

The aims of the Programme are:
Law as a Joint subject

The BA Combined Honours (Joint) programme where law is taken as a joint honours subject
with a second field, is designed to meet the QAA benchmark for law. In doing so, it meets the
needs of students who will choose to enter a wide range of careers and professions and for
whom the intellectual and practical skills and abilities acquired and developed during the
programme will be appropriate. This programme does not satisfy the requirements of the
Professional Bodies for the purposes of qualifying as a solicitor or barrister.

Specifically the Joint Honours programme will enable students to

        Acquire knowledge and understanding of the principal features of the English legal
         system and of selected areas of law
        Analyse and critically evaluate legal and relevant non-legal primary and secondary
         materials
        Develop transferable skills of research, problem solving, group working, information
         handling, and independent learning
        Acquire specialist skills in mooting, debating and negotiating.
        Present written and oral argument in a clear and concise manner.
        Recognise the impact of the learning methods on their achievement of the programme
         outcomes.

Distinctive features of the Programme are:
The programme incorporates the legal skills of mooting, negotiating and debating into the
core modules.


The Learning Outcomes of the Programme are at
        Level 4
     Students will have:
               a knowledge and understanding of the theoretical framework of English Law
                (including the context of the EU)
               be aware of the institutions and major techniques of the legal system



B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                                2
              knowledge and understanding of the main concepts and principles of the law
               of contract.
              a understanding of the sources of law
              begun to develop legal study skills, the skills of communication and argument ,
               group working skills and numeracy skills.
              begun to acquire skills in mooting, debating and negotiation.
              Experience of word processing, e-mail and the internet.


      Level 5
   Students will have:
              a sound knowledge and understanding of Public Law
              a sound knowledge and understanding of selected optional subjects
              capacity for legal analysis and argument and enhanced skills of reasoning and
               criticism and a developing ability of critical evaluation
              further developed skills in mooting, debating and negotiation
              ability to handle moderately complex legal problems and propose solutions
              developed written and oral communication skills


      Level 6
   Students will have:

              a sound and detailed knowledge and understanding of Criminal Law
              a sound and detailed knowledge and understanding of selected optional
               subjects
              a developed ability of crucial evaluation
              ability to handle complex legal problems and propose solutions
              developed skills in legal analysis and argument
              developed skills in mooting, debating and negotiation
              developed skills in written and oral communication




The Learning outcomes in these areas are:
      A. Knowledge and understanding:
       Single and Combined Honours students will have knowledge and understanding of:

           1. the principal features of the English legal system
           2. the concepts, rules and values of the English legal system



B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                                 3
             3. the main institutions and procedures of the English legal system
             4. selected subjects of English law
             5. the social, political and economic context to law
             6. current developments in the areas of law studied
             7. selected subjects in depth
             8 the principal methods of legal research


        B. Intellectual and cognitive skills
        Students will be able to:

             1. demonstrate ability to apply knowledge to complex problems and produce
             defensible conclusions supported by legal authority
             2. synthesise and evaluate information from primary and secondary sources
             3. identify within a problem the issues requiring research
             4. critically assess the merits of competing arguments
             5. determine the relevance and ranking of legal issues


        C. Skills and other attributes
        Students will be able to:

             1. compile information from a number of sources such as law reports, statutes and
             other relevant material
             2. work independently and as part of a team
             3. conduct independent legal research
             4. make effective use of legal terminology
             5. identify, find and retrieve standard legal materials in hard copy and electronic
             form
             6. communicate complex material and argument orally and in writing
             7. apply numeracy skills
             8. critically reflect on learning and development
             9. use IT systems including e-mail, electronic data base retrieval systems and
             word processing.
             10. meet deadlines and work within word limits


Law as a subsidiary subject
Students may study law as a subsidiary subject within the Combined Honours scheme. The
modules available for subsidiary students are drawn from the modules available to B.A. Joint
students and LL.B. students subject to pre-requisite and co-requisite requirements. The


B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                                   4
availability of law modules as a subsidiary enables students to add to their main subject
discipline to meet their individual study or career needs and aims.

Students will have taken the core level 4 modules of Legal Systems and Method and Law of
Contract along side all combined honours students. At levels 5 and 6 subsidiary students
study between 60 and 90 credits (30 and 45 ECTS) of law modules in total. There are no core
modules for subsidiary students at levels 5 and 6. There is no requirement that any of the
subsidiary law modules should be taken at level 6 but that option is available.

The Law Benchmark is not written to apply to students studying fewer than 180 credits (90
ECTS) of law.

The learning outcomes for a subsidiary student beyond Level 4 are therefore entirely
dependent upon which, how many and at what level modules are selected. An indicative set of
learning outcomes is given here:

               B.A. (Hons) Law (subsidiary) - Indicative learning outcomes


Students studying for a B.A. (Hons) in Law where law is a subsidiary subject study 60 credits
(30 ECTS) in law at level four. Thereafter they study between 60 and 90 credits (30 and 45
ECTS) of law across levels five / six. They do not need to study any at level six, though may
study all at level five or all at level six (subject to pre/co requisites) if they wish. Aside from
the FLKs at Level four there is no requirement to study any other Foundation subject. All 60-
90 credits (30-45 ECTS) at levels five and/or six can be chosen from optional modules as
appropriate. Learning outcomes are therefore mainly dependent upon the main subject. The
chart set out below is therefore indicative only.

 Level       Programme             Learning outcomes

 4           Combined              At level four all students will have:
             (subsidiary)
                                           knowledge and understanding of the theoretical
                                            framework of English Law (including the context
                                            of the EU)
                                           be aware of the institutions and major techniques
                                            of the legal system
                                           knowledge and understanding of the main
                                            concepts and principles of the law of contract.
                                           understanding of the sources of law
                                           begun to develop legal study skills, the skills of
                                            communication and argument , group working
                                            skills and basic numeracy skills.
                                           begun to acquire skills in mooting, debating and
                                            negotiation.
                                           Some experience of word processing, e-mail and
                                            the internet



B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                                      5
 5         Combined           A student studying (for example) 60 - 90 credits (30 - 45
           (subsidiary)       ECTS) at level five will have:

                                     a sound knowledge and understanding of selected
                                      optional subjects
                                     a developing capacity for legal analysis and
                                      argument and enhanced skills of reasoning and
                                      criticism and an improving ability for critical
                                      evaluation
                                     further developed skills in one or more of the
                                      following: mooting, debating and negotiation
                                     ability to handle moderately complex legal
                                      problem and propose solutions
                                     developed written and oral communication skills


 6         Combined           A student studying (for example) 30 credits (15 ECTS)
           (subsidiary)       at level six will have:

                                     a sound and detailed knowledge and understanding
                                      of selected optional subject/s
                                     ability to handle more complex legal problems and
                                      propose solutions
                                     developed skills in legal analysis and argument
                                     developed skills in one or more of the following:
                                      mooting, debating and negotiation
                                     developed skills in written and oral
                                      communication

                 Learning outcomes – knowledge and understanding

 All       Combined           By the end of the programme students will have
           (subsidiary)       knowledge and understanding of:

                                  1. the principal features of the English legal system
                                  2. the concepts, rules and values of the English legal
                                     system
                                  3. the main institutions and procedures of the English
                                     legal system
                                  4. selected subjects of English law
                                  5. some of the social, political and economic context
                                     to law



B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                           6
                                  6. current developments in the areas of law studied
                                  7. selected subjects in depth
                                  8. the principal methods of legal research

                 Learning outcomes – intellectual and cognitive skills

 All       Combined           By the end of the programme all students will be able to:
           (subsidiary)
                                  1. demonstrate ability to apply knowledge to at least
                                     moderately complex problems and support
                                     argument using appropriate legal authority
                                  2. synthesise and evaluate information from primary
                                     and secondary sources
                                  3. identify within a problem the issues requiring
                                     research

                   Learning outcomes – skills and other attributes

 All       Combined           By the end of the programme all students will be able to:
           (subsidiary)
                                  1. compile information from a number of sources
                                     such as law reports, statutes and other relevant
                                     material
                                  2. work independently and as part of a team
                                  3. conduct independent legal research
                                  4. make effective use of legal terminology
                                  5. identify, find and retrieve standard legal materials
                                     in hard copy and electronic form
                                  6. communicate at least moderately complex material
                                     and argument orally and in writing
                                  7. apply basic numeracy skills
                                  8. critically reflect on learning and development
                                  9. use IT systems including e-mail, electronic data
                                     base retrieval systems and word processing.
                                  10. meet deadlines and work within word limits




B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                            7
3)      LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGIES

Description of the Programme’s Learning and Teaching Strategy which enables the outcomes
to be achieved and demonstrated

The learning and Teaching strategy aims to provide students with a supportive yet challenging
environment in which to achieve learning and the programme and module outcomes. To this
end a variety of methods is employed that focus on the acquisition of knowledge, cognitive
skill and the practical and transferable skills contained throughout the programme. All core
modules incorporate explicit methods of developing skills as well as knowledge so that
formal learning sessions will include opportunities to practice sills such as in mooting,
negotiating and debating as well as problem solving and discussion of legal issues. Such
activities are underpinned by directed private study that will focus on knowledge acquisition
as well as skills. The variety of activities across the core modules is a particular deliberate
strategy so that all methods are met by all students and no method is marginalised whilst
ensuring that the methods most appropriate to the module content are utilised. Exposure to
these methods will inevitably depend on which modules are selected and how many law
credits are studied by a combined honours student.

The Learning and Teaching strategy is informed by the research and knowledge transfer
strategy with an active approach to ensuring as far as possible the incorporation of RKT into
individual modules and extra curricula activity, both in terms of subject content and crucially
in terms of including students in the RKT culture.

Set out here is a more explicit description relating to knowledge and understanding and then
acquisition of skills:

Knowledge and Understanding

The core knowledge required in modules is introduced in large group sessions (LGS) which
will mainly take the form of lectures but also incorporates visiting speakers and the use of
electronic resources. By directed learning there is a progression from LGS to small group
Sessions (SGS) where students will engage in a variety of activities including discussion
topics, problem solving, mooting, negotiation exercises and debating, all of which are
designed to enable learning and the acquisition of knowledge and understanding. Progression
from one level to the next is marked by the complexity of the material as well as the level of
direction provided to students which begins at level 4 with a high degree of direction and
tapers to level 6 where little direction is provided and more independent learning will be
taking place.

Cognitive, practical and transferable skills

The deliberate strategy of including a wide range of learning activities in the core subjects is
designed to ensure an environment in which thinking skills are developed in an active
manner. The preparation of an argument in the context of a moot for example or in order to
participate in a debate develops independent thinking skills equally relevant to problem
solving and discussion activities that will also take place. Critical analysis of the law and the
policy and other influences on it will also be engaged particularly through the use of these
student centred activity based methods at levels 5 and 6. Inevitably a student following the



B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                                    8
combined honours joint programme will not repeat these learning activities to the same extent
as a single honours student on the LL.B. programmes.

Legal research skills will be developed via this wide range of activities including library
exercises in semester 1 of year one. Group work skills will be needed especially at level 4
where some of the skills will be introduced to students working in teams. Presentation skills
are integral to much of the activity such as mooting, negotiating and debating and are skills
that are transferable to many contexts other than law.

IT skills will be developed through instruction in the use of electronic legal databases such as
Lawtel, Lexis Nexis and Westlaw as well as more general resources available through the
library pages. The Learning Network (a Moodle based VLE) will be used to provide material
including learning and teaching materials and administrative support material such as module
guides and student notices.

Means of delivery
(eg lectures, seminars, workshops, field trips)

The standard pattern of delivery is given below but it is not intended to be prescriptive,
particularly with optional modules where the standard teaching time for each module of three
hours per week can be used in a variety of ways appropriate to the achievement of the module
outcomes.

Standard pattern:

Large Group Sessions (LGS) (e.g. lectures, visiting speakers) - Two hours per week per
module. (Court visits may replace LGS in some instances.)

Small Group Sessions (SGS) (e.g. seminars, moots, debates, negotiation exercises) – One
hour per week per module.

Tutor access: Students have access to subject tutors by means of appointment for one to one
support and by email communication.



4) ASSESSMENT STRATEGY

The diversity of learning activity is reflected in the range of assessment techniques employed
across the programme. Some emphasis is given to unseen examination as a method of
assessment in the core modules recognising the importance of the foundation knowledge and
the accepted value of this method of assessment. Nonetheless in all modules including the
core modules other assessment methods are employed to complement examinations and these
include assessed moots, written assessment essays and problems, negotiation exercises and
debates.


Specifics of the Programme’s assessment strategy and criteria
       Level 4



B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                                   9
   Students are introduced to the assessment criteria and the range of assessments.
   Opportunities to practice activities that will be included in summative assessments is
   provided at an early stage and continue throughout the academic year building to full
   scale formative assessment examples. Students will move from a purely descriptive form
   of expression to begin to formulate reasoned arguments based on some evaluation of
   material. All assessment methods are assessing knowledge and understanding and the
   skills relevant to the particular assessment vehicle.
   Criteria:
   Content
             1. Demonstrates ability to identify legal issues
             2. Defines relevant key legal terms
             3. Demonstrates legal research of primary and secondary sources
             4. Demonstrates ability to analyse and then apply the law to issues
             5. Begins to formulate reasoned conclusions
  Presentation
             6. Structure
             7. Clarity of expression
             8. Use of English
             9. Use of appropriate IT skills


      Level 5
   Again by explicit reference to assessment criteria and the programme learning outcomes
   students are expected to begin to display some independence in their learning and to
   contribute their own findings. Expression now moves beyond the mainly descriptive to
   engage with evaluation and criticism and to make use of contextual materials from policy
   and other sources. Opportunities for formative assessment continue to be made available
   in the core module Public Law.
   Criteria:
   Content
             1. Demonstrates ability to identify legal issues in moderately complex situations
             2. Demonstrates independence in legal research of primary and secondary
                sources
             3. Demonstrates ability to analyse and then apply the law to issues and
                problems of moderate complexity
             4. Displays critical analysis and evaluative judgment using legal and non-legal
                materials
             5. Formulates reasoned conclusions
  Presentation
             6. Structure and argument



B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                                 10
              7. Clarity of expression
              8. Use of English
              9. Citation and bibliographic norms observed
              10. Use of appropriate IT skills


       Level 6
    Students will be expected to display increasing levels of independence not only in the
    Final Year Project (FYP) but in all modules at this level. In some optional modules
    students will have the freedom to formulate their own focus of enquiry for assessed
    written assessment. Some open book examinations will be used emphasising the
    expectation that students will apply the law to complex factual and theoretical questions.
    At this level critical analysis and evaluation of the law by reference to legal arguments
    and to wider contextual material is expected.
    Criteria:
    Content
              1. Demonstrates ability to identify legal issues in complex factual and
                 theoretical settings
              2. Demonstrates independence in legal research of primary and secondary
                 sources
              3. Demonstrates ability to analyse and then apply the law to complex issues and
                 problems
              4. Displays critical analysis and evaluative judgment using legal and non-legal
                 materials
              5. Formulates reasoned conclusions
   Presentation
              6. Structure and argument
              7. Clarity of expression
              8. Use of English
              9. Citation and bibliographic norms observed
              10. Use of appropriate IT skills


Specifics of the forms of assessment
(e.g. essays, exams, presentations, performances)
Examination: Time constrained unseen examinations are an established and validated
approach to the assessment of knowledge and understanding and their application in written
form. This form of summative assessment permits an evaluation of a candidate’s knowledge
and understanding and ability to apply substantive law.
Essay: Written written assessment subject to word limits and time deadlines assesses
application of knowledge and avoids any tendency for rote learning. The approach



B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                                 11
incorporates both discursive argument and problem based assessment. At Level 6 there is
scope for students to develop individual topics, thereby facilitating and emphasising
independent learning.
Moot: An oral and a written submission on two different aspects of a fictitious legal case is a
means of assessment that assesses knowledge, application and ability to construct and defend
an argument. A moot will always be accompanied by a written skeleton outline which will be
worth 25% of overall marks awarded
Negotiation: Focuses on a transaction or dispute based problem. Negotiation exercises are
assessed having regard to a candidate’s ability to research issues, produce a written plan of
the legal issues and their application, role play a negotiation with a fellow student and
complete a self evaluation. Students are independently assessed. A negotiation will be
accompanied by a plan which will also outline sources used in preparation. This will be worth
25% of overall marks awarded
Debate: Essentially an oral presentation of a researched argument with the requirement to
defend a position and display knowledge and understanding. A debate will be accompanied
by an extended bibliography outlining sources chosen or rejected and why. This will be worth
25% of overall marks awarded.


                             Skills based assessment methods


Use will be made of debating, mooting and negotiation as assessment methods over the FLK
modules throughout the Law programme. These methods offer students the opportunity to
develop and demonstrate:


       knowledge and understanding
       analysis, synthesis, critical thinking and evaluation
       legal research skills
       communication and literacy skills
       teamwork and IT skills


The methods will be introduced at Level four. Students will be supported in developing their
skills initially through small group sessions within the Legal Systems and Method Module
and will utilise those skills through appropriate assessment in this and other FLK modules.
An incremental approach will be taken to the development of students’ ability to use these
skills in this context. Assessment will not be based on the technical aspects of the particular
method (e.g. the skill of negotiation) but on ability to use the method to demonstrate
knowledge and understanding as well as the range of cognitive, legal and transferable skills
set out above.


Debating:




B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                                  12
Level four

Students completing level four will be expected to:

      a)     present largely expository material selected from a given range clearly and
             efficiently
      b)     formulate logical and consistent oral arguments
      c)     support their debate with such written materials as defined within the assessment
             written in a clear, literate manner appropriate to this level of study

Level five

Building on the skills developed at level four, students completing level five will be expected
to:

      a)     identify and select materials appropriate to the argument developed
      b)     synthesise a moderately sophisticated argument using materials selected
      c)     orally present in a clear and consistent manner
      d)     support their debate with such written materials as defined within the assessment
             written in a clear, literate manner appropriate to this level of study

Level six

Building on the skills developed at level five, students completing level six will be expected
to use debate to:

      a)     research and select appropriate materials in order to structure a coherent and
             lengthy presentation dealing with complex issues
      b)     orally present a sophisticated analytical argument in a clear and consistent
             manner
      c)     be able to sustain a coherent argument under questioning
      d)     support their debate with such written materials as defined within the assessment
             written in a clear, literate manner appropriate to this level of study



Mooting:

Level Four

Students completing level four will be expected to:

      a)     under direction, conduct legal research by locating retrieving and applying legal
             materials
      b)     Analyse the legal issues arising in a given factual situation
      c)     Identify, analyse and construct valid arguments at an introductory level
      d)     Apply legal principles to problem questions
      e)     Display clear and effective skill in oral and written communication



B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                                  13
Level Five

Building on the skills developed at level four, students completing level five will be expected
to:

      a)     conduct legal research by locating retrieving and applying legal materials
      b)     Analyse the legal issues arising in a given moderately complex factual situation
      c)     Identify, analyse and construct valid arguments at a moderately complex level
      d)     Apply legal principles to problem questions of moderate complexity
      e)     Display clear and effective skill in oral and written communication


Level Six

Building on the skills developed at level five, students completing level six will be expected
to:

      a)     conduct legal research by locating retrieving and applying legal materials
      b)     Analyse the legal issues arising in a given complex factual situation
      c)     Identify, analyse and construct valid arguments at a complex level
      d)     Apply legal principles to complex problem questions
      e)     Display clear and effective skill in oral and written communication

Negotiation:

Level Four

      a)     Under direction, conduct legal research by locating retrieving and applying legal
             materials
      b)     Identify the factual and legal issues arising in a given factual situation
      c)     Accurately present facts where needed.
      d)     Identify, analyse and construct valid arguments at an introductory level
      e)     Generate alternative solutions or maintain position where appropriate
      f)     Apply legal principles to problem questions
      g)     Display clear and effective skill in oral and written communication


Level Five

Building on the skills developed at level four, students completing level five will be expected
to:
    a)      Conduct legal research by locating retrieving and applying legal materials
    b)      Identify the factual and legal issues arising in a given factual situation of
            mederate complxity
    c)      Accurately present facts where needed.
    d)      Identify, analyse and construct valid arguments at a moderately complex level
    e)      Generate alternative solutions or maintain position where appropriate
    f)      Apply legal principles to moderately complex problem questions



B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                                  14
     g)     Display clear and effective skill in oral and written communication


Level Six

Building on the skills developed at level five, students completing level six will be expected
to:

     a)     Conduct legal research by locating retrieving and applying legal materials
     b)     Identify the factual and legal issues arising in a given complex factual situation
     c)     Accurately present facts where needed.
     d)     Identify, analyse and construct valid arguments at a complex level
     e)     Generate alternative solutions or maintain position where appropriate
     f)     Apply legal principles to complex problem questions
     g)     Display clear and effective skill in oral and written communication




5)        ENGAGEMENT WITH THE ACADEMIC INFRASTRUCTURE
Law Benchmark
The Subject benchmark statement for law was first issued in 2000 and was the subject of
consultation in 2006 with a draft new statement. The benchmark is applicable to a programme
of study where at least 180 credits (90 ECTS) of law will be studied. The draft is expected to
be adopted following the closure of the consultation which did not produce any substantive
amendments. Accordingly the draft has informed the design of this programme and the
benchmarks described in the draft are set out in the mapping chart in this document.
There are seven areas of performance described in the benchmark:
Knowledge
Application and problem solving
Sources and research
Analysis, synthesis, critical judgement and evaluation
Autonomy and ability to learn
Communication and literacy
Numeracy, information technology and teamwork




Law Benchmark – Areas of Performance

6 Subject-specific abilities

Knowledge

6.1 A student should demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the principal features of


B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                                 15
the legal system(s) studied. They should be able to:
        • demonstrate knowledge of a substantial range of major concepts, values, principles
        and rules of that system
        • explain the main legal institutions and procedures of that system
        • demonstrate the study in depth and in context of some substantive areas of the legal
        system.

Application and problem solving

6.2 A student should demonstrate ability to apply their knowledge to a situation of limited
complexity in order to provide arguable conclusions for concrete problems (actual or
hypothetical).

Sources and research

6.3 A student should demonstrate ability to:
        • identify accurately the issue(s) which require researching
        • identify and retrieve up-to-date legal information, using paper and electronic
        sources
        • use primary and secondary legal sources relevant to the topic under study.

7 General transferable intellectual skills

Analysis, synthesis, critical judgement and evaluation

7.1 A student should demonstrate ability to:
        • recognise and rank items and issues in terms of relevance and importance
        • bring together information and materials from a variety of different sources
        • produce a synthesis of relevant doctrinal and policy issues in relation to a topic
        • make a critical judgement of the merits of particular arguments
        • present and make a reasoned choice between alternative solutions.

Autonomy and ability to learn

7.2 A student should demonstrate ability, with limited guidance, to:
        • act independently in planning and undertaking tasks in areas of law which they have
        already studied
        • be able to undertake independent research in areas of law which they have not
        previously studied starting from standard legal information sources
        • reflect on their own learning, and to seek and make use of feedback.

8 Key skills

Communication and literacy

8.1 Both orally and in writing, a student should demonstrate ability to:
        • understand and use the English language (or, where appropriate, Welsh language)
        proficiently in relation to legal matters
        • present knowledge or an argument in a way which is comprehensible to others and
        which is directed at their concerns
        • read and discuss legal materials which are written in technical and complex


B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                                 16
        language.

Numeracy, information technology and teamwork

8.2 A student should demonstrate ability:
        • where relevant and as the basis for an argument, to use, present and evaluate
        information provided in numerical or statistical form
        • to produce a word-processed essay or other text and to present such work in an
        appropriate form
        • to use the internet and email
        • to use some electronic information retrieval systems
        • to work in groups as a participant who contributes effectively to the group's task.


QAA Benchmark for law mapping chart for Joint Honours law

 6 Subject-specific           Programme            Module(s)             Assessment(s)
 abilities                    Outcomes

 Knowledge
 6.1 A student should         A1                   Legal Systems and     Examinations
 demonstrate a knowledge      A3                   Method                Written assessment
 and understanding of the                                                Moots, negotiations,
 principal features of the                                               debates
 legal system(s) studied
 • demonstrate knowledge      A2                   Core and all          As above
 of a substantial range of    A4                   selected optional
 major concepts, values,                           modules
 principles and rules of
 that system
 • explain the main legal                          Legal Systems and     As above
 institutions and                                  Method
 procedures of that system                         Public Law

 • demonstrate the study      A7                   All core and          As above
 in depth and in context of                        selected at level 5
 some substantive areas of                         and 3
 the legal system.

 Application and
 problem solving
 6.2 A student should         B1                   Core and all          As above
 demonstrate ability to                            selected optional
 apply their knowledge to                          modules
 a situation of limited
 complexity in order to
 provide arguable
 conclusions for concrete
 problems (actual or
 hypothetical).



B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                                17
 Sources and research
 6.3 A student should
 demonstrate ability to:
 • identify accurately the   B3              All Core and all      Written assessment
 issue(s) which require                      selected optional     Moots, negotiations,
 researching                                 modules               debates
 • identify and retrieve     C5              Core and all          Written assessment
 up-to-date legal                            selected optional     Moots, negotiations,
 information, using paper                    modules               debates
 and electronic sources

 • use primary and           B2              Core and all          Examinations
 secondary legal sources     C1              selected optional     Written assessment
 relevant to the topic                       modules               Moots, negotiations,
 under study.                                                      debates
 7 General transferable
 intellectual skills
 Analysis, synthesis,
 critical judgement and
 evaluation
 7.1 A student should
 demonstrate ability to:
 • recognise and rank        B4              Core and all          Examinations
 items and issues in terms   B5              selected optional     Written assessment
 of relevance and                            modules               Moots, negotiations,
 importance                                                        debates
 • bring together            C1              Core and all          Examinations
 information and                             selected optional     Written assessment
 materials from a variety                    modules               Moots, negotiations,
 of different sources                                              debates
 • produce a synthesis of    A5              All core and          Examinations
 relevant doctrinal and      B2              selected at level 5   Written assessment
 policy issues in relation   C1              and 3                 Moots, negotiations,
 to a topic                                                        debates
 • make a critical           B4              Core and all          Examinations
 judgement of the merits                     selected optional     Written assessment
 of particular arguments                     modules               Moots, negotiations,
                                                                   debates
 • present and make a        B4              Core and all          Examinations
 reasoned choice between                     selected optional     Written assessment
 alternative solutions.                      modules               Moots, negotiations,
                                                                   debates
 Autonomy and ability
 to learn
 7.2 A student should
 demonstrate ability, with
 limited guidance, to:
 • act independently in      C3              All core and          Not explicitly


B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                          18
 planning and undertaking                    selected at level 5   assessed
 tasks in areas of law                       and 6
 which they have already
 studied
 • be able to undertake        C3            Final Year Project    Written assessment
 independent research in                     if selected
 areas of law which they                     Level 6
 have not previously
 studied starting from
 standard legal
 information sources
 • reflect on their own        C8            Legal Systems and     Negotiation
 learning, and to seek and                   Method
 make use of feedback.                       Encouraged in all
                                             modules

 8 Key skills
 Communication and
 literacy
 8.1 Both orally and in
 writing, a student should
 demonstrate ability to:
 • understand and use the      C4            All                 Examinations
 English language              C6            All at level 5and 6 Written assessment
 proficiently in relation to                                     Moots, negotiations,
 legal matters                                                   debates
 • present knowledge or        C6            All core modules at Moots, negotiations,
 an argument in a way                        levels 5 and 6      debates
 which is comprehensible
 to others and which is
 directed at their concerns
 • read and discuss legal      B2            All core and          Examinations
 materials which are           C1            selected at level 5   Written assessment
 written in technical and      C3            and 6                 Moots, negotiations,
 complex language.             C4                                  debates
                               C6

 Numeracy, information
 technology and
 teamwork
 8.2 A student should
 demonstrate ability:
 • where relevant and as       C7            Legal Systems and     Examinations
 the basis for an                            Method                Written assessment
 argument, to use, present                   Law of Contract       Moots, negotiations,
 and evaluate information                                          debates
 provided in numerical or                    Options where
 statistical form                            selected:
                                             Consumer Law
                                             Medical Law



B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                          19
                                                 Employment Law
                                                 1
                                                 Company Law
                                                 Family Law
                                                 Human Rights
                                                 Law of Torts
 • to produce a word-         C9                 All                    Written assessment
 processed essay or other                                               Negotiations; moots
 text and to present such
 work in an appropriate
 form
 • to use the internet and    C9                 Internet in All        Not explicitly
 email                                           E-mail explicitly in   assessed
                                                 Legal Systems and
                                                 Method
 • to use some electronic     C9                 All                    Not explicitly
 information retrieval                                                  assessed
 systems
 • to work in groups as a     C2                 Legal Systems and      Not explicitly
 participant who                                 Method                 assessed
 contributes effectively to                      (non-curricular
 the group's task.                               opportunities in
                                                 negotiation,
                                                 mooting and
                                                 debating
                                                 competitions.)



Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ)
The Programme has been designed in line with the FHEQ which informs University processes
and policies as well as ensuring appropriate level descriptors of programme and module
outcomes. Progression through the three year programme is in accordance with the FHEQ.
The FHEQ in conjunction with the Law Benchmark informs outcomes and abilities.


QAA Code of Practice
The Code of Practice for the assurance of academic quality and standards in higher education
Section 6: Assessment of students – 2nd Edition - September 2006 underpins the assessment
strategy and is fully reflected in the University’s policies and procedures on assessment. In
particular the programme incorporates significant opportunities for formative assessment,
peer observation and feedback and for self assessment and reflection, a strategy informed by
QAA – Integrative Assessment - Balancing assessment of and assessment for learning Guide
No 2 2007.


6)      PROGRAMME STRUCTURES AND REQUIREMENTS, LEVELS,
        MODULES, CREDIT AND AWARDS
This section may be described as a chart or diagram, setting out the Levels, the awards,
mandatory and optional modules, including credits.


B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                                20
Combined Honours Programme Law component
Students must take 360 credits (180 ECTS) with at least 7 at Level 6 (105 CATS credits 52.5
(ECTS)), including the double module Final Year Project (30 CATS credits (15 ECTS)). Up
to two modules at Level 5 may be taken during the final year of a degree programme, or its
part-time equivalent. Modules studied in the second semester of a student’s final year of
study, or equivalent, will normally be at Level 6.
Students completing the requirements for progression to Level 5 are eligible for a Certificate
of Higher Education; those completing the requirements for progression to Level 6 are
eligible for the award of a Diploma in Higher Education as an exit qualification. Students
with 300 credits (150 ECTS), but without the Final Year Project, are eligible for an Ordinary
degree.
Law component:
Level 4 ( QAA FHEQ credit level 4)
60 credits (30 ECTS) consisting of two mandatory core modules each of 30 credits (15
ECTS). A student leaving the combined honours programme after completing this stage is
entitled to the award of a Certificate in Higher Education in Law with (field 2).
Level 4 Core
Legal Systems and Method 30 credits (15 ECTS)
Law of Contract 30 credits (15ECTS)
Level 5 (QAA FHEQ credit level 5) and 6 (QAA FHEQ credit level 6)
Joint Honours students:
Level 5/6
Field 1: 105 credits (52.5 ECTS) (including at least 30 credits (15 ECTS) at Level 6)
Field 2: 105 credits (52.5 ECTS) (including at least 30 credits (15 ECTS) at Level 6)
In addition to the above, all students taking Joint Honours must submit a Final Year Project
(30 CATS credits (15 ECTS)).


Level 5 Core
Public Law 30 credits (15 ECTS)
Level 6 Core
Criminal law 30 credits (15 ECTS)
The remaining credits are selected from the following available modules all of which are
optional for this programme:


The law options for levels 5/6

Level 5 law options:

Semester 1


B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                                 21
Employment Law 1 15 credits (7.5 ECTS)
Consumer Law 15 credits (7.5 ECTS)
Introduction to Human Rights Law 15 Credits (7.5 ECTS)

Semester 2
Employment Law 2 15 credits (7.5 ECTS)
Medical Law 15 credits (7.5 ECTS) (Law of Torts co-requisite)

Across two semesters
Law of Torts 30 credits (15 ECTS)
Property Law 1 30 credits (15 ECTS)
Company Law 30 credits (15 ECTS)

Level 6 Law options

Semester 1
EU Law 15 credits (7.5 ECTS)
Current Legal Problems 15 credits (7.5 ECTS)
Mooting 15 credits (7.5 ECTS)
Commercial Law 15 credits (7.5 ECTS)
IP Law (1) 15 credits (7.5 ECTS)

Semester 2
Property Law 2 15 credits (7.5 ECTS) (Property Law 1 pre-requisite)
ADR 15 credits (7.5 ECTS)
Sports Law 15 credits (7.5 ECTS)
Legal History 15 Credits (7.5 ECTS)
Mental Health Law 15 credits (7.5 ECTS)
IP Law (2) 15 credits (7.5 ECTS)

Across two semesters
Family Law 30 credits (15 ECTS)
Law of Evidence 30 credits (15 ECTS) (Criminal Law co-requisite)
Final Year Project 30 credits (15 ECTS)


Structure diagrams:
                                   Law Joint Honours

Year 1

Core Modules:


                           LEGAL SYSTEMS AND METHOD
                                30 credits (15 ECTS)


                                  LAW OF CONTRACT



B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                      22
                                  30 credits (15 ECTS)




Other field modules:




                                   60 (30 ECTS)credits




Year 2

Students must select 105 credits of law modules over years 2 and 3. A minimum of 105
credits (52.5 ECTS) from the two combined subjects must be taken at Level 6 with a
minimum of 30 credits (15 ECTS) of law modules at Level 6. In addition students must
submit a Final Year Project of 30 credits (15 ECTS) in one of their subjects.

Core Modules:



                                     PUBLIC LAW
                                  30 credits (15 ECTS)



Options:



             Law: maximum 45 credits (22.5 ECTS)
                  Minimum 15 credits (7.5 ECTS)




Other field modules:

             Other Field: maximum 75 credits (37.5 ECTS)
                          minimum 45 credits (22.5 ECTS)




Year 3


B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                       23
Core Modules:



                                     CRIMINAL LAW
                                    30 credits (15 ECTS)



                                  FYP Law or Other Field
                                   30 credits (15 ECTS)


Options:



              60 credits (30 ECTS) (minimum 45 (22.5 ECTS) at level 6)
              Law and/or other field (minimum 30 credits (15 ECTS) of other
              field.) 30 credits (15 ECTS)




                            Combined Honours law subsidiary

Subsidiary students follow the same Level 4 modules as joint students. Thereafter subsidiary
students study between 60 and 90 credits (30 - 45 ECTS) of law modules drawn from the
modules available to Joint students, subject to satisfying pre-requisite and co-requisite
requirements. There are no core modules for subsidiary students.

Year 1

Core modules:

                            LEGAL SYSTEMS AND METHOD
                                 30 credits (15 ECTS)


                                   LAW OF CONTRACT
                                    30 credits (15 ECTS)




B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                               24
Other Field:



                                   60 credits(30 ECTS)




Years 2/3:


               Law: minimum 60 credits(30 ECTS)
                    maximum 90 credits(45 ECTS)




               Other Field: minimum 150 credits (75 ECTS)
                            maximum 180 credits (90 ECTS)




                                     Module maps


Table 1                          Joint Honours options




    Level                Core             Credits           Option   Credits

                                          (ECTS)                     (ECTS)




B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                               25
      4        Legal Systems and          30 (15)            N/A
               Method                     30 (15)
               Law of contract


      5        Public Law                 30 (15)     Law of Torts        30 (15)
                                                      Employment I        15 (7.5)
                                                      Consumer            15 (7.5)
                                                      Employment II       15 (7.5)
                                                      Introduction to     15 (7.5)
                                                      Human Rights        30 (15)
                                                      Law                 30 (15)
                                                      Medical             30 (15)
                                                      Torts               30 (15)
                                                      Property I          30 (15)
                                                      Company             30 (15)


      6        Criminal Law               30 (15)
                                                      EU Law              15 (7.5)
                                                      Current Legal
                                                      Problems            15 (7.5)
                                                      Mooting             15 (7.5)
                                                      Commercial Law      15 (7.5)
                                                      Property II         15 (7.5)
                                                      ADR                 15 (7.5)
                                                      Sports Law          15 (7.5)
                                                      IP Law (1)          15(7.5)
                                                      IP Law (2)          15 (7.5)
                                                      Legal History       15 (7.5)
                                                      Mental Health Law   15 (7.5)
                                                      Family Law          30 (15)
                                                      Evidence            30 (15)

      6                        FYP (in law or in Field 2)                 30 (15)

 Note: 105 credits (52.5 ECTS)must be earned in law selected from levels 5 & 6. The
 FYP is compulsory but can be studied either in law or Field 2




Table 2                     Subsidiary honours options




B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                      26
    Level                Core              Credits            Option          Credits

                                           (ECTS)                             (ECTS)


      4          Legal Systems and         30 (15)             N/A
                 Method                    30 (15)
                 Law of Contract

      5                  N/A                                 60 – 90 30 (30 - 45)
                                                      Credits from levels 5 or 6 subject
                                                      to pre-requisites.
      6




Table 3                            Part-Time Law Joint



Example assuming 50% of full time




               Y1           Y2             Y3            Y4            Y5          Y6


 Level      Legal       Law of            N/A         N/A              N/A         N/A
   4        Systems     Contract
            and         30 (15
            Method      ECTS)
            30 (15      Field 2
            ECTS)       30 (15
            Field 2     ECTS)
            30 (15
            ECTS)


 Level         N/A          N/A        Public &      Options           N/A         N/A
   5                                   EU 30         30 (15
                                       (15           ECTS)
                                       ECTS)


 Level         N/A          N/A           N/A         N/A        Criminal      Options
   6                                                             Law 30        30 (15
                                                                 (15 ECTS)     ECTS)
                                                                               FYP


B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                           27
                                                                                  30 (15
                                                                                  ECTS)

 Note: 105 credits (52.5 ECTS) must be earned in levels 5 & 6 with a minimum of 30
 credits (15 ECTS) at level 6 – see Table 1. The FYP is compulsory but can be studies
 either in law or Field 2




Table 4                       Part-Time Law Subsidiary

Example assuming 50% of full time




                Y1               Y2             Y3           Y4           Y5           Y6


 Level 4   Legal           Law of              N/A          N/A          N/A           N/A
           Systems and     Contract 30
           Method 30       (15 ECTS)
           (15 ECTS)


 Level 5        N/A             N/A
                                              60-90 credits (30 – 45 ECTS) in law levels 5
                                                                and/or 6
 Level 6        N/A             N/A




7)        SUPPORT FOR STUDENTS
University Student Services provides the following support: personal tutors, counsellors,
Chaplaincy; Careers Service; Job Shop; Equal Opportunities Officer; Study Skills
Programme; Pre-Entry Study Skills Programme; Child Care Nursery; Welfare Advice;
Bursaries; Financial Advice.
Support is provided by the Faculty and Department / Programme via Student Handbooks;
Module Guides; Assignment Feedback; the VLE; PDP; Exchange Programme;
IT and Computer Services (ITCS) provides a range of support and technical solutions to help
student to make the best use of the IT facilities provided. Technical support can be gained in a
number of ways including a helpline and face to face Helpdesk or by Email where queries are
logged in the system and given a priority according the nature of the problem.
An IT Trainer provides free of charge study skills courses throughout term time. Topics
covered include Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, Outlook and Publisher.
Graphics, web page design and use of the Internet are also available. Tailor-made courses can


B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                                   28
also be arranged if student demand is sufficient.
One-to-one training and assistance is also offered to students in all the software covered by
the study skills courses mentioned above, as well as for the University Virtual Learning
Environment, the University Portal (internal website) and other IT skills by request. This free
service is run on a weekly basis.
A range of IT self help leaflets and instructions covering a variety of topics (including the
study skills subjects), is available in open access areas and at other locations on campus. They
are also available online from the IT Training pages on the University Portal
The Multimedia trainer runs free weekly courses on Using the TV Studio; Video editing;
Audio editing; Video-camera skills and Lighting for video. Sessions cover starting up, the
system, and file management. Packages include AVID and Adobe Premiere.
Student Services offer a programme of workshops for study skills and personal development.
Topics include: Essay writing; Time management; IT skills; Mind mapping. Places can be
booked through Student Services Reception.

Library staff offer tours and training in the following topics: Using the Library Catalogue;
Finding journal articles; Searching databases; Searching the Internet. Private tutorial or small
group training sessions can also be booked through Library Enquiries. Online tutorials are
also provided on a wide range of topics.

An academic member of staff will have the role of careers advisor and will function in
association with the University careers Service




8)      CRITERIA FOR ADMISSION
Points scores and other information
 GCE/VCE A Levels (inc. Double
 Award) CACHE Diploma / Scottish
 Highers / Irish Leaving Certificate                220-260 points
 at grade c3 + / Welsh Baccalaureate

 BTEC National
 Diploma (inc.                                      MMP
 Early Years)

 BTEC
 National
 Certificate                                        DM
 Access
 Pass at level giving entry to HE                   Pass

 International                                      24 points
 Baccalaureate
 Mature entry                                       Evidence of potential to benefit from the
                                                    course is sought, each case being assessed
                                                    on its merits.


B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                                   29
9)      QUALITY AND STANDARDS
Description of Quality Assurance mechanisms and the methods for evaluating and improving
the quality and standards of learning

The quality management of taught programmes


Day-to-day support of quality systems for taught programmes rests with the Quality Office,
which has two Quality Officers – one responsible for validation and review (including review
by bodies external to the University) and one for external relations (collaborative partnerships
and external examiners). The position of Director of Quality supervises the management of
taught awards.
Senate ASC has oversight of quality at the institutional level and is chaired by a senior
academic who is not part of the management structure. Within the Faculties, Associate Deans
(Quality) have managerial responsibility for advising on the processes for quality assurance in
their Faculties, whilst Faculty Quality Committees (FQCs) (chaired independently of the
management structure within the Faculties) oversee the operational aspects of quality
processes. The Director of Quality, FQC Chairs and Associate Deans (Quality) meet
informally on a monthly basis to share information.
Committee responsibility for maintenance and enhancement of quality and standards is
overseen by Senate ASC on behalf of and in conjunction with Senate. Ownership of quality
processes and procedures is achieved by a committee structure that devolves responsibility to
Faculty level with FQCs that receive and scrutinise Annual Monitoring Reports, Programme
Proposals, interim validations, external examiner appointments (for taught programmes), and
validation and review documents.
Senate ASC’s membership includes the Director of Quality, Chairs of RDC, FQCs, the
Student Union Education Officer and academic staff with cross-University roles. It advises
Senate on quality and standards, internally and in the national context. It has supervisory
responsibility for the approval and review of programmes, validation of programmes offered
in partnership with Further Education colleges and for the monitoring and maintenance of
academic standards generally across the institution. The Committee has an ongoing function
in ensuring review of University quality procedures and the sharing of good practice.


Academic standards and quality assurance
The University of Winchester’s academic standards and assurance of quality are underpinned
by these key tenets:
• to enhance the student experience;
• to ensure ownership of, and engagement with, quality processes throughout the University;
• to encourage critical self evaluation;
• to involve external academic and professional peers in academic development validation and
review;



B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                                   30
• to engage with the national academic infrastructure.
Ownership of the resulting processes extends to students and therefore they are involved in
quality processes wherever possible. Transparency in processes and the implementation of a
cohesive set of internal regulations, policies and strategies are key features.
The external examiner system underpins the University’s achievement of national standards
and allows dialogue with academics from other universities. Validation procedures encourage
input from external academics and employer representatives at the design stage and require
external representation at the scrutiny event.
Consistency and transparency in quality and standards across the University are maintained
by a system of cross-Faculty membership of validation panels and within the annual
monitoring processes. In line with the principle of involvement of all stakeholders in quality,
students are represented on programme and quality committees. Monthly meetings of Chairs
and Associate Deans (Quality) further strengthen the overview of these areas.
Key institutional documents regarding academic standards and quality assurance all go
through a regular process of revision and renewal. They comprise:
• The Academic Regulations of the University, divided into three units:
       Common Academic Regulations for Undergraduate Programmes of Study
       Common Academic Regulations for Taught-Course Masters Programmes
       Academic Regulations for Postgraduate Certificate In Education (Primary)
• Quality Assurance and Enhancement Handbook
• Learning and Teaching Strategy
• Academic Appeals Panel Regulations: Appeals by Students Against the Decision of a Board
of Examiners
• Plagiarism Regulations
The Quality Assurance and Enhancement (QAE ) Handbook is the main source of guidance
on programme design, validation procedures, monitoring of programmes of study and
external examiners. The QAE Handbook is regularly reviewed to meet internal and external
requirements. Changes in procedures require the approval of Senate, although guidance on
changes in documentation may be provided as appropriate.
All University processes retain either an explicit or implicit relationship with the Academic
Infrastructure (The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ), The Code of
Practice for the Assurance of Academic Quality and Standards in Higher Education (CoP) and
Subject Benchmark statements). Programmes are required to refer to the FHEQ and relevant
Subject Benchmark Statement(s) in validation and review, whilst the comprehensive strategy,
policy and regulatory documents produced by the University engage actively with those
elements of the CoP which operate more effectively at an institutional level.
The Faculty of Social Sciences and the University therefore have well established
mechanisms of quality assurance and enhancement which govern the programme and which
include:
1. Module evaluation
Modules are evaluated informally during delivery and formally at their conclusion by the
completion of anonymous student evaluation questionnaires. A module report is then
produced in response to the evaluation and that report is considered by the Programme


B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                                  31
Committee. The report and all minutes of the Programme Committee are made available to all
students on the programme.
2. Student satisfaction survey
All students are invited to complete a satisfaction survey when graduating from the
programme. Findings from the survey inform ongoing evaluation and the formal process of
revalidation.
3. Programme committee
A key mechanism for enhancement as well as quality assurance this committee included
student representatives usually elected for one year at a time. It meets at least four times a
year, before the commencement of the academic year, once in semester 1 and twice in
semester 2. The committee considers in particular the effectiveness of modules, resources and
day –to-day issues. Committee minutes are made available to all students on the programme
and are sent to the Law Department and to the Faculty Quality Committee. The Committee is
also a major focus for annual monitoring and the completion of the Action Plan and
Evaluation. Further information on the Programme Committee is contained in the Handbook
for Programme Leaders.
4. Action Plan and Evaluation
An Action Plan and Evaluation (AP&E), approved by the Programme Committee, is sent to
the Faculty Quality Committee and the Law Department. The AP&E evaluates the previous
year, sets out to address the issues that have arisen, notes forward looking requirements and
plans for enhancement and includes the External Examiner’s Report and the programme’s
reply. Further information on AP&E is contained in the Quality Office document
“Departmental Structures and the format for the annual monitoring of taught programmes”.
5. Staff meetings
The Law Department staff meetings are held on a regular basis to discuss all matters
concerning the delivery and administration of its programmes. Such meetings will include
consideration of consultations by the Professional Bodies of the Solicitors Regulation
Authority and the Bar Council.
6. Assessment
Examination papers and other formal assessments are subject to scrutiny within the
programme team. Sample double marking will take place facilitated by marking notes
provided by the member of staff responsible for setting the assessment.
7. External examiners
External examiners are consulted on all matters relating to assessment including scrutiny and
approval of examination papers and moderation of marks. In accordance with University
Regulations all Firsts and a sample of scripts at all boundaries grades is sent to an external
examiner. External examiners are also provided with the report following module evaluation
questionnaires.


Reference points applied:
Including consideration of stakeholder feedback from, for example, current students,
graduates and employers.




B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                                 32
                    Reference Points used in the design of the programme
                   Internal                                        External
 Faculty Strategic Plan                           External academic consultant
 University Strategic Plan 2006-2011              Head of Law of other University
 University Learning and Teaching Strategy        Employers
 2006-11
 Academic Standards Committee                     QAA Code of Practice
 Conditions and Recommendations set at
 Quality Assurance Events in 2006-07
 University Quality Assurance and                 FHEQ
 Enhancement Handbook 2007/8
 Handbook for Programme Leaders 2007/8            QAA Subject benchmark for law
 University Common Academic Regulations           UK Centre for Legal Education
 for Undergraduate Programmes
 University Assessment Strategy 2002              Combined Honours Programme Leader at
                                                  other University
 University cultural awareness and equal
 opportunities statement

Future feedback:
Current student input via Programme Committee
Current student input via personal tutor system
Current student input via module evaluation
Employer feedback through involvement with delivery of current legal issues module
Employer feedback from involvement as visiting speakers
Employer feedback from involvement as moot judges


10) THE REGULATORY FRAMEWORK

The University’s Academic Regulations apply to all undergraduate and Taught –Course
Master’s programmes.
(a) The programme of study conforms fully with the Academic Regulations for
Undergraduate Programmes of Study


(b) Exemptions are required
Give brief summary of details (must be agreed by Senate Academic Standards Committee
BEFORE a programme is submitted for approval/review – consultation with the Quality
Office is advised).
No exemptions are required.
c) External Accreditation



B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                         33
11) UNIVERSITY STRATEGIES AND POLICIES



i) Cultural Awareness and Equal Opportunities

Policy Statement, University of Winchester
The University is committed to promoting equality, diversity and an inclusive and supportive
environment for its students and staff as part of a quality learning environment, in which
individuals will be treated fairly and with respect, and will be afforded opportunities to fulfil
their potential. To this end:
Staff and students will be treated equitably regardless of their age, colour, disability, family
responsibilities, gender, marital status, national origins, race/ethnicity, religious or political
beliefs and affiliations , sexual orientation, socio-economic background or other inappropriate
distinction.
The University will promote diversity in its students and staff and provide and maintain an
inclusive and supportive study and work environment.
The University will promote cultural awareness, prevent unlawful discrimination, promote
equality of opportunity and promote good race relations.

To support these aims the University will ensure that the occurrence of inappropriate
discrimination will be minimised, whether direct or indirect, through the implementation of
appropriate procedures. Any discriminatory behaviour including harassment or bullying, by
individuals or groups, will be regarded extremely seriously and will be grounds for
disciplinary action, which may include expulsion or dismissal.

The B.A. Law component
In some academic situations it may be necessary to use inflammatory resources to aid
learning. Where academics wish to use such resources they must make students aware that
they are using such material e.g. by placing a disclaimer in the module handbook, and why
they are using it. Lecturers should be aware of the impact the materials they use may have on
their students. Where that impact is to encourage/inform debate the outcomes should be very
clear in the lecturer’s mind and this related to the students (both through a disclaimer and in
the classroom).

The curriculum necessarily includes reference to a wide range of material and contexts
concerning cultural awareness and equal opportunity, not least where EU initiatives in the
field of discrimination are studied and also in a great many modules, core and optional.

In line with the University’s commitment to widening participation law has been included in
the academic year 2006-7 in activities such as the Aim Higher days, Compact Partners Day
and in attendance at meetings of the Law Curriculum Support Group of the Hampshire Sixth
Form Colleges’ Partnership and all such activities will continue in future years.

Admissions procedures are in place to ensure that applications from students with special
needs are assessed on academic merit and that any special needs are addressed by the
disability officer within student services to ensue the University can make necessary



B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                                     34
provision.

ii) Personal Development Planning

The University provides a range of opportunities by which to engage with PDP on a voluntary
basis to facilitate the development, monitoring and recording of skills, qualities and
competencies that will benefit students in their academic, professional & personal lives.

PDP opportunities are embedded formally and informally within the curriculum
programme(s). Informal PDP opportunities are also offered by Personal Tutors, Student
Services, the Student Union, the Careers Centre and resources developed within the
University. Wider PDP opportunities include positions of responsibility, posts within the SU
or student clubs; part-time employment; taking part in activities within the community or
voluntary work.

The University Library has a wide range of books and resources that will assist students in
their chosen PDP activities.

To assist students in choosing which PDP resources to engage with the Learning pages of the
Portal offer a number of gateways to resources based on three PDP websites which can be
accessed and used according to personal preference. Each web site provides a distinct method
for PDP: Method (1) offers the opportunity to engage with PDP from a perspective that sees it
as important to develop a range of thinking skills, study skills, research skills and career skills
during a student’s time at University. Method (2) takes a slightly different approach by
foregrounding the importance of study skills as level 4 and level 5 and concentrating on
career skills at level 6. Method (3) takes a slightly different approach again and starts by
asking the question “What do you want?” and then getting students to think about their
transferable and life skills and also employability resources. An introduction to PDP and these
resources is included in the Legal Systems and Method module at level 4. Combined honours
students may also receive instruction or guidance from their other field of study.

PDP by these methods enables students to have a much deeper understanding of the learning
process and their skills and helps them to develop their ability to evaluate their own
performance and take control over their learning so that they become independent learners.
PDP develops reflexive individuals who are forward thinking and capable of working on their
own and with others. PDP is achieved by thinking about and recording achievements,
reflecting upon them and setting targets and devising action plans to enable students to further
develop their skills and competencies. The PDP facilities enable students to monitor and
review progress whist reflecting upon development and to maintain a record of achievement
and development.

iii) Employability

Employability, meaning the combination of subject knowledge, skills and personal qualities,
developed through an effective learning, teaching and assessment strategy, clearly underpins
the law benchmark statement, the Joint Statement of the Solicitors Regulation Authority and
the Bar Council and is fully embraced by the programme and the opportunities available
outside of the programme. The Programme has a particular focus on the embedding of skills
into the curriculum. Student Services provides considerable support in terms not only of the
careers service but in developing study skills and in the provision of guidance on CV



B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                                      35
construction ands letter writing and a whole range of employability focussed resources. Links
with the legal profession at the local, regional and national level will inform the programme
and provide contact for students. Local practitioners already visit the University in the context
of career advice and have also offered to give talks to the law student body. The Law
Department advisory group is also an important point of contact and includes employers from
outside of the legal profession.
Extra-curricular activities include a Student Lawyers Society, membership of the Programme
Committee, competitions in mooting, negotiating, client interviewing and debating.
See also Personal Development Planning.




B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                                    36
12. RESOURCES



Library

The Law Library is located in a discrete area occupying half of the top floor of the Martial
Rose library. The building of the hard copy collection commenced in the academic year 2005-
6 with donations of material and a substantial acquisition programme commenced in the
academic year 2006-7 and continues in 2007-8. Further acquisition to support level 5 and 6
modules will be made in the academic year 2008-9.

The law library resourcing is informed by the standards set by the Society of Legal Scholars
Statement of Standards for University Law Library Provision in England and Wales 2003.
Full details of the library are contained in the appendix.

Room allocation

The programme teaching strategy requires large group teaching for two hours per week per
module and one hour per week in small groups. The University operates a central room
allocation system. It is likely that large group work will take place in one of the lecture theatre
rooms on the King Alfred campus, such as Herbert Jarman building, Examination Hall 2 and
The Stripe. A moot court room is situated in St Edburgha's building, close to the library. This
room will be used extensively for small group sessions although other rooms of a suitable size
will also be used for small group work. A detailed room space projection for 2008 – 2011 was
provided to the Director of Estates in January 2007 to inform the estates strategy for that
period.

IT

IT facilities and support are provided centrally and managed by IT and Communication
Services (ITCS).

Wireless coverage:

King Alfred’s outside campus
West Downs outside campus
Tom Atkinson Building
Fred Wheeler Building
Library
Student Union
University Centre
Main Building
Medecroft Annex
West Downs Shakespeare room
West Downs C2H bar
St Grimbalds
St James
St Elisabeth’s


B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                                      37
Alwyn Hall

PCs:

Library:

Level 1 = 31
Level 2 = 25
Level 3 = 38
Open access PCs :
Learning Café, University Centre = 50 (available 24 x 7)
Library = 94 (available during normal library opening times)
Library training room (available when not booked) = 17 (available as above)
IT Centre, KKB = 107 (weekdays during semester 9am - 10pm with shorter hours at
weekends)

IT Training and help:

Study Skills courses are available throughout term time. Courses are free of charge to
students. Tailor-made courses can be arranged if there is enough interest and free 1-2-1
training or consultation is offered on a weekly basis by arrangement with the IT Trainer.
One to one or small group sessions are available and focus upon the particular needs of the
user within the following areas:
Computing basics; Beginning Web Page Design with Dreamweaver; The Internet; Access
Databases; Email; Excel Spreadsheets; File Management;
Publisher; Word Processing; Working from Home; PowerPoint; Virtual Learning
Environment (VLE)
Self help material available on line includes:
Microsoft Office Suite (Word incl. mail merge, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, Outlook)
Design and Graphics (Web design, Desk Top Publishing, Image Manipulation)
General (Windows Help Topics, Working Online, Statistics, Writing to CDs)


Academic Staff expertise

The strategy for the appointment of staff aims to ensure that expertise exists in all of the core
subjects, the optional modules already written and has a capacity to develop new option
modules as the programme develops and student numbers increase. The head of law was
appointed from 1 September 2006 and a Senior Lecturer (Helen James) has been appointed
from 1 January 2008. Together these appointments have expertise in skills and across some of
the core subjects, particularly Public law, Law of Contract, Law of Torts and Criminal Law as
well as option subjects of Medical Law, Law of Evidence, Employment Law 1. Helen James
has expertise gained in her post at the UK Centre for Legal Education (UKCLE) in learning
and teaching in law including the management of a high-level development project ‘Toolkit
for Law Teaching’ to support professional development needs of new law teachers. Further
appointments will be made to commence in September 2008 and the focus of those
appointments will be to appoint those with expertise to complement that already in place.
Further appointments in subsequent academic years will be made as student numbers
increase.




B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                                    38
13. STAFF DEVELOPMENT, RESEARCH AND THE PROGRAMME


Staff attend Faculty, and University Learning and Teaching events and actively engage in
Research and Knowledge Transfer activities with support from the Faculty where appropriate.
Staff engage in a variety of activities including with professional associations and in
particular CPD for practicing lawyers thereby facilitating research and knowledge transfer
beyond, but to the benefit of, the university. All staff have the opportunity to attend academic
conferences related to research interests and to Learning and Teaching.

Excellence in teaching is at the heart of the University's mission. Funding for learning and
teaching is intended to support the development of new and innovative courses that will meet
the needs of diverse learners, and a range of initiatives to help staff to give students the best
possible learning experience.

Learning and teaching fellowships give staff funding and time to research and develop new
approaches to learning and teaching such as the development of a new virtual learning
environment for part-time students. Support is also given for work on key issues, which
currently include the development of virtual learning, work-based learning, peer observation
of teaching and personal development planning. Staff development is offered through an
accredited programme leading to a postgraduate certificate together with further opportunities
to gain credit for ongoing professional development activity.

Accreditation for professional development activity, supported by staff development events or
involvement in learning and teaching initiatives, is available through the MA Education:
Professional Enquiry. The following modules, for example, offer new and experienced
colleagues the opportunity to gain credits for professional activity and reflection and in
specific areas and as part of the Postgraduate Certificate Learning and Teaching in Higher
Education (PGCLTHE): Examining Professional Practice; The Context of Higher Education;
Using IT for Innovation in Learning; The Practice of Teaching in Higher Education.

Research informed teaching

The University of Winchester understands research to be defined by an active, contributory
engagement with a community of academic practice, whether that be a traditional academic
discipline or a professional grouping. There is an expectation that full-time staff be engaged
in such activity and for this to directly inform their teaching. It is a strategic aim to have all
full-time staff engaged in such activity with measurable outputs by 2010/11. The University
aims to enhance and grow the research environment so that all teaching is underpinned by
RKT activity.

This strategy is therefore a focus for staff appointments in law and for the continuing
development of staff who will be supported and encouraged in their RKT activity and in
informing the teaching and learning process. The involvement of existing staff in research
that will clearly inform teaching includes Helen James’ work at the UKCLE and David
Chalk’s Visiting Research Fellowship at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies each of
which has direct relevance to pedagogy. Helen James’ own post graduate work in medical law
and David Chalk’s work in the field of access to justice and litigation funding provide
considerable occasions for RIT activity across a large number of modules from Legal Systems
and Method, Law of Contract to Law of Tort and the option module in Medical Law. Helen
James is a committee member of the Association of Law Teachers, Deputy Convenor of the


B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                                     39
legal education stream of the Society of Legal Scholars and a member of the Socio-Legal
Studies Association and David Chalk is a member of the Association of Law Teachers and an
executive board member of the Commercial Litigation Association, all of which enhance the
opportunities for RIT activity.




B.A. Combined Honours Law (Joint and Subsidiary)                                            40

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:3
posted:3/13/2012
language:
pages:40