CITY OF SEATAC COMMUTE TRIP REDUCTION PLAN

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CITY OF SEATAC COMMUTE TRIP REDUCTION PLAN Powered By Docstoc
					      CITY OF SEATAC
COMMUTE TRIP REDUCTION PLAN




          July 2007
Table of Contents
SECTION I: LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION CONTEXT ............................1

SECTION II and III: SETTING GOALS AND TARGETS FOR 2011 ....................22

SECTION IV: PLANNED LOCAL SERVICES AND STRATEGIES FOR
            ACHIEVING THE GOALS AND TARGETS ...................................24

SECTION V: CONTRIBUTIONS FROM MAJOR EMPLOYERS .........................32

SECTION VI: DOCUMENTATION OF CONSULTATION ....................................35

SECTION VII: SEATAC’S SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL PLAN...........................36

SECTION VIII: IMPLEMENTATION STRUCTURE ..............................................41



LIST OF APPENDICES
Appendix A: Commute Trip Reduction Efficiency Act Legislation
Appendix B: Commute Trip Reduction Program Rules
Appendix C: City of SeaTac Commute Trip Reduction -Affected Worksites
Appendix D: City of SeaTac 2008-2017 Transportation Improvement Program
Appendix E: KC Metro Scope of Work for the City of SeaTac



LIST OF MAPS
SeaTac Comprehensive Transportation Analysis
SeaTac Land Use Map with CTR Sites
SeaTac Zoning Map with CTR Sites
CTR Sector Analysis: North End/S. 152nd St. Region
CTR Sector Analysis: East End/Military Rd. Region
CTR Sector Analysis: Airport/SeaTac City Center Region
CTR Sector Analysis: South End/International Blvd. Region
                       COMMUTE TRIP REDUCTION PLAN

In 2006, the Washington State Legislature passed the Commute Trip Reduction (CTR)
Efficiency Act which requires local governments in those counties experiencing the
greatest automobile-related air pollution and traffic congestion to develop and implement
plans to reduce single-occupant vehicle trips. This plan has been prepared in accordance
with RCW 70.94.521.

The Commute Trip Reduction Plan is a collection of SeaTac’s adopted goals and policies,
facility and service improvements and marketing strategies about how SeaTac will help
make progress for reducing drive alone trip and vehicle miles traveled over the next four
years. Building upon the success of the existing commute trip reduction program,
SeaTac strives to meet the goals of the plan for the future by working in partnership and
coordination with local employers, transit agencies, organizations and individuals from
throughout the State. This plan helps to support the achievement of SeaTac’s vision and
the goals of our comprehensive plan.

          Agency: City of SeaTac


    Departments: Public Works Administration Department
                 Planning Department

   Contact Persons Desmond Machuca
   Preparing CTR Kate Kaehny
             Plan:

        Address 1: 4800 S. 188th St.

        Address 2:          

     Jurisdiction: SeaTac

             State: WA

        Zip Code: 98188-8605

          Phone #: 206-973-4735
                   206-973-4834

            Fax #: 206-973-4999

  Email Address: dmachuca@ci.seatac.wa.us
                 kkaehney@ci.seatac.wa.us
I. LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION CONTEXT

LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION CONTEXT

A.     Location of CTR-affected work sites in SeaTac

The purpose of this section is to describe the existing and planned land use and
transportation context that affects SeaTac’s ability to meet its goals for reducing drive
alone trips and vehicle miles traveled. The information in this section has been prepared
using our existing comprehensive plan and other planning documents. Information on
transit services and facilities has been provided by King County Metro and Sound
Transit.

                                      City-Wide Snapshot
              Area (square miles)                            12.6
              Population (2000)                              25,230
              Population per square mile                     2,002
              Employment (2000)                              31,899
              Employees per square mile                      2,532
              Housing units (2000)                           10,300
              Source: OFM 2006

A list of SeaTac’s seventeen CTR-affected worksites, the Employee Transportation
Coordinators (ETCs), and their locations, is provided in Appendix B. A series of maps
are included showing the locations of CTR-affected work sites within SeaTac, and related
transit services and other characteristics. GIS maps are included for each site that
graphically illustrate the spatial relationship of the locations of each CTR-affected work
site with a ¼ mile and ½ mile buffer.

The City of SeaTac encompasses 12.6 square miles bounded generally by S. 128th St. on
the north at Tukwila, I-5 on the east at Kent, S. 229th St. on the south at Des Moines, and
SR 509 on the west at Des Moines and Burien.

Of SeaTac’s seventeen CTR-affected sites, three are located outside of the International
Blvd. (SR 99) corridor. For the purpose of this CTR Plan, the seventeen CTR sites in
SeaTac have been grouped into the following four regions:

       1) North End/S. 152nd St. Region
       This region includes only one CTR site, The Boeing Company Spares
       Distribution Center. Boeing Spares is located on 24th Avenue S., a north-south
       arterial and truck route due north of Sea-Tac International Airport and SR 518.

       2) East End/Military Rd. Region
       This region is comprised of only one CTR-affected site, SeaTac City Hall. City
       Hall is located on S. 188th St., a major east-west arterial, at the intersection of
       Military Road S., a major north-south arterial. It is also very near the junction of
       S. 188th St. and I-5.


                                                                                              1
I. LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION CONTEXT

    3) Airport/SeaTac City Center Region.
    This region includes ten of the City’s CTR-affected sites. Six sites are located
    within the airport - Alaska Airlines, Horizon Airlines, Northwest Airlines, United
    Airlines, HMS Host, and the Port of Seattle. The Boeing Company Sea-Tac
    Tower II and Northwest Airlines Reservations are across International Blvd. from
    the airport, and the Doubletree Hotel is at the corner of International Blvd. and S.
    188th St. These worksites are located within the boundaries of the SeaTac City
    Center and are either within or near the boundaries of the SeaTac/Airport Station
    Area.

    Alaska Flight Operations site is the only worksite in this region located south of
    S. 188th St. It is over ½ mile from the Station Area but can be considered part of
    the City Center Region because it is within 1/4 mile, a convenient walking
    distance from transit that serves the airport. There is more transit service
    available to the airport because service is focused on transporting people to and
    from major highways/regions to the airport.

    4) South End/International Blvd. Region
    There are five CTR-affected sites in this region including Alaska Airlines Inc.
    Corporate, Horizon Air General Office, the Federal Detention Center, Alaska
    Airlines McGee Building, and Alaska Airlines Gold Coast. These worksites are
    located along International Blvd., except for the Federal Detention Center, but are
    all over 1/4 mile from S. 188th St.




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I. LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION CONTEXT

B.     Identify Major Issues Regarding Land Use and Transportation Conditions
       Around CTR-Affected Work Sites or Work Site Clusters
       and

C.     Potential Actions for SeaTac to Eliminate Barriers
       After assessing the land use and transportation conditions surrounding each CTR
       work site cluster, SeaTac analyzed the major issues facing these CTR regions,
       identifying deficiencies, and potential actions to eliminate these barriers, for each
       of the following:
       o Existing and planned land use conditions:
       o Existing and planned transportation facilities:
       o Existing and planned transit services and facilities:
       o Existing parking conditions:

North End/S. 152nd St. Region

The Boeing Spares Distribution Center Work Site – 2201 S. 142nd St.

 Existing and planned Existing: This worksite is located in the north end of
 land use conditions: SeaTac – the only CTR-affected site in this area. The
                      Boeing Spares Distribution Center is 702,725 square feet
                      under one roof, or 15 acres. The Boeing Center distributes
                      airplane parts worldwide.
                        The worksite is located in an area zoned Industrial in an
                        Aviation Commercial Zone. It is situated along 24th
                        Avenue S., an arterial and state designated truck route north
                        of the airport. There are few retail or commercial sites
                        nearby. The residential neighborhoods located east of 24th
                        Ave. S., are primarily single family with residences located
                        on long blocks allowing for few north-south roads.


                        Planned: The Boeing Spares site is a bit over a mile from
                        Sound Transit’s Tukwila International Blvd. Link Light Rail
                        Station, which will be located at S. 154th St. and
                        International Blvd., and has a planned opening date of 2009.
                        The City is currently moving forward with implementing
                        elements of the recently adopted S. 154th St. Station Area
                        Action Plan, which encourages transit-oriented, high
                        density, pedestrian-friendly development adjacent to Sound
                        Transit’s Tukwila International Blvd. Link Light Rail
                        Station.



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I. LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION CONTEXT

Existing and planned Existing: The Boeing Spares worksite is located on 24th
transportation       Ave S. between S. 142nd St. and S. 146th St. While 24th
facilities:          Ave. S. and portions of S. 142nd St. and S. 146th St. west of
                     24th Ave. S. have sidewalks, there are few sidewalks within
                     the residential neighborhood east of 24th. There are
                     designated bike routes on both 24th Ave S. and S. 142nd St.


                       Planned: The City has funding to construct the Westside
                       Trail on the west side of the airport from S. 136th St. to S.
                       154th St. The trail will provide an improved north-south
                       pedestrian and bicycle trail which is located about 1/2 mile
                       due west of Boeing Spares. SeaTac will continue to
                       enhance new bike and walking paths including new
                       connections to the light rail station area. SeaTac’s
                       Pedestrian Program which is currently under development is
                       a potential resource for these activities.


Existing and planned Existing: The bus service to The Boeing Spares site is very
transit services and limited and the service that is available does not run at the
facilities:          hours in the morning that are needed to support Boeing's
                     first shift start times. The earliest shift start time at the
                     Boeing Spares site is 5:00 a.m., however many employees
                     work flexible hours and often begin at 2:00, 3:00 or 4:00
                     a.m. This site is a 24 hour, seven day a week operation
                     where employees work around the clock.
                       Metro Route #170 is the only bus route that serves the
                       worksite. The route is extremely limited in terms of both
                       the times service is offered as well as the locations from
                       which the route can be accessed. Route 170 provides
                       service on 24th Ave. S. from S. 144th (adjacent to the
                       worksite) to the north and ultimately to downtown Seattle.
                       Those desiring transit to and from areas south and east of
                       the worksite must utilize Route 170 via S. 144th St. and then
                       connect to routes running along International Blvd.
                       Metro Route 170 - Daily service to Seattle from SeaTac.
                       Departure times: This route heads west on S. 144th St. and
                       north on 24th Ave. S. adjacent to the Boeing Spares site
                       through Riverton Heights.




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I. LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION CONTEXT

                   For employees of Boeing Spares that are interested in the
                   Sounder train, the Tukwila Station provides the closest
                   access. Employees could then use van share or would have
                   to take multiple bus routes.


                   Planned: The Tukwila International Blvd. Link Light Rail
                   Station is currently under construction at International Blvd.
                   and S. 154th St. and set to open in 2009. While the Link
                   station will be approximately one mile from the worksite, it
                   is hoped that there will be new or improved transit service
                   connecting the Link station to Boeing Spares. Additionally,
                   once funding can be identified, the City has plans to create
                   improved bike amenities along S. 154th St. between
                   International Blvd. and S. 24th which is already a designated
                   bike route.


Existing parking   Parking is ample with large surface parking lots with free
conditions:        employee and visitor parking. Priority carpool and vanpool
                   parking is offered.




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I. LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION CONTEXT

East End/S. 188th St. Region

SeaTac City Hall Work Site – 4800 S. 188th St.

 Existing and planned Existing: SeaTac City Hall is located on the east side of
 land use conditions: SeaTac – the only CTR-affected site in this area. The
                      worksite is at the intersection of 188th St. and Military
                      Road, and is off the 188th St./Orillia Rd. exit of I-5. This
                      worksite is located in an area zoned Urban High Density
                      Residential. There is a motel across the street and a
                      convenience store within ¼ mile, but these are the only
                      retail and commercial amenities within easy walking
                      distance. A park and two schools are also close by.
                        Lutheran Community Services will soon complete The
                        Village at Angle Lake, a unique community services
                        campus high rise and resource “hub.” In one convenient
                        location, residents can access healthcare, childcare, senior
                        housing, homecare services, immigrant and refugee
                        services, and family resources. It is located less than ½ mile
                        from SeaTac City Hall on S. 188th St. at 42nd Ave. S.


                        Planned: A new private mixed-use project is anticipated to
                        be developed in the near future within a mile of the worksite
                        on S. 188th St.


 Existing and planned Existing: The worksite is at the intersection of S. 188th St.
 transportation       and Military Rd., and immediately accessed by the 188th
 facilities:          St./Orillia Rd. exit of I-5. There are sidewalks on S. 188th
                      St. but there are no marked bicycle lanes. There are few
                      sidewalks along streets in the residential neighborhoods
                      northeast of the worksite. SeaTac City Hall provides
                      covered, secure bicycle lockers, private showers, and
                      clothes lockers for employees.


                        Planned/Under Construction: The City is constructing
                        sidewalks and bicycle lanes along Military Rd. S. that will
                        extend from SeaTac City Hall to S. 176 th St.




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I. LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION CONTEXT

Existing and planned Existing: SeaTac City Hall is serviced by Metro Transit
transit services and Route 180 and 194, and Sound Transit 574.
facilities:          Metro Route 180 - Weekday trips to and from Auburn and
                     Kent to SeaTac City Hall.
                     Metro Route 194 - Daily airport service to and from
                     downtown Seattle and to and from Federal Way.
                     Departure times: about every 15 – 30 minutes in both
                     directions weekdays, every 30 minutes weekends.
                     Sound Transit Route 574 - Daily service to and from
                     Lakewood, Tacoma and SeaTac Airport.
                     Departure times: every 30 minutes during the week, and
                     every 60 minutes on Saturday & Sunday.
                     Sounder Train - Weekday morning service northbound from
                     Tacoma, Puyallup, Sumner, Auburn, and Kent Stations to
                     Tukwila Station arriving at 6:24, 6:59, 7:27, and 7:49 a.m.
                     Weekday afternoon service southbound from Tukwila
                     Station to Kent, Auburn, Sumner, Puyallup, and Tacoma
                     Station leaving at 4:36, 5:01, 5:26, 5:56 p.m.


                     Planned: The City will continue to work with Metro
                     Transit and Sound Transit to add additional in-city routes.
                     One new peak round-trip on the Sounder train from Tacoma
                     to Seattle is planned. A new reverse-peak morning trip
                     from Seattle to Tacoma, and then from Tacoma to Seattle in
                     the afternoon, are also planned for September 2007.


Existing parking     Parking is ample with large surface parking lot with free
conditions:          employee and visitor parking. Priority carpool and vanpool
                     parking is offered.




                                                                                   7
I. LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION CONTEXT

SeaTac City Center/Airport Region

SeaTac City Center/Airport Region Work Sites:

Sites located within the Sea-Tac International Airport:
Alaska Airlines Terminal - 17801 International Blvd.
Horizon Air Terminal Ramp - 17801 International Blvd.
Northwest Airlines Ground Services - 17801 International Blvd.
United Airlines Sea-Tac Airport - 17801 International Blvd.
Port of Seattle Sea-Tac Airport - 17801 International Blvd.
HMS Host Sea-Tac Airport - 17801 International Blvd.

Sites located across International Blvd. from the Airport:
The Boeing Company Sea-Tac Tower II - 17930 International Blvd.
Northwest Airlines Reservations Office - 17900 International Blvd.


Site located on International Blvd. at the corner of S.188th St.:
Doubletree Hotel Sea-Tac Airport - 18740 International Blvd.

Site located on S. 192nd St. approximately 1/8 mile west of International Blvd.:
Alaska Airlines Flight Operations - 2651 S. 192nd St.



 Existing and planned Existing: All of these worksites are located in or adjacent to
 land use conditions: SeaTac’s designated City Center. Six of the worksites in
                      this region - Alaska Airlines Terminal, Horizon Air
                      Terminal Ramp, Northwest Airlines Ground Services,
                      United Airlines SeaTac Airport, Port of Seattle SeaTac
                      Airport and HMS Host SeaTac Airport are located within
                      the airport and are in the Aviation Operations (AVO) zone.
                        The remaining four sites - The Boeing Company Sea-Tac
                        Tower II, Northwest Airlines Reservations Office, the
                        Doubletree Hotel and Alaska Airlines Flight Operations are
                        located along International Blvd. in an area zoned
                        Community Business in Urban Center (CB-C).
                        While this region contains the City’s highest commercial
                        and residential zoning designation, CB-C, there are
                        relatively few commercial and retail entities in the area.
                        Existing land uses include some of the region's largest
                        motels, Sea-Tac International Airport, office towers, and
                        airport-related rental car and park-and-fly facilities.




                                                                                       8
I. LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION CONTEXT


                      Planned: Sound Transit’s SeaTac/Airport Link Light Rail
                      Station is planned to open in late 2009 and will be located
                      within this region adjacent to the airport at the intersection
                      of International Blvd. and S. 176th St. A pedestrian bridge
                      will connect the station to SeaTac’s City Center.
                      SeaTac recently adopted the SeaTac/Airport Station Area
                      Action Plan and is working to implement the plan’s vision
                      of a high density, mixed use, transit-oriented neighborhood
                      next to the station.


Existing and planned Existing: Worksites in the SeaTac City Center/Airport
transportation       Region have close access to SR 518, International Blvd.,
facilities:          and SR 509. I-5 is approximately 1 1/2 miles away.
                      SR 518/North Airport Expressway provides connections
                      from the City Center to SR 509 on the west and I-5 on the
                      east. Access to and through SeaTac is dominated by
                      International Blvd. which traverses the entire center from
                      north to south. International Blvd. has been improved
                      between S. 170th St. and S. 200th St., and has four through
                      lanes, a center median, a southbound HOV lane, left turn
                      refuges, transit pullouts and shelters, landscaping,
                      sidewalks, lighting, underground utilities, and drainage
                      improvements.
                      Because this region encompasses the airport (the 17th
                      busiest in the U.S.) and multiple state highways, traffic
                      congestion is a significant problem. Surface congestion on
                      International Blvd., the Airport's limited curb access
                      roadways, the number of low-occupancy bus shuttle trips to
                      and from the airport, unpredictable ground travel times, and
                      traffic diversion onto International Blvd. from I-5
                      compound the traffic congestion. Future needs of the
                      airport and the planned SeaTac City Center development
                      add to the current mobility concerns.
                      International Blvd., S. 170th St., S. 176th St. and S. 188th St.
                      are designated bike routes and have sidewalks.


                      Planned: As part of the City’s efforts to implement the
                      SeaTac/Airport Station Area Action Plan, the City is
                      currently hiring a consultant to design new north-south and
                      east-west roads which will provide better pedestrian and
                      vehicle access within the mega block that currently exists

                                                                                         9
I. LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION CONTEXT

                     directly across from the airport and Link Station. Sidewalks
                     and other pedestrian and bike amenities are also planned for
                     this portion of the station area.
                     One new peak round-trip on the Sounder train from Tacoma
                     to Seattle is planned. A new reverse-peak morning trip
                     from Seattle to Tacoma, and then from Tacoma to Seattle in
                     the afternoon, is also planned for September 2007.
                     Collaborating with SeaTac and other south-end cities, Metro
                     is working on transit signal priority (TSP), a system to
                     extend green lights to allow buses to get through. The
                     system can boost average speeds as much as 10% and is
                     planned on International Blvd. from Federal Way to S 518
                     north of SeaTac.


Existing and planned Existing: The Sea-Tac Airport is served by four Metro
transit services and Transit bus routes, and two Sound Transit bus routes.
facilities:          Metro Route 140 - Daily airport service to and from
                     Southcenter, Renton and Burien.
                     Departure times: every 20-30 minutes in both directions,
                     Monday-Friday, every 30-60 minutes Saturday and Sunday.
                     Metro Route 174 - Daily early morning airport service to
                     and from downtown Seattle and to and from Federal Way.
                     Departure times: every 30 minutes in both directions.
                     Metro Route 194 - Daily airport service to and from
                     downtown Seattle and to and from Federal Way.
                     Departure times: about every 15 – 30 minutes in both
                     directions weekdays, every 30 minutes weekends.
                     Metro Route 180 - Weekday early morning trips from
                     Auburn and Kent to the Airport at 3:00 a.m. and 3:30 a.m.
                     Weekday morning service to Burien from 4:44 a.m. to 8:07
                     a.m. Weekday afternoon service from 12:30 p.m. to 7:00
                     p.m. Weekday morning service to Kent and Auburn from
                     5:22 a.m. to 8:19 a.m. And, weekday afternoon service from
                     11:44 a.m. to 6:14 p.m.
                     Sound Transit Route 560 - Daily service to and from
                     Bellevue, Renton, Burien and West Seattle.
                     Departure times: every 30 minutes on weekdays and every
                     60 minutes on Saturday and Sunday.
                     Sound Transit Route 574 - Daily service to and from
                     Lakewood, Tacoma and Sea-Tac Airport.


                                                                                    10
I. LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION CONTEXT


              Departure times: every 30 minutes 6:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
              weekdays and 11:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Saturday & Sunday
              and every 60 minutes at earlier and later times.
              Sounder Train - Weekday morning service northbound from
              Tacoma, Puyallup, Sumner, Auburn, and Kent Stations to
              Tukwila Station arriving at 6:24, 6:59, 7:27, and 7:49 a.m.
              Sounder Train Weekday afternoon service southbound from
              Tukwila Station to Kent, Auburn, Sumner, Puyallup, and
              Tacoma Station leaving at 4:36, 5:01, 5:26, 5:56 p.m.
              Van share is available for SeaTac worksites from the
              Tukwila Station on South Longacres Way, Kent Station,
              and Renton Station. Bus routes are also available from
              some of these stations.
              Airline and hospitality industries operate on seven-day, 24
              hour, rotating shifts with multiple start times. The City of
              SeaTac requests earlier peak service, more frequent service
              and direct service from Metro Transit, Sound Transit and
              Pierce Transit. Research is based on our employees' work
              hours, home zip codes and commuting habits that have
              identified these transit needs.
              Employees at the worksites in this region comment on the
              amount of transfers that are required to get to these
              worksites, as well as the time it takes to make the commute
              by bus. Also, Metro, Sound Transit, and the Sounder train
              times are not early enough in the morning or in the
              afternoon to support many of the shift times at the airport.
              The earliest shift start time at The Boeing Sea-Tac Tower II
              site, across from the airport, is 6:00 a.m. However, many
              employees at the site work flexible hours and often begin
              earlier than 6:00 a.m. This site is a 24 hour, seven day a
              week operation where employees work around the clock.


              Planned: The City plans to continue to work with these
              sites, Sound Transit and Metro to encourage earlier peak
              service, more frequent service, and direct services from all
              applicable transit modes.
              The SeaTac/Airport Link Light Rail Station will be adjacent
              to the fourth level of the airport parking garage. This
              station will include a pedestrian bridge and dedicated
              walkway to the airport's ticket counters. A second
              pedestrian bridge will cross International Blvd. and connect

                                                                             11
I. LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION CONTEXT

                   the station to a passenger drop-off and pick-up facility
                   within SeaTac’s designated City Center.
                   Free shuttle buses will connect the Tukwila International
                   Blvd. Link Light Rail Station and the airport until the
                   airport Link extension opens in December 2009.



Existing parking   Parking is limited at the airport with large surface parking
conditions:        lots for employees and visitors. Parking is costly but
                   parking cash out programs are successful, and priority
                   carpool and vanpool parking is valued.




                                                                                  12
I. LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION CONTEXT

South End/International Blvd. Region

Alaska Airlines Inc. – Corporate – 19300 International Blvd.
Horizon Air General Office – 19521 International Blvd.
Federal Detention Center – 2425 S. 200th St.
Alaska Airlines – McGee Building – 20313 28th Ave S.
Alaska Airlines Inc. – Gold Coast – 20833 International Blvd.

 Existing and planned Existing: Three of the five worksites in this region are
 land use conditions: located on International Blvd. south of S. 188th St. - Alaska
                      Airlines Corporate, Horizon Air General Office, and Alaska
                      Airlines Gold Coast. The Federal Detention Center is
                      situated approximately 1/2 mile west of International Blvd.
                      on S. 200th St. at 26th Ave. S. The Alaska Airlines McGee
                      site is about 1/4 mile west of International Blvd. on S. 28th
                      Ave. S. Employees walk 1/2 mile or more to ride the
                      airport transit routes. More bike and walking paths are
                      needed in this area, as well as safer bike routes.
                        The worksites in this region are all located within various
                        commercial zoning categories including Office/Commercial
                        Medium (O/CM), Commercial Business in Urban Center
                        (CB-C) and Aviation Business Center (ABC).
                        Because of the area’s proximity to the airport there are
                        many park-and-fly facilities and motels along International
                        Blvd. south of S. 188th St. There are relatively few
                        restaurants or other neighborhood-focused commercial and
                        retail businesses. Angle Lake Park is located at
                        International Blvd. and S. 194th St. East of the worksites in
                        this region is a fairly large single family neighborhood,
                        some multi-family areas and a mobile home park.


                        Planned: The Port of Seattle owns a significant portion of
                        the property in the area. Sound Transit also owns
                        undeveloped and vacant property in the area including
                        parcels located on the corner of S. 200th St. and 28th Ave. S
                        where future light rail tracks and a station are planned. The
                        International Blvd. and S. 200th St. light rail station are part
                        of the Sound Transit 2/RTID roads and transit package to be
                        presented to voters in the Fall of 2007. The City supports
                        this location, and if the RTID/ST2 package passes, will
                        develop a plan that encourages higher density, pedestrian
                        and transit-oriented development in the area.



                                                                                           13
I. LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION CONTEXT

Existing and planned Existing: SR 509 and International Blvd. provide
transportation       convenient access to all of the worksites in this area. There
facilities:          are sidewalks running north and south along both sides of
                     International Blvd. and along 26th Ave. S. adjacent to the
                     Federal Detention Center. Employees at the Alaska
                     Airlines McGee Building are within 1/4 mile of sidewalks
                     on International Blvd. However, there are almost no
                     sidewalks connecting with these pedestrian corridors to the
                     east or west.
                       International Blvd., 28th Ave. S. and 26th Ave. S. are
                       designated bike routes. The Des Moines Creek Trail, a
                       pedestrian and bicycle trail, is part of a regional trail system
                       that will tie the Des Moines waterfront area to North SeaTac
                       Park, and other regional trail systems. The completed
                       portions run from S. 200th St. to Des Moines Creek Park.
                       The trail is 1/4 to one mile west of the worksites in this
                       region.


                       Planned: There are plans to eventually link these trails
                       from the Des Moines Marina and downtown area north
                       through SeaTac to the Duwamish/Green River Trail in
                       Tukwila to provide a regional pedestrian and bicycle
                       connection.


Existing and planned Existing: Only two of the six bus routes that currently serve
transit services and the airport along International Blvd. continue south of S.
facilities:          188th St. - Metro Routes 174 and 191.
                       Metro Route 174 - Daily airport service to and from
                       downtown Seattle and to and from Federal Way.
                       Departure times: every 30 minutes in both directions.
                       Metro Route 191 - Daily morning service to Seattle from
                       Federal Way.
                       Departure times: Five morning trips weekdays, with six
                       reverse afternoon/evening trips.
                       Metro Route 194 - Daily airport service to and from
                       downtown Seattle and to and from Federal Way.
                       Departure times: about every 15 – 30 minutes in both
                       directions weekdays, every 30 minutes weekends.
                       While all of the worksites in this region are within 1/4 mile
                       of Routes 174 and 191 along International Blvd., most of
                       them are over a mile from the additional bus routes

                                                                                          14
I. LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION CONTEXT

                   provided at the airport. The Horizon Air General Office
                   and Alaska Airlines Corporate sites are closest to the airport
                   bus service and are approximately 1/2 mile from those
                   routes.
                   Planned: A potential light rail station site has been
                   designated at International Blvd. and S. 200th St. Funding
                   for this station is included as part of the package of road and
                   transit projects by RTID and Sound Transit that will be put
                   to the voters in November 2007.
                   One new peak round-trip on the Sounder train from Tacoma
                   to Seattle is planned. A new reverse-peak morning trip
                   from Seattle to Tacoma, and then from Tacoma to Seattle in
                   the afternoon, is also planned for September 2007.
                   Metro will deploy new Bus Rapid Transit Service,
                   "RapidRide," on five of the county's most congested
                   corridors, one being from SeaTac to Federal Way. The
                   service will run every 10 to 15 minutes, six days a week


Existing parking   Parking is ample with large surface parking lots with free
conditions:        employee and visitor parking. Priority carpool and vanpool
                   parking is offered.




                                                                                     15
I. LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION CONTEXT

D.     Review SeaTac Comprehensive Policies and Regulations

The City of SeaTac’s Comprehensive Plan contains goals and policies which promote
Transportation Demand Management (TDM) and Commute Trip Reduction (CTR)
programs. These policies were adopted December 20, 1994, by Ordinance No. 94-1051.
They were last updated December 12, 2006. City policies that support and encourage CTR
are listed below.

CHAPTER 1 – LAND USE

Policy 1.1A
Designate and create an "Urban Center" that has clearly defined boundaries, a mixture of
land uses and densities sufficient to support high capacity transit, a pedestrian emphasis,
public open spaces and recreational opportunities, and both daytime and nighttime activities.

Policy 1.1B
Encourage most of the City's commercial and residential growth to occur within the Urban
Center's boundaries.

Policy 1.1F
Provide a network of connected local streets in the three High Capacity Transit districts and
elsewhere through the Urban Center to facilitate pedestrian circulation and transit
accessibility.

Policy 1.2B
Encourage moderate and high density residential development in appropriate locations,
primarily within SeaTac's Urban Center boundaries.

Policy 1.5B
Develop a system of distinctively designed pedestrian, jogging, and bicycle/horse trails
throughout SeaTac that could also connect to regional trail systems.


CHAPTER 3 - TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT

Policy 3.2D
I-5 should continue to provide for the high volume, north-south, regional travel patterns
in the vicinity of the City of SeaTac, including additional provisions for permanent HOV
lanes and transit service.

Policy 3.2G
Design elements should be defined for arterials and local streets based on the functional
classification of the facility and the projected land uses. The design elements should be
compatible with the projected adjacent land uses and identify desired provisions for
integrating alternative travel modes such as transit, HOV, pedestrians, and bicycles for
each classification.

                                                                                          16
I. LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION CONTEXT

Policy 3.2M
The City shall address neighborhood traffic control issues in a comprehensive fashion
consistent with the plans and procedures that have been adopted to address these issues,
consisting of but not limited to the following: The Pedestrian Facilities Plan (including
access to local and regional transit systems), Bicycle Facilities Plan, and Neighborhood
Traffic Control Program (NTCP).

Policy 3.3A
Recognize pedestrian movement as a basic means of circulation and assure adequate
pedestrian facilities are provided for in conjunction with other facilities.

Policy 3.3E
Develop a system of bicycle routes providing for travel within the City with connections
to regional facilities and major local destinations (such as North SeaTac Park or Sea-Tac
International Airport).

Policy 3.3F
Coordinate with the Port of Seattle to explore the possible development of a bicycle route
to the airport from S. 188th and S. 170th Streets.

Policy 3.4A
Work with Metro Transit to focus local transit service on major employment centers and
feeder service to the residential areas, including existing concentration areas and the
future growth areas, such as the Urban Center.

Policy 3.4B
Work with Metro Transit and adjacent jurisdictions to enhance east-west transit service
and future multi-modal transit options.

Policy 3.4C
Coordinate with Sound Transit, King County/Metro, WSDOT, Port of Seattle, and other
regional and local agencies to plan and implement for a High Capacity Transit (HCT)
system to serve the City of SeaTac and the airport. Integrate the system into planned
transportation system improvements such as the South Access Roadway project.

Policy 3.4E
Work with Sound Transit, Metro, and private developers to provide transit rider amenities
to create a more hospitable environment for transit users.

Policy 3.4F
Formal Transportation Demand Management (TDM) programs should be encouraged for
new developments and in existing developments. The programs should, at a minimum,
conform to the Commute Trip Reduction (CTR) Act. Transportation Management
Associations should be encouraged in order to coordinate TDM programs between
adjacent developments to increase their potential impact on reducing future traffic
volumes.

                                                                                        17
I. LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION CONTEXT

Policy 3.4G
Consider flexibility in general parking requirements of the City in new developments in
order to encourage innovative parking plan solutions and multi-modal options.


CHAPTER 6 - COMMUNITY IMAGE ELEMENT
Policy 6.2C
Protected Uses and Intensity - Encourage uses near major transit centers that are
compatible with and reinforce the pattern of transit activity. Future light rail stations will be
the focus of transit-oriented development and transportation infrastructure.

Policy 6.2J
Crosswalks and Safety Medians - Provide safe methods such as textured crosswalk paths
and pedestrian islands within the planted median for people to cross major streets at regular
and convenient intervals.

Policy 6.3A
Ensure that business park developments apply high design standards with respect to site
planning, natural areas, transit use, pedestrian movement, and parking facilities.


CHAPTER 9 - PARKS, RECREATION AND OPEN SPACE ELEMENT
Policy 9.3D
Improve bicycle access and safety throughout the SeaTac area and provide new bicycle
lanes and/or trails, when new roads or transportation facilities are constructed or
improved.




                                                                                              18
I. LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION CONTEXT

E.     Planning Coordination

       The SeaTac CTR Plan has been coordinated with the following agencies:

         Agency                   Date                        Issues


Metro Transit               Feb. 22, 2007     KC Metro Six-Year Transit
                                              Development Plan and Transit Now
                                              Ordinance/website
                            May 10, 2007      STTP Meeting – Tim Apicella,
                                              Doug Johnson


Sound Transit               May 10, 2007      ST Bus Service Implementation Plans
                                              STTP Meeting – Jim Moore,
                                              Carol Masnik


King County CTR             Sep. 12, 2006     CTR Efficiency Act, Coordination of
Coordinating Meetings       Sep. 28, 2006     CTR services among jurisdictions
                            May 21, 2007

                            Jan. 10, 2007
Washington State            Mar 13, 2007      CTR Efficiency Act, Funding, Grant
Transportation Department   May 9, 2007       Programs, CTR Training

                            Jan. 16, 2007
Puget Sound Regional        Feb. 20, 2007     CTR Efficiency Act
Council                     March 20, 2007


SeaTac Transportation       Feb. 22, 2007     CTR Efficiency Act, services for CTR
Partnership (STTP)          May 10, 2007      affected sites in SeaTac


SeaTac, Federal Way,        Mar. 26, 2007     Coordination of CTR services among
Tukwila, Renton Meetings    May 21, 2007      jurisdictions




                                                                                    19
I. LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION CONTEXT

F.     Broad Assessment of SeaTac’s Existing Transportation and Transit
       Conditions

Our Workforce
Our airline and hospitality industries, and The Boeing Company sites, operate on seven-
day, 24-hour, rotating shifts with multiple start times. Over the years, we have requested
earlier peak service, more frequent service and direct service because we have researched
in detail information about our employees' work hours, home zip codes and commuting
habits and identified these transit needs. In total, approximately 28,000 employees
commute to and around SeaTac daily. Of these, more than 35% commute from West
Seattle, the East side, S. King County and Pierce County.

Our Transit Needs - Extended Peak Service
The City of SeaTac will continue to advocate for more, earlier morning bus and train
routes to accommodate our employers’ early start times. Many employees, particularly in
the Airport, report start times as early as 3:00 a.m., and require service that arrives into
SeaTac by 2:30 a.m. Staggered start times associated with the travel industry necessitate
extended peak service from 3:00 a.m. - 8:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.

Frequent service
To make transit a viable option, commuters need to know they can go to a stop and wait
for less than 15 minutes for a connection. This is particularly important for commuters
that are transferring. Currently peak service operates approximately every 25 to 30
minutes.

More service
Currently there is limited service from Pierce County, the East-side, Seattle and West
Seattle. More than 35% of the 28,000 employees at the Airport commute from these
areas.

Buses that can accommodate a reasonable amount of carry-on baggage are needed for
airport commuters.




                                                                                         20
II AND III. BASELINE, GOALS, AND TARGETS
SETTING THE BASELINE

The purpose of this section is to provide information about how jurisdictions set the
baseline and measure progress toward meeting goals and targets of the CTR program.
Base year values are critical because they set the benchmark for determining whether the
jurisdiction and employer have made progress toward their goals.

Using the latest available CTR survey data (2005, until 2007 data is available), WSDOT
provides the baseline data for the jurisdictions. The baselines are for drive alone rates
and VMT. The baseline is the benchmark for determining whether the jurisdiction has
made progress towards its goal.

Based on the baseline data from WSDOT, SeaTac has set its goals and established the
2011 targets for its CTR-affected employers. Although jurisdictions have the option of
setting variable targets in sub areas across the urban growth area, SeaTac is setting the
same target for all CTR-affected employers. Jurisdictions may also set higher goals and
targets than the minimum goals established by the CTR Efficiency Act. SeaTac is setting
the minimum goals and targets for its CTR-affected employers for the period to 2011.




                                                                                        21
II AND III. BASELINE, GOALS, AND TARGETS
SETTING GOALS AND TARGETS

SeaTac will establish the following targets for reducing single occupancy vehicle (SOV)
rates and vehicle miles traveled (VMT) consistent with the minimum goals established by
the 2006 CTR Efficiency Act and SeaTac’s Comprehensive Plan. The targets displayed
in the following tables assume a goal of a 10% reduction from baseline in the drive alone
(SOV) rate and a 13% reduction from baseline in vehicle miles traveled (VMT).



                                              2011
                      2005        Drive-
                                             Drive-                             2011 VMT
    Employer          Drive-      Alone
                                             Alone
                                                        2005 VMT    VMT Goal
                                                                                 Target
                      Alone       Goal
                                             Target


                                               2011
                      2005        Drive-
     Area of                                  Drive-
                                                                    VMT Goal
                                                                                2011 VMT
                      Drive-      Alone                 2005 VMT
   Jurisdiction       Alone       Goal
                                              Alone                              Target
                                              Target
Overall
                                10.0 %                                            10.2
jurisdiction                                                       13.0 %
                    69.00%                  62.10%      11.75
                                reduction                          reduction   miles per
                                                                               employee

City of SeaTac
                                10.0 %                                            9.1
                                                                   13.0 %
                    78.73%                  70.86%      10.50
                                reduction                          reduction   miles per
                                                                               employee




                                                                                         22
II AND III. BASELINE, GOALS, AND TARGETS
City of SeaTac CTR-Affected Employers

                                            2011
                    2005       Drive-
                                           Drive-                             2011 VMT
    Employer        Drive-     Alone
                                           Alone
                                                     2005 VMT     VMT Goal
                                                                               Target
                    Alone      Goal
                                           Target
E80275
Alaska Airlines    85.72%    10.0 %      77.15%      13.0 miles   13.0 %      11.3
Inc. - Corporate             reduction               per          reduction   miles per
                                                     employee                 employee
E87882
Alaska Airlines   84.35%     10.0 %      75.91%      13.5         13.0 %      11.8
Inc. - Gold Coast            reduction               miles per    reduction   miles per
                                                     employee                 employee
E80259
Alaska Airlines    80.27%    10.0 %      72.25%      12.2         13.0 %      10.6
Inc. - McGee                 reduction               miles per    reduction   miles per
Building                                             employee                 employee
E80234
Alaska Airlines    58.64%    10.0 %      52.77%      11.8         13.0 %      10.3
Inc. - Terminal              reduction               miles per    reduction   miles per
                                                     employee                 employee
E80601
Alaska Airlines    85.00%    10.0 %      Not         9.3          13.0 %      8.10
Inc. - Flight                reduction   available   miles per    reduction   miles per
Operations                                           employee                 employee
(Zone baseline
average used)
E80333
The Boeing         79.33%    10.0 %      71.39%      14.5         13.0 %      12.6
Company Sea-                 reduction               miles per    reduction   miles per
Tac Tower II                                         employee                 employee
E84921
The Boeing         82.39%    10.0 %      74.15%      19.9         13.0 %      17.3
Company –                    reduction               miles per    reduction   miles per
Spares Distrib.                                      employee                 employee
Center
E89631
City of SeaTac     78.73%    10.0 %      70.86%      11.8         13.0 %      10.2
City Hall                    reduction               miles per    reduction   miles per
                                                     employee                 employee
E80283
Doubletree         75.55%    10.0 %      68.00%      10.2         13.0 %      8.9
Hotel SeaTac                 reduction               miles per    reduction   miles per
Airport                                              employee                 employee


                                                                                     23
II AND III. BASELINE, GOALS, AND TARGETS



                                            2011
                     2005       Drive-
                                           Drive-                           2011 VMT
    Employer         Drive-     Alone
                                           Alone
                                                    2005 VMT    VMT Goal
                                                                             Target
                     Alone      Goal
                                           Target
E86587
US Govt.         50.05%       10.0 %      45.05%    12.4        13.0 %         10.8
Federal                       reduction             miles per   reduction   miles per
Detention Center                                    employee                employee
E84889
HMS Host -          46.52%    10.0 %      41.87%    5.8         13.0 %          5.0
SeaTac Airport                reduction             miles per   reduction   miles per
                                                    employee                employee
E80812
Horizon Air -       73.54%    10.0 %      66.19%    12.9        13.0 %         11.2
General Office                reduction             miles per   reduction   miles per
                                                    employee                employee
E86991
Horizon Air -       54.63%    10.0 %      49.17%    9.4         13.0 %          8.1
Terminal Ramp                 reduction             miles per   reduction   miles per
                                                    employee                employee
E80499
Northwest           44.29%    10.0 %      39.86%    6.3         13.0 %          5.5
Airlines -                    reduction             miles per   reduction   miles per
Ground                                              employee                employee

E84384
Northwest           79.08%    10.0 %      71.17%    12.3        13.0 %         10.7
Airlines -                    reduction             miles per   reduction   miles per
Reservations                                        employee                employee

E80457
Port of Seattle -   58.76%    10.0 %      52.88%    11.4        13.0 %         10.0
SeaTac Airport                reduction             miles per   reduction   miles per
                                                    employee                employee
E80309
United Airlines -   81.80%    10.0 %      73.80%    13.0        13.0 %         11.3
SeaTac Airport                reduction             miles per   reduction   miles per
                                                    employee                employee




                                                                                   24
IV. DESCRIPTION OF PLANNED LOCAL SERVICES AND
STRATEGIES FOR ACHIEVING THE GOALS AND TARGETS
A. Policies and Regulations

SeaTac's Comprehensive Plan and zoning code already support, and in the case of the
zoning code, require various TDM and CTR activities. Other plans developed and
adopted by the City, including, the City Center Plan, SeaTac/Airport Station Area Action
Plan and S. 154th St. Station Area Plan, also encourage land use, transportation and
transit activities that support CTR.

1. Comprehensive plan policies
As noted above, the SeaTac Comprehensive Plan includes goals and policies that
encourage CTR. SeaTac's Comprehensive Plan policies that support CTR are listed in
section D. "Review of Comprehensive Plan Policies" of this plan. Amendments to the
Comprehensive Plan may be made at year end of each year. No additional changes are
proposed for 2007.

2. Land use regulations
Amendments to the Comprehensive Plan may be made at year end of each year. Land
use regulations were amended in 2006 to help encourage higher density development
within the S. 154th St. Station Area. No additional changes are proposed for 2007.

3. Zoning code regulations
The City is currently in the process of updating the development standards for the S.
154th St. Station Area and City Center (which includes the SeaTac/Airport Station
Area). The purpose of the updates is to further enhance the code's ability to encourage
higher residential densities, more mixed use development and pedestrian and bicycle
amenities in the station areas and City Center. Ten of the City's CTR sites are within 1/4
mile of the City Center.

Existing zoning code regulations pertaining to CTR Concurrence follow.

15.15.095 Commute Trip Reduction (CTR) Concurrence

A. All applicable employers in the City shall comply with requirements of state and
   local ordinances on CTR standards.
B. At a minimum, major employers, as denoted by state law, shall develop a commute
   trip reduction program within established timelines by the City. The plan shall
   include the necessary elements to reach established county and City goals. Those
   elements that should be considered are:
    1.   Providing preferential parking or reduced parking charges, or both, for high
         occupancy vehicles;
    2.   Instituting or increasing parking charges for single-occupant vehicles;
    3.   Providing commuter ride matching services to facilitate employee ride-sharing
         for commute trips;


                                                                                        25
IV. DESCRIPTION OF PLANNED LOCAL SERVICES AND
STRATEGIES FOR ACHIEVING THE GOALS AND TARGETS
    4.   Providing subsidies for transit fares, carpools or vanpools;
    5.   Permitting the use of the employer’s vehicles for carpooling or vanpooling;
    6.   Allowing flex-time work schedules to facilitate or encourage employee’s use of
         transit, carpools or vanpools;
    7.   Coordinating with transportation providers to provide additional regular or
         express service to the worksite;
    8.   Constructing special loading and unloading facilities for transit, carpool, and
         vanpool users;
    9.   Providing bicycle parking facilities, lockers, changing areas, and showers for
         employees who bicycle or walk to work;
    10. Providing parking incentives such as rebates for employees who do not use the
        parking facilities;
    11. Providing guarantee ride home programs and emergency taxi service.
C. All commute trip reduction plans shall be reviewed pursuant to mandated county and
   City policies.
D. All determinations on the commute trip reduction plans are appealable as mandated
   by county and City policies.
E. The City may impose civil penalties, in the manner provided in Chapter 7.80 RCW,
   for failure by an employer to implement a commute trip reduction program or to
   modify its commute trips reduction program pursuant to staff review. No major
   employer shall be liable for civil penalties under the state and local TDM ordinances
   if failure to achieve a commute trip reduction program goal was the result of an
   inability to reach agreement with a certified collective bargaining agent under
   applicable laws where the issues were raised by the employer and pursued in good
   faith. (Ord. 92-1041 § 1)




                                                                                           26
IV. DESCRIPTION OF PLANNED LOCAL SERVICES AND
STRATEGIES FOR ACHIEVING THE GOALS AND TARGETS
B.   Services and Facilities

     As part of its capital improvement program, SeaTac is planning the following
     improvements that will help reduce drive alone trips and vehicle miles traveled.
     In addition to the jurisdiction’s investments, the jurisdiction is working with its
     transit agency partners to improve transit services and facilities.

     Elements that are being planned and/or being implemented include:

     1. High occupancy vehicle lanes
        SeaTac strongly supports HOV lanes as a cost- effective and environmentally
        friendly option to help move people along congested city routes. SeaTac
        currently has an HOV lane along International Blvd. south bound from the
        Highway 518 Bridge to S. 216th St. No further HOV lanes are scheduled.

     2. Transit services
        King County Metro and Sound Transit provide bus transit services and
        facilities for SeaTac. On January 11, 2007, the Sound Transit Board adopted a
        Sound Transit 2 Draft Package that builds on the current light rail, commuter rail and
        regional bus system. Transit Now and ST2 improvements include service
        enhancements for the SeaTac area in the way of link light rail and the
        additional Sounder train trips.

     3. Vanpool services and vehicles
        SeaTac supports and promotes vanpooling and also coordinates with Metro to
        use vanshare from the Tukwila Station (Longacres) where employees can
        depart the train and ride in a van to their work site. King County Metro
        provides both vanpool and vanshare services for SeaTac.

     4. Ride matching services
        SeaTac promotes www.rideshareonline.org for ride-matching services. King
        County Metro provides an online ridesharing database for SeaTac and King
        County.

     5. Car sharing services
        SeaTac supports and promotes carpooling and coordinates with other SeaTac
        employers to reduce drive alone commuting.

     6. Transit facilities
        SeaTac does not currently have a bus transit center. The closest transit centers
        are in adjoining cities of Burien, Tukwila and Kent.

     7. Bicycle and sidewalk facilities
        Bicycle and pedestrian planning as part of the citywide planning process.


                                                                                           27
IV. DESCRIPTION OF PLANNED LOCAL SERVICES AND
STRATEGIES FOR ACHIEVING THE GOALS AND TARGETS
C.   Marketing and Incentives

     The City of SeaTac and King County Metro work in partnership with our CTR-
     affected sites to get a good understanding of the environment of their worksite
     and then go through alternative modes available (carpool, vanpool, bus, etc.),
     possible promotional efforts and/or incentives, alternate support modes (KC
     rideshare online, CTR law, STTP), structural or support facilities that may be
     helpful (park & ride lots, bus stops, traffic signals, etc.), alternative routes and
     flexible work schedules to help reduce drive alone trips and vehicle miles
     traveled. Following are some of these marketing and incentive programs.

     Employer outreach
     SeaTac works with King County Metro Transit to provide outreach to individual
     sites, as well as through our employers’ network group, SeaTac Transportation
     Partnership (STTP) that meets quarterly.

     Area wide promotions
     SeaTac encourages area wide promotions such as Wheel Options, a statewide
     campaign to encourage the use of alternative transportation modes.

     Transit pass discounts
     Metro’s FlexPass program is a low-cost, annual, commute benefit that employers
     can purchase for their employees.

     Parking cash-out programs
     Employers may allow employees to "cash out" the value of employer provided
     parking and use the equivalent value for transit or vanpool benefits or receive
     additional taxable cash.

     Carpool subsidies
     Many employers offer an incentive for carpooling such as Commuter Bonus Plus
     vouchers.

     Parking charges and discounts
     When parking rates increase significantly, and employers offer employees a
     subsidized bus transit pass, employees often use an alternate means to getting to
     work other than driving alone.

     Preferential parking
     Many employers offer an incentive for carpooling such as reserved parking in a
     desirable priority location.




                                                                                            28
IV. DESCRIPTION OF PLANNED LOCAL SERVICES AND
STRATEGIES FOR ACHIEVING THE GOALS AND TARGETS
    Flexible work schedules
    SeaTac encourages flexible work schedules to allow employees to commute more
    efficiently. Some flex schedules allow a compressed work week - for example,
    four 10-hour days per week rather than five eight-hour days. Others allow
    employees to come and go from work on a custom schedule, for example, to
    accommodate a child's daycare schedule or a carpool or vanpool schedule.

    Program to allow employees to work at home or at a closer worksite
    Working from home via telephone and computer has significant benefits for
    workers as well as employers including less sick leave, reduced hiring and
    training costs, increased employee productivity and less need for parking space.




                                                                                       29
IV. DESCRIPTION OF PLANNED LOCAL SERVICES AND
STRATEGIES FOR ACHIEVING THE GOALS AND TARGETS
D.   Special Programs for Mitigation of Construction Activities

     SeaTac has plans for the construction projects included in our 2008-2017
     Transportation Improvement Plan listed in Appendix D. Generally, the typical
     impacts are lane closures during active construction, and transit stop closures or
     relocations.

     CTR strategies to mitigate the impacts of construction are used whenever
     possible. Construction work is constrained to the non-peak commute periods and
     SeaTac’s engineering department works with the contractors to approve traffic
     plans. Major disruptions such as full road closures are planned for night time to
     avoid the peak commute periods. There is a coordinated public notification
     process and we also coordinate transit impacts with Metro. The City has
     developed mitigation programs for the following construction activities.

     SeaTac/Airport Transit Station Area Infrastructure Phase 1 and 2
     In partnership with adjacent developers and property owners, construct a new
     north/south street, 30th Ave. S., between International Blvd. and 32nd Ave. S. to
     improve pedestrian and vehicle access and circulation. Construct new east/west
     streets from International Blvd. to the new 30th Ave. S. at approximately the
     17300 and 17500 blocks. Install new traffic signals at International Blvd. and the
     new streets, S. 173rd St. and 30th Ave. S. Install utility distribution systems.
     Provide pedestrian amenities such as street trees, pedestrian-level illumination,
     and street furniture for public gathering places.

     In partnership with adjacent developers and property owners, extend 30th Ave. S.
     from the 17300 block to S 170th St to improve pedestrian/vehicle access and
     circulation. Construct new east/west street from International Blvd. to 32 Ave S
     at approximately the 17200 block. Install utility distribution systems. Provide
     pedestrian amenities such as street trees, pedestrian level illumination, street
     furniture and public park.

     City-wide Pedestrian Facilities Program
     Install and repair pedestrian improvements throughout the City in the
     neighborhoods for the purpose of creating a safe pedestrian network.

     Des Moines Creek Trail Phase 2 (Beach Park to 14th Ave S)
     Construct second phase of an 8,400 L.F. bicycle and pedestrian trail with
     amenities from Des Moines Marina to Midway Sewer Treatment Plant parallel to
     Des Moines Creek.




                                                                                          30
IV. DESCRIPTION OF PLANNED LOCAL SERVICES AND
STRATEGIES FOR ACHIEVING THE GOALS AND TARGETS
Recommended Strategies to Achieve Goals and Targets

Based on the potential actions that were identified, SeaTac identified the following
strategies that will support the CTR-affected work sites to make progress towards their
2011 goal. These strategies will be performed in coordination and partnership with
WSDOT, Metro Transit, Sound Transit, Pierce Transit, King County, and neighboring
cities.

These measures incorporate existing and future TDM elements identified in the CTR
Plan, the City of SeaTac Comprehensive Plan, City-wide CTR program, Light Rail
Transit plan, consolidated ground transportation center development and other public
transit improvement plans.

Parking:
To increase the percentage of commuters using transit, vanpool, carpool and non-
motorized forms of transportation, SeaTac will work with CTR employers to implement
parking management programs, such as parking cash out programs and employee
incentives. Successful parking management strategies can reduce single occupant vehicle
(SOV) commute trips by effecting the demand or supply for parking. Parking demand
can be reduced by charging employees for parking. When implemented, however,
parking management programs should include elements to prevent employees from
parking outside their facilities in areas such as adjacent residential neighborhoods and
arterials.

Parking supply should be kept below demand to reduce the convenience of SOV
commuting and ensure that demand management strategies are not undermined by an
oversupply of parking. The City will also implement its Comprehensive Plan policies on
parking management. The City may also review the development code for parking
requirements that discourage single-occupancy vehicles.

Transit:
The City will continue to work with Metro Transit to provide transit and vanpool services
to CTR-affected work sites. Metro Transit has identified priorities for services and future
investments in their Transit Development Plan. Metro Transit will continue to work with
the City to implement the requirements of the CTR Efficiency Act and help employers
achieve their 2011 goals. It is hoped that the opening of the two light rail stations in 2009
will help the City and employers meet the CTR goals.

Work with Developers to Implement TDM Elements in New Development:
To increase opportunities for ridesharing and creating partnerships between employers,
the City will create local networking opportunities for affected employers. Local
networking with other CTR-affected employers will offer opportunities to discuss CTR
and transportation issues, conduct joint promotions, and offer coordinated programs that
can benefit their employees.


                                                                                          31
IV. DESCRIPTION OF PLANNED LOCAL SERVICES AND
STRATEGIES FOR ACHIEVING THE GOALS AND TARGETS
Land Use
The City will implement its current land use policies that encourage the development of
mixed-use centers, specifically in the two station areas. Employers will be encouraged to
locate in the centers where higher levels of services, such as transit, non-motorized and
TDM programs are offered. Higher densities will be allowed which will help increase
transit and ridesharing activities.

Management and ETC Support
Designating an ETC with staff time dedicated to the CTR program is the single most
important factor to reducing commute trips. The City and King County Metro will work
with employers, the Southwest King County Chamber of Commerce and other business
organizations to increase support for CTR programs.

Employer Assistance
To help CTR-affected work sites achieve their goals, the City of SeaTac and Metro
Transit will continue to provide assistance to employers with implementing their
programs. The City of SeaTac and Metro Transit could help promote CTR programs at
work sites through transit fairs and by preparing public information materials.

Telecommuting
Demonstration projects throughout the county indicate that telecommuting should be
integrated in future TDM strategies. By enabling employees to work from a remote site
or their homes, use of telecommunications technology can significantly shorten or
eliminate peak commute trips.

Biking and Walking Programs
Biking and walking are efficient, low-impact modes of travel that don't contribute to air
pollution or traffic congestion. SeaTac encourages all sectors, young, old, disabled, poor
and others who may not drive to walk. Well-designed, strategically located non-
motorized facilities can also increase public transit ridership, such as on bus and train, by
providing better access to transit for more people. In addition, bicycle and pedestrian
facilities can provide for economic development in downtowns, urban centers, and other
mixed-use areas.

Evaluate TDM measures
The City of SeaTac evaluates the effectiveness of worksite TDM programs in reducing
SOV commutes following each CTR survey cycle. Results from the CTR survey indicate
whether and to what degree progress has been made to reduce commute trips at each
major worksite. Survey results also provide information on employee preferences for
individual TDM measures. While the general nature of the survey data precludes an
assessment of the impact of any particular TDM measure on the SOV rate, by comparing
worksite programs it is possible to infer the relative impact of different types of TDM
measures. Additionally, programs that incorporate a combination of CTR elements are
generally successful at reducing commute trips.


                                                                                           32
IV. DESCRIPTION OF PLANNED LOCAL SERVICES AND
STRATEGIES FOR ACHIEVING THE GOALS AND TARGETS
Benefits of Meeting CTR Goals

SeaTac’s Comprehensive Plan goal for transportation establishes the City’s general
philosophy. The policies also indicate SeaTac priorities for regional transportation system
programs, including bus and rail transit, people mover systems, and transportation
demand management (TDM).

Goal 3.1
To promote the safe and efficient mobility of people and goods of SeaTac residents,
businesses, and visitors through a multi-modal transportation system that encourages
alternative travel modes.

SeaTac identified the following local, regional and state benefits that will support the
CTR-affected work sites to help make progress towards their 2011 goal.

Improved Health
Actions that reduce air pollution have significant benefits for public health. For example,
EPA estimates that reductions in particulate matter and ozone through implementation of
the Clean Air Act avoided approximately 184,000 premature deaths in 1990, along with
674,000 cases of chronic bronchitis, 850,000 asthma attacks, and 8.7 million cases of
acute bronchitis in children. Efforts to reduce motor vehicle use also have compelling
health benefits: motor vehicle pollution causes an estimated 11,500 premature deaths
annually.

Improved air quality
SeaTac will receive better air quality through improved CTR compliance. By reducing
greenhouse gas emissions, SeaTac will reduce other pollutants and reduced
environmental costs associated with air pollution. Efforts to reduce emissions and air
pollution help prevent urban smog and acid rain. SeaTac and the Puget Sound Region
incur costs from acid rain and smog, which adversely affect trees, wildlife, natural
ecosystems, agriculture, and structures and equipment such as buildings and cars.

Improved water quality
CTR policies to reduce emissions and air pollution may slow eutrophication (over-
enrichment of a water body with nutrients, resulting in excessive growth of organisms
and depletion of oxygen concentration) and other water quality problems.

Reduced climate change
Actions that reduce emissions will help to limit future climate change. Potential impacts
of global climate change include sea level rise, changes in precipitation patterns,
disruptions to natural ecosystems, and an increase in the frequency and severity of
extreme weather events including heat waves and their associated mortality.




                                                                                           33
V. REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJOR EMPLOYERS
The purpose of this section is to describe SeaTac’s required contributions from major
employers. The CTR Law specifies that major employers are required to provide four
elements as part of their CTR programs. SeaTac does not require additional elements but
supports the appropriate mix of elements to produce a successful CTR Program that
makes progress towards, and ultimately achieves the Washington State CTR goals.

Required Element        Description

                        The Employee Transportation Coordinator is the point of
Designate Employee      contact between the employer and its workforce to implement,
Transportation          promote and administer the organization’s CTR program.
Coordinator             He/she is also the point of contact between the employer and the
                        local jurisdiction to track the employer’s progress in meeting
                        CTR requirements.

                        Information about commute alternatives will be distributed
Regular Distribution    regularly to employees. Examples of information that will be
of Information to       distributed will include:
Employees
                            •      Description of the employer’s commute options
                                   program
                            •      Transit system maps and schedules
                            •      Vanpool rider alerts
                            •      Weekly traffic alerts
                            •      Wheel Options campaign promotional materials

Regular Review of       The employer is required to complete the Employer Annual
Employee Commuting      Report and Program Description Form and submit to the local
and Reporting of        jurisdiction. Every two years, the employer shall conduct a
Progress                program evaluation to determine worksite progress toward
                        meeting the CTR goals. As part of the program evaluation, the
                        employer shall distribute and collect Commute Trip Reduction
                        Program Employee Questionnaires (surveys) to achieve at least
                        a 70 percent response rate.

Implementation of a     The employer is required to implement a set of measures that
Set of Measures         are designed to increase the percentage of employees using the
                        following modes:
                            •      Transit
                            •      Vanpool
                            •      Carpool
                            •      Bicycle or walking
                            •      Telework
                            •      Other non-single occupant vehicle modes



                                                                                       34
V. REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJOR EMPLOYERS

              Measures to reduce drive alone trips and vehicle miles traveled
              include, but are not limited to:
                  •      Provision of preferential parking or reduced parking
                         charges for high occupancy vehicles
                  •      Instituting or increasing parking charges for single-
                         occupant vehicles
                  •      Provision of commuter ride matching services
                  •      Provision of subsidies for transit fares
                  •      Provisions of vans for vanpools
                  •      Provisions of subsidies for carpooling or vanpooling
                  •      Permitting the use of the employer’s vehicles for
                         carpooling or vanpooling
                  •      Permitting flexible work schedules
                  •      Cooperation with transportation providers to provide
                         additional regular or express service to the worksite
                  •      Construction of special loading and unloading
                         facilities for transit, carpool, and vanpool users
                  •      Provision of bicycle parking facilities, lockers,
                         changing areas, and showers
                  •      Provision of a program for parking incentives such
                         as a rebate for employees who do not use the parking
                         facility
                  •      Establishment of a program to permit employees to
                         work part or full time at home or at an alternative
                         worksite closer to their homes
                  •      Establishment of a program of alternative work
                         schedules such as compressed work week schedules
                  •      Implementation of other measures designed to
                         facilitate the use of high-occupancy vehicles such as
                         on-site day care facilities and emergency taxi
                         services
                  •      Employers or owners of worksites may form or
                         utilize an existing transportation management
                         association or other transportation-related
                         associations by RCW 35.87A.010 to assist members
                         in developing and implementing commute trip
                         reduction programs.




                                                                           35
   V. REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJOR EMPLOYERS
     POSSIBLE TRANSPORTATION DEMAND MANAGEMENT MEASURES AT
                        SEATAC WORKSITES

      Product                                      Description
Alternative Work     Compressed or flexible work schedules allowing employees to work
Schedules            longer hours in fewer days.
Biking and           Alternative commute mode that can be subsidized.
Walking
Business Use of      A program making Metro commuter vans available for use by employees
Vans                 (at that worksite) during the business day.
Metro Commuter       A non-taxable voucher program that encourages employees to take the bus,
Bonus Vouchers       a vanpool or a ferry.
Metro Commuter       A voucher program to encourage employees to commute by carpool, or
Bonus Plus           walking and biking.
Vouchers
Carpools             Alternative commute mode that can be subsidized.

Custom Bus           A special service for areas with limited bus service.

Employee             Each major employer designates an employee to coordinate worksite TDM
Transportation       programs.
Coordinator (ETC)
ETC Network          A group of ETCs that regularly meets to coordinate TDM programs
Group                between adjacent developments.
Flex Pass            A comprehensive discount pass program that can be customized to include
                     commute incentives.
Flex Time            Employees vary their schedules in order to meet carpool, vanpool and bus
                     schedules with management approval.
Home Free            A program that ensures an emergency ride home for employees using
Guarantee            alternative commute modes.
Parking Cash-out     A program for offering employees a choice between a subsidized parking
                     space, and cash.
Pass Subsidy         A variety of options for businesses interested in purchasing employee
                     transit passes.
Preferential Parking Program that reserves worksite parking spaces for those employees
                     commuting by carpool & vanpool.
Promotional events Promoting the use of alternative commute modes at worksites through
                     information distribution and prize drawings.
Ridematch            A computerized ridematching database and mapping service.

Shuttle              Employer-provided shuttle service to major transit connections or for
                     work-related trips.
Vanpools/Vanshare    A program that supplies vans to groups of employees to share. Vanshare is
                     used to bridge the gap in the commute trip from home, P&R, or transit.



                                                                                        36
VI. DOCUMENTATION OF CONSULTATION
This section describes the consultation process that was used to develop SeaTac’s
Commute Trip Reduction Plan. Public involvement efforts included stakeholder
interviews, scoping meetings, meetings with South King County cities, an open house
near completion of the project, and public/City Council action to accept the new CTR
Plan. The Plan was developed in consultation with the following organizations and
individuals:
A.     City of SeaTac
       Department of Public Works
        Contact: Dale Schroeder, Public Works Director
        Contact: Desmond Machuca, Public Works Programs Coordinator

       Department of Planning
        Contact: Steve Butler, Planning Director
        Contact: Kate Kaehney, Associate Planner

       Department of Finance
        Contact: Mike McCarty, Finance Director

       Transportation & Public Works Committee
        Contact: Dale Schroeder, PW Director
       Land Use and Parks Committee
        Contact: Steve Butler, Planning Director
       Planning Commission
        Contact: Steve Butler, Planning Director
B.     WSDOT
       Contact: Keith Cotton

C.     Puget Sound Regional Council
        Contact: Lindy Johnson

D.     King County CTR Coordinating Committee
        Contact: Kathy Anderson, City of Seattle, Chair

E.     SeaTac Transportation Partnership/SeaTac Major Employers
        Contact: Desmond Machuca, Chair
        Contact: Tim Apicella, KC CTR Employer Representative/SeaTac Consultant
F.     Transit Agencies
       Contact: King County Metro Transit, Doug Johnson
                 Sound Transit, Jim Moore




                                                                                       37
VII. A SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL PLAN
SeaTac has prepared a financial analysis to identify revenues and expenses that are
associated with our city’s Commute Trip Reduction Plan. The following is a description
of the available funding sources that we may use to implement our CTR Plan.

A.     Funding Sources

       1.     WSDOT CTR grant

       The WSDOT CTR Grant is the annual allocation given to jurisdictions to help
       them administer their CTR programs. The City of SeaTac will receive $34,274
       funding for the period of July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2008, from WSDOT based on
       past trip reduction performance and the number of CTR-affected worksites in
       SeaTac. These funds are used to manage the program, provide local
       administration and services, establish accountability, provide technical assistance,
       generate public awareness, and support policy development. Washington State
       invested $5.5 million in CTR in the 2001–2003 biennium. The funding
       methodology for the CTR Program is currently under review.

       2.     SeaTac’s Operating Funds and Capital Investment Program Funds

       SeaTac’s CTR program is funded with the Arterial Street Fund and the Capital
       Investment Programs Fund. The budget for CTR from the Arterial Street Fund is
       $8,500. Capital investment programs funds are usually earmarked for certain
       projects such as bicycle and sidewalk facilities, intelligent transportation systems
       (ITS) equipment and road improvements. These are listed in Appendix D by year
       on the 2008-2017 Transportation Improvement Program.

       Local governments in Washington including counties, cities, and transit systems,
       provide an additional investment. Based on 2002 data, local government
       investment is approximately $6 million for the biennium. These funds are used to
       provide commute services to employers.

       3.     Federal funds
       SeaTac does not currently receive federal funds for funding our local CTR
       program. Federal funds include the grants from the Congestion Mitigation and Air
       Quality Improvement (CMAQ) program, Surface Transportation Program, and the
       Federal Transit Administration. The City of SeaTac last received CMAQ funds in
       2001. CMAQ funding was available to offset the reduction in CTR funding for
       CTR administration and contract services to King County.




                                                                                         38
VII. A SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL PLAN
       4.      Employer contributions
       SeaTac employers affected by the CTR law contribute both financially and in-
       kind in commute programs for their employees. Washington State employer
       investment has steadily increased since 1995 when they reported investing $9
       million for the year. In 2004, the latest year for which data is available, employers
       invested about $49 million in their CTR programs - $18 for every $1 invested by
       the state. Analysis suggests that employers have continued to increase their
       investment. Employer investment has shifted as the CTR program has matured. In
       1995, the majority of their investment was for administration; today over 75
       percent of the investment is commute subsidies.

       5.      Other state funding sources
       The City of SeaTac does not currently have other state funding sources or
       programs that provide assistance. SeaTac may apply for funding through sources
       that include the Safe Route to Schools Program, Competitive WSDOT
       Performance grants, etc.

       6.      Construction TDM Funds
       Funds may be available through construction mitigation programs. With the Link
       Light Rail Transit Stations, City-wide Pedestrian Facilities Program, City Center
       Pedestrian Corridors, and Des Moines Creek Trail Program, SeaTac has many
       programs where construction mitigation funding may be available listed by year
       in the 2008-2017 Transportation Improvement Program list in Appendix D.

Source of Funding              Responsible Agency             Estimated Amount

CTR Grants                     WSDOT                          $     34,274.00

Other State Funds              WSDOT, CTED                    $         0.00

CMAQ Funds                     RTPO                           $         0.00

Local Funds from               City of SeaTac                 $     18,500.00
Operating Budgets
Capital Investment Program     City of SeaTac                 $ 2,860,000.00
                               Sound Transit                  $ 500,000.00
Transit Revenue                Transit Agency                 $         0.00

Employer Contributions         TMA or Local Jurisdiction      $           .00

Developer Contributions        Local Jurisdiction             $             .00

Mitigation Funds for           Sound Transit                  $ 1,200,000.00
Construction Projects
TOTAL                                                         $ 4,560,000.00


                                                                                         39
VII. A SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL PLAN
B.   Program Expenses

     1.      Administration
     Program administration includes activities such as identifying and notifying
     affected employers, reviewing and evaluating employer programs and surveys,
     coordination with neighboring jurisdictions and transit agencies, and preparing
     annual reports on the CTR program.
     • New Site Notification/Site Status Change
     • Survey Processes/Data Management
     • Program review
     • Program Development
     • Quarterly report information to WSDOT
     • Promotions & Marketing
     • Records maintenance

     Agency Responsible: City of SeaTac and our consultant, KC Metro

     2.      Facilities
     Facilities include capital elements that help to reduce the number of drive alone
     trips such as high occupancy vehicle lanes, bicycle lanes, sidewalks, transit signal
     priority improvements, and bus shelters.
     Agency Responsible: City of SeaTac, KC Metro, Port of Seattle,
                         Washington State Department of Transportation

     3.     Services
     Services include elements that support transit and ridesharing such as transit
     services, assistance with the formation of vanpools, car sharing and ride matching
     services.
     Agency Responsible: City of SeaTac, KC Metro Transit, and Sound Transit

     4.     Marketing
     Marketing includes activities that help to promote and increase awareness of
     commute options among commuters and residents. Activities include the
     development and distribution of transit and ridesharing information, promotional
     campaigns, web sites to promote commute options programs, and outreach to
     employers.
     Agency Responsible: City of SeaTac, KC Metro Transit, and Sound Transit.

     5.     Incentives
     Incentives include transit pass discount programs, subsidies for vanpool
     programs, and other contributions to encourage employers to participate in
     commute options programs.
     Agency Responsible: City of SeaTac, KC Metro Transit, and Sound Transit

                                                                                       40
VII. A SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL PLAN
       6.     Training
       Training includes activities for both employer and local jurisdiction staff that may
       include workshops on various topics to address CTR, attendance at conferences
       and other training opportunities that will help improve program performance.
       Agency Responsible: City of SeaTac, WSDOT, KC Metro Transit, PSRC

        Expense                     Responsible Party             Estimated Annual Cost

Prepare local CTR plan       City of SeaTac
                                                                        $ 10,000.00
and ordinance

Administer CTR program       City of SeaTac and contract with
(contract management,        KC Metro                                   $ 24,274.00
annual reporting, etc.)

Training cost for all CTR-   KC Metro
                                                                        $     500.00
affected sites in SeaTac

Conduct employer             City of SeaTac and KC Metro
                                                                        $ 10,000.00
outreach

Implement supporting         KC Metro and Sound Transit
                                                                             NA
transit services

Implement supporting         KC Metro and Sound Transit
                                                                             NA
transit facilities

Implement supporting         KC Metro
                                                                             NA
vanpool services

Implement bicycle and        City of SeaTac and Sound
                                                                             NA
pedestrian facilities        Transit

Offer program incentives     City of SeaTac, KC Metro,
                                                                        $     500.00
                             Sound Transit

Car sharing services         FlexCar                                         NA

Conduct special area wide    City of SeaTac, KC Metro,
                                                                             NA
promotions                   Sound Transit

Prepare updates to           City of SeaTac
                                                                        $ 2,500.00
comprehensive plans

TOTAL                                                                   $ 47,774.00



                                                                                        41
VII. A SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL PLAN
B. Financial Gaps

The following table summarizes program areas that are not currently funded that could
provide additional benefits to the City of SeaTac’s CTR Program.

Service or Strategy       Target        What Strategy        Financial       Potential
                          Market        Will Accomplish        Gap           Funding
                                                                              Source

Increase               CEOs,           Assist ETCs and
Management             Managers,       the number of
Support with           Supervisors     employees using        $ 3,500.00    State Grant
Additional Outreach                    the CTR Program


Telework Education     CEOs,           Assist ETCs and
                       Managers,       the number of
                       Supervisors,    employees that         $ 4,000.00    State Grant
                       ETCs            telework


Bicycle and          Bicyclists and    Increase the
Pedestrian Amenities Pedestrians       number of
                                       employees             $ 25,000.00    State Grant
                                       bicycling and
                                       walking to work

City-wide              CTR-Affected Increase number
Promotional            Employers in of employees
Materials for SeaTac   SeaTac       using non-SOV             $ 5,000.00    State Grant
in Multiple                         modes
Languages

Incentives for Non-    CTR-Affected Build and retain
SOV Commutes           Employees in non-SOV
                       SeaTac       commute modes            $ 10,000.00    State Grant



TOTAL                                                        $ 47,500.00




                                                                                        42
VIII. IMPLEMENTATION STRUCTURE

CTR Implementation Plan

As part of our strategic plan for implementing the Commute Trip Reduction program, the
City of SeaTac will continue to work in partnership with the Washington State
Department of Transportation, Puget Sound Regional Council, KC Metro Transit, Sound
Transit, Pierce Transit, neighboring jurisdictions, and our CTR-affected employers
through the SeaTac Transportation Partnership.

Listed below are the organizations that will be involved with the implementation of
SeaTac’s CTR Plan. Their roles and responsibilities are described as follows:

A.     City of SeaTac
The City of SeaTac is responsible for developing and implementing our local CTR plan.
We are responsible for ensuring that CTR plans are consistent with our SeaTac
Ordinance, and our local comprehensive plans. As part of our CTR plan, SeaTac has set
the goals and targets for CTR-affected employers. SeaTac is responsible for CTR
program administration, ensuring that affected employers are in compliance with the
CTR law.

B.     Contractor
The City of SeaTac contracts with KC Metro for assistance with employer outreach,
program review and development, data management, and records maintenance. Attached
in Appendix E is KC Metro’s Scope of Work.

C.      Transit Agency
KC Metro and Sound Transit will be responsible for providing transit and ridesharing
services to the City of SeaTac. Transit agencies may also conduct employer outreach and
advertising and marketing campaigns.

D.      Transportation Management Association
The City of SeaTac does not have a Transportation Management Association but does
have the SeaTac Transportation Partnership (STTP). The STTP evolved out of a
Commute Trip Reduction employer network group that has worked since 1992 to
enhance commuting options to and around the City of SeaTac. The STTP works with
businesses, civic organizations and residents to promote use of transit. They work
closely with transit agencies to coordinate services, as well as with regional
transportation partners to create a seamless system. The STTP also advocate on behalf of
Sea-Tac Airport commuters to develop transit services that respond to existing and
potential transit ridership, and changes in demographics and travel demand.

E.       CTR-Affected Employers
The CTR-affected employers will be responsible for complying with the requirements of
the Washington State CTR Law. These requirements are also listed in Section V,
Requirements for Major Employers, in SeaTac’s CTR Plan. Attached in Appendix C is a
list of SeaTac’s CTR-Affected Employee.


                                                                                      43