Docstoc

Wildlife Damage Prevention Program

Document Sample
Wildlife Damage Prevention Program Powered By Docstoc
					Wildlife Damage Prevention Program

Department of Environment
Government of Nunavut




Application Guidelines
Information Packages
Project Justification and Assurances Form
General Application Form
Office Use Only Form




Drafted February 11, 2011
TABLE OF CONTENTS


TABLE OF CONTENTS                                        2

APPLICATION GUIDELINES                                   3
Eligibility                                              3
Purpose of program and eligible items                    3
Application process                                      3
Review of Applications                                   3
Appeal                                                   4
Method of Payment                                        4
Term                                                     4


INFORMATION PACKAGES & PROJECT JUSTIFICATION AND
ASSURANCES FORMS                                         5
Project Code 001 – Bear Detection Systems                5
Project Code 002 – Electric Fence (portable)             8
Project Code 003 – Electric Fence (semi-permanent)      13
Project Code 004 – Bear Resistant Containers            18
Project Code 005 – Deterrents                           22
Project Code 006 – Cache Protection                     26
Project Code 007 – Existing Structure Reinforcement     28
Project Code 008 – OTHER PROJECTS                       31


GENERAL APPLICATION                                     33

OFFICE USE ONLY                                         35

OPERATIONS AND EXECUTION OF PROGRAM                     36
Distribution Centers                                    36
Roles                                                   36
  Conservation Officers                                 36
  Regional Managers                                     37
  Wildlife Deterrent Specialist                         37
  Assistant Director of Wildlife                        38
  Director of Wildlife                                  38
  Deputy Minister of Environment                        38
  Administrative Staff                                  38
Start Up Years & Future                                 38
   Performance and Management Review                    38


BUDGET AND DISTRIBUTION ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED.ERROR!
BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED.
APPLICATION GUIDELINES
Eligibility
Residents and recognized non-profit community groups of Nunavut who wish to take
measures to prevent and reduce wildlife damage to their personal property.


Purpose of program and eligible items
To reduce human-wildlife conflict, individuals and recognized non-profit community
groups may be eligible to receive training, equipment, financial support, and technical
assistance to take measures to prevent or reduce damage to personal property caused by
wildlife and improve human safety.


Application process
The applicant will complete an approved application form and provide a description of
the proposed measures they would like to take. Applications will be submitted to the
Conservation Officer.


Review of Applications
      On receipt of the application, the Conservation Officer will, where feasible, go to
       the location to assess the feasibility and anticipated effectiveness of the proposed
       measures.
      The Conservation Officer will forward the completed application form with
       comments and a recommendations to the review committee.
      The review committee is composed of the 4 Regional Managers, Assistant
       Director of Wildlife, and Wildlife Deterrent Specialist.
      The review committee will meet to discuss the applications and recommend to
       approve, not approve, or modify the project. Recommendations will be forwarded
       to the Director of Wildlife for decision
      Within 90 days of the completed application being received by the Department,
       the applicant will be provided with a letter informing them of the decision and
       reasoning.
      In the allocation of the annual budget, the Director will give preference to projects
       located in areas with a history of known damage caused by problem wildlife.
      In determining the level of funding, the Director of Wildlife will consider:
          i. The history and extent of wildlife damage and the anticipated effectiveness
             of the proposed measures
         ii. The feasibility of putting the measures into place
        iii. Funding or in-kind services provided by the applicant
Appeal
An applicant who disagrees with the assessment and decision on their application may
appeal to the Deputy Minister of Environment, whose decision shall be final.

Method of Payment
A combination of any or all of lump sum payment (for reimbursement only), equipment,
or training in accordance with the amount of support approved. Maximum compensation
shall not exceed the maximum allotted to each project type.

The payment will be in the form of a grant.


Term
This is a continuing program
      Information Packages & Project Justification and
                    Assurances Forms


Project Code 001 – Bear Detection Systems
The equipment and materials made available through the Wildlife Damage Prevention
Program are intended to assist Nunavummiut in their traditional pursuits of hunting,
fishing, and having an active lifestyle on the land. The best way to avoid problems with
bears and other wildlife is to not attract them with food, garbage, carcasses, etc. When
this is unavoidable, equip yourself with the knowledge and tools to prevent, detect, and
resolve an encounter.



 Background Information


Detection systems
   1. Alert you to the presence or approach of a bear providing you time to prepare
       additional deterrents or firearms.
   2. The early warning allows you to prevent bears from getting food which makes it
       easier to deter bears.
   3. Deterring a bear before it receives a food reward reduces the likelihood that it will
       return.
   4. Some bears are deterred by the noise and lights which serve to alert you of their
       presence but DO NOT depend on them to scare away a bear.
   5. Detection systems often DO NOT distinguish between bear and other large
       bodied animals including human, caribou, muskoxen, dogs, or etc.

Examples of detection systems which have been used to detect polar bears:
          - Dogs (not covered under WDPP)
          - Small Personal Alarms (e.g. CritterGitter)
          - Trip Wire Alarm Fence

Dogs (not covered by WDPP)
Not all dogs are suitable for bear detection or deterrent work. Dogs used to detect the
presence of bears in camps or during travel on the land should be tethered close to the
people or area in which bears should be kept away. Dogs roaming free may not be
present when needed. If dogs are kept inside the cabin it will be less able to detect the
bears approach, therefore dogs should be used to living outside. Ideally, use dogs which
have previously encountered and acted aggressively towards bears.
Dogs may be a liability. Dog food can be an attractant to bears. Food should be stored in
containers which prevent the detection of food odors and can not be accessed by bears.
Fecal material should be frequently removed from the area being protected. Although
dogs themselves are not supported through WDPP, equipment used to ensure proper
storage of food is available through project code 004 – Bear Resistant Food Storage
Containers.

Small Alarm Systems (e.g. CritterGitter; maximum 2 per applicant)
CritterGitters® are short range infrared detection devises which protect an area extending
up to 40 feet in front of the unit. They are not selective for bears; humans or other
wildlife species may set off the alarm. Some bears leave after the lights and alarms are
triggered, others require stronger deterrent actions from humans. The unit may be
mounted to exterior cabin walls or on posts to alert occupants to an approaching animal.
They may also be located by caches in an attempt to prevent an approach.

They operate on a 9Volt Battery. Disposal of discharged batteries should comply with
local environment health and safety.

Trip Wire Alarm Fence (maximum 1 per applicant)
This is a high tech version of hanging pots and pans from a rope surrounding a camp site.
Alarm fences consist of a thin wire suspended 10-18” from the ground; when this circuit
is continuous the alarm is deactivated. If an animal breaks this circuit of wire then the
alarm sounds. The fence should be a sufficient distance away from tent or cabin
occupants to allow enough time to prepare other deterrents or firearms. The alarm may be
sufficient to deter the bear but you may have to follow up with additional deterrent
activities. The alarm fence kit comes with 200m of wire, additional weather proof
housing is required to protect the alarm unit.

This system operates on a 2 – 6 Volt batteries. If batteries are not rechargeable then they
must be disposed of appropriately.
                                                     Application # __________________


 Project Justification and Assurances Form

               Equipment Request - Wildlife Detection System
          If more room is required please attach additional pages to this form.

Describe the location or situation in which the equipment will be used:



Describe the wildlife problem that exists:



Describe the proposed solution in relation to the equipment requested:




Describe other measures that will be taken to minimize or prevent wildlife encounters:




Describe how you will react to a bear that has been detected by the detection system:




Acknowledge each statement with your initials:                                    Initial

      I understand that detection systems are meant only to alert the
       presence of bears and do not necessarily deter the bear.

      I understand that detection systems do not prevent bears from
       coming to camp, and clean camp practices are still required to
       reduce the attractants that may attract wildlife.

      I understand that detection systems require regular testing and
       maintenance to ensure that they work correctly

Name of Applicant (print):_____________________________

Signature of Applicant:________________________________            Date:




Please use additional pages if necessary.
Project Code 002 – Electric Fence (portable)

The equipment and materials made available through the Wildlife Damage Prevention
Program are intended to assist Nunavummiut in their traditional pursuits of hunting,
fishing, and having an active lifestyle on the land. The best way to avoid problems with
bears and other wildlife is to not attract them with food, garbage, carcasses, etc. When
this is unavoidable, equip yourself with the knowledge and tools to prevent, detect, and
resolve an encounter.


 Background Information


Portable Electric Fence Systems (Maximum 1 per applicant, not to
exceed $3000.00)
   1. Are intended to act as a barrier between you and/or your property, and bears.
   2. Require proper installation, regular maintenance, and frequent checking.
   3. Uses a high voltage shock at low amperage lasting 0.0004 seconds. This makes
      the system safe to humans, dogs, and wildlife, but extremely unpleasant.
   4. Some bears are not deterred by electric shock or will not be deterred if the system
      unknowingly fails.
   5. Cold and snow build-up can reduce the efficiency of the fence.
   6. Solar powered fencing units will require additional attention during the dark
      season. This includes changing batteries and clearing units of ice every 2 weeks
   7. Portable electric fence systems must not be left unattended for more than 24hr
      when operated in areas with caribou. Caribou antlers can become entangled and
      trapping a caribou which will panic as the electric fence continues to cycle. This
      can lead to injury to the caribou and most likely your fence will be torn down.
      Flagging tape may increase visibility and reduce this occurrence.
   8. Electric fence systems may be modified to attach directly to buildings; however,
      frequent monitoring through cold and dark months would be needed to ensure
      protection (see note 6).

Examples of use for portable electric fences to deter polar bears and grizzly bears:
Is a portable electric fence right for you?

How long will you be in camp or camping in one place?
Electric fences may take 2-8 hours to install depending on their size. They are best suited
to multi-day camps, base camps, or cabins which will be occupied for longer periods of
time and/or where significant attractants are present. Portable electric fences are suitable
for meat cache sites and dog-teams which may be moved seasonally or annually.
If you are only intending to camp in one place overnight then an electric fence systems is
not the best option. You would be better with an alarm fence or other detection and
deterrent tools.

What type of ground (substrate) is there?
Fence posts need to be dug or sunk 8-24 inches to be secure and allow tension on the
wire. The looser the substrate the deeper the posts will need to be sunk. Portable electric
fences can be erected on any substrate but if you are planning to erect the fence on rock
you will need a hammer/impact drill to make holes in solid rock.

How big a fence should I get?
For whatever you want and need to prevent bear access (tent(s), cabin(s), equipment,
caches, dogs, etc) you want to aim for an additional 10 m between these items and the
perimeter of the fence (Figure 1). More if you require additional room for working within
the protected area.

How do I figure out how much material I will need?
You need to answer the following questions.
   1. What is the perimeter length of the fence?
   2. How many corners/bend are there?
   3. How many gates will I need (fewer is better)?
   4. Will I use 6 or 8 strands of wire?
   5. Is the ground very undulating or flat (this will affect the number of line posts
      needed)?

Will the fence eliminate all risks from bears?
No. Some bears are not deterred by the electric shock or without regular monitoring and
maintenance the system could fail. Additionally, the smell of humans, food, and garbage
may still result in a bear coming to, and remaining in, the area outside of the fence.

Why should I use an electric fence?
The fence improves the likelihood that the bear will move on ONLY if the opportunity to
access food is not present (i.e. no carcasses, food, or garbage outside of fence). The fence
also provides an area in which humans can more safely use other deterrents to encourage
a bear to leave. You should be prepared by having on hand other deterrents, a firearm,
and communication devices (radio, satellite phone, etc.). A properly functioning fence
can also protect property while you are away (see note 7 about caribou).
Will it work in the winter?
If the snow build-up around the fence does not ground the fence (i.e. complete the
electrical circuit) then the fence will continue to work. It is possible to disconnect the
lower wires of the fence when snow does reach them, and reconnect as spring melt
occurs. Ice or snow build-up, along with lack of sunlight may mean that you need to
recharge the battery by plugging it into an electrical circuit every 2 weeks. Snow and ice
will need to be removed from the solar panel for it to assist in recharging the battery.

What maintenance is involved in having an electric fence?
Once built, the majority of the maintenance involves ensuring that there is no garbage,
snow, or vegetation “grounding” the fence (i.e. completing the electrical circuit). This
will cause the battery to drain faster than it can be recharged. Without electrical current
the fence is ineffective in preventing bears from accessing an area. Wires may need to be
tightened periodically and this sometimes involves replacing wire grips.

What is the difference between a Portable Electric Fence and a Semi-Permanent
Electric Fence?
A portable electric fence is much quicker to erect and disassemble and is more suited to
short-term stays (days – weeks). The Semi-Permanent fence has significantly more robust
corner and gate posts which allow greater wire tension and hinged gates. Posts are also
anchored into the ground. Semi-permanent fences are suitable only for long term camps
that are frequently occupied (e.g. outpost camps, industrial camps) or other areas which
require permanent protection. There are significant cost increases between portable
systems and semi-permanent systems.
                                                      Application # __________________


 Project Justification and Assurances Form

            Equipment Request – Portable Electric Fence System
          If more room is required please attach additional pages to this form.

Describe the location or situation in which the equipment will be used:




Describe the wildlife problem that exists or has occurred in the past:




Describe the proposed solution in relation to the equipment requested:




Describe other measures that will be taken to minimize or prevent wildlife encounters:




Describe how you will react to a bear that has come to investigate your camp/site:




You need to answer the following questions in order for the appropriate quantity of
materials to be ordered.
   What is the perimeter length of the fence?




Please use additional pages if necessary.
                                                      Application # __________________


   How many corners/bend are there?




   How many gates will I need (fewer is better)?



   Will I use 6 or 8 strands of wire?




   What type of substrate (ground) is the fence going to be used in?




   Is the ground very undulating or level?

Acknowledge each statement with your initials:                                 Initial

      I understand that electric fence systems require correct installation
       as per manufacturer’s guidelines and regular maintenance to be
       effective in preventing bears access to the fenced area.

      I understand that electric fence systems, even when correctly
       installed and maintained may not prevent all bears from entering
       the area.

      I understand that an electric fence system will be most effective in
       preventing conflict when the land in and around the fence is kept
       clean of potential food and attractants for bears.

Name of Applicant (print):_____________________________

Signature of Applicant:________________________________             Date:




Please use additional pages if necessary.
Project Code 003 – Electric Fence (semi-permanent)

The equipment and materials made available through the Wildlife Damage Prevention
Program are intended to assist Nunavummiut in their traditional pursuits of hunting,
fishing, and having an active lifestyle on the land. The best way to avoid problems with
bears and other wildlife is to not attract them with food, garbage, carcasses, etc. When
this is unavoidable, equip yourself with the knowledge and tools to prevent, detect, and
resolve an encounter.

NOTE: Semi-permanent fence is only available for PARTIAL assistance and to
Non-Profit Groups.



 Background Information


Semi-Permanent Electric Fence Systems (Maximum 75% of cost up to
$10,000)
   1. Are intended to act as a barrier between you, or your food or property, and bears.
   2. Require proper installation, regular maintenance, and frequent checking.
   3. Uses an uncomfortable electric shock to prevent bears from entering an area.
   4. Some bears are not deterred by electric shock or will not be deterred if the system
      unknowingly fails.
   5. Snow build-up will reduce the efficiency of the fence.
   6. Solar or battery powered fencing units will require additional attention during the
      cold dark season.

Examples of use for portable electric fences to deter polar bears and grizzly bears:
          - Outpost Camps
          - Industry (Tourism) Camps
          - Permanent Dog Tie-ups

Is a semi-permanent electric fence right for you?

How long will you be in this one place?
Semi-permanent fences are long lasting installations intended for frequently or constantly
used areas which require separation from bears for both human and bear safety. Although
semi-permanent fences can be dismantled and reassembled the anchors are often left
behind leaving a small but permanent mark on the environment.

What type of ground (substrate) is there?
Semi-Permanent fences can be erected on any substrate but if you are planning to erect
the fence on solid rock you will need a hammer/impact drill to make holes in solid rock.
Very loose substrate (e.g. large gravel) may not be suitable for a semi-permanent fence as
this ground type will loosen quickly over time.

How big a fence should I get?
For whatever you want and need to prevent bear access (tent(s), cabin(s), equipment,
caches, dogs, etc) you want to aim for an additional minimum of 10 m between these
items and the perimeter of the fence. Due to the more permanent nature, you may want to
consider the potential growth that may occur at that site (i.e. additional building or use).

How do I figure out how much material I will need?
You need to answer the following questions.
   6. What is the perimeter length of the fence?
   7. How many corners/bend are there?
   8. How many gates will I need (fewer is better)?
   9. What size gates will I need?
   10. Will I use 6 or 8 strands of wire?
   11. Is the ground very undulating or flat (this will affect the number of line posts
       needed)?

Will the fence eliminate all risks from bears?
No. Some bears are not deterred by the electric shock or without regular monitoring and
maintenance the system could fail. Additionally, the smell of humans, food, and garbage
may still result in a bear coming to and remaining in the area.

Why should I use an electric fence?
The fence improves the likelihood that the bear will move on ONLY if the opportunity to
access food is not present (i.e. no carcasses, food, or garbage outside of fence). The fence
also provides an area in which humans can more safely take other deterrent actions to
encourage a bear to leave. You should be prepared by having on hand other deterrents, a
firearm, and communication devices (radio, satellite phone, etc.). A properly functioning
fence can also protect property while you are away.

Will it work in the winter?
If the snow build-up around the fence does not ground the fence (i.e. complete the
electrical circuit) then the fence will continue to work. It is possible to disconnect the
lower wires of the fence when snow does reach them, and reconnect as spring melt
occurs. Ice or snow build-up, along with lack of sunlight may mean that you need to
recharge the battery every 2 weeks. Snow and ice build-up on the solar panel will need to
be removed for the unit to assist in recharging the battery.

What maintenance is involved in having an electric fence?
Once built, the majority of the maintenance involves ensuring that there is no garbage,
snow, or vegetation “grounding” the fence (i.e. completing the electrical circuit). This
will cause the battery to drain faster than it can be recharged and the fence being
ineffective. Second, wires may need to be tightened and this sometimes involves
replacing wire grips.
What is the difference between a Portable Electric Fence and a Semi-Permanent
Electric Fence?
A portable electric fence is much quicker to erect and disassemble and is more suited to
short-term stays (days – weeks). The Semi-Permanent fence has significantly more robust
corner and gate posts which allow greater wire tension. Higher wire tension improves the
delivery of the electric shock through the coat to the skin of the bear. Posts are also
anchored into the ground. Greater wire tension also reduces the risk of entanglement to
caribou and other wildlife. There are significant cost increases between portable systems
and semi-permanent systems.
                                                     Application # __________________


 Project Justification and Assurances Form

      Equipment Request – Semi-Permanent Electric Fence System
          If more room is required please attach additional pages to this form.

Describe the location or situation in which the equipment will be used:




Describe the wildlife problem that exists:




Describe the proposed solution in relation to the equipment requested:




Describe other measures that will be taken to minimize or prevent wildlife encounters:




Describe how you will react to a bear that has come to investigate your camp/site:




You need to answer the following questions in order for the appropriate quantity of
materials to be ordered.
   What is the perimeter length of the fence?




   How many corners/bend are there?




Please use additional pages if necessary
                                                     Application # __________________


   How many gates will I need (fewer is better)?




   What length of gate will I need?




   What type of substrate (ground) is the fence going to be used in?




   Is the ground very undulating or level?




Acknowledge each statement with your initials:                                Initial

      I understand that electric fence systems requires correct
       installation as per manufacturers guidelines and regular
       maintenance to be effective in preventing bears access to fenced
       area.

      I understand that electric fence systems, even when correctly
       installed and maintained may not prevent all bears from entering
       the area.

      I understand that an electric fence system will be most effective in
       preventing conflict when the land in and around the fence is kept
       clean of potential food and attractants for bears.
  
Name of Applicant (print):_____________________________

Signature of Applicant:________________________________            Date:




Please use additional pages if necessary
Project Code 004 – Bear Resistant Containers

The equipment and materials made available through the Wildlife Damage Prevention
Program are intended to assist Nunavummiut in their traditional pursuits of hunting,
fishing, and having an active lifestyle on the land. The best way to avoid problems with
bears and other wildlife is to not attract them with food, garbage, carcasses, etc. When
this is unavoidable, equip yourself with the knowledge and tools to prevent, detect, and
resolve an encounter.


Background Information



Bear resistant containers are an important tool for preventing or resolving human-bear
conflicts as the majority of problems are related to bears detecting and accessing sources
of food. When you remove the ability of bears to access food they are often more easily
deterred and are less likely to return. Even using air tight containers can improve the
likelihood of preventing conflict as they help to reduce odors. The most appropriate
container for you depends on the quantity and type of food or material you have and any
activities which you might engaging in.

Open top plastic barrel (maximum 2 per applicant)
These barrels are often not rated for bear resistance though some barrels used as overpack
drums (for leaking steel drums) have been tested with grizzly bears and have significant
resistance. These containers reduce the odor of food and waste and therefore the ability
for bears to detect food sources. Barrels can be obtained in a range of sizes and styles.
These barrels would be best suited for storing non-perishable food and/or equipment
which is desired to remain undamaged if left at camp.




Open top steel barrel (Maximum 2 per applicant)
Typically in 55 or 30 gallon drums the lids are completely removable and secured in
place with a metal ring and lever/bolt system. These barrels have reasonable resistance to
bears. These containers are ideal for storing or transporting large quantities of food (or
wastes) and other attractants for longer stays at camps or cabins.




Metal Box (Pannier or garbage container) (Maximum 1 per applicant)
Similar to those used in southern communities to store garbage; these containers could be
used to secure country foods from bears. Some models have been tested with polar bear.
Because they are large and more difficult to transport they are most suitable for around
homes, permanent camps, or sled dog teams.




Sea-Lift Container (Maximum 75% of cost up to $3500)
The large metal containers used to transport goods & materials to the north are an
excellent storage container for large amounts of meat such as that which might be used to
feed multiple dog-teams. Over the summer months, these containers can quickly heat up
and lead to spoiled meat. However, the containers could be modified to improve
ventilation.

Proper management and maintenance is needed to avoid spoiling meat and keeping the
container from becoming too odorous. This might include limiting the use to months
where temperatures are below freezing. If this conflicts with when you experience bear
conflicts then this might not be the best option. Installing tables or shelves will also help
to improve organization and ensure that old meat is used before new leading to less
spoilage and waste.
                                                      Application # __________________




 Project Justification and Assurances Form

               Equipment Request – Bear Resistant Containers
          If more room is required please attach additional pages to this form.

What type (style or model if known, size, etc.) container are you interested in?



Describe the location or situation in which the equipment will be used:



Describe the wildlife problem that exists or has been experienced in the past:



Describe the proposed solution in relation to the equipment requested:



Describe other measures that will be taken to minimize or prevent wildlife encounters:




Acknowledge each statement with your initials:                                     Initial

      I understand that bear resistant containers are intended to reduce
       the attractiveness or food/wastes to prevent bear conflicts.

      I understand that the correct use of bear resistant containers is
       only one part of preventing bear-human conflicts

      I understand that “bear resistant” is not the same as “bear-proof”
       and that some bears may be able to gain entry to some containers


Name of Applicant (print):_____________________________

Signature of Applicant:________________________________             Date:




Please use additional pages if necessary
Project Code 005 – Deterrents

The equipment and materials made available through the Wildlife Damage Prevention
Program are intended to assist Nunavummiut in their traditional pursuits of hunting,
fishing, and having an active lifestyle on the land. The best way to avoid problems with
bears and other wildlife is to not attract them with food, garbage, carcasses, etc. When
this is unavoidable, equip yourself with the knowledge and tools to prevent, detect, and
resolve an encounter.


 Background Information


A deterrent is a common term for equipment used to scare or chase bears. They typically
work either as negative auditory, visual, or pain stimuli. You likely already have
deterrents in your camp! Things which make noise such as pots & pans, vehicles, and
even your own voice can all be used to chase away a bear. If these don’t work you may
need something more aggressive.

More aggressive deterrents used for bears include noisemakers such as 15mm signal
pistols, banger or cracker shells fired from 12 gauge shotgun, and other types of flares.
Some of these products will also produce a visible display which can also deter bears.
Bean Bag Rounds and Rubber Slugs fired from a 12 gauge shotgun will be painful to a
bear. This is the closest simulation to hunting where the projectiles fired at the bear are
less-than-lethal if used correctly. Pepper Spray will also provide a painful experience to
bears but must be used with great caution and is a last resort in a close encounter.

15 mm pistol kits (maximum 1 for individual or 3 for group)
Kit contains a RG-300 starter pistol, 6mm blanks, and box of 50 screamer cartridges and
box. Screamers have an advantage over other types of 15 mm cartridges (banger, flaming
whistle) as they make a noise for the duration of its 70 m travel. These kits are ideal for
use while out at the cabin, camping, or hunting on the land.

Because these are pyrotechnic devises addition applicants must be over 21 to apply.
Applicants may also be required to sign additional liability waivers and agree to proper
storage, handling, and use.




Please use additional pages if necessary
12 gauge deterrent rounds (????)
Several deterrent rounds that can be launched from an open choke 12 gauge shotgun.
This includes noise producing cracker shells, and pain inducing rubber slugs and bean
bag rounds.

A short barreled, pump action shotgun is the most versatile tool for deterring any species
of bear. Twelve gauge deterrent rounds should only be used in a shotgun with an open
choke and a manual action (pump or hinge). A full or modified choke, common for
birding shotguns can result in a dangerous barrel obstruction. Low powder loads may not
operate a semi-automatic action which can lead to jamming the firearm.

Because 12. ga. cracker shells are pyrotechnic devises addition applicants must be over
21 to apply. Applicants may also be required to sign additional liability waivers and agree
to proper storage, handling, and use.




Pepper Spray (Maximum 2 per applicant)
Pepper spray is meant to be used as a last defense in the event of an imminent attack. It
can only be used effectively in close range with a bear (less than 3 m). Its effectiveness
depends on getting the spray into the mouth, nose, and eyes of the approaching bear. It is
most useful to people who will not have to remain in the area (e.g. hiking, hunting, and
camping). It will only buy the user time to either increase the distance between
themselves and the bear or get access to other deterrents or firearm.

Pepper Spray is NOT to be used as a repellent, such as mosquito repellent. In fact, bears
can be attracted to the pepper spray and may lick, chew, or roll in objects that have been
in contact with it.




Please use additional pages if necessary
Please use additional pages if necessary
                                                      Application # __________________


 Project Justification and Assurances Form

                   Equipment Request - Wildlife Deterrents
          If more room is required please attach additional pages to this form.

Describe the location or situation in which the equipment will be used:




Describe the wildlife problem that exists or has been experienced in the past:




Describe other measures that will be taken to minimize or prevent wildlife encounters:




Describe how you will use the requested deterrents:




Acknowledge each statement with your initials:                                    Initial

      I understand that deterrents are not guaranteed to resolve human –
       bear conflicts.

      I understand that deterrents are most effective when used to deter
       bears that are not accustomed to people or their food and that I
       should take extra precautions to ensure bears do not have access
       to my food or wastes.
      I have been instructed on the safe storage, handling, and use of
       the deterrent requested and will sign a waiver of liability before
       taking possession of deterrents.

Name of Applicant (print):_____________________________

Signature of Applicant:________________________________             Date:




Please use additional pages if necessary
Project Code 006 – Cache Protection

The equipment and materials made available through the Wildlife Damage Prevention
Program are intended to assist Nunavummiut in their traditional pursuits of hunting,
fishing, and having an active lifestyle on the land. The best way to avoid problems with
bears and other wildlife is to not attract them with food, garbage, carcasses, etc. When
this is unavoidable, equip yourself with the knowledge and tools to prevent, detect, and
resolve an encounter.


 Background Information


Cache Protection (Maximum 1 roll)
Wire mesh has been used successfully in some situations to prevent bears from accessing
buried meat. Bears find it difficult to remove the mesh and further attempts puts the bear
at risk of damaging its claws. The mesh must be buried deep within the cache and the
sections fairly long to completely cover and extend beyond the cache (Figure 1). This
way, any material removed from the top of the cache will weigh down the mesh and keep
it in place. Three sections of mesh should be used to ensure complete coverage and
increase protection. Wire can be reused year after year and should be secured when not in
use so it does not blow away or become a hazard to other wildlife.




Figure 1: Iggunaq cache with wire mesh (solid black line in cross section), and as viewed
from above with 3 sections of wire protecting cache.
                                                     Application # __________________


 Project Justification and Assurances Form

                    Equipment Request – Cache Protection
          If more room is required please attach additional pages to this form.


Describe the location (latitude & longitude) or situation (type of meat cache) in which the
equipment will be used:




Describe the wildlife problem that exists:




Describe the number and length of 4’ mesh required or the number of caches intended to
be protected?




Acknowledge each statement with your initials:                                    Initial

      I understand that these materials must be used as described to
       ensure the greatest likelihood of cache protection.

      I understand that I am only reducing, not eliminating, the
       potential for property damage by taking these actions.

      I understand that meat caches, even when protected, are not
       covered under the wildlife damage compensation program but
       that these additional measure may reduce risk of loss to bears.

Name of Applicant (print):_____________________________

Signature of Applicant:________________________________             Date:




Please use additional pages if necessary.
Project Code 007 – Existing Structure Reinforcement

The equipment and materials made available through the Wildlife Damage Prevention
Program are intended to assist Nunavummiut in their traditional pursuits of hunting,
fishing, and having an active lifestyle on the land. The best way to avoid problems with
bears and other wildlife is to not attract them with food, garbage, carcasses, etc. When
this is unavoidable, equip yourself with the knowledge and tools to prevent, detect, and
resolve an encounter.


 Background Information

(Maximum $500 per applicant)

Damages to cabins can be a result of ineffectively constructed or secured cabins. Further
affecting cabin damage is the cleanliness and existence (or past existence) of attractants,
including cooking grease, animal fats or blood, condiments, or animal skins. Bears which
gain access to cabins, and food within, are very likely to seek out similar structures. Often
a single bear will be responsible for breaking in to a number of cabins because it has
earned food by doing so in the past.

Human negligence has allowed bears to learn this behaviour. To prevent more bears from
learning this behaviour we need to ensure that bears do not receive food motivation to
investigate or enter cabins. The following will help to make your cabin more secure:

   1. ALWAYS thoroughly clean cabin before leaving it empty for long periods of time
      removing any possible attractants or securing them in airtight and bear resistant
      containers.
   2. If wood counters are contaminated with food spills or grease replace the wood
      and protect it with a non-permeable surface that will be easy to clean.
   3. Cover windows and doors with thick plywood; consider putting these on hinges
      for easier removal and to discourage use of the materials for other reasons.
      Windows are particularly vulnerable if left uncovered. Bears may break them
      when investigating or reacting to their reflection and subsequently gain entry.
   4. Adding 2” nails to poke through the wood at approximately 4” intervals will
      further discourage bears from pushing against doors and windows or trying to
      gain entry. Placing the nail boards on the vertical surfaces reduces the risk of
      more serious injury to wildlife. Leaving the boards on the ground may result in
      more serious puncture wounds, or may not be effective at all if snow accumulates
      or, if unsecured, boards are moved.
   5. Tall narrow windows are preferable to windows that are large enough to permit a
      bears body to pass through. Consider replacing broken windows with more sturdy
      plexiglass.
   6. Weak exterior walls either from thin plywood/chipboard and too large stud
      spacing can make it easier for bears to gain entry. Use minimum 20” stud spacing.
   7. Gaps between wood boards, especially around corners and bottom of buildings,
      and around doors, will make it easier for bears to use their claws to remove
      boards.
   8. Ensure that doors fit snug into doorframe and latch securely so that bears pressing
      on the door will not result in it opening or becoming unsecured. Use something
      which will require the dexterity of human hands to open (locks, nut & bolt, clips,
      etc)




Reimbursement or funding for expenses up to $500.00 per structure is available for the
following materials:

      ¾” or ½” plywood
      Nails
      Screws
      Other Hardware (hinges, locks, etc.)
      Plexiglass, flexiglass, etc.

Application Process for Reimbursement
  1) Complete application and await approval
  2) Purchase materials and reinforce structure
  3) Submit all receipts (or receipts totaling $500.00) to track expenses
  4) Notify conservation officer for validation of work completed at site
  5) Reimbursement of funds will follow for approved and completed projects

Application Process for Materials (dependent on availability may take > 1 year)
  1) Complete application and await approval
  2) Funds, credit, or materials will be made available through suggested vendor(s)
  3) Purchase materials and reinforce structure within 1 year of acquisition
  4) Submit all receipts to track expenses
  5) Notify conservation officer for validation

NOTE: failure to use the materials or credit for the purposes indicated in the application
will result in action to reclaim lost funds and immediate ineligibility for any Department
of Environment support programs INCLUDING WDPP and wildlife damage
compensation.
                                                      Application # __________________


 Project Justification and Assurances Form

                Equipment Request – Reinforcement Materials
           If more room is required please attach additional pages to this form.

Describe the location of the building requiring reinforcement (latitude & longitude):


Describe the wildlife problems or damages that have occurred in the past:




Describe the current state of the building and what improvements are intended (photos
are encouraged):




List the required materials (with costs):




I am requesting:      Reimbursement              Materials   

Suggested Vendor (local building supply):

Acknowledge each statement with your initials:                                     Initial

      I understand that these materials are to be used to reinforce an
       existing structure.

      I understand that I am only reducing, not eliminating, the
       potential for property damage by taking these actions.
      I understand that along with reinforcing an existing structure I
       will also need to ensure that no food, garbage, or other attractants,
       remain in a cabin that is unoccupied for extended periods of time.

Name of Applicant (print):_____________________________

Signature of Applicant:________________________________             Date:




Please use additional pages if necessary.
Project Code 008 – OTHER PROJECTS

The equipment and materials made available through the Wildlife Damage Prevention
Program are intended to assist Nunavummiut in their traditional pursuits of hunting,
fishing, and having an active lifestyle on the land. The best way to avoid problems with
bears and other wildlife is to not attract them with food, garbage, carcasses, etc. When
this is unavoidable, equip yourself with the knowledge and tools to prevent, detect, and
resolve an encounter.


 Background Information


The WDPP will consider an application for other projects provided a detailed proposal,
including budget and timeline, are included.

Maximum contribution towards other projects will be the lesser of either 75% of project
cost or:

       Individual or Household maximum: $2,000.00
       Non-Profit Group: $10,000.00

Portions of the funds may be withheld until the completion of the project is proven. The
applicant will be held financially responsible for the funds if the project is not completed
within two years of the anticipated completion date.


Exclusions
Proposals requesting the following equipment will not be considered:
    Motor vehicles (ATV, snowmobile, motorbike, truck, car, etc.).
    Generators
    Firearms
    Dogs or dog food
 Proposal Guidelines

                                   Other Project
Please follow the following headings when developing your proposal:

   1. Summary – provide a brief summary of what the funds requested would purchase
      or help purchase, the reason this equipment is needed, what would be the outcome
      of the project and how will that positively influence wildlife.

   2. Problem History or Future Prevention
         a. Describe location of human-wildlife conflict – latitude & longitude
            preferred.
         b. Describe history of human-wildlife conflict which is being resolved; if
            possible, list significant events in reverse chronological order, include
            month or season of conflict
         c. Describe who is experiencing the human-wildlife conflict (individual,
            household, or group) and who will benefit from the solution.

   3. Proposed Solution
         a. Describe the proposed solution –
         b. How does this solution increase human safety?
         c. How does this solution prevent property damage or other economic loss?
         d. How does this solution prevent defense kills?
         e. In addition to the materials and funds requested will other actions be taken
            to reduce human/wildlife conflict?
         f. Include a diagram(s), schematic(s), or photograph(s) of proposed solution.

   4. Budget – Show a breakdown of equipment or material costs, shipping &
      transportation, Services, and etc. Show other sources of funding if project exceeds
      maximum allowed contribution. Funds may not be released until proof of full
      project support from other sources.

   5. Timeline – Show a breakdown of equipment orders, arrivals, installations, and
      completion. Projects must be completed within 2 years of project approval or
      applicant will be responsible for returning funds, equipment, or materials.
                                                        Application # __________________




 Wildlife Damage Prevention Program

General Application
Contact Person:

Community:

House Number:

Telephone:

Mailing Address:
E-Mail
(If preferred)

I am submitting on behalf of:      Myself ____        Group ____
If group:        Give organization or name:
                 Applicant’s relationship to group:
                 Number of people in group:


Project Code (only one per application):
 Attached completed Project Application Form
Brief Description of funds or materials requested:




______ (initials) I acknowledge that failure to put into service the equipment or materials
within 2 years of receiving may result in the loss of that equipment.
______ (initials) Use of equipment and materials outside of the purpose of preventing
human-wildlife conflict will result in future WDPP applications to be rejected and MAY
prevent damage compensation claims from being approved.


___________________________________              ________
Applicant Signature                                Date
                                               Application # __________________


This section to be completed by Conservation Officer_____   _____      ______
Likelihood of success (reduced conflict): High      Moderate       Low 
Site visit performed: Yes      No 
COMMENTS:




RECOMMENDATION:            Consider            Do Not Consider 


Signature & Date
                                                    Application # __________________


                                   – Office Use Only
Wildlife Damage Prevention Program

Office Use Only
Application #:
Applicant name:
Applicant contact:

Project Code:
Project Summary:




Total Project Cost Estimate:
Contribution Requested through WDPP:


Approvals:
Conservation Officer – Consider           Do Not Consider 
      Comments:




Review Committee – Consider         Do Not Consider      Modify 
      Comments:




FINAL DECISION:
Director of Wildlife – Approve      Do Not Approve       Modify 
       Comments:




Letter informing decision sent:    Yes    No     Date: ______________ Initial: ____
Operations and Execution of Program

Distribution Centers
Kivalliq (and Sanikiluaq) – Rankin Inlet
Kitikmeot – Kugluktuk
Qikiqtaaluk – Iqaluit

Distribution centers are chosen for their central location (regionally) with frequent
transportation opportunities. They are also located where station staffing is greater than
one member.

Annually a certain amount of equipment will be ordered for the region. This includes:
crittergitter®, trip wire fences, electric fencing equipment, tye-dee bins (or similar),
flexi/plexi glass, hardware, and deterrents (pistol, 15 mm, 12 ga.. bear spray).

Storage of these items will need to be accommodated at the station or other Department
of Environment facilities. If needed, a locked sea container may suffice for the majority
of the goods which are not temperature sensitive.

Shipping from distribution centers may require Dangerous Goods paperwork, and cargo
only flights or transportation by land or sea.

Roles
Conservation Officers
Conservation Officers (COs) may experience increased workloads, particularly in
communities which house distribution centers.

Duties in Distribution Centers include:
    Receive and store incoming supplies from sealift
    Packaging, shipping, and distribution of equipment (within and out of
       community)
    Tracking inventory
    Dangerous goods paperwork
    Forwarding all paperwork (invoices, receipts, etc.) to administration.

Duties in All Communities (incl. distribution centers):
    Help residents identify solutions to their wildlife damage prevention needs
    Visit sites to evaluate proposed projects
    Provide knowledgeable suggestions or comments ensuring applicants are aware of
       the limitations of the equipment being requested and encouraging additional
       actions that might be taken to reduce wildlife damage risk
    Assist residents in the application process.
      Provide comments on the final application form and forward application and
       supporting documents to Wildlife Deterrent Specialist along with
       recommendation to approve or not.
      Assist participants with the implementation of the equipment (e.g. electric fence,
       showing how equipment works, etc.)
      Follow up on projects in their community to see that equipment is being used as
       intended.
      Reclaim equipment that is not being used as indicated in application or in a means
       which reduces human – wildlife conflict and redistribute to other user in
       community or HTO.

Officers will likely experience the brunt of the dissatisfaction of residents whose
applications are denied or who may still experience wildlife damage after taking efforts
to avoid.


Regional Managers
Managers must be aware of the increased workload that the WDPP program can have on
officers and help officers manage this workload. When possible this may be to assist in
distribution related tasks or to review applications before sending to Wildlife Deterrent
Specialist.

Regional managers will also:
    Ensure that all applications are forwarded by the assigned due date (which will be
      30 days following applicants submission/due date).
    Assist applicants from communities that are unstaffed (No conservation officer).
    Participate in committee meetings to review applications and make
      recommendations to the Director.

Wildlife Deterrent Specialist
The wildlife deterrent specialist (WDS) will:
    Provide an advisory role to conservation officer or directly to project applicants
    Review all applications; follow up with officers/applicant if needed.
    Organize and participate in committee meetings to review applications and make
       recommendations to the Director.
    Forward recommendations to Director
    Receive final decision from Director
    Compose letters regarding outcome of application and send these to Director.
    Inform Conservation Officers of application outcomes.
    Ordering of equipment for distribution centers / communities
    Ensuring that successful applications do not exceed inventory
    Sending order and shipping instructions to distribution centers
    Monitor the administrative needs for the program (finances, etc.)
    Track applications and prepare annual reports on the program.
Assistant Director of Wildlife
      Participate in committee to review applications

Director of Wildlife
Responsibilities of the Director of Wildlife include:
    Review of applications and comments provided by COs and WDS and make final
      decision.
    Forward applications with decisions to WDS.
    Review letters prepared by WDS and sign. Forward signed letters to
      administrative staff for mailing.
    Advise the Deputy Minister in appealed cases.


Deputy Minister of Environment
If a participant is unhappy about the outcome of their application they may appeal this
decision via the Deputy Minister of Environment. This will require the DM to:
      Review the application and comments provided by CO, WDS, and Director
      Review any additional documents provided in the appeal
      Support or Decline the appeal and initiate the required actions (second letter of
        rejection or fulfill application request)

Administrative Staff
There will be increased workload on DoE finance staff in handling an increase in
purchasing both equipment and services such as shipping.



Start Up Years & Future
For at least the first year (2011-2012) the program will pre-order equipment based on
budget and perceived need to coordinate with sea-lift. Some items will not be ordered
until there is a request (i.e. many bear resistant containers, and items such as electric
fences). Following 2 years, and a review of the applications received, it may become
clear that funds should be focused on specific projects or equipment or distributed
differently throughout the regions.

It may also become possible to reevaluate the use of distribution centers and whether or
not we might in the future order equipment to be sent directly to communities using sea-
lift. This would be possible if the program was to be operated on an annual basis
(deadline for applications) as opposed to ongoing (no deadline for applications).


Performance and Management Review
It will be difficult to measure the success of this program. Numbers of applications will
likely depend on a number of variables (including recent bear activity, population size,
community relations, etc.) and is likely not a good indication. Success in reaching
objectives of the program, such as increasing human safety and knowledge of bear
conflict prevention, will be difficult to measure. Overtime it is hoped that claims for
wildlife damages and kills in defense of life and property will decrease as residents
become more knowledgeable and better equipped to prevent wildlife related property
damage and conflict. Applicants will be able to provide feedback relating to the program.
A database to track applications will be valuable in showing trends over time and
successful or unsuccessful components of the program. This information would be
compiled into annual summary reports.


Budget
For the first fiscal year the budget for this program is $100,000.00 with the possible
addition of funds from outside grants and contributions.

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:2
posted:3/11/2012
language:
pages:40