Effective Public Speaking

Document Sample
Effective Public Speaking Powered By Docstoc
					Effective Public Speaking
     Leadership Certification
             Level 1
Three Types of Public Speaking
   1. Speeches that inform


                         •   Explain
                         •   Report
                         •   Describe
                         •   Clarify
                         •   Define
                         •   Demonstrate
2. Speeches that persuade

                 Designed to convince
                 or influence beliefs
                 or attitudes
3. Speeches that entertain


              Use humour to influence an
              audience
              Goal: to warm audience up
Three main speaking styles


              • Cool presenter
              • Hot presenter
              • Dull presenter
Four basic methods of delivery


•   Reading a manuscript verbatim
•   From memory
•   Speaking impromptu
•   Speaking extemporaneously
        Getting Organized


The organized speaker is more likely to be
though of as competent and trustworthy.
   How Long Should a Talk Be?
• “Long enough to reach the ground”
• There’s great power in words, if you don’t hitch
  to many of them together.”
• No one likes a speech that runs too long.
• “Lord, fill my mouth with worthwhile stuff . . .
  and nudge me when I’ve said enough.”
• The more you have to say, and the more time
  you take, the less people will remember
Know Your Audience
          Make up of Audience
•   Superiors
•   Peers
•   Team members
•   Special interest groups
•   Mixed groups
       Time to Outline

•   Gather materials
•   Examples
•   Statistics
•   Testimony
           The Preparation Outline
I.         Introduction
II.        Body
      A.        Main point
      B.        Main point
           a.     Sub sub-point
           b.     Sub sub-point

III. Conclusion
Build the Body First
         The Introduction



The beginning prepares
listeners for what is to
come.
Three things you do during the intro.

  • Get attention
  • Startle the audience with
    an arresting statement
  • Arouse curiosity
         The Conclusion


Two Purposes

 • Let the audience know
   you are ending
 • Reinforce central idea
 • The conclusion should
   conclude
      Two versions of speaking Outline
Ineffective                             More Effective
I.      1840-1860                       I.    1840-1860
A.      World Anti-Slavery Convention         A. World Anti-Slavery Convention
B.      Seneca Falls convention               B. Seneca Falls convention
1.      Lucretia Mott                             1. Lucretia Mott
2.      Elizabeth Cady Stanton                    2. Elizabeth Cady Stanton
3.      Declaration of Sentiments                 3. Declaration of Sentiments
II.     1900-1920                       II.   1900-1920
A.      National American Woman               A. National American Woman
        Suffrage Association                      Suffrage Association
1.      Founding                                  1. Founding
2.      Objectives                                2. Objectives
B.      Nineteenth Amendment                  B. Nineteenth Amendment
1.      Campaign                                  1. Campaign
2.      Ratification                              2. Ratification
                Visual Aids
• One picture is worth a thousand words
   Retentions With Visual Aids
• With visual aids           • Without visual aid
   – 82% within 24 hours        – 62% within 24 hours
   – 62% three weeks later      – 20% three weeks later
       Tips for using visual aids:

•   Avoid chalkboards
•   Prepare visuals in advance
•   Prepare them large enough
•   Display them to be seen
•   Avoid passing aid among audience
•   Display aids only while discussing
    them
Tips for using visual aids(cont):




                        •   Talk to audience, not visual aid
                        •   Practice with visual aid
                        •   Real objects make good visuals
                        •   Computer presentations
                Handouts
• Distribute handouts after your presentation
• Tell the audience that handouts will be
  provided at the end
• Have enough handouts for everyone
Flubs ‘N Things
Body language




        • Verbal        7%
        • Tone of Voice 38%
        • Non Verbal    55%
              Body Language
• Body Posture
• Hand Gesture
  –   By your side
  –   Do not place your hands on the podium
  –   Hand gestures should be about chest level
  –   Open hand conveys openness and encourages
      trust
                           Eye Contact
                                        Speaker

                         Section 1     Section 2       Section 3



             The speaker has three major sections to make eye contact with

                                         Speaker

             Section 1                                             Section 5
                           Section 2    Section 3 Section 4
                                        Audience

The larger the audience, the more sections you need to establish for effective eye contact
         Facial Expressions
• Initial feeling an audience gets from a
  speaker comes through facial expressions
• Be yourself
• Smile before you begin speaking
       Winning Conversation
• The tone of voice can draw others toward
  you or push them away
• A word may be a word, but how it is
  received is dependent on how it is said
• Meaning is given to words by the sender as
  she chooses the words,m but also is taken
  by the listener as she listens and interprets
                      Lag Time


•   Average speaker   100-150 wpm
•   Slow speaker      80-90 wpm
•   Fast speaker      Up to 170 wpm
•   Can listen to     450-600 wpm




       We can THINK 5 times faster than we can talk!
A Fast Talker Contra Slow Talker
• The fast talker can be persuasive and
  expressive
• The slow talker may imply apathy and
  indifference
• Speak fast enough to keep people intrigued,
  but not so fast they feel uncomfortable or
  rushed
               Practice!
                 Practice!
                   Practice!

•   Prepare speaking outline
•   Practice aloud
•   Polish & refine delivery
•   Present under similar conditions
Purpose of an Introduction

         • Build enthusiasm for speaker
         • Build enthusiasm for topic
         • Establish a welcoming
           atmosphere
         • Boost credibility of speaker
Points to Remember

           • Check facts for accuracy
           • Adapt remarks to
             occasion
           • Adapt remarks to
             audience
           • Create a sense of
             anticipation
                       Room Setting
                            Speaker




Audience members should be able to easily see the speaker and visual
                    aids the speaker presents.

                              Podium
            Audience                        Audience




            Audience         Audience       Audience
Seating Arrangement
(Screen or Blank Wall – elevated if possible)


             Overhead Projector
                      ◙
                      X


      ☻☻☻☻
     ☻☻☻☻☻
     ☻☻☻☻☻☻

             Registration Table

                Back of Room
Visual
display
                            Conference Style

                   leader




          Refreshments/
          displays
Visual
display
                            U-Shaped Style

                   leader




          Refreshments/
          displays
 Visual display
                    Circle Style

           leader




Refreshments/
displays
Visual
display
                              Pod Style
                     leader




     Refreshments/
     displays
     Visual display      Classroom Style
                leader




Refreshments/
displays
     Visual display      Chevron Style

                leader




Refreshments/
displays
   “The outside appearance is frequently an
 index to the mind, and we should be careful
what signs we hang out for the world to judge
          of our faith.” (MYP p346)

   Your aim when in public is to present a
     picture of poise, and quiet serenity.
    Guidelines for appropriate dress
• Avoid fabrics that wrinkle
• Dress traditionally
• Wear a dress or business suit
• Empty pockets
• Leave hand bag at your seat
• Use of colour
• Necklines
• Tailored look gives more
  authority
• Choose comfortable shoes
        Platform Decorum
“The outside appearance is frequently an
index to the mind, and we should be careful
what signs we hang out for the world to
judge of our faith.” Ellen G. White
(Messages to Young People p.346)
               Appearance
• Posture
  – Sit up straight
  – Stand up straight
  – Maintain good posture
                  Appearance
• Sitting
  – Keep your hands quiet and in your lap
  – Put them to one side rather than in the middle of your
    lap
  – Keep your knees together
  – Place your feet out slightly farther than the knees
  – Keep the soles of your shoes on the floor
  – Never, ever cross your legs on the platform!
               Appearance
• Standing
  – Assume what is called the social stance
               Appearance
• Ascending and Descending Stairs
  – Pause for a second or two before beginning
  – Bend your knees
  – Keep your knees slightly bent
  – With your head high, put your whole foot on
    the stairs with the toe straight ahead
  – Do not watch your feet
  – Rest your hand lightly on the railing
          Using a podium

• Do not put hands on it
• Do not lean on it
• Check podium height
      When using a
      microphone
•Don’t use a hand held mike
•A lapel or lavaliere mike is ideal
•Prepare as if you had no mike
•Adjust mike before speaking
•Stand close enough to benefit
•Don’t allow mike to block your
face
•Be careful with “p” or “th”
sounds
•Beware of other noises
    You can reduce stage fright by
• Preparation & rehearsing   75%
• Deep breathing             12%
• Mind Control               10%
       Tips for overcoming fear

•   Pick your own subject matter
•   Follow the “as if” principle
•   Put on a happy face
•   Think positively
•   Picture your audience as friendly
•   No apologies
•   Pray again, again, and again

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:6
posted:3/7/2012
language:
pages:53