11 English III Unit 6

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					                                                                                                                                                    English III: Unit 6




                                                      Ascension Parish Comprehensive Curriculum
                                                                 Concept Correlation
                                                      Unit 6: The Early Years of the Twentieth Century
                                                       Time Frame: Regular 5 weeks; Block 2.5 weeks

Big Picture: (Taken from Unit Description and Student Understanding)
    The characteristics of the early twentieth century or The Modern Period of literature are identifiable.
    The ways in which wars and societal changes influenced the writings of The Lost Generation and The Harlem Renaissance can be identified.
    The elements of modern drama can be analyzed and compared from text to film
    Research can be done to relate literature read to real-life experiences.


                               Ongoing Activities                                                                              GLEs
Independent Reading                                                                         03a, 07e, 09a
Vocabulary Study                                                                            01a, 01b, 01c, 21, 23d, 24
Writing Prompts to Make Real-Life Connections and to Assess
                                                                                            05, 09a, 09c, 09d, 09f, 20a, 30b
Understanding
Grammar Study                                                                               21, 22a, 22b, 23d
           Guiding Questions                                                   Activities                                                   GLE’s
Concept 1: Lost Generation Writers               Activity 59: The Early Twentieth Century: The Beginning
                                                                                                                         05, 06, 09a, 09f, 11, 12, 14a, 14b, 14c, 14d,
36. Can students identify the primary            of the Modern Age and the Lost Generation of Writers: GQ
                                                                                                                         16b, 20a
characteristics of the early twentieth           36
century and how they are reflected in the                                                                                03a, 05, 06, 07e, 09a, 09c, 09d, 09e, 09f,
literature of the age?                           Activity 60: F. Scott Fitzgerald and The Great Gatsby: GQ               09h, 11, 12, 14a, 14b, 14c, 14d, 16a, 16b,
37. Can students demonstrate how the             36                                                                      16c, 16d, 16e, 16f, 16g, 37c, 38a, 39c, 40a,
psychological effects of World War I are                                                                                 40b
reflected in the works of the period, as
                                                 Activity 61: Ernest Hemingway and the Hemingway Hero:
well as in the characters portrayed in the                                                                               05, 06, 07e, 09c, 09d, 11, 12, 16b
                                                 GQ37
fiction?


   English III – Unit 6 – The Early Years of the Twentieth Century in American Literature
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                                                                                    GLEs
 GLE #s     GLEs
01   Extend basic and technical vocabulary using a variety of strategies, including:
     a      analysis of an author’s word choice (Application)
     b      use of related forms of words (Application)
     c      analysis of analogous statements (Application)
02   Analyze the significance of complex literary and rhetorical devices in American, British, or world texts, including:
     a      apostrophes (Analysis)
     b      rhetorical questions(Analysis)
     d      implicit metaphors (metonymy and synecdoche) (Analysis)
03   Draw conclusions and make inferences about ideas and information in complex texts in oral and written responses, including:
     a      fiction/nonfiction (Evaluation)
     b      drama/poetry (Evaluation)
     d      film/visual text (Evaluation)
05   Analyze and critique the impact of historical periods, diverse ethnic groups, and major influences (e.g., philosophical, political,
     religious, ethical, social) on American, British, or world literature in oral and written responses (Synthesis)
06   Analyze and explain the significance of literary forms, techniques, characteristics, and recurrent themes of major literary periods in ancient,
     American, British, or world literature (Analysis)
07   Analyze and synthesize in oral and written responses distinctive elements (e.g., structure) of a variety of literary forms and types, including:
     a      essays and memoirs by early and modern essay writers (Synthesis)
     c      forms of lyric and narrative poetry such as the ballad, sonnets, pastorals, elegies, and the dramatic monologue (Synthesis)
     d      Ancient, Renaissance, and modern comedies and tragedies (Synthesis)
     e      short stories, novellas, and novels (Synthesis)
     f      biographies and autobiographies (Synthesis)
09   Demonstrate understanding of information in American, British, and world literature using a variety of strategies, for example:
     a      interpreting and evaluating presentation of events and information (Synthesis)
     c      making inferences and drawing conclusions (Synthesis)
     d      evaluating the author’s use of complex literary elements, (e.g., symbolism, themes, characterization, ideas) (Synthesis)
     e      comparing and contrasting major periods, themes, styles, and trends within and across texts (Synthesis)
     f      making predictions and generalizations about ideas and information (Synthesis)
     h      synthesizing (Synthesis)
11   Analyze and evaluate the philosophical arguments presented in literary works, including American, British, or world literature (Evaluation)
English III – Unit 6 – The Early Years of the Twentieth Century in American Literature
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12      Analyze and evaluate works of American, British, or world literature in terms of an author’s life, culture, and philosophical assumptions
        (Evaluation)
14      Develop complex compositions, essays, and reports that include the following:
        a      a clearly stated central idea/thesis statement (Synthesis)
        b      a clear, overall structure (e.g., introduction, body, appropriate conclusion (Synthesis)
               supporting paragraphs organized in a logical sequence (e.g., spatial order, order of importance, ascending/descending order,
        c
               chronological order, parallel construction) (Synthesis)
        d      transitional words, phrases, and devices that unify throughout (Synthesis)
16      Develop complex compositions using writing processes such as the following:
        a      selecting topic and form (e.g., determining a purpose and audience) (Application)
        b      prewriting (e.g., brainstorming, clustering, outlining, generating main idea/thesis statements) (Application)
        c      drafting (Application)
        d      conferencing with peers and teachers (Application)
        e      revising for content and structure based on feedback (Application)
        f      proofreading/editing to improve conventions of language (Application)
        g      publishing using available technology (Application)
18      Develop writing/compositions using a variety of complex literary and rhetorical devices (Synthesis)
19      Extend development of individual style to include the following:
        c       diction that sets tone and mood (Application)
        d       vocabulary and phrasing that reflect the character and temperament (voice) of the writer (Application)
20      Write for various purposes, including:
        a      interpretations/explanations that connect life experiences to works of American, British, and world literature (Application)
        b      functional documents (e.g., resumes, memos, proposals) (Synthesis)
23      Apply standard rules of mechanics and punctuation, including:
        d      commas after introductory adverb clauses and long introductory phrases (Application)
        e      quotation marks for secondary quotations (Application)
24      Use a variety of resources (e.g., dictionaries, thesauruses, glossaries, technology) and textual features, (e.g., definitional footnotes, sidebars) to
        verify word spellings (Application)
35      Locate, analyze, and synthesize information from a variety of complex resources, including:
                multiple print texts (e.g., encyclopedias, atlases, library catalogs, specialized dictionaries, almanacs, technical encyclopedias, and
        a
                periodicals) (Synthesis)
        b       electronic sources (e.g., Web sites or databases) (Synthesis)
37      Access information and conduct research using various grade-appropriate data-gathering strategies/tools, including:
English III – Unit 6 – The Early Years of the Twentieth Century in American Literature
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        c      using graphic organizers (e.g., outlining, charts, timelines, webs) (Application)
39      Use word processing and/or technology to draft, revise, and publish various works, including:
        c      research reports on high-interest and literary topics (Application)
40      Use selected style guides to produce complex reports that include the following:
        a      credit for sources (e.g. appropriate parenthetical documentation and notes) (Application)
        b      standard formatting for source acknowledgment (Application)




English III – Unit 6 – The Early Years of the Twentieth Century in American Literature
                                                                                         English III: Unit 6
Unit 6 – Concept 1: Lost Generation Writers


Purpose/Guiding Questions:                         Concepts and Vocabulary:
    Identify the primary characteristics of           Lost Generation
       the early twentieth century and how             Jazz Age/Roaring Twenties
       they are reflected in the literature of the     Biography
       age.                                            Setting
    Demonstrate how the psychological                 Character analysis
       effects of World War I are reflected in         Figurative language
       the works of the period, as well as in the      Theme
       characters portrayed in the fiction.            Symbolism
    Show how early twentieth-century                  Point of View
       fiction writers use imagery and
                                                       Hemingway Hero
       figurative language in their works to
       create atmosphere, develop character,
       and convey meaning.
Assessment Ideas:                                  Resources:
    Rubrics                                           Textbook and additional resources
    Journals                                          Computers with internet access
    Graphic Organizer                                 The Great Gatsby
Activity-Specific Assessments:                         Television
   Activity 61                                         It’s A Wonderful Life
                                                       The Untouchables


Activity A: Ongoing Independent Reading (GLEs: 03a, 07e, 09a)

Materials List: teacher-provided independent reading lists

Throughout each of these units, students should explore a wide range of authors and texts with a
focus on American authors, in addition to the readings required in the whole-class activities. To
encourage students to be independent and thoughtful readers, they should investigate subjects and
ideas that matter to them through their own choices in independent reading activities. This will
show them that reading can be useful, enjoyable, and relevant in their everyday lives. This
practice may be especially important if students are reluctant readers or are not accustomed to
reading independently. The teacher should monitor this reading, making sure to incorporate both
oral and written responses to the text.




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Activity B: Ongoing Vocabulary Study (GLEs: 01a, 01b, 01c, 21, 23d, 24)

Materials List: student vocabulary logs, Checklist of Common Errors BLM (see Unit 1)

To extend basic and technical vocabulary, students will record both student- and teacher- selected
new and unfamiliar vocabulary in an ongoing vocabulary log. This log should include a
  definition, the part of speech, and a sentence for each word. Sentences should contain
  appropriate context and enough detail to convey the meaning of the word. Students should
  refer to the Checklist of Common Errors BLM to apply the standard rules of mechanics and
  punctuation, including parallel structure, no split infinitives, commas after introductory adverb
  clauses, and commas after long introductory phrases.

Activity C:
Materials List: prompts, note cards

Students will use writing-for-understanding strategies such as the following:
     entrance cards as a lesson initiation activity
     “Stop and Writes” as a comprehension, reflection or prediction activity during reading
     annotated text as a during-reading activity
     exit cards as a lesson closure activity

     Prompts should address comprehension, higher-order thinking, and connections between text
     and real-life experiences. Prompts can be used to begin discussions or for assessments.
     During discussion, students will use active listening strategies, including monitoring
     messages for clarity and selecting and organizing essential information.

Activity D: Ongoing Grammar Study (GLEs: 21, 22a, 22b, 23d)

Materials List: mini-lesson activities, student writing samples, practice exercises, Checklist of
Common Errors BLM (see Unit 1)

The teacher will facilitate a classroom discussion during the drafting/revising process of any
composition on sentence formation problems (i.e., fragments, run-ons, or syntax problems) or
standard rules of usage or mechanics (i.e., subject/verb agreement, appropriate verb tense,
pronoun/antecedent agreement, appropriate pronoun case, comparative forms of adjectives,
avoidance of double negatives, and appropriate punctuation/capitalization). Discussion will be
based on the common errors in student writing samples using the Checklist of Common Errors
BLM. Mini-lesson activities will be from student-generated examples and will be
ongoing and skill specific. Ideally, the mini-lessons will become differentiated for students’
specific needs and will be integrated within student writing assignments and not taught in
isolation.

Activity 59: The Early Twentieth Century: The Beginning of the Modern Age and the Lost
Generation Writers (CC, Teacher-made Activity)
(GLEs: 05, 06, 09a, 09f, 11, 12, 14a, 14b, 14c, 14d, 16b, 20a)

Teachers can complete one of the following activities as an overview of the 1920s:
    Students will note major concepts from a teacher-facilitated overview of the early
      twentieth century that includes focus on turbulence and change during the war and its

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        aftermath. Next, students will examine the characteristics and motivations of the lost
        generation of the 1920’s including well-known authors and their lifestyles. In whole-class
        discussion, they will fill in a graphic organizer for the “lost generation” of the 1920’s that
        includes areas for attitudes, priorities, media attention, global events, and others as
        appropriate.
       Students will walk through stations to learn about the 20th century. Stations include:
        famous people, the “lost generation”, slang/music, prohibition and the mafia, and flappers.
        At the famous people station, they viewed pictures of famous people and read short
        biographies. They then complete a graphic organizer on several of the people. At the
        “lost generation” station, they visit a website and answer questions about the lost
        generation. At the slang/music station, they view a clip from “It’s a Wonderful Life” and
        look at slang terms to find their meanings. At the mafia/prohibition station they watch clip
        of “The Untouchables” and answer questions. The last station, flappers, they read a poem
        and a passage about flappers and compare and contrast the two

Activity 60: F. Scott Fitzgerald and The Great Gatsby (CC)
(GLEs: 03a, 05, 06, 07e, 09a, 09c, 09d, 09e, 09f, 09h, 11, 12, 14a, 14b, 14c, 14d, 16a, 16b, 16c,
16d, 16e, 16f, 16g, 37c, 38a, 39c, 40a, 40b)

Materials List: video biography of Fitzgerald, copies of the novel, Student Notes for Chapter 1
Reciprocal Teaching BLM, Student Notes for Reciprocal Teaching #2 BLM

Students should view a biographical film of F. Scott Fitzgerald, noting key moments in the
development of his writing career, his fame during the Roaring Twenties, and his life as an
expatriate in Paris. Information on Fitzgerald can be found at http://www.pbs.org/. They should
then read The Great Gatsby and complete any or all of the following assignments:
     At the end of Chapter 2, create a visual or graphic organizer that contrasts the three
        settings: Daisy and Tom’s home, the garage at the “Valley of Ashes,” and Tom and
        Myrtle’s apartment in New York City. Students could then use this to write a composition
        describing the three settings and discussing their differences.
     At the end of Chapter 2, write a character description of Tom Buchanan that includes
        physical appearance, behavior, and attitude with detailed support from the text.
     In small groups, complete a graphic organizer that traces the use of colors as symbols
        throughout the novel. Each student will then choose one color from the chart and write a
        composition that details that use and connects it to Fitzgerald’s development of a theme.
     Locate and record examples of the author’s use of figurative language. Choose one and
        create a visual depiction of that image. Example: He took Nick’s arm and moved him
        across the room as if he were moving a checker to another square…
     At the end of the novel, create a timeline of Jay Gatsby’s life. Use this graphic as a guide
        in developing an essay that discusses how Jay Gatsby is used to develop the author’s
        theme.
     Research a topic from the Roaring Twenties (e.g., Al Capone, Lucky Luciano, Babe Ruth,
        prohibition, fads, dances, fashion, etc.) from a teacher-provided list. Students should use
        research processes (e.g., skimming and scanning, note-taking, outlining, summarizing
        etc.) to locate and organize information from a variety of print or electronic resources and
        publish it in a documented essay or a PowerPoint® presentation.
     Track the author’s incorporation of automobiles during the novel in a graphic organizer.
        Use this pre-write as a guide for a composition that discusses the author’s attitude toward
        what cars might represent as a part of the “new modern world.”
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      Choose a major event from the story and rewrite it from another character’s point of view
       (other than Nick) (e.g., Jordan describes the party in Ch. 3; Daisy describes the scene at
       the hotel in Ch. 7).
      In small groups discuss how Nick Carraway might be at fault for what happens in the
       story, considering his comment that he is the only honest person he knows. Then as a
       group, write a letter to Nick expressing the outcome of the discussion.
      Choose a quote from the book that best expresses the theme of the novel. Use the quote to
       write an essay that discusses how this theme is developed.
      Using biographical information on the author, explain how Fitzgerald’s personal life is
       incorporated into elements of the story.

Assessment
 Students will choose from one of the following options:
           Research a topic from the Roaring Twenties (e.g., Al Capone, Lucky Luciano,
               Babe Ruth, prohibition, fads, dances, fashion) from a teacher-provided list.
               Students will use research processes to locate and organize information from a
               variety of print or electronic resources and publish it in a report that includes
               parenthetical credit for sources and standard formatting for source
               acknowledgement.
           Create a visual or graphic organizer that contrasts the three settings of the novel,
               The Great Gatsby.
           Write a character description (that includes physical appearance, behavior, and
               attitude with detailed support from the text) of Tom Buchanan from The Great
               Gatsby.
           Write a composition that details how Fitzgerald’s use of colors as symbols aids in
               his development of a theme.
           Compose a multi-paragraph composition that discusses Fitzgerald’s attitude
               toward what cars might represent as a part of the “new modern world.”
           Develop an essay that explains the theme using a quote from The Great Gatsby
               that best expresses the theme.


Activity 61: Ernest Hemingway and the Hemingway Hero (CC)
(GLEs: 05, 06, 07e, 09c, 09d, 11, 12, 16b)

Materials List: Hemingway background notes, copies of the story, student journals, Analyzing
the Hemingway Hero BLM

Students should write a journal entry that describes why and how someone they know could be
considered a hero, along with detail or events to support.

Students will note the life and work of Ernest Hemingway from a teacher-facilitated overview
that discusses his writing style and the following qualities of a Hemingway hero:
     qualities of skill, competence, bravery, and endurance
     ability to show “grace under pressure”

Students will then read a Hemingway short story such as
“The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber”, “Soldier’s Home” or “In Another Country”, or a
novel such as A Farewell to Arms. In small groups students should use a graphic organizer split-
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notetaking (view literacy strategy descriptions) to chart which characters in the story display the
qualities of a hero and which do not, along with evidence from the story to support their choices.

EXAMPLE:
“Macomber had not thought                  Francis is so scared he can barely move. This
how the lion felt as he got out            is probably because he listened to the lion roar all
of the car. He only knew that              night. He told his wife he was nervous, but she only
his hands were shaking and as              made fun of him. He is the true opposite of a hero
he walked away from the car                here; he shows no competence or bravery in hunting
it was almost impossible for               his lion. His “muscles fluttering” shows he
him to make his legs move.”                has no “grace under pressure.” He is a coward.

This prewriting activity should be used in a composition that compares or contrasts one character
quality of a Hemingway hero. The Analyzing the Hemingway Hero BLM may be used to assess
the work.




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Unit 6 - Concept 2: Literary Style: Stream of Consciousness


Purpose/Guided Questions:                                 Concepts and Vocabulary:
    Show how early twentieth-century                         Stream of consciousness
      fiction writers use imagery and                         Elements of a short story
      figurative language in their works to                   Setting
      create atmosphere, develop character,                   Theme
      and convey meaning.


Assessment Ideas:                                         Resources:
    Journal                                                  Textbook and additional resources
    Graphic Organizer
Activity-Specific Assessments:




Activity 62: Short Stories of Eudora Welty (CC Activity 11)
(GLEs: 03a, 07e, 09a, 09c, 09d, 12)

In a teacher-directed mini-lesson, students will discuss the life and work of Eudora Welty and
then read one of her short stories, such as A Worn Path. In small groups, students will create a
graphic organizer that lists events in the story with a comment on what each event displays about
the character. Students will then write a character description of Phoenix Jackson that discusses
with support from the text whether or not she could be considered a “Hemingway hero.”



Activity 63: Short Stories of Katherine Anne Porter (CC Activity 10)
(GLEs: 09a, 09c, 09d)

Students will write a journal entry recalling their memories of an elderly relative or friend.
Students will then note detail of the life and work of Porter and read one of her short stories such
as The Jilting of Granny Weatherall. Following the reading, small groups should outline in
chronological order in a time-line the memories of Granny Weatherall on her deathbed. The
whole-class should then compile these timelines, and in teacher-facilitated discussion, examine
the characteristics and purpose for “stream of consciousness” writing.

Activity 64: John Steinbeck (CC Activity 7)
(GLEs: 03b, 07e, 09a, 09c, 09d)

Students will become familiar with the life and work of John Steinbeck and read a representative
short story by him (e.g., Flight) or view Of Mice and Men in which a character is developed
through conflict. In small groups, students should create a graphic organizer or timeline that lists
events in the story along with any strong examples of imagery and changes or reactions in the
character. Students should then use the organizer to create a character description that shows how
the story traces changes in the character to help develop a theme.
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Activity 65: William Faulkner: Southern Writer (CC)
(GLEs: 07e, 09a, 09c, 09d)

Students will form cooperative groups to discuss those elements that would make their hometown
a significant setting for a story, record ideas, and then discuss their ideas in a large-group setting.
The students will note an introduction to Faulkner’s imaginary Yoknapatawpha County.

Students will read and analyze a representative short story by Faulkner such as A Rose for Emily.
The focus of this analysis should be the setting and its significance in theme development. They
will then develop appropriate webs, drawings, or graphic organizers to list details to describe the
setting of the story




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Unit 6 - Concept 3: Poetic Expression of the 1920’s

Purpose/Guiding Questions:                                 Concepts and Vocabulary:
    Analyze the works of the Harlem                           Imagists
      Renaissance writers to show what they                    Literary Devices
      reveal about their struggles.                            Theme
    Can students demonstrate how the poets                    Lyric Poetry
      of the early twentieth century use                       Dramatic Poetry
      imagery and figurative language to                       Harlem Renaissance
      reveal their perception of American life.                Rhetorical questions
                                                               Implicit metaphors
Assessment Ideas:                                          Resources:
    Rubric                                                    Textbook and additional resources
    Artwork                                                   Artwork
                                                               Computer with internet access
Activity-Specific Assessments:                                 Videos to use at stations for the Harlem
Activity 68                                                      Renaissance: “The History of Jazz” a
                                                                 BMG video and “The Harlem
                                                                 Renaissance and Beyond” a GA video


Activity 66: Imagist Poetry of the Early 20th Century (CC)
(GLEs: 02d, 03b, 06, 09a, 09c, 09e, 12, 20b)

Students will view a transparency of a piece of art that has strong sensory images. In a graphic
organizer, either individually or in small groups, students will list those ways in which the image
appeals to each of the five senses, ways in which it conveys any emotion, and how it could fit an
everyday scene. They will then note the definition of imagist poetry and discuss how the artwork
fits the depiction of that style.

Working in cooperative groups, students will choose a representative work from the period by
poets such as Ezra Pound, William Carlos Williams, or T.S. Eliot. Each group will read the poem
carefully together and complete an analysis of the poem that includes noting of the image
conveyed, any literary devices or stylistic elements such as rhetorical questions or implicit
metaphors, and the theme. Each group will read its poem in a whole-class setting and present an
analysis for peers.


Activity 67: The Poetry of Robert Frost (CC)
(GLEs: 02a, 03b, 05, 07c, 08b, 09d, 12, 18, 19c, 19d)

Materials List: author background, copies of selected poems by Robert Frost

Students should then use the literacy strategy of RAFT (view literacy strategy descriptions) to
retell the story behind one of Frost’s poems as someone who was involved in the incident or a
bystander who observed the situation and is now telling family or friends what happened. The
anecdote should include feelings and thoughts, as well as events.
     Role: someone involved or someone who has observed the situation

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    Audience: family or friends
    Format: an informal conversation
    Topic: the situation or events described in the poem
These conversations should be shared in whole-class discussion.

In a mini-lesson, the teacher will provide an overview of the life and work of Robert Frost, with
students participating in an oral reading of several of his works. In whole-class discussion,
students will note the use of figurative language (i.e., apostrophe, personification), use of the
rhetorical question, tone, and meaning of each poem. Students should then complete one of the
following writing activities:
     dramatic poem focusing on some aspect of nature that has been instructive
     original lyric poem that expresses a reaction to a beautiful or inspiring place
     artwork that depicts a scene from one of Frost’s poems with written explanation
     dramatic poem for two voices presented as an oral reading

The teacher will provide a brief overview of the life and work of Robert Frost. Students will then
participate in an oral reading of selected works as “The Death of the Hired Man,” “Mending
Wall,” or “Birches.” In whole-class discussion, students will use a learning log (view literacy
strategy descriptions) to note the use of
     figurative language (i.e., apostrophe, personification)
     use of the rhetorical question
     tone
     the meaning of each poem

Activity 68: Harlem Renaissance (CC)
(GLEs: 02b, 02d, 03b, 05, 09a, 09d, 11, 12, 35a, 35b, 37c)

Students will note the quote by James Weldon Johnson: “The world does not know that a people
is great until that people produces great literature and art.” They will then use this as a prompt for
a journal entry, discussing whether or not they believe this statement to be valid and why. Entries
will discuss both modern examples, as well as those from the past.

In small groups students will research several aspects of the Harlem Renaissance (e.g., musician,
poet, artist, location), using stations and/or webquests. The teacher should begin the activity with
an overview of the circumstances that brought about the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s. In
small groups, students will research one writer of the Harlem Renaissance using a research
process and available electronic or print resources. Resources and links to information may be
found at http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/harlem/harlem.html

Students will then read a sampling of works of the Harlem Renaissance writers such as Langston
Hughes, Countee Cullen, Claude McKay, and Zora Neale Hurston. They will interpret and
analyze how each author creates tone and conveys meaning using distinctive literary elements
(e.g., characterization, theme, rhetorical questions, and implicit metaphors) and devices (e.g.,
simile, metaphor).


The group should also choose one poem by this author to analyze the language devices, the tone,
and the theme by using the Connecting Poetry, Art, and Music in Harlem BLM. Next, these
groups should use the same resources to locate a painting, a photograph, or a piece of music from
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the time they believe conveys a similar attitude and theme as the poem and will create an analysis
as they complete the Connecting Poetry, Art, and Music in Harlem BLM. Finally, each group
should make a brief, well-organized presentation that includes a discussion of the poet, a dramatic
reading of the poem, and a presentation of the art or the music. The presentation may be evaluated
using the Assessing the Presentation BLM.

The class should note important facts from each presentation in a learning log (view literacy
strategy descriptions). In a composition, students should then explain how art, music, and
literature helped develop a cultural identity for African-Americans in Harlem in the 1920s, using
the detail from their notes for support. The composition may be assessed using the Assessing the
Composition BLM.

Assessment
In small groups, students will research one aspect of the Harlem Renaissance (e.g. musician, poet,
artist, location, etc.), using a research process and available electronic or print resources. Groups
will then plan a brief presentation that will include a dramatic reading, music, or visual
presentation that may be assessed for:
                  information, ideas that are selected to engage the interest of the audience
                  language selected to suit the purpose and the audience
                  organization that includes an introduction, relevant examples, and a conclusion
                     with impact




English III – Unit 6 – The Early Years of the Twentieth Century in American Literature              79
                                                                                         English III: Unit 6
Unit 6 - Concept 4: American Drama

Purpose/Guiding Questions:                                 Concepts and Vocabulary:
    Analyze the elements of modern drama                     Dramatic elements
       and compare text to film.
Assessment Ideas:                                         Resources:
    Rubrics                                                  Textbook and additional resources
    Graphic organizer                                        Film version of chosen play
    Test
Activity-Specific Assessments:



Activity 69: Modern Drama (CC Activity 12)
(GLEs: 03b, 03d, 06, 07d, 09a, 09c, 09d, 09f, 11, 12, 14a, 14b, 14c, 14d, 16a, 16b, 16c, 16d,
16e, 16f, 16g, 20a 23e,)

The teacher will provide an introduction to a modern drama writer such as Tennessee Williams or
Lorraine Hansberry that includes facts about their life and work. Students will review the
elements of drama and the format of a play. They will then participate in an oral reading of one
act or scene from their chosen author’s plays, such as The Glass Menagerie, A Raisin in the Sun,
or A Streetcar Named Desire. They will then watch the play in its entirety. Following the
reading and viewing, students will work in small groups to complete any of the following
activities:
                 briefly describe plot of the story, including major conflict
                 explain how staging helps to create play’s mood
                 describe major characters, including their behavior and motivation
                 identify examples of symbolism throughout the play
                 discuss differences between illusion and reality in lives of the characters
                 explain significance of the title of the play
                 Use a writing process to develop an analysis of the central theme of the play.
                   The composition should use textual support and correct use of quotation marks
                   for secondary quotations with proper documentation.

They will then compare the act or scene they read to the one viewed by completing the following
activity in small groups:
     Create a graphic organizer or chart that compares and contrasts the two versions. The
        focus should include the setting, dialogue, and characterization in the text version
        compared and contrasted with director’s use of language, staging, music, color, and other
        devices in the film version. Each student will write a paragraph explaining which version
        they prefer and why.

If notes on American Drama are included and taught along with The Crucible in Unit 1, this
activity may be optional.




English III – Unit 6 – The Early Years of the Twentieth Century in American Literature              80
                                                                                         English III: Unit 6
                                        General Assessments for Unit 6

            Students will complete a comparison matrix that shows similarities and differences
             between the culture of young adults of the 1920’s and contemporary youth.
            In cooperative groups, students will research and present information on The Harlem
             Renaissance for their peers to note.
            In small groups, students will examine and analyze an example of Imagist poetry and
             present their findings, along with a reading to the class.
            Student will create a timeline for Katherine Anne Porter’s “The Jilting of Granny
             Weatherall.”
            Students will use a graphic organizer to chart qualities of a hero of The Lost
             Generation in Ernest Hemingway’s “Soldier’s Home”
            Students will analyze historical significance, characters, or setting and theme in The
             Great Gatsby in a composition or graphic reprensentations




English III – Unit 6 – The Early Years of the Twentieth Century in American Literature              81
                                                                                                                             English III: Unit 6
     Name/School_________________________________                                              Unit No.:______________

     Grade          ________________________________                                    Unit Name:________________


                                                         Feedback Form
                   This form should be filled out as the unit is being taught and turned in to your teacher coach upon completion.



Concern and/or Activity                                Changes needed*                                          Justification for changes
       Number




     * If you suggest an activity substitution, please attach a copy of the activity narrative formatted
     like the activities in the APCC (i.e. GLEs, guiding questions, etc.).




     English III – Unit 6 – The Early Years of the Twentieth Century in American Literature                                             82

				
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