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OFFICE OF REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT DIVISION OF UNACCOMPANIED

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					 OFFICE OF REFUGEE
   RESETTLEMENT
     DIVISION OF
  UNACCOMPANIED
CHILDREN’S SERVICES

     ORR-DUCS
    AGENCY FLOW CHART
• United States Dept. of Health and Human
  Services (HHS)
  A) Administration of Children & Family
  Services (ACF)
     1) Office of Refugee Resettlement
        (ORR)
         a) Division of Unaccompanied
           Children’s Services (DUCS)
  LAW UNDER WHICH THE ORR
         OPERATES
• Section 462 of the Homeland Security Act
  of 2002 (6 U.S.C. §279) transferred
  responsibility for the custody and care of
  UAC from the Commissioner of the former
  Immigration and Naturalization Service,
  U.S. Department of Justice, to the Director
  of the Office of Refugee Resettlement
  within the Administration for Children and
  Families of the U.S. Department of Health
  and Human Services.
         LAWS-CONTINUED
• The ORR also follows the requirements of the
  Flores Settlement Agreement, Jenny Lisette
  Flores, et al., v. Janet Reno, Attorney General of
  the United States, et al., Case No. CV 85-4544-
  RJK (C.D. Cal. 1996) which outlines detailed
  provisions for ensuring that UAC are placed in
  the least restrictive setting appropriate to the
  UAC’s age and special needs while in
  government custody and that they are promptly
  reunited with family members in the U.S. when
  such family is available and when such
  reunification is appropriate.
         LAW-CONTINUED
• William Wilberforce Trafficking Victims
  Protection Reauthorization Act of 2008
  – This Act mandates ORR/DUCS to take
    additional precautions for children in care who
    meet outlined categories.
   Unaccompanied Alien Children
             UAC
• DEFINITION OF UNACCOMPANIED ALIEN CHILDREN

• Section 462 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (6
  USC §279) defines an
• unaccompanied alien child (UAC) as a child –
• 1) Who has no lawful immigration status in the United
  States;
• 2) Who has not reached 18 years of age; and
• 3) With respect to whom -
• a) There is no parent or legal guardian in the United
  States – or -
• b) There is no parent or legal guardian in the United
  States available to provide care and physical custody.
      ORR RESPONSIBILITIES
• Making and implementing placement decisions for the UAC
• Ensuring that the interests of the child are considered in decisions
  related to the care and custody of UAC
• Reunifying UAC with qualified sponsors and family members who
  are determined to be capable of providing for the child's physical
  and mental well-being
• Providing home assessments for certain categories of UAC at risk
• Conducting follow-up services for certain categories of children
• Overseeing the infrastructure and personnel of ORR-funded UAC
  care provider facilities
• Conducting on-site monitoring visits of ORR-funded care provider
  facilities and ensuring compliance with DUCS national care
  standards
     Responsibilities-Continued:
• Collecting, analyzing, and reporting statistical information on UAC
• Providing training to federal, state, and local officials who have
  substantive contact with UACs
• Developing procedures for age determinations and conducting these
  determinations along with DHS
• Cooperating with the Department of Justice’s Executive Office for
  Immigration Review to ensure that sponsors of UACs receive legal
  orientation presentations
• Ensuring, to the greatest extent practicable, that all UAC in custody
  have access to legal representation or counsel
• Granting specific consent for state court jurisdiction over children
         UAC DEMOGRAPHICS
• UAC have indicated that, among other reasons, they leave their
  home countries for the U.S. to rejoin family already in the U.S., to
  escape abusive family relationships in the home country, or to find
  work to support their families in the home country.
• ORR has approximately 7,200 UAC a year in its facilities. The
  average length of stay is approximately 55 days before children are
  released to family members and other sponsors, or before aging out
  or before being returned to their home countries.
• In FY08, the numbers of children in ORR custody and care ranged
  from approximately 800 to 1,500. Of those, 78% were male and 22%
  female; 13% were below the age of 14.
• The most common native countries of UAC are Honduras,
  Guatemala, and El Salvador.
• Native Countries of UAC in FY08 Honduras 30.8% Guatemala
  27.4% El Salvador 23.4% Mexico 10.6% Ecuador 3.2% Nicaragua
  0.8% Brazil 0.5% Other 2.7%
           ORR-UAC SERVICES
• The majority of children are cared for through a network of ORR-
  funded care provider facilities, most of which are located close to
  areas where immigration officials apprehend large numbers of
  aliens. There are currently more than 41 ORR-funded care provider
  facilities in 10 different states.
• Care provider facilities are state licensed and must meet ORR
  requirements to ensure a high level of quality of care. The facilities,
  which operate under cooperative agreements and contracts, provide
  children with classroom education, health care,
  socialization/recreation, vocational training, mental health services,
  family reunification, access to legal services, and case
  management. Care provider facilities’ case management teams use
  effective screening tools to assess children for mental health and
  victim of trafficking issues.
     ORR-UAC PLACEMENT
• ORR places UACs in the least restrictive
  environment which meets the minor’s care
  needs.
• Placements Types:
  – Shelter
  – Staff-Secure: Staff-secure care providers
    provide a heightened level of staff supervision,
    communication, and services to control problem
    behavior and prevent runaways.
  – Secure: A secure care provider is designed for an
    UAC who requires very close supervision and may
    need the additional internal controls and physical
    structure of a secure facility.
     WEST COAST POINTS OF
          CONTACTS
• Richard Zapata, Federal Field Specialist
  (202)380-6894
  richard.zapata@acf.hhs.gov
  Ivonne Velazquez, Federal Field Specialist
  Supervisor
  (202) 281-9535
  ivonne.velazquez@acf.hhs.gov;
  Alex Sanchez, Federal Field Specialist
  (202) 494-0392
  alex.sanchez@acf.hhs.gov

				
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