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					                 Sociology 12: Unit 3 Socialization (Aligned with Provincial Outcomes)

Outcomes Unit 3—Socialization: The Shaping of Human Behaviour

3.1 explain the process of socialization
• Define socialization.
• Identify various agents of socialization (e.g., media, family, peers, education, religion, work)
and describe their role in the socialization process.
• Relate the impact of agents of socialization to their behaviour and own socialization.

3.2 investigate the relationship between socialization and the development of individual personality
• Examine the roles of nature and nurture in the socialization process.
• Analyze major theories of personality development (e.g., Freud’s Psychosexual Theory,
Erikson’s Psychosocial Development, Cooley and Mead’s Symbolic Interactionist theories).
• Identify connections between society and the development of self-image and personality.
• Assess how personality development and socialization influence each other.

3.3 investigate the relationship between socialization and the process of human learning
• Examine various theories of human learning (e.g., Piaget’s Cognitive Development Theory,
Erikson`s Psychological Development, Kohlberg’s Moral Development Theory, and Gilligan’s
Theory on Gender and Moral Development.
• Evaluate various theories of human learning (e.g., Piaget’s Cognitive Development Theory,
Erikson`s Psychological Development, Kohlberg’s Moral Development Theory, and Gilligan’s
Theory on Gender and Moral Development.
• Formulate a hypothesis as to which theory(ies) of human learning best characterize their
learning.
• Assess how human learning and socialization influence each other.

3.4 investigate a social issue that serves as a good example of socialization and related concepts
• Examine the relationship between the process of socialization and the issue.
• Assess the relationship between personality development and the issue.
• Analyze the relationship between human learning and the issue.
• Formulate and support a hypothesis related to the issue.



Philosophy types and how demonstrated:

(In all cases this field of philosophy is examined partially through class discussion. In class discussion
students will be coached to consider their arguments, express their thoughts, organize their thinking, and
clarify any points which may not be immediately clear. During Discussion students will not be asked to
repeat their statements as other students will be expected to be ready to hear and respond. Teacher
directed comments will need to be designed to facilitate thinking – to comment on the relevance or clarity of
the thought and not the quality of the content.)

Philosophy      Applied Meaning/Question Types                        Demonstrated by/with/through
Encountered
Ethics          Ethics examines the concept of morality as well       Class Discussion, creation of a
                as behaviour –What is good behaviour? Why do          moral gallery entry, examination of
                we do good things?                                    their duties under a social
                                                                      contract, consideration of the
                                                                      costs of breaking the social
                                                                      contract on either end
Aesthetics      Aesthetics examines questions of beauty and           Class discussion, creation of a
                appearance – How important is appearance in           moral gallery entry
                society? What makes something important?
                How does the look of a piece of art to engage or
                the sound of music affect your willingness to
                listen?
Axiology        Axiology concerns itself with the examination of      Class discussion, consideration of
                value – How do we know what is important? Can         the agents of socialization, moral
                one person be more important than another? Do         gallery interview, review of the
                your rights have more value than someone in a         social contract
                prison or jail?
Ontology        Some would consider this the “P” philosophy.          Class discussion, research
                This field examines questions of being and            building into the moral gallery,
                existence – Why do we have societies? Why do          examining the social contract
                we have the need to fit into them?
Logic           Logic is the umbrella term for thinking with          Class discussion, exploration of
                clarity. A student studies logic when they            the school code of conduct,
                examine their thinking for clarity and progression    examination and deconstruction of
                – If the state breaks their social contract with me   the social contract
                am I entitled to break my contract with the state?

Context:

Through examination of philosophical concepts we will examine what makes us a society and what controls
us. Ultimately I will ask the students how they become members of a society and guide them to the concept
that they actively make the decision to become members of a group to gain acceptance but by doing so
they agree to a social contract. That contract being that there are specific rules and regulations they buy
into and agree to uphold and in response they get the benefits of belonging to a social group. The questions
then beg to get asked about what those benefits are and at what cost do they come.

The learning context of these lessons is in a Sociology 12 class with an outcomes based planning,
assessment and evaluation approach. Hence each lesson will be constructed around not only the outcomes
of the lessons but how students can think about the outcomes. The goals will be not only to cover the
outcomes but to assist students in developing their thinking about the society in which they live.

Although the following quote was an inspiration for this unit it may not figure into the final product. When I
think about how students will work with and process information it will be a factor. However, I do not feel it is
necessary to deconstruct this quote to achieve the end product.

"By a divine paradox, wherever there is one slave there are two. So in the wonderful reciprocities of being,
we can never reach the higher levels until all our fellows ascend with us." - Edwin Markham

Resources/Materials Required:

       Overhead machine
       Blank transparencies
       Overhead marking pens
       Photocopier for transparencies
       Student Access to the Internet (High speed)
       Copies of Appendices as required on transparency or as student handouts
       Basic art supplies
       A display place other than a classroom with minimum supervision
       Access to a computer lab or lap top rolling lab
Appendices (Listed in Order):

    A.   A New Student
    B.   Socialization and Agents of Socialization/Civilization
    C.   Student Sheets – Student Interview Sheet Moral Gallery
    D.   The Social Contract
    E.   Discussion Cards
    F.   Student Response Sheet – Behind the Scenes Ottawa County Jail: Breaking the Social Contract
    G.   Considering the Theories
    H.   Celebrity Articles
    I.   Star Power Summative Assessment
    J.   Moral Gallery Evaluation Guide

Summative Assessments

    o    Star Power
    o    Moral Gallery
Assessment & Evaluation:

Assessment of their learning will take place in terms of an outcomes based approach. They understand
assessment to be the review and feedback required to gauge their own learning and performance with
teacher feedback. They work with the term evaluation to mean a final product being graded and used to
determine a grade in the course.

Usually a number of evaluations will occur after the delivery of lesson material and in a separate section we
call “Application.” In order to gauge they are understanding outcomes and material a number of
assessments or formative assessments will combine with one evaluation or summative assessment.
Following delivery of this unit of lessons will be a series of evaluations or summative assessments.

Optional Start to Unit – Active Listening Role Play


Complete an “Active Listening Role Play” with students so they are aware of how to be an active listener in
discussions. Have the Active Listening template (Optional Appendix) on the screen. Ask for a volunteer to
type class responses and a volunteer to tell a story. Tell the volunteer that you will go through a few
different versions of the story and each time you will react in a different way. Ask the student to bear with
this and that you appreciate the efforts. During the first telling of the story the teacher will be distracted,
using earphones, and rustling paper. Ask students why this was or was not using active listening. On the
next trial the teacher will demonstrate some of the qualities brought forth by the students as good qualities
for active listening but there will still be some faults. On the third telling of the story the teacher will
demonstrate active listening by summarizing, making eye contact, using appropriate volume, asking
questions, and appropriate body language. Student responses to the questions will need to be sorted into
Active Listening: Looks Like, Sounds Like and Feels Like. Therefore when you examine student responses
ask them to think of how to respond to the columns to change the actions of the listener.)
Lesson 1: Defining the Process

Outcomes: By the end of this lesson students will…                                Philosophical Concepts:
3.1 explain the process of socialization                                          Ethics, Ontology, Axiology
• Define socialization.
• Identify various agents of socialization (e.g., media, family, peers,
education, religion, work)
and describe their role in the socialization process.
• Relate the impact of agents of socialization to their behaviour and
own socialization.


Resources:
http://wapedia.mobi/en/Socialization
http://www.yourdictionary.com/medical/socialization

Materials:
Appendix A: A New Student (Student Handouts)
Appendix B: Socialization and Agents of Civilization (Transparency)
Blank transparency
Overhead markers (two different colours)

Procedure:
Give students handout sheet of “A New Student”. Students are to read the material in groups of four and
decide which of the students would be more likely to be accepted at our school. For each student the
groups will need to make a list of the attributes they feel are positive or good traits and a list of attributes
they feel would be negative or bad traits.

Ask students then to share their lists. When they do ask each group to clarify why they choose specific traits
as “good” or “bad”. Also ask students about how they decided to define the traits. What set of rules did they
use to define good or bad traits?

Get large group of students back together. Ask students how they defined the good or bad traits. Also ask
students who helped them create this idea? Who helped them refine what were good traits to have and
what were not? Take a blank overhead sheet and draw a line to separate the sheet in half. On the top half
write “WHAT” and on the bottom write “HOW”. On the half that states “WHAT” brainstorm a list of what the
students did that would make them accepted or not accepted. On the half that states “HOW” derive with
students a list of influences the new students had on their lives that made them act the way they did. Write
all the WHAT entries in one color and all the HOW entries in another. After they have the completed list
write the word SOCIALIZATION on the what half and the words AGENTS OF SOCIALIZATION on the
second. Ask if anyone knows given the examples we derived of these ideas if they can define these words.
Help them through asking questions to pull out ideas if they are not clear.

Ask students to reflect personally on the questions posed in Appendix B. Start the next class with a review
of their reflections.
                                       Lesson 2: Moral Compass

Outcomes: By the end of this lesson students will…                  Philosophical Concepts:
3.1 explain the process of socialization                            Ethics (morality), aesthetics,
• Define socialization.                                             ontology
• Identify various agents of socialization (e.g., media, family,
peers, education, religion, work)
and describe their role in the socialization process.
• Relate the impact of agents of socialization to their behaviour
and own socialization.
3.2 investigate the relationship between socialization and the
development of individual personality
• Examine the roles of nature and nurture in the socialization
process.
• Analyze major theories of personality development (e.g.,
Freud’s Psychosexual Theory,
Erikson’s Psychosocial Development, Cooley and Mead’s
Symbolic Interactionist theories).
• Identify connections between society and the development of
self-image and personality.
• Assess how personality development and socialization
influence each other.


Resources:
http://classics.mit.edu/Plato/republic.html
http://www.bookrags.com/notes/rep/TOP3.html
http://plato.stanford.edu/
http://caae.phil.cmu.edu/cavalier/80130/part1/sect4/Hobbes.html
http://www.tameri.com/csw/exist/kierkegaard.shtml
http://www.dalailama.com/page.166.htm

Materials:

My Website – hrsbstaff.ednet.ns.ca/jwelcher
Lap top lab/access to the internet
LCD Projector
Optional Appendix: Active Listening Template

Procedure:


Ask students what makes us generally act in ways that are good or helpful to humanity? Are we helpful for
the reason of being helpful to each other or do we act to make our own situations better? Ask students what
makes them the people they are? Ask if they are influenced by their friends, teachers, family…? Then ask
students about religion. Does a person have to be religious to be a moral person?

Ask students to go to my website and find the link “Exploration of Morality”. Then ask students to complete
the questions.


Once completed ask students to bring their information back to class and review the answers as a group. A
completed webquest and answer guide will appear as a link on the website after the students have
completed the web exploration in class. Review this information and the questions as a group using an LCD
and computer to type the answers as required.
                                      Lesson 3: The Social Contract

Outcomes: By the end of this lesson students will…                     Philosophical Concepts:
3.4 investigate a social issue that serves as a good example of        Ethics, axiology
socialization and related concepts
• Examine the relationship between the process of socialization
and the issue.
• Assess the relationship between personality development and
the issue.
• Analyze the relationship between human learning and the
issue.
• Formulate and support a hypothesis related to the issue.




Resources:
http://www.elliotcross.com/glossary.html

Materials:
Appendix D: Social Contract (Student Handout)

Procedure:

Put a blank overhead sheet up and split the page in three. First put a line horizontally across the page then
spilt the top half in half vertically. On the left side write the word constraints. On the right write the word
consequences. Ask students what they expect to get out of school – what are the benefits of staying in
school. Ask students about what the consequences would be of not staying in school for any reason write
those consequences on the right. On the bottom half write the word boundaries. Under this section ask
students about what behaviours they cannot do while they are in school and what would happen as a result.

State to students that as long as they decide to follow what is expected of them while they are in the school,
they are accepted as part of the community and can expect the advantages of being in the community. Or,
put in another way they agree to conform to the rules placed on them and get to participate in education
and reap the rewards later. Tell students – this is a social contract. You are agreeing to conform to what is
asked of you in order to gain the rewards of belonging to a group.

Have students read the definition of a social contract from Appendix D: The Social Contract.

Formative Assessment:

Break students into groups of 4. Give each group a circumstance and ask them to identify what the
individual gives up and what they get in return. The final question each group will need to answer is if this
exchange is fair. Review the answers with the class.

Ask students if they think the concept of a social contract is valid. Is it true that we enter into a social
contract? In the case of school – does it pay off or is it unfair?
                                Lesson 4: The Social Contact - Is it fair?

Outcomes: By the end of this lesson students will…                    Philosophical Concepts:
3.4 investigate a social issue that serves as a good example of       Ethics, logic, ontology
socialization and related concepts
• Examine the relationship between the process of socialization
and the issue.
• Assess the relationship between personality development and
the issue.
• Analyze the relationship between human learning and the
issue.
• Formulate and support a hypothesis related to the issue.




Resources:
Article from class

Materials:
Appendix E: Discussion Cards (Laminate and cut)
My website link You and the Law
Lab Top Lab


Procedure:

Review Social Contacts with the class. Give a social contract analysis sheet to everyone. Ask them to pick
one of a list of social contracts on the board and complete an analysis sheet. Walk around the class

Start by telling the class that each person will get a discussion card. In order to talk they must fulfill one of
two conditions. The first is that they are the first person answering a question. The second is that they are
cashing in a card. That means they hold up their card and I come with a container and collect their card.
Once they have used their card or answered a question they are finished. Read all of the cards to students
and explain their meaning. The goal is for everyone in the class to speak at least once and everyone in the
class to use their cards. Decide with the class our reward if they complete this task.

But first we have some research to do so we can speak intelligently. Ask students to go to my website and
to the link for You and the Law. There students will be asked to think about various scenarios and answer
two questions for each. 1) What is legal? 2) What is fair?

Give the discussion cards to the students. Review the research with the class after completion. In each
case ask for their answers. What do they think about the laws of Canada? If any feel like sharing ask if they
have ever felt unfairly treated by authority or if they feel our laws are too harsh. Discuss their stories.

After discussion is completed review the status of our agreement. Did they realize they were entering a
social contract with me only ours was clearly stated? What do they think of our status? Do we deserve our
reward? How would they feel if I decided to not complete my end of the contract?
                                     Lesson 5: Breaking the Contract

Outcomes: By the end of this lesson students will…                                     Philosophical Concepts
3.1 explain the process of socialization                                               Ethics, logic
• Define socialization.
• Identify various agents of socialization (e.g., media, family, peers,
education, religion, work)
and describe their role in the socialization process.
• Relate the impact of agents of socialization to their behaviour and own
socialization.
3.4 investigate a social issue that serves as a good example of
socialization and related concepts
• Examine the relationship between the process of socialization and the
issue.
• Assess the relationship between personality development and the
issue.
• Analyze the relationship between human learning and the issue.
• Formulate and support a hypothesis related to the issue.



Materials:
School Codes of Conduct (Available in their Agendas)
LCD (Show Behind the Scenes Ottawa County Jail) {Available http://vimeo.com/1111400}

Procedure:
Ask students: think back to when we negotiated our contract for discussion. What would you do if I did not
follow through? Would you trust me again? What if I lied about my intention to follow through? What if I lied
about anything to you such as grades or school procedures?

After some discussion ask students what they could do if they felt I did lie. What action could they take?
Ultimately one will say that they could approach administration. When that comes ask them what would
happen if I lied to administration when it came to them and made myself seem innocent? Who has power in
this case?

Ask students to think of another situation. Ask students what would happen if they broke school rules? Ask
students what kinds of consequences can happen for items listed under Level 3. Basically get to that if
Codes of Conduct continue to be broken then they will not be a student at the school.

A key point here is that if a social institution breaks the social contract then there is little they can do – they
may not have power to change this situation. If it is them that breaks the social contract they are removed
from the social institution or even from the society.

Remind students about the sheet they received asking them to think about what would happen to someone
who has shown they cannot or will not follow the rules. What does happen to people who continue to break
the laws of society. Show the video – Behind the Scenes Ottawa County Jail.

Formative Assessment:

Have students complete Appendix F: Response Sheet and hand in.
                                   Lesson 6: The Human Animal

Outcomes: By the end of this lesson students will…                             Philosophical Concepts:
3.3 investigate the relationship between socialization and the                 Ethics, Ontology, Axiology
process of human learning
• Examine various theories of human learning (e.g., Piaget’s
Cognitive Development Theory,
Erikson`s Psychological Development, Kohlberg’s Moral
Development Theory, and Gilligan’s
Theory on Gender and Moral Development.
• Evaluate various theories of human learning (e.g., Piaget’s
Cognitive Development Theory,
Erikson`s Psychological Development, Kohlberg’s Moral
Development Theory, and Gilligan’s
Theory on Gender and Moral Development.
• Formulate a hypothesis as to which theory(ies) of human learning
best characterize their
learning.
• Assess how human learning and socialization influence each other.


Materials:

Internet access
Printer

Procedure:

- Ask students to think of an animal that is relatively weak, loud when scared or stressed, unable to control
instincts, little tolerance for heat and cold, and tends to need to eat more often than required, the female of
the species has a longer than normal birthing process and tends to live in groups. Then ask students to
attempt to guess the animal. After they guess humans brainstorm on overhead all that they know about how
humans grow and change over time.

- Break students into 6 groups randomly by giving each person a picture of a theorist of learning and
socialization. Their picture and name will serve as the person they are to study. Ask each group to create a
one page primer on their theorist. They may include graphics, print, or images but must include information
on their theorist on one page that will go to the rest of the class. This will serve as the class notes on that
theorist. Students are to go to wikipedia.com and look up their theorist as a starting point. However, they
may not use the information directly from that page for their primers. They may use this information to get a
better idea about what to look for and where to look for information when they refine their searches.

- Once completed collect from students and review the primers. Once validated for information give each
student in the class a copy of the primers they do not have. These will be their notes on the theorists.

- Each primer must include their names, the names of the theorists, the key theory, some sort of picture or
graphic and a citation.

- Students will need to know how to do a bibliography reference or know where to access easybib or bibme.


Group        Theorist and main area of concern
1            Piaget – Cognitive Development Theory
2            Vigotsky – Zones of Proximal Development
3            Erikson – Stages of Psychosocial Development
4            Kohlberg – Stages of Moral Development
5         Carole Gilligan - Theory on Gender and Moral Development
6         Bowlby – Attachment Theory

- Review the sheets with the students the next class
The Theories at Play

Outcomes: By the end of this lesson students will…                             Philosophical Concepts:
3.3 investigate the relationship between socialization and the                 Ethics, Ontology, Aesthetics
process of human learning
• Examine various theories of human learning (e.g., Piaget’s
Cognitive Development Theory,
Erikson`s Psychological Development, Kohlberg’s Moral
Development Theory, and Gilligan’s
Theory on Gender and Moral Development.
• Evaluate various theories of human learning (e.g., Piaget’s
Cognitive Development Theory,
Erikson`s Psychological Development, Kohlberg’s Moral
Development Theory, and Gilligan’s
Theory on Gender and Moral Development.
• Formulate a hypothesis as to which theory(ies) of human learning
best characterize their learning.
• Assess how human learning and socialization influence each other.



Materials & Resources:

    -   Student Handout (Considering the Theories)
    -   Student Handout (Celebrity Article)
    -   Student Handout (Star Power: Examining Celebrity Behaviour) (Summative Assessment)
    -   One Page Primers

Procedure:

- Ask students to get out their one page primers

- Quick write – 5 minutes and will be collected – During their 5 minute quick write ask students to answer
the following question – Which of the theorists we studied seems to make the most sense? Why do you
think so?

- Once completed have students pair to share their answers then collect for formative feedback.

- Give out Student Handout (Looking at the theories) and ask them to complete. Review the answers. Have
students hand them in for formative feedback

- Break students into groups of 4 and give each group a different article. Groups are formed for
collaboration and sharing of the articles only. Each article contains something the celebrity did or did not do
which may not make them a positive role model, or may contain an example of a celebrity acting in a way
that we see is positive for themselves or the community. Students will be asked to complete a “Star Power”
moral reflection sheet on the celebrity. Students will pass in their individual efforts for evaluation.
                          Lesson 7 Summative Evaluation: The Moral Gallery

Outcomes:

Upon completion of this unit, students should be able to:

 Demonstrate an understanding for evaluating the theories of socialization,
learning, and personality development.
 Explore social sanctions as identified in Canadian society.
 Reflect on their own personality development and learning.
 Identify agents of socialization

Materials:

Access to the internet
Access to art materials
Access to working space
Access to display space
Moral Gallery Powerpoint
Moral Gallery Student Exemplars (Powerpiont)
Copies of the student sheets for the Moral Gallery
Copies of the student interview sheets for the moral gallery

Cautions:

There are some issues to work through in this evaluation. The first is that it does take some logistical
organization to get the space to showcase the work of your students. If you have the room within your
classroom this will work. Alternative spaces could include a science lab, library, or art room.

Another issue is the nature of socialization. Throughout sociology an in particular in socialization we deal
with some controversial and potentially sensitive subjects. We do not know who in our classes may be
deeply touched by religion, who may have been the victim of sexual assaults, who is not heterosexual, who
is an aggressor… Therefore it is important to have established an atmosphere of mutual respect and
collaboration amongst the students and with the students.

Also, since this is not a traditional method of evaluation I would advise discussing this idea with your
administration/Department Head. They may be able to assist with resources or simply appreciate knowing
what is happening in the building. The administration may even want to attend the gallery exhibition.

Time Required:

This will take one class period to explore the concept with the class and derive the indicators of mastery.
Students should also be provided with two classes to work on their products and one additional class for
display. There should be a space of at least one full week between the completion of class time for working
and the display. It will take at least 30 minutes to set up the gallery. The remainder of the class should be
used to display the gallery and complete student interviews. Marking of the student pieces is fairly quick as
the logistics of outcomes based assessments allows for viewing of the piece, reflection, then evaluation
based on outcomes for sociology and not on artistic talent or technique.




Procedure:
Ask students to think for a minute about how they became the person they are. Ask students to take out a
piece of paper and complete a quick write (a sustained piece of writing) for 5 minutes about how they
became who they were. If students appear to not understand ask students to think about what were the
most important lessons they learned about life and how did they learn them. Ask students to then complete
the quick write.

After the quick write ask students for volunteers to share. Then ask students to form pairs or even trios then
ask students to read their pieces to each other. Once completed ask students to name the agents of
socialization. By now they should be able to do this from memory. If not tell them they may flip through their
notes then name the agents of socialization. Remind students that each one plays a role in forming who we
become in some way. Tell students that they will create a piece to show people what it means to be a
“good” person and how they become a “good” citizen.

Review the “Moral Gallery” Powerpoint presentation and use it as a vehicle to discuss what is morality and
what is the role of art in expressing morality. There are question prompts and samples to assist. After this
review the “Moral Gallery Examplar Powerpoint”. Then use the student handout for the Moral Gallery and
derive the Indicators of Mastery with the students. Basically these are the elements they will show in their
work in order to receive a perfect mark on that outcome.

Once you have chosen the exhibition date ask the students to complete posters and invitations. Once the
invitations are completed place one in each mailbox in the staff room and to each of the administration. By
asking the students to make one invitation and one poster each you are cutting down your work and
increasing their ownership of the event. Ask two or three students to post the one page posters through the
school depending on your school’s policy about flyers.
                                   Appendix A: A New Student

J.P.

J.P. came to Sackville High from the southern United States. He lived in a small town in Mississippi and he
went to a high school that had students coming from several towns. He played football and was the starting
quarterback. J.P. was known for two things – football and girls. He could date any girl he wanted and did
not like to date the same girl more than twice. He had several “good buds” and would often be with them. If
one of his friends was dating someone he wanted he would go after the girl and if she went with him, he felt
that it was not his fault, he could not make them do anything they did not want.

Loma

Loma came to Sackville High from New York City. Her high school specialized in maths and sciences and
she was one of the top students. She had a fair bit of money and often wore the best clothes. She casually
dated a few people but did not seem to get serious with anyone. She laughed easily and liked to have fun,
even if it was at the expense of someone else. Loma is not athletic but she is thin and makes oinking noises
at her friends if they eat more than she does.

Mike

Mike came to Sackville High from Ireland. His family had to leave their town because they were catholic and
lived in a mostly protestant area. They had family here in Canada so they decided to emigrate. He is
devoutly religious and would never take any action that would be looked at badly in the eyes of God. He
gets good grades and attends all classes. His family has enough money to get by but there is not much
extra so he cannot afford to buy food in the cafeteria nor can he get a locker so he always has his books
with him. He has dated before but is afraid to get serious about someone in case he decides to join the
seminary.

Gwendolyn

Gwendolyn came to Sackville High from Australia. She learned to surf at a young age and loves the ocean.
She has a tattoo of waves above her ankle and has tones of pictures of surfing in her locker. She likes fast
cars and eating her new favorite food – poutine. She dates occasionally but has not found anyone serious
yet. She has dated other girls as well as guys but decides not to talk about her sexuality. She will not hide
who she is seeing but it is her business and will not advertise. She has a few bad habits such as swearing
often and telling people when they get on her nerves. Her favorite method of this is to “flip them the bird”
then walk away.
                     Appendix B:
             Socialization and Agents of
              Socialization/Civilization

Socialization: The process of learning interpersonal
and communication skills that are in conformity with
the values of one's society.

Agents of socialization/civilization: The people,
groups, agencies, and institutions that help shape our
ideas, thoughts, beliefs, and behaviour.

Examples include:
 1. Mass Media
 2. Family
 3. Peer groups
 4. Religion
 5. Government
 6. Educational Institutions
                Time for Personal Reflection:

Take a piece of paper and fold it in half. On one half
answer the first question and on the second answer
the second.

  1. Rank each of the agents of civilization from one
     to six in order of their importance in your life.

  2. How do each one of these influence your
     personal ideas, thoughts, beliefs and behaviour?

Something to think about:

Does this mean there are different
agents of socialization in different
places? What if those places are in
the same society? Would the rules
have to be different for people
who have shown they cannot
follow the rules?
                               Appendix C: Student Sheet Moral Gallery

Outcomes                            Indicators of Mastery               Comments
 Demonstrate an understanding
for evaluating the theories of
socialization, learning, and
personality development.
 Explore social sanctions as
identified in Canadian society.

Reflect on their own personality
development and learning.

Identify agents of socialization



Use this sheet in combination with the PowerPoint we reviewed about
our Moral Gallery. When we think about a moral gallery we should be
thinking of two things. First, the purpose of a gallery is to have a place
where people can view and interact with pieces of art, literature or music.
The second is that your pieces must have a message – in this case your
message is about socialization. How do we become who we are? How
did I become who I am? What went into our social education?

You are invited to put a piece in our gallery. We will take some time to
organize and set up our gallery. Then we will review our gallery for
ourselves then we will invite others to our gallery over a lunch period.
You do not have to be there – I will be there to watch our gallery and
help others experience it. However if you feel you would like to be there
to assist others with viewing our gallery or if you feel that you would just
like to be in attendance please feel free to attend and engage as much or
as little as you like. By attending over lunch you will give me another
opportunity to assess and evaluate your understanding of the outcomes.

As far as evaluation is concerned your grade will come from how well your piece and involvement shows
your understanding of the outcomes.

To complete this gallery we will review the PowerPoint together, review exemplars, discuss this sheet,
review and derive the indicators of mastery then have time in the library for research and decision making.
Then the items will be due two days before the gallery. Then we will prepare for the gallery and hold the
gallery the next day.

As a group we agree to have the pieces completed by ______________________.

                              To complete this assignment you need:

Item                                                  Completed by:
Invitation
Poster
First Draft
Final Draft
Set-up
                        Appendix C: Student Interview Sheet Moral Gallery

Please place a * next to your name.

Group Member 1                     Group Member 2                   Group Member 3


Please ask the person you are to interview the questions below and record their answers. You may not
challenge a person’s answer. Your role is to record their answers and to ask for clarification only.

Member 1 will interview member 2. Member 2 will interview member 3. Member 3 will interview member 1.

1. Before the moral gallery what did you think about why people decide to do good things?




2. What did you create for the gallery?




3. What did you hope to teach people about being a good person?




4. Now that we have had the gallery, do you still think the way you did before the gallery about why
we act the way we do? Why do people do good things?




Notes/Additional Comments:
                                     Appendix D: The Social Contract

Social Contract: A theory on how government and societies began. “Contractarians” hold that societies
were formed by the consent of the populations of various areas who decided, for whatever reasons (these
vary from philosopher to philosopher) that it would be to their mutual advantage to band together and
cooperate.

Below are types of social contracts to which you belong at some point or another. With your group create a
list of the benefits and costs of being a member of these groups. We will review this as a class.

Group 1: Your family
                                                        Group 5: Your        extra-curricular     activities
As part of a         family   what    are     your      (teams, clubs…)
responsibilities?
                                                        As a member of this group, what are your
What do you get in return for being part of a           responsibilities?
family?
                                                        What do you get in return for being a part of
Is this a fair exchange?                                this group?

Group 2: Your part time job                             Is this a fair exchange?

As a part time employee what are your                   Group 6: Your music
responsibilities?
                                                        As a fan of a particular artist, what are your
What do you get in return for being a part time         responsibilities?
employee?
                                                        What do you get in return for your loyalty?
Is this a fair exchange?
                                                        Is this a fair exchange?
Group 3: Your friends
                                                        Group 7: Your pets
As a friend what are your responsibilities?
                                                        As   a     pet    parent,   what        are   your
What do you get in return for your friendship?          responsibilities?

Is this a fair exchange?                                What do get in return for taking care of a pet?

Group 4: Your “other half”                              Is this a fair exchange?

As a member of a relationship, what are your            Group 8: Your interactions with police
responsibilities?
                                                        As a person who is interacting with the police,
What do you get in return for your membership           what are your responsibilities?
in the relationship?
                                                        What do you get in return for interacting with
Is this a fair exchange?                                the police?

                                                        Is this a fair exchange?
                                Appendix E: Discussion Cards

Ask someone for                 Ask someone for                 Ask someone for
clarification of their point.   clarification of their point.   clarification of their point.
Ask someone what they           Ask someone what they           Ask someone what they
think who has not spoken        think who has not spoken        think who has not spoken
yet.                            yet.                            yet.
Ask someone a question          Ask someone a question          Ask someone a question
about their point of view.      about their point of view.      about their point of view.
Ask someone a question          Ask someone a question          Ask someone a question
who you feel will agree         who you feel will agree         who you feel will agree
with you.                       with you.                       with you.
Ask someone a question          Ask someone a question          Ask someone a question
who you feel will disagree      who you feel will disagree      who you feel will disagree
with you.                       with you.                       with you.
Ask someone to describe         Ask someone to describe         Ask someone to describe
a similar situation.            a similar situation.            a similar situation.
Ask someone to share a          Ask someone to share a          Ask someone to share a
personal story that is          personal story that is          personal story that is
similar. This story may be      similar. This story may be      similar. This story may be
truthful or made up.            truthful or made up.            truthful or made up.
Ask someone how they            Ask someone how they            Ask someone how they
would explain their             would explain their             would explain their
perspective to someone          perspective to someone          perspective to someone
not in the room.                not in the room.                not in the room.
Ask someone if a                Ask someone if a                Ask someone if a
musician, artist or actor       musician, artist or actor       musician, artist or actor
they know of has                they know of has                they know of has
portrayed a similar             portrayed a similar             portrayed a similar
situation                       situation                       situation
Ask someone if they read        Ask someone if they read        Ask someone if they read
something with a similar        something with a similar        something with a similar
perspective or situation.       perspective or situation.       perspective or situation.
What was it and what was        What was it and what was        What was it and what was
it about?                       it about?                       it about?
Ask someone what they           Ask someone what they           Ask someone what they
learned that was new in         learned that was new in         learned that was new in
this discussion so far.         this discussion so far.         this discussion so far.
           Appendix F: Student Response Sheet – Behind the Scenes Ottawa County Jail
                                  Breaking the Social Contract

Name:

Outcomes Covered:
  Demonstrate an understanding for evaluating the theories of socialization, learning, and
  personality development.
  Explore social sanctions as identified in Canadian society.
  Reflect on their own personality development and learning.
  Identify agents of socialization

To complete this assessment you need to see the film clip “Behind the Scenes: Ottawa County Jail”.
This clip is linked on my website. Answers can be on a piece of loose-leaf or on the back of this
sheet.

    1. Why does the person introducing the clip state “in this case you might not want to see it first
       hand”?

    2. What agents of socialization do you see here?

    3. Why would protecting the identity of inmates be important?

    4. What kinds of visitors are allowed private visits?

    5. How is the clientele described? Why does the correctional officer state that “…it is mentally a
       very taxing job at times…”?

    6. How much privacy does it look like an inmate would have?

    7. What was the difference between maximum security and general population? Why do you
       think there would be such a difference?

    8. Does the jail look like it would be a
       pleasant place to be? Why?

    9. What does the jail say about the threat of
       a person breaking the social contract?

    10. Does it seem like there is a separate kind
        of social contract within jail? Does it seem
        like there is another set of rules put in
        place for people after they break the
        contract with society?
                                      Appendix G: Considering the Theories

Complete the chart below. You may use your one page primers but please make sure your answers are your
own.

 Theorist         Theory                  Basic Premise                                Example
 Jean Piaget      Cognitive               All knowledge is constructed through         Jennifer needs to learn how to
                  Development Theory      schemas, what we can learn depends on        factor binomials in math. She
                                          our stage in life and what we are ready to   already knows how to multiply and
                                          know. People learn through                   she is at the concrete operational
                                          accommodation or assimilation. They          stage so she can memorize the
                                          absorb new information into already          procedure.
                                          existing schemas or they change their
                                          schemas to fit new information.
                  Zones of Proximal       This is apparently the difference between
                  Development             what a child can do independently or what
                                          a child can do with help.
 Erik Erikson                             In each stage of a person’s life there are
                                          conflicts. If the conflicts are resolved
                                          successfully, the stage is completed and a
                                          person can move on. If the conflict is not
                                          resolved successfully there may be too
                                          much resentment to really grow and learn
                                          as a functioning human being.
 Carol Gilligan                                                                        Michael and Joanne are children.
                                                                                       They both are playing with dolls and
                                                                                       action figures. Joanne is playing
                                                                                       mommy to the dolls and action
                                                                                       figures. Michael is fighting to save
                                                                                       the world from deceptacons.
                  Attachment Theory       An infant forms an attachment to a
                                          dependable care giver. They know someone
                                          will always be there for their needs when
                                          they are helpless. This forms a solid
                                          foundation for the rest of their lives.
                  Stages of Moral                                                      Jane and Cathy are volunteers.
                  Development                                                          Cathy volunteers at a cancer centre
                                                                                       because she read about the disease in
                                                                                       school and she can’t stand the idea
                                                                                       of people suffering like that. Jane
                                                                                       volunteers at a youth centre because
                                                                                       she has to – she got into a fight and
                                                                                       in order to come back to school
                                                                                       from her suspension she must give
                                                                                       community service hours.
                    Appendix H: Celebrity Articles

'I didn't mean to hit the guy'

June 7, 2005 - 5:39PM


Russell Crowe walks out of the 1st Precinct of the New
York      Police    Department       in      handcuffs.
Photo: Reuters

A remorseful Russell Crowe says all he wanted was a phone that worked so he
could ring his wife Danielle in Sydney.

But whether the phone the fiery Crowe threw in a trendy New York hotel hit a
wall, or a hotel worker's face, is now the subject of criminal charges that could
land the Oscar-winning actor in jail.

Crowe's degrading day began in a $US3,000 ($A3,925) a night suite in SoHo's
voguish Mercer Hotel at about 4am, when he attempted to call Danielle Spencer
at home in their Sydney apartment.

Hollywood's $US20 million man then spent six hours in a jail cell before being
handcuffed and paraded before news cameras like a prized catch on his way to a
New York court.

The day ended with Crowe in hiding and charged with assault in the second
degree and criminal possession of a weapon in the fourth degree.

The "dangerous or deadly instrument" cited by police was a faulty phone Crowe
unplugged from his suite, took down to The Mercer's sleek lobby and allegedly
threw at concierge, 28-year-old Nestor Estrada.

New York police allege the phone struck Estrada in the face, leaving him needing
stitches.

If found guilty of both charges, Crowe could spend up to eight years in prison
with killers, robbers and rapists.

What actually happened at 4.20am depends on who is talking.

Crowe, through his publicist Robin Baum, said Estrada was unhelpful when the
actor complained he could not make the long distance call to Sydney.

Crowe did throw a phone, but it hit a wall, not Estrada's face, Baum said.

"After asking the front desk several times to replace a faulty phone in his room -
and getting only attitude from the clerk on duty - Crowe brought the phone
down to the front desk in an effort to address the situation in person," Baum
said in a statement.

"Words were exchanged and Crowe wound up throwing the phone against the
wall. He regrets that he lost his temper, but at no time did he assault anyone or
touch any hotel employee."

Authorities view it differently.

"We have a strong case," Assistant District Attorney Chad Sjoquist said.

"This defendant is charged with hitting an employee of a hotel in the face with a
telephone. The defendant admitted throwing the phone."

Police said Crowe was sober and cooperative at the time of his arrest - one
officer described him as a perfect gentleman - although some reports say Crowe
used foul language.

"F*** me, I'm sorry," Crowe allegedly said to police, according to the New York
Daily News.

"I really didn't mean to hit the guy. I just wanted to get the f***ing phones to
work."

Crowe has a history of a bad temper, but he has been on his best behaviour the
past two weeks in the US while promoting his new film, Cinderella Man.

The 41-year-old revealed to reporters last week he used techniques to calm
himself down at times when he felt aggressive.

The techniques included "yoga or going for a walk or having a conversation
about a completely different subject matter".

According to the London Sun newspaper, Danielle Spencer's overheard reaction
to news of Crowe's arrest was: "No, not again, I told you I should have stayed. I
want you to fly back today."

After his arrest Crowe was taken from the hotel to a police jail cell in the
Manhattan suburb of Tribeca.

About six hours later - enough time for about 100 TV cameras, press
photographers, paparazzi and journalists to converge - Crowe was led out to a
waiting police car to take him to Manhattan's Criminal Courthouse.

Crowe's arms were handcuffed behind his back as a police officer guided him to
the waiting car.

Barricades were set up on either side of the walk to keep the media at a
distance.
Crowe, his eyes hidden by aviator-style sunglasses and his stern, emotionless
face covered in stubble, did manage to give his new film Cinderella Man a plug.

Throughout the ordeal he wore a blue jacket with the Cinderella Man logo - the
same jacket he wore when supporting friend Kostya Tszyu at his weekend world
title fight in Manchester.

In court Sjoquist asked Judge Martin Murphy to saddle Crowe with $US5,000
($A6,500) bail, but the judge allowed the actor to leave the court on his own
recognisance. Crowe will have to re-appear on September 14.

Crowe was taken to an undisclosed location.

A few hours later his belongings, including guitars, were removed from The
Mercer by acquaintances.

The incident, even excluding the charges and potential sentence, poses other
serious issues for Crowe.

Cinderella Man, a movie about 1930s working class hero heavyweight boxer
James Braddock that cost $US90 million ($A118 million) to make, had a
mediocre opening at the North American box office last weekend, finishing
fourth with $US18 million ($A24 million).

Box office experts predicted a long run in theatres, meaning a blockbuster
opening was not as important as other popcorn films.

But how will cinemagoers react now?

The charges and negative publicity could also damage Crowe's Oscar chances.

Before today he was thought to be a definite best actor nominee for his
portrayal of Braddock.

Many believe Crowe's unruly behaviour at the BAFTA Awards in London just prior
to the 2002 Oscar ceremony cost Crowe his second gold statuette for A Beautiful
Mind.

Crowe could also find himself facing a costly civil lawsuit from Estrada.
Christian Bale's Blowup Proves Actor's Anger
Problem
'Terminator' Outburst Shines Light on Dark Side
of 'Dark Knight' Star


                                 By LUCHINA FISHER
Feb. 4, 2009

It's no act: Christian Bale is one angry man. Christian
Bale's blowup may be a sign of major issues.

(Akihiro I/Getty Images)
More Photos

A recording of the "Dark Knight" star's four-minute F-word-laced tirade on the set of his
upcoming film "Terminator Salvation" surfaced on the Internet Tuesday.

For many the tape was proof that the oft-described intense actor, who was arrested in July for
allegedly assaulting his mother and sister, has an anger problem.

"There was a lot of mystery around that moment," US Weekly senior editor Bradley Jacobs said
about the arrest. "Now we have a little more of a window of understanding into Christian Bale."

Bale's rant took place a few days after his arrest in London, where he was questioned and
released by police after his mother, Jenny, and sister, Sharon, lodged a complaint against him.
No charges were filed and it's unclear what actually happened, though there were reports of a
heated argument that may have ended with Bale shoving one of the women.

"This is the second incident within a year in which he's blowing up at people," Jacobs told
ABCNews.com. "The difference this time was we actually got to hear it ourselves. It went on and
on and on. This was not just a moment of raising your voice. This was a four-minute tirade. He
was scary and intimidating."

Bale's rep did not respond to questions from ABCNews.com about the incident.

The actor was shooting a scene with actress Bryce Dallas Howard when Shane Hurlbut, the
film's director of photography, accidentally walked on set, touching off the maelstrom.

Bale went ballistic, threatening to kick Hurlbut's "a--" and even get him fired. "I want you off the f-
--ing set, you p----," he shouted at Hurlbut.
When Hurlbut apologized, Bale brushed it off with, "No don't just be sorry. Think for one f---ing
second. …Am I going to walk around and rip your f---ing lights down in the middle of the scene?
...Do you have any f---ing idea about it's f---ing distracting? Give me a f---ing answer."

When Hurlbut did try to answer him, it only enraged Bale more.

"Why are you trashing my scene?" Bale screamed at him.

"I'm not trashing your scene," Hurlbut responded.

"You are trashing my scene. You do it one more f---ing time and I ain't walking on this set if
you're still hired. You're a nice guy. But that don't f---ing cut it."

The director, who goes by McG, was on the set during the rant, though it's not clear if he saw
what precipitated it. He did, however, come to Bale's defense after his arrest in July. Singing the
actor's praises for his on-set behavior to US Weekly, McG said: "Christian sets an excellent
example in that way. Just for the record, he is a big-hearted, good guy. I've worked with a lot of
people, and that's just simply who he is. He loves his wife. He loves his child." Reps for McG
and Hurlbut did not respond to requests for comment from ABCNews.com. On Monday, the
"Terminator's" assistant director Bruce Franklin defended Bale in an interview with E!. He called
the actor a "consummate professional" and chalked up the latest outburst to being interrupted in
the middle of an emotional scene. “He didn't walk around like that all day long. It was just a
moment and it passed," Franklin told E!. "I think someone is begging to make some noise about
this, but I don't think it's fair. The art of acting is not paint by numbers, it's an art form." Therapist
and anger expert Richard Driscoll believes Bale's commitment to artistry accounts for the
extremeness of his outburst. "Once he started he could very well have gotten into the artistry
and the craft of what he was doing," Driscoll told ABCNews.com. "He's not doing a wussy
complaint. He's doing a full-fledged exemplary headline-news tantrum. He's reaming this fella out
at great length and with extreme passion." Harrison Cheung, who worked for Bale for many
years as an assistant, told Britain's Daily Mail newspaper that the actor had a hair-trigger temper
for as long as he knew him and that his family catered to him. "Everything was about keeping
Christian happy because he was the meal ticket," Cheung said. "If something wasn't just so,
Christian would just erupt. He would yell until he was red in the face. It was very intimidating."
Denise Richards Calls Laptop Toss a
'Big Mistake'
By Christine Kilpatrick
Update Saturday November 11, 2006 02:15 PM EST Originally posted Friday November 10, 2006 07:00 PM EST



                                   Denise Richards

                                   BAUER-GRIFFIN

                                   Denise Richards says she made a "big mistake" when she tossed a
                                   photographer's laptop computer off a balcony on a Canadian movie
                                   set, but the actress will not face criminal charges in the incident.

                                   "I am not justifying my behavior. It was wrong," Richards tells Access
                                   Hollywood in an exclusive interview airing Monday. "I saw one of the
                                   photographers, went up to him and offered to give him a few nice shots
                                   and asked him to please leave so we can focus on our scene. He
                                   wouldn't and he got really belligerent and he was saying vulgar, nasty
                                   things to me and made a derogatory remark about my family. I just did
what I did and I feel terrible."

Richards admits hurling a computer on the set of her new movie Blonde and Blonder at the River
Rock Casino and Hotel in Richmond, British Columbia, a suburb of Vancouver, but says it did not
strike an 80-year-old woman in a wheelchair and it was only one laptop, not two as reported earlier.

"Over the balcony it went," she tells Access Hollywood. "It was a big mistake on my part … I'm not
volatile at all. I'm not aggressive. I've never been with the paparazzi. I feel bad that I ended up doing
that."

On Friday, Canadian police said Richards won't face charges in the incident.

"The photographers, Denise Richards and her management company have agreed to settle the
matter civilly regarding the damages to the photographers' laptops," Cpl. Peter Thiessen, a media-
relations officer for the Richmond Royal Canadian Mounted Police, said in a statement. "It is not in
the public interest to forward criminal charges regarding this matter."

Still, the movie production company for Blonde and Blonder, which also stars Pamela Anderson, said
in a statement Thursday that "a number of unauthorized persons entered the film set and began
harrassing members of the cast." Richards and cast members were "very upset" about the incident,
which stopped filming for an hour, Howard Blank, a representative of the production, said.

A rep for Richards told PEOPLE, "Based on the actions of the paparazzi, they are lucky their laptops
are the only things that were tossed over the balcony."
Kanye West's
interruption of Taylor
Swift award speech
storyline of MTV Video
Music Awards
BY Jim Farber
DAILY NEWS MUSIC CRITIC

Updated Monday, September 14th 2009, 4:02 PM

Polk/GettyKanye West stunned the crowd when he told Taylor Swift that Beyoncé deserved Best Female
Video instead.


And the MTV Music Award for "Worst Behaved Artist of the Night" goes to...
Kanye West.

Pop's most famous bad sport stormed the Radio City stage Sunday night at the MTV
Video Music Awards to interrupt country teen queen Taylor Swift as she was
accepting her award for Best Female Video.

West boorishly declared that another singer in the category should have won.

"I'm sorry," said West, "but Beyoncé had one of the best videos of all time."

Swift looked shaken on stage and a source said she cried backstage.

The crowd booed West then, and it did so again later in the night when Diddy
mentioned West's name before handing out the moon man for Best Male Video.

In a rare display of contrition, West later apologized on his blog. "I'M SOOOOO SORRY TO
TAYLOR SWIFT AND HER FANS AND HER MOM," West
wrote.

Beyoncé had her revenge toward the night's close, when she won "Video of the
Year" for the clip "Single Ladies."

Showing all the class Kanye lacked, she said, "I'd like Taylor to come out and have
her moment."

"Let's try this again," Swift joked.

Beyoncé had come into the show tied with Lady Gaga for the most nominations - nine.

However rude West's intrusion may have been, it suited the controversy the VMAs
openly crave.
Sean Penn's Latest
Role: Haiti Relief
Worker
by Katia Riddle
March 23, 2010



Enlarge Sophia Paris/MINUSTAH via Getty Images
In this image provided by the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti, U.N.
Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon greets Sean Penn as he visits a tent camp at the
Petionville Club golf course in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, on March 14.

Sophia Paris/MINUSTAH via Getty Images
In this image provided by the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti, U.N.
Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon greets Sean Penn as he visits a tent camp at the
Petionville Club golf course in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, on March 14.
text size A A A
March 23, 2010
One of the largest tent camps in post-earthquake Haiti has a nickname: "the Sean
Penn camp."
One recent day, I found myself in the camp's makeshift hospital, where dozens of
doctors were organizing supplies. Sure enough, a few minutes later, Sean Penn
walked out.
Penn says he got to Haiti a week after the earthquake and set up a
nongovernmental organization. He is sleeping among the 40,000 people in this
camp.
"There's not nearly enough tents here for four to six people, families or more," he
says. "Not a healthy place for kids to be, and we're going to have incredible
problems when the rains come. So we're doing all we can in that effort."
Penn says that when he saw the earthquake, he remembered Hurricane Katrina in
New Orleans and how much help was needed then. So this time, he made contact
right away with the U.S. Army.
"They needed help and said so, and so we were able to have a great collaboration
with them," he says. "It built very quickly when I told a friend of mine who's a
businesswoman of our intentions to come down, just a few of us. She then seeded
us some initial funds that got us on our feet here ... and so here we are."
The doctors and nurses working in this camp wear T-shirts and hats that bear the
acronym of the group Penn and his partner have set up: Jenkins-Penn Haitian Relief
Organization.
The camp where Penn is staying is also known as the "golf course camp," because
it sits on what used to be the country club.
Right now, Penn says, his biggest concern is relocating the thousands of people
who live here before the rains hit.
"These tents will be likely washed away," he says. "The stakes that hold them in are
going to be torn up by the water. And before that happens, the water comes straight
under the tents immediately, and they become just mud baths."
I asked Penn what he has taken away from his time in Haiti.
"Well, it's exhausting," he laughed. "But I don't know. That's something to be
digested later."
As I was leaving, I asked one of the residents of the camp what he thought about
Penn. He said he has never seen any of the actor's movies. But he really
appreciates all of Penn's help.
Angelina Jolie's Charity Work, Events and
Causes
             Charity biography

             Oscar-winning actress, professional model, daughter of
             Academy Award-winning actor Jon Voight, and listed on
             countless “most beautiful women” lists, Angelina Jolie
             trained and performed at the Lee Strasberg Theatre
             Institute following her mother Marcheline Bertrand, who had
             studied with Lee Strasberg directly. A mother to six children
and a natural beauty both inside and out, she needs no introduction as
humanitarian spokes person to the world.

Jolie first became personally aware of worldwide humanitarian crises
while filming Tomb Raider in Cambodia. She eventually turned to The
Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR),
the agency mandated to lead and co-ordinate international action to
protect refugees and resolve refugee problems worldwide, for more
information on international trouble spots.

Since 2001, Jolie has been on field missions around the world and met
with refugees and internally displaced persons in more than 20 countries,
including Sierra Leone, Tanzania, Cambodia, Pakistan, Thailand, Ecuador,
Kosovo, Kenya, Namibia, Sri Lanka, North Caucasus, Jordan, Egypt, New
Delhi, Costa Rica, Chad, Syria, and Iraq, to name a few, and most
recently visited earthquake victims in Haiti on her latest trip to help
survivors of conflict and natural disaster.

The Jolie-Pitt Foundation, dedicated to eradicating extreme rural poverty,
protecting natural resources and conserving wildlife, donated $1 million to
Doctors Without Borders, an international medical humanitarian
organization created by doctors and journalists in France in 1971. The
organization provides aid in nearly 60 countries to people whose survival
is threatened by violence, neglect, or catastrophe, primarily due to armed
conflict, epidemics, malnutrition, exclusion from health care, or natural
disasters, for emergency medical assistance to help victims of the Haiti
earthquake.

Asked what she hoped to accomplish meeting with refugees and internally
displaced persons in more than 20 countries, she stated, “Awareness of
the plight of these people. I think they should be commended for what
they have survived, not looked down upon.”
In 2001 Jolie was recognized and named a UNHCR Goodwill Ambassador
at UNHCR headquarters in Geneva, to help educate the public not only
about the plight of refugees, but also about the perseverance and
courage they show in overcoming all odds to rebuild their lives.

In 2003, Jolie was the first recipient of the newly created Citizen of the
World Award given out by the United Nations Correspondents Association
to those who have made a significant contribution. It was initiated in
2003, in honor of Brazilian diplomat Sergio Vieira de Mello, the UN High
Commissioner for Human Rights, who was killed in the 2003 bombing of
the UN headquarters in Iraq. In 2005, Jolie was awarded the Global
Humanitarian Award by the United Nations Association of the USA for her
work with UNHCR and with refugees. That same year, Cambodia’s King
Norodom Sihamoni awarded Jolie Cambodian citizenship for her
conservation work in the country.

Over time, Jolie has become more involved in promoting humanitarian
causes on a political level. She has regularly attended World Refugee Day
in Washington, D.C., dedicated to raising awareness of the situation of
refugees throughout the world, and she was an invited speaker at the
World Economic Forum, an annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland which
brings together top business leaders, international political leaders,
selected intellectuals and journalists to discuss the most pressing issues
facing the world including health and the environment in 2005 and 2006.
Jolie began lobbying humanitarian interests in the U.S. capital, where she
met with members of Congress at least 20 times from 2003.

Jolie also co-chairs the Education Partnership for Children of Conflict,
which helps fund education programs for children affected by conflict.
Founded in 2006 at the Clinton Global Initiative, annual meetings have
brought together more than 100 current and former heads of state, 14
Nobel Peace Prize winners, hundreds of leading global CEOs, major
philanthropists and foundation heads, directors of the most effective non-
governmental organizations, and prominent members of the media. In
2007, 19 organizations made a commitment worth $148 million to
educate 350,000 of the children out-of-school in conflict areas and help
improve the quality of schooling for nearly 700,000 additional children.
Goodwill Ambassador for UNHCR.

Jolie is on the board of advisors for the Yéle Haiti Foundation, and with
Brad Pitt took time to help Wyclef Jean with his Clean Streets project.
Jolie also arranged a deal with People Magazine allowing them to print the
first picture showing her visibly pregnant in exchange for a $500,000
donation to the charity.
Angelina has been travelling to refugee camps around the world since
filming Tomb Raider. During her missions she has visited places including
Sudan’s war-torn Darfur, Sierra Leone, Cambodia and Tanzania. She also
visited Afghan refugees in Pakistan and donated $1 million to help.

Jolie is known to cover all of her costs while on missions, and shares the
working and living conditions as the UNHCR field staff.

Jolie published Notes from My Travels, a collection of journal entries that
chronicle her early field missions (2001-2002) with proceeds benefitting
UNHCR.

According to tax records, Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt donated more than
$8 million to charity in 2006 alone.

In January, 2008, Jolie and her brother, James Haven, marked the first
anniversary of their mother’s death from ovarian cancer by making an
undisclosed donation to the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.
Jay-Z's Charity Work, Events and Causes

                         Jay-Z sent more than $2,500 worth of designer street wear to the Spring
                         Hill Campaign for Adolescent and University Student Empowerment
                         (CAUSE) in appreciation of their community efforts.

                         His November 2006 concert in New York city raised over
                         $250,000 for PlayPumps International.

                    On August 9, 2006, he met with UN Secretary General Kofi
                    Annan at the organization’s headquarters in New York. The
                    rapper pledged to use his upcoming world tour to raise
awareness of–and combat–global water shortage.

Also in 2006, he visited Africa and produced a documentary entitled Diary of Jay-Z:
Water for Life.

He pledged $1 million to the American Red Cross' relief effort after Hurricane Katrina

February 12, 2009 by Tim Saunders

Rapper Jay-Z is joining together with NBA star LeBron James to donate over 150 musical
instruments to a school in Arizona this week. The pair will meet with over 200 students
at Mesa Arts Academy in Mesa on Friday, February 13, to hand over the instruments –
donated through a partnership with Coca Cola’s Sprite Green – and will also sign a
donated piano which will permanently stay in the school’s auditorium.

“We are so delighted Sprite Green is donating instruments to the students of Mesa Arts
Academy and the Boys & Girls Club,” said Ramon Elias, president of the Boys & Girls
Clubs of the East Valley. “Our kids love to perform, and we know the instruments and
musical equipment . . . will be a great way to motivate the kids to go to class and come
to the Club after school.”

The stars are in Arizona to mark the upcoming NBA All-Star weekend and will hold their
annual Two Kings Dinner later on Friday night.

October 3, 2008 by Tim Saunders

Rapper Jay-Z has been honored by the United Nations for his humanitarian work in
Africa. The performer and president of Def Jam Records was praised for his work when
he attended the United Nations Global Leadership Awards Gala in New York on
Wednesday. He recently returned from Africa, where he has invested heavily in
programs to supply clean water.

“Many charities, you close your eyes and cross your fingers and hope that the money
gets to the people who really deserve it,” he told People Magazine. “But with this, I got
to go to Africa, see the water pumps. I got to see the kids turn them on.”

The rapper first visited Africa in 2006, and recorded an MTV documentary of his visit
called “The Diary of Jay-Z: Water for Life.” Since then he has been paying for PlayPumps
water systems to be installed in African villages where clean water was not available.
  Appendix I: Star Power: Examining Celebrity Behaviour (Summative Evaluation)

Outcome                                      Indicators of Mastery
3.3 investigate the relationship between        o Examine various theories of
socialization and the process of human             human learning (e.g., Piaget’s
learning                                           Cognitive Development Theory,
                                                   Erikson`s Psychological
                                                   Development, Kohlberg’s Moral
                                                   Development Theory, and
                                                   Gilligan’s Theory on Gender and
                                                   Moral Development.
                                                o Evaluate various theories of
                                                   human learning (e.g., Piaget’s
                                                   Cognitive Development Theory,
                                                   Erikson`s Psychological
                                                   Development, Kohlberg’s Moral
                                                   Development Theory, and
                                                   Gilligan’s Theory on Gender and
                                                   Moral Development.
                                                o Formulate a hypothesis as to
                                                   which theory(ies) of human
                                                   learning best characterize their
                                                   learning.
                                                o Assess how human learning and
                                                   socialization influence each other.

Grade
1       Attempted achievement of outcome, included a piece of evidence
2       Approached achievement of outcome, included 2 pieces of evidence
3       Met achievement of outcome, included 3 pieces of evidence
4       Exceeded achievement of outcome, included 4 pieces of evidence
5       Outstanding achievement of outcome, included 4 pieces of evidence and
        justification of opinions

                                           Task

In your groups read and discuss the articles presented. Your group either has an
article describing the positive contribution of a
celebrity or the negative contributions of a
celebrity. It is your job to evaluate their
behaviour and consider how their behaviour
shows their stage of development.
                                       Context

Who is the celebrity?

What did they do?

Would you consider this behaviour positive or negative? Why?

                               Behavioural Theorist

Consider each one of the theorists below. For each theorist write a description of
where the celebrity fits within the theory mentioned and what evidence you have of
this.

        Theorist and main area of concern
1       Piaget – Cognitive Development Theory
2       Vigotsky – Zones of Proximal Development
3       Erikson – Stages of Psychosocial Development
4       Kohlberg – Stages of Moral Development
5       Carole Gilligan - Theory on Gender and Moral Development
6       Bowlby – Attachment Theory

                              Your own development
Please remember that I will not share this with anyone unless I have your
permission or if you share that you need some protection.

Think of your own actions over the period of one week.

Would you consider yourself a positive role model?

Which of the theorists do you feel is more likely to
be correct?

Where do you fit within their description of human
development?
                                       Appendix J: Moral Gallery Evaluation Guide

           Student Name:

Outcome                      Evidence                                                                             /5
3.1 explain the process of   Define socialization.
socialization                • Identify various agents of socialization (e.g., media, family, peers, education,
                             religion, work)
                             and describe their role in the socialization process.
                             • Relate the impact of agents of socialization to their behaviour and own
                             socialization.
3.2 investigate the          • Examine the roles of nature and nurture in the socialization process.
relationship between         • Analyze major theories of personality development (e.g., Freud’s Psychosexual
socialization and the        Theory,
development of individual    Erikson’s Psychosocial Development, Cooley and Mead’s Symbolic Interactionist
personality                  theories).
                             • Identify connections between society and the development of self-image and
                             personality.
                             • Assess how personality development and socialization influence each other.

3.3 investigate the          • Examine various theories of human learning (e.g., Piaget’s Cognitive
relationship between         Development Theory,
socialization and the        Erikson`s Psychological Development, Kohlberg’s Moral Development Theory, and
process of human             Gilligan’s
learning                     Theory on Gender and Moral Development.
                             • Evaluate various theories of human learning (e.g., Piaget’s Cognitive
                             Development Theory,
                             Erikson`s Psychological Development, Kohlberg’s Moral Development Theory, and
                             Gilligan’s
                             Theory on Gender and Moral Development.
                             • Formulate a hypothesis as to which theory(ies) of human learning best
                             characterize their
                             learning.
                             • Assess how human learning and socialization influence each other.

3.4 investigate a social     • Examine the relationship between the process of socialization and the issue.
issue that serves as a       • Assess the relationship between personality development and the issue.
good example of              • Analyze the relationship between human learning and the issue.
socialization and related    • Formulate and support a hypothesis related to the issue.
concepts



Scoring Guide:

1 Achievement of outcome is questionable – you did not show that you understand the meaning of this
  outcome.

2 Achievement of outcome is possible – you did not meet this outcome but you seem to understand what it
  means.

3 Achievement of this outcome is evidenced – you met the expectations of this outcome to a satisfactory level.

4 Achievement of this outcome is obvious – you met and in places exceed the expectations of this outcome.

5 Achievement of this outcome is outstanding – you exceeded all expectations of this outcome.

Teacher Comments (See reverse)

				
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